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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Correspondence of the Oregon Superintendency
1865
Southern Oregon-related correspondence with the Oregon Superintendency for Indian Affairs.


Washington. D.C.
    Jan. 10th 1865.
Hon. W. P. Dole
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Sir
            Finding that I suffer from the effects of injuries received by collision of cars on the Pennsylvania Railroad, as reported to you, and being unable for this cause to apply myself continually to business, I have determined to return to Ohio and there write up the necessary explanations to enable the Department to arrive at a just understanding of my accounts. As soon as the explanations are completed I will return to this city or mail them, as the condition of my health will permit. Should you have occasion to correspond  with me on any subject, my address will be Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio.
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servt.
        G. H. Abbott
            Late Sub-Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 622-624.



Jan. the 17th 1865
    Fort Klamath
Mr. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Sir I received your blank forms the last mail which I will fill out and return next month, for the flour will all be given to them by the first of February. They recd. more flour, for the weather is very cold here and from 2 to 3 feet of snow at present in this valley. They will suffer for want of food if this weather should continue much longer, as they are very poorly clad and cannot get around for fish. The lake has been frozen over for two months past. They are killing the horses and eating them, the feed being nearly all gone. They say the Snakes are suffering very much this winter. Captain Kelly says that there is a surplus of flour which he will furnish them and gave [sic] order if you wish.
    I have given them some beef and shall give them some more. I do not expect that you will pay for it as there is some of them that is camped near the post that would suffer for the want of food if I should not feed them some. There is some very old Indians that cannot get food if it is not given to them.
Yours with respt.
    George Nurse
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 87.



Washington D.C.
    February 1st 1865
Hon. J. P. Usher
    Secretary of the Interior
        Sir
            By reference to the enclosed letter of this date from the office of the Commissioner [of] Indian Affairs you will find that mention is made of certain disallowances in the settlement of my accounts, and for further action on the subject I am respectfully referred to you.
    Deeming their disbursements just and legal, I therefore appeal from the decision of the Indian Bureau to the head of the Department.
    In order that you may understand the nature of the disbursements which have been disallowed, I will here state the facts as fully as the space of a letter will permit.
    The sum of $557.53, being payments for the salary of clerks during the year 1860 and the 1st quarter of the year 1861, has been disallowed on the ground that I was not entitled to the services of a clerk. I would respectfully submit the fact that all my disbursements previous to the year 1860 for salary of clerks were allowed without objection and that there was no change in the policy of the Department until about the close of the 3rd quarter 1860, when a circular was issued from the Indian Office directing the discharge of clerks by the agents and refusing to permit their further employment.
    My disbursements of this character were made previous to this change, and I am informed that such disbursement by other agents under similar circumstances have since been allowed.
    My business was that of a full agent, although I was only a sub-agent, and it appeared necessary for the prompt rendering of accounts and the efficiency of the service to employ a clerk, which I did with the full knowledge and consent of the Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon, under whose Superintendency my business was done.
    The sum of $30.00 was disallowed, being the fraction of the sum of $345.00 paid for services as carpenter, because during the same period I paid another carpenter $10.00 per month less than in the case referred to.
    The cause of this difference in the salary allowed me was that the one receiving the larger amount was the best workman and could command a better salary.
    It appears to me that in justice these disallowances, a total of $587.53 should be removed. The disbursements were honestly made in good faith and under circumstances which certainly were not such as to lead me to doubt their legitimacy.
    Any communication addressed to me, in care of J. W. Nesmith, United States Senate, this city, will reach me.
    Hoping that your decision will be favorable, I am
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servt.
        G. H. Abbott
            Late Sub-Ind. Agent
                for Oregon.
   
Department of the Interior
    Office Indian Affairs
        February 1st 1865.
Sir,
    I have to acknowledge the receipt of explanations to your accounts (left at this office by you on the 28th January last) for the 1st, 2nd, 3rd & 4th qrs. 1860 and 1st, 2nd, 3rd qrs. 1861, and have to state that they have been examined and are deemed sufficient to remove the suspensions which were made in this office for the quarters above mentioned.
    With reference to the disallowances which have been decided upon in the examination of these accounts, I have to remark that should the decision of this office be unsatisfactory to you, your appeal lies with the Secretary of the Interior, to whom, in such case, you are respectfully referred.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Charles E. Mix, Chief Clk.
            for the Commissioner
George H. Abbott Esq.
    Present
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 627-632.



Washington Feb. 2nd 1865
Hon. Wm. P. Dole
    Com. Ind. Affairs
        Dear Sir,
            Herewith I enclose statements from John F. Miller, late Indian agent at Grand Ronde, Oregon. I also enclose a letter from Mr. Miller to Senator Harding. As Mr. Harding has left for home the papers had fallen into my hands for presentation, and I respectfully invite your early attention to them.
    I also enclose Mr. Mullan's vouchers in triplicate for the amount due him upon his salary. I have to request that you will notify me of the result of your examination, and that the balance (if any) found due to Mr. Miller be sent to my care.
Respectfully your
    Obt. servt.
        J. W. Nesmith
   
Salem Oregon Dec. 7th 64.
Hon. B. F. Harding
    Dear Sir,
        I take the liberty to send you my a/cs with the Indian Dept., with the request that you will give them your earliest attention.
    You will see by the enclosed copy of a letter from E. B. French, Secd. Aud. of the Treasury, under date Jany. 28th 1864, that the amount of $273.34 is still unsettled.
    The enclosed explanatory statement will I trust satisfactorily explain $113.07 of this and leaving a difference of $160.18.
    This amt. of $160.18 is composed of numerous small items, varying in amt. and ranging from 50 cts. to perhaps as many dollars, which would require an amount of labor to overhaul my papers for a series of years, in order to explain the objections made, that would cost more than the amt., and although I am satisfied that every dollar in the a/cs is just, I would rather waive the matter and pay the $160.18 than to perform the labor that would be necessary to make the required explanations.
    You will see by my explanatory statement that the objection made to my a/cs by the auditor, with the exception of this sum of $160.18, are confined to the a/cs of the physician, blacksmith and one farmer.
    The auditor objects, in the case of the physician and blacksmith, that they were paid at a higher rate of salary than was authorized by the Dept. To show you clearly, and enable you to understand the matter yourself, I would say this much--
    The treaties with the Indian tribes at the Grand Ronde Reservation provided for a physician and blacksmith, but did not fix the rate of pay, and as you will see by the certified copies of the several letters of instructions that I received from the Superintendents under whose orders I was acting, that the rate of pay was fixed by them and taken altogether out of my control.
    The Rogue River farmer, to whose appointment the auditor objects, was not appointed by me, but by the Supt. of Ind. Affrs. as you will see by my explanatory statement.
    I feel perfectly confident that as soon as the statement is laid before the auditor, that it will be satisfactory to the Department.
    I would feel obliged if you would show these papers to Col. Nesmith, who is perfectly conversant with my a/cs, and I am satisfied that he will render any assistance in his power.
    I am extremely anxious to have my a/c closed with the Dept., and I would feel obliged if you will attend to it as soon as you can--and having full confidence in your judgment, I leave the matter in your hands, and you are hereby authorized to act for me and make a final settlement.
    There is still due me by the govt. four (4) months and five (5) days salary as Indian agent, amounting to $520.83--the vouchers for which I have enclosed. As soon as my a/cs are closed with the Treasury Dept. please present these vouchers at the office of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and they will doubtless be paid.
    Please write me as soon as any action has been taken on my papers and you will confer further obligations on
Very truly
    John F. Miller
   
Salem Oregon
    Sept. 5th 1866 [sic]
Sir,
    I have the honor to enclose herewith a copy of "Statement of Differences" in settlement of my accounts to August 5th 1861, with the necessary explanations and corrections, hoping that this will prove satisfactory and enable me to close my accounts.
I am sir
    Very respectfully
        Your obt. servt.
            John F. Miller
                Late Indian Agent
Hon. E. B. French
    2nd Auditor
        Treasury Dept.
            Washington
                D.C.
[statement of differences and vouchers not transcribed]
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 983-996.




Umpqua City Feb 5th 1865
Mr. J. W. P. Huntington
    Superintendent
        Indian Affairs
            For the Dist. Or.
Sir
    I write to say that on the night of the 22nd Jan. / 65 some Indians in the act of leaving the reservation took my boat from the beach at this place, crossed the bay in it, fastened it near some rocks at the lower Winchester Head where when the tide came in the boat was stove and entirely spoiled. The Indians here (of whom there is quite too many) say the offending party are two squaws belonging to the Coos tribe called Polly & Iron Legs.
    Mr. Huntington, I am neither able nor willing to lose my boat in that way and claim that the Indian Dept. should pay for the boat, which I cannot replace for less than fifty dollars [to] say nothing about the want of it while another is being built. Hoping you will consider it your duty to settle with me at once I enclose bill for same. Please send vouchers. I will sign them here and return them to you. As we are strangers I would refer you to George Hinsdale, Job Hatfield or P. P. Palmer for the probable correctness of my claim while
I remain
    Your obt. svt.
        H. B. Burnap
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 99.



Coast Reservation Oregon February 6th 1865
Mr. Wm. P. Dole Commissioner of Ind. Affairs
    Dear Sir    I received your letter dated November 26, 1864 in reference to one of my vouchers that was sent from Superintendent's office at Salem, Oregon to your office at Washington in September 1862. You state in your letter to me in order that payment may be made it will be necessary for me to forward the other vouchers to complete the set, which when received will be forwarded to 2nd Auditor for settlement. But you don't say in your letter to me whether if payment be made you would forward the amount to me or not. I would forward my vouchers to your office to complete the set if I could be certain my pay would be sent to Superintendent's office at Salem so I could get it, but there is two men on this reserve, one named Thomas Briggs, the other named George Megginson; they tell me they sent full sets of their vouchers to your office near two years ago and have not received payment up to this time. They say they have employed a lawyer named Barnard; he says he can get pay for them. Now, sir, under present circumstances I cannot forward my vouchers to your office not knowing when I would get my pay. I am sick and in need of what is honestly due me, but I can't afford to give a percentage to any lawyer to have it collected for me. Before I do I will go to my grave without it. Now, sir, you would confer a great favor if you would forward the amount due me to Superintendent's office, Salem, Oregon. I could there present my vouchers and receive pay, and if not please return my voucher from your office to Superintendent's office, Salem so I can get it and I will trouble you no more.
Yours truly
    Thomas Clarke.
    Please reply to this letter as soon as possible and direct your letter to Thomas Clarke, Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon.
    But if you forward the amount $168.00 on my voucher direct to Superintendent's office, Salem, Oregon.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 727-729.



Office Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Salem Oregon, Feby. 6th 1865.
Sir
    Referring to your letter of 23rd September last, advising me that your requisition for the funds necessary for the Indian Service in this Superintendency during 3rd and 4th quarters 1864, had been made six days previously, and directing me to immediately turn over said funds to the several agents in order that no liabilities be contracted, I have to advise you that, finding it totally impossible to realize money upon checks against deposits in San Francisco, I left this place on the 13th December and proceeded to San Francisco, arriving there on the 26th of the same month. To my surprise no advice had been received by the Asst. Treasurer of the requisition, nor of your subsequent one for the sum of $10,000, of which I was advised in your letter of 24th October last (Klamath treaty fund), but singularly enough your requisition for the sum of $5000, made on Nov. 4th, had been for some time deposited to my credit.
    The $56,616.66/100 called for by your requisition of 17th September was finally deposited to my credit on the 13th of January, and the $10,000 under your requisition of October 24th was deposited to my credit on the 19th of the same month--in each case nearly four months after your requisition was made. Of course a compliance with your instructions in letter of 23rd September (as well as previous ones of same tenor) to incur no liabilities, has been simply impossible. I arrived at this place on the 1st of the present month. Agent Benj. Simpson (Siletz Agency) and Sub-Agent Geo. W. Collins (Alsea Sub-Agency) were in Salem awaiting my return. To them funds were immediately transferred. Agent Amos Harvey (Grand Ronde) will be supplied within a few days, but as the Columbia River is blocked by ice and likely to remain so some time, it is quite uncertain when funds can be transmitted to Agent W. Logan (Warm Springs) and W. H. Barnhart (Umatilla). It will be done, however, at the very earliest day that communication opens, but as the winter is very severe it is probable that they cannot receive the money before March. They will thus be unable to pay the employees for third and fourth quarters 1864 until their wages are seven and four months overdue. I deeply regret that your promptness in making requisitions has been of so little avail.
    I regret to notice that you have again cut down the remittance for "Removal and Subsistence" and "General Incidental Expenses" to two thirds the amounts appropriated, and usually remitted. The fund for "Removal & Subsistence" is the one upon which we mainly rely for the support of the very large number of Indians upon the Coast Reservation who are not parties to any ratified treaty. My letter of December 4th 1863 advised you of the very great disparity in the amount per capita which was applicable to these Indians as compared with those at other agencies, and I respectfully now refer you to it for details. The deficiency then existing is increased still further at this time by the greater depreciation of the currency, and the withholding of one third of the appropriations under the head referred to.
    These Indians have for the last two years raised ample supplies of food (except a few decrepit, infirm or orphans) with no other aid than the superintendence and direction of from four to six employees, and the tools, teams &c. furnished by the government. They will continue to do this, but they are very destitute of clothing, and during the last very cold winter have suffered severely in consequence. To furnish them with tools, teams &c., with blankets, clothing &c., with seeds, with superintendence and instruction, with everything in fact, we have no fund but the "Removal & Subsistence," and the small balance of the appropriation for "Colonizing" &c.
    The fund for "General & Incidental Expenses" is required as you are aware to pay the salaries of commissaries at four agencies at $1200 per annum each, the salary of messenger $1200, by late instructions the salary of clerk to Supt. $1800, the traveling expenses of Superintendent, agents and messengers, the transportation of annuity goods, cost of stationery and fuel (these expenses are all more than doubled by the condition of the currency), rents of Superintendent's office, and the many little expenses which are constantly occurring. The salaries alone amount to $780 per annum, rent to $480, stationery, fuel &c. to about $1200, transportation to about $3000, while the amount remitted for six months is only $5,833.33/100. This you will perceive is totally inadequate to the wants of the service, exclusive of traveling expenses, which are necessarily large, but of which I have not now time to look up the figures.
    I trust you will give this subject a careful investigation, and I am sure it will result in a concurrence with the views herein expressed. I have prepared an estimate which is herewith enclosed of the amounts necessary in my judgment to supply the deficiency in the remittances, and I trust the amounts called for will be remitted without delay.
    The subject of clerk hire, which is alluded to in your letter of 28th Sept., will be explained in a separate communication within a very few days.
    In conclusion I desire to say that during my administration of the affairs of this branch of the Indian Service I have with the utmost care endeavored to expend the public money with judicious economy. I have done this under very great embarrassment, arising from diminished appropriations, depreciation of currency and other causes, and I feel no small pride in being able to say that while the service has never before been in as efficient condition--the Indians so closely confined to reservations, and well supplied with food--I have not only kept within the limit of every appropriation, but I have under nearly ever head accumulated a surplus, when funds have been remitted in due time. But this favorable state of things cannot be expected to continue if funds appropriated are first diminished more than one half by depreciation, then cut down one third by your action, and finally not remitted until many months overdue.
    The estimates which your letter directed me to "prepare and transmit to this (your) office without further delay" were duly transmitted on the 8th of August last, and your acknowledgment of my statement of "letters sent" shows that it was received, probably soon after your letter was written.
    I therefore deemed it unnecessary to comply with your directions, by repeating the estimates.
I have the honor to be
    Very respectfully
        Your obt. servant
            J. W. Perit Huntington
                Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Hon. Wm. P. Dole
    Commissioner &c.
        Washington D.C.
[estimate of funds not transcribed]
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 786-795.



Office Superintendent Indian Affairs,
    Salem, Oregon February 15th 1865
Sir
    Your letter of 23rd September last, notifying me of requisition in my favor for the expenses of the Indian Service in Oregon during 3rd and 4th quarters 1864, contains the following sentence:
    "By reference to your accounts for the 1st quarter of 1864, it is observed that you have settled and paid for clerk hire at the rate of $1800 per annum, notwithstanding prior instructions from this office to allow only $1500 for that service, said allowance having been based upon the consideration that the necessary expenses of living in Oregon could not exceed that in California, in which latter superintendency $1500 was deemed an ample allowance. Until otherwise directed you will therefore settle for this service at the rate of $1500 per annum, and pay for the same from 'Incidental Expenses'" &c. &c.
    An examination of the subject will make it apparent that you have fallen into several errors in the letter referred to. No instructions have ever been received at this office to limit the pay of clerk to $1500. On the contrary, the rate for many years has been $1800, and it has not been intimated that it was unsatisfactory to your office. Second, the salary of clerk to the Superintendent of California is fixed by law at $1800, and he is paid at that rate out of an appropriation for that specific purpose. Besides, he is allowed by special instructions from your office to employ an extra clerk who is paid also at the rate of $1800 per annum. When payments were made in gold, $1800 was a fair compensation for the clerk, but now that it is paid in currency depreciated one half or more it is far less than similar services are paid in other business. The clerks to quartermaster at the various military posts in this state and California are all paid legal tenders equivalent to $150 per month in gold. The last payments have been $300 per month ($3600 per year) in currency. The enclosed copy of the instructions of Maj. Babbitt, Dept. Quartermaster General at San Francisco, will show you the rates paid in that department for clerk hire as well as for some other kinds of service.
    To obey your instructions will be simply to deprive me of clerical assistance altogether. Mr. Woodworth, who has acted in that capacity ever since I have been Superintendent, at a rate of pay entirely inferior to what he could have obtained in other employment, utterly refuses to remain in the service if the pay is still further reduced. I have obeyed your instructions to dispense with the services of the assistant clerk which all my predecessors had, except for short periods in an emergency. This has entailed upon both my clerk and myself much additional labor. Mr. Woodworth is very faithful and diligent, and it is not boasting for me to say that I have personally performed more clerical labor in the last two years than previous Superintendents did in ten. To follow your directions will deprive me of clerical assistance altogether (for I cannot employ anyone else than Mr. Woodworth at the rate named) and practically suspend the whole business of the Superintendency.
    I have therefore determined to disobey your instructions (which have evidently been made under misapprehension of the facts) and have already paid Mr. Woodworth for the 4th quarter 1864 at the rate of $1800 per annum.
    I trust after investigation that my action in so doing will be approved by you.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Hon. Wm. P. Dole
    Commissioner &c.
        Washington D.C.
[pay rates circular of E. B. Babbitt not transcribed]
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 797-802.



Office Supt. Indian Affrs.
    Salem Oregon Feby. 17th 1865
Sir Captain
    I received this morning a telegraphic dispatch from Capt. Lindsay Applegate stating that you desired him to inform me that the Indians at Klamath Lake were suffering from starvation. I had previously received similar statements, though less explicit, from Mr. Nurse. I immediately sent a dispatch to you requesting that flour to an amount not exceeding $1000 in value be issued from the quartermaster's stores at Fort Klamath. I desire that this be done under your direction, or that of Lieut. Underwood, and that it be done only upon the certificate of yourself and Lieut. Underwood officially made that it is necessary to save the Indians from starvation. The funds at my command are so limited and overtaxed so heavily by the depreciation of the currency and the many demands of the service that I am compelled to limit the expenditure in this case to a sum which I am aware is very small compared with the large number of Indians to be supported. Circumstances however compel me to enjoin that it be not exceeded under any circumstances. Mr. Nurse will do the labor of distributing the flour among the Indians under the supervision of yourself or Lieut. Underwood.
    I take this occasion, Captain, to thank you for your kindness in attending to the wants of the Indians near you in the absence of an agent in this Department, and thus relieving me of much labor and embarrassment.
I remain
    Very respectfully
        Your obt. servt.
            J. W. Perit Huntington
                Supt. Ind. Affrs. in Oregon
Capt. Wm. Kelly
    Comdg. Fort Klamath
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, pages 644-645.



[Telegram]
Siskiyou Mtn. Feb. 18 1865
To J. W. P. Huntington
    Salem
        Capt. Kelly requests me to telegraph you that the Indians are suffering at Klamath and says army flour can be had there on your requisition.
L. Applegate
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 100.



(Telegram)
Salem Feby. 18th 1865
Capt. Lindsay Applegate
        Toll House
    Tell Capt. Kelly to issue flour in his discretion not exceeding one thousand dollars value. I will write him by mail.
J. W. Perit Huntington
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 645.



(Copy)
Headquarters District of Oregon
    Fort Vancouver W.T.
        February 23rd 1865.
Colonel
[text omitted from copy]
    I will here respectfully submit that Fort Klamath should be attached to my District. Many matters connected with the Office of the Governor, of the Surveyor General, of the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, and of the Provost Marshal General render it proper. The people ask for it. Umpqua and Rogue River valleys in Oregon were left out of the Department of Oregon when organized in 1858, and the same boundaries were given this district by [the] War Department, Orders No. 10, of November 22nd 1860, changing the Department to a District.
I am very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        Benj. Alvord
            Brig. Genl. U.S.V.
                Comdg. District
Lieut. Colonel. R. C. Drum
    Asst. Adjutant General
        Hqrs. Department of Pacific
            San Francisco
                Cal.
   

[Note in Alvord's handwriting:]
    I sent you the above copy, as I know it will interest you. I think it will be done, whether the District remain under my command or not.
Very respty.
    Benj. Alvord
        Brig. Genl.
            &c.
J. W. P. Huntington Esq.
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem
            Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, no number.



Corvallis Oregon
    March 1st 1865
W. P. Dole
    Commissioner
        Sir
            Your letter of Jan. 5, 1865 and set complete of Geo. Megginson vouchers has come to hand. It is a disgrace to the Indian Department that employees should be so served. These men worked on their faith in the government and have been sadly abused. I do not see the pertinence of the argument set forth in your letter, copy of letter Sept. 29, 1864, "that the vouchers [of] Geo. Megginson & T. Briggs are incomplete, one wanting." These returned are complete & Mr. Megginson is absent. Upon his return I have no doubt he will order them returned to the Indian Department at Washington as worthless papers to him--unpaid promises to pay of the Indian Department.
    At the bottom of the copy of the aforesaid letter is this sentence--and below your signature: "The above vouchers issued in quadruplicate and only triplicate recd. This note is no part of the letter." Worthless quadruplicate vouchers were returned to me.
Respectfully
    A. D. Barnard
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 700-702.




March 9th 1865
Dear Sir
    We shall need at least one hundred and fifty bus. of club wheat for seed, as most of the wheat sowed last fall is froze out. I can buy it for three dollars per bus. in L.G. at the barn. Will it be necessary to advertise? If so will you please insert one in the Statesman. Make the time as short to receive bids as you think right, as I fear if put off long the wheat will mostly be sold.
    I would be glad to get a line from you in relation to this matter.
Yours very respectfully
    Amos Harvey
J. W. P. Huntington Esqr.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 117.



Office Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Salem, Oregon, 10th March 1865
Sir
    I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, with the communication of Commissioner Dole to you upon the subject of the claim of George Megginson for $195.00, and to say in reply that my instructions from the Commissioner expressly forbid me to pay any claim contracted by my predecessors in office, but with cases of this date (that is 1st quarter 1862) to forward statement of the same to Washington for adjustment. This claim of Megginson was presented at this office year before last and sent with others to the Commissioner on the 12th Dec. 1863, since which time no advices have been received in relation to the same. I cannot pay the same without other instructions than those by which I am now governed, and the vouchers are therefore herewith returned to you.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs
   
Filed in Indian Department Washington D.C. for payment by A. D. Barnard--for Geo. Megginson. N.B. in complete sets, agreeable to instructions.
A. D. Barnard
Corvallis March 13th 1865
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 697-699.



College Hill, Hamilton County, Ohio
    March 15th 1865
Wm. P. Dole Esq.
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Sir,
            I enclose in this a letter from Lieut. Col. C. S. Crew, commanding U.S. troops at Fort Klamath, together with an account for beef furnished the Indians at that part during last winter by J. M. Anderson. I have no knowledge of the facts beyond what are stated by Col. Drew. I would recommend that Superintendent Huntington be instructed to investigate the matter and to pay the account in the amt. of its being found correct.
I am respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Nesmith
   
Jacksonville, Oregon,
    January 24th 1865.
Hon. J. W. Nesmith
    U.S. Senate
        Dear Sir:--I take the liberty to enclose to you certified copies of these several accounts of J. M. Anderson for fresh beef furnished to the Klamath Lake Indians during the last winter and which have been disallowed by the War Department as not properly chargeable to the army appropriations.
    The history of this issue to the Indians is as follows:
    In October 1863, a band of Klamath Lake Indians, under the leadership of a petty chief called "George," created some disturbance in one of the out-settlements of Rogue River Valley, whereupon I took charge of, and cared for, the leader, and ordered all the others, including such as were around Jacksonville, back to their country and subsisted them during their march. So far the issue of supplies to them was legitimate. I then reported my doings to the Department commander, and asked, on the score of humanity, that a small issue of flour might be made to them during the winter, as the winter season was close at hand and I had ordered upwards of seventy in number back to their country where they had no supplies laid up, and among Indians who were but little better off in this respect than themselves. The order was made by the General commanding the Department for the issue to be made as I had recommended, out of such supplies as were on hand and could be spared from Fort Klamath. This did not include of course the purchase of beef, nor did I contemplate making such an issue. But leaving Fort Klamath about this time to go to Department headquarters myself, the execution of this order was left to my next in command, Captain Wm. Kelly, who directed the issue of the flour, as authorized, but unfortunately for himself and the claimant, added thereto the issue of fresh beef, requiring Mr. Anderson, who was then the contractor to furnish beef to the troops at Fort Klamath, to furnish for the Indians also. Captain Kelly exceeded instructions in the premises to this extent. But as the issue was honestly made, and without doubt necessary, I recommend its payment by the Indian Department, out of the appropriation for these Indians which is yet unexpended. Mr. Anderson was under bonds to furnish the amount of beef required at Fort Klamath and was directed by the commanding officer of the post to furnish this. It is right therefore that he should be paid. The money could not, under any circumstances, be obtained from Captain Kelly. The accounts were unpaid when notice was received of their disallowance. The gross amount still remaining due to Mr. Anderson is $1236.43/100. I submit this to you asking your kind offices on his behalf, and in doing so I feel conscious that I have discharged more than my duty him.
    Will write you on other subjects shortly.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        C. S. Drew
            Lt. Col. &c.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 997-1002.





Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem Oregon March 21st 1865
Sir
    In reference to the depredations alleged to have been committed by Indians in destroying your boat near the mouth of Umpqua River, I have to say that the law under which such claims as yours are based is the act of Congress approved on the 30th June 1834. A claimant under this act must within three years from the time the depredation is committed establish by proper proofs that the act was done, what tribe of Indians did it, and the value of the property taken or destroyed. If the proofs are sufficient, the sum due is to be deducted from the annuities by order of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. No agent or Superintendent has authority to make the deduction, nor can the Commissioner do so except upon affidavit which clearly establishes 1st the value of the property, 2nd the fact of its having been taken or destroyed and 3rd identify the Indians who did it. If the Indians are not entitled to any annuities, the claimant can only then have recourse to Congress, and ask them for an appropriation for his benefit. Your letter does not state what tribe those who destroyed your boat belonged to.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Ind. Affrs. in Oregon
H. B. Burnap Esq.
    Umpqua City
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 657.



Fort Klamath Oregon
    March 21st 1865
Sir,
    I have the honor to transmit herewith a bill for flour issued to the Klamath Indians agreeable to your dispatch of Feb. 18 1865. I have exceeded the amount by a few cents.
    The issue was made in good time and very much required by the Indians, who would have suffered very much if it had not been made to them. The winter has been severe to them; many of them have killed their horses for food. At this date the snow is four feet deep at the fort, but it begins to melt away. About half of the Indians have gone to Lost River to fish. The fish is now beginning to run in the rivers of this valley.
    Please send me your check for the amount of the enclosed bill, or have it placed to my credit, as Asst. Comr. of Subsistence at Fort Klamath, with the Assistant Treasurer of the U.S. at San Francisco Cal.
    Mr. Nurse will write to you on this matter in a few days, when he will send the receipts of the chiefs for the flour issued to them.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. Kelly Capt. 1st Cav.
            Oregon Volunteers
                A.C.S.
J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. of Indian Affairs
        for Oregon
            Salem, Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 146.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency
    March 23rd 1865
Sir
    In relation to the claims of Donald McLeod forwarded by you under date of August 8th 1864 for damages committed on his property by dogs belonging to Peter, Joe & Jack of Umpqua tribe of Indians.
    I would say, after a careful inquiry I have been unable to find either Joe or Jack belonging to that tribe.
    Peter is one of the chiefs of the tribe, but he refuses to pay--as he says that Breyman's (a white man) dog was as much engaged in killing the sheep as his was--unless he, Breyman, pays a part, and he also further objects to paying, as he says that McLeod killed his dog.
    Under these circumstances I respectfully refer the matter to you for instructions.
Very respectfully
    Amos Harvey
        U.S. Indian Agent
J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem
            Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 135½.



Fort Vancouver W.T.
    April 1 1865
Dear Sir
    Before leaving I desire to say while I have repeatedly intended to say in my letters to you that I consider your administration of the affairs of the Indian Department in Oregon as very judicious & successful, and I will take occasion to say as much at Washington City if I have a good opportunity. It is altogether probable that I will meet the Commissioner of Indian Affairs.
    If I can be of any service to you in Washington please write me, directing to Washington City.
I am very truly & respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        Benj. Alvord
            Brig. General
                U.S. Volunteers
J. W. P. Huntington Esq.
    Superintendent of
        Indian Affairs for Oregon
            Salem
                Oregon
P.S. I have had occasion often in my official letters & reports to speak in terms of commendation & satisfaction with your discharge of your duties, & it is but fair to now inform you, as I take my adieu of Oregon.
B.A.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 145.



April the 6th 1865
J. W. Perit Huntington
    Sir I send you the returns of the flour as I have issued to the Indians. I have acted under Capt. Wm. Kelly and had him present at nearly all of issues made to the Indians; I have never let any flour go without his
knowledge. At the time there is a good many of them that is dissatisfied because they do not hear from an agent and have him among them. I told them that you would be here as soon as you could get here this spring. The lake is still frozen over, but the fish have commenced running in the streams; that gives them plenty to eat of fish. There is some dissatisfied about their slaves the Pit Rivers, as they have left them and come to the Captain and complained of their ill treatment and wished him to protect them. They threatened that they will kill them if they do not return and say that they will go as soon as they can this spring and sell the young slaves for horses to some other tribes. The Captain told them that they could not hold the slaves unless they treated them better. I wish you could send an agent here this spring, early if possible.
    I received 38 thirty-eight barrels of flour of Captain Wm. Kelly as you will see in the returns. Since I commenced waiting I learned by one Indian, 
Mogen-kash-kit, that there had been 2 Snakes in to his ranch and said that Paulina, the Snake chief, would come in as soon as the snow would get off of the mountains and would fetch as many of his Indians as possible in this summer. If there was any way to treat with him and make a permanent treaty the Indians wish to have Capt. Applegate as an agent for them and want him to come this spring and superintend putting in a crop of vegetables if nothing more. If the certificate that I send you is not as it should be I will get balance receipt for the flour should he come in before you come here. I forgot at the time that I let him have it to get it which I should have done. One of the Snakes that was in last fall at the treaty has shot himself; the other has been nearly killed by a grizzly bear.
    I send you the Captain's certificate for the flour that I let the Snake chief of the Snakes have last Nov. 1864. I let it go on his request thinking it right to do it as he came in for peace. When you receive this I wish you would acknowledge the receipt of the same.
Yours with respect
    George Nurse
Fort Klamath
April the 6th 1865
J. W. Perit Huntington
    Superintendent of Indian
        Department at Salem
            Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 152.



Fort Klamath Oregon
    April 7th 1865.
Sir,
    Some few days ago two Pit River Indian women, slaves in the Klamath tribe, came to me and claimed protection and their freedom. They had been cruelly used by the Klamaths, who rented them out to the whites (soldiers & others) against their will as prostitutes. One of them was purchased by La Lake from the Indian who captured her, for five horses. One of the soldiers at this post agreed to pay La Lake part of the cost, but afterwards broke his agreement. I sent for La Lake and told him that the Pit River women and children captives in his tribe should no longer be considered as slaves, that they should be considered as being on the same footing as the Klamaths, and if they wished to remain with the Klamaths I had no objection to it, but they should not be ill treated. If they declined remaining I should not force them to remain with their captors, but they should remain in this valley until instructions was received concerning them. La Lake's slave woman said she would not return with La Lake and said in his presence that the Klamaths had killed her people and punished women who run away by tying cords or ropes to each leg, dragging them asunder, and driving a stake up her privates and killing her. I asked La Lake if such was the fact, and he said yes they did as before I came here, but not since as I had given them other hearts, or minds.
    La Lake and the tribe are very much displeased about the slaves being liberated or any prospect of their being taken from them.
    The Indians have since declared that if such was to be the case that they would kill all of the Pit River Indians among them, or run them off to other places and sell them for horses. I have cautioned them against doing anything of the kind under pain of death if they should kill their slaves, or other punishment if they took them away. La Lake today denies that there was any such intention. They are very much dissatisfied in not having an agent to attend to their wants, as they expected to commence putting in crops this spring. I hear that La Lake has declined to act as chief any longer, and he recommends Chiloquin's son, Khi ma, who has been considered unfriendly by La Lake before.
    I would collect such of the Pit River women and children as demanded or asked to separate from the Klamaths, but I have no authority to furnish them subsistence. The two women near the post are supported by soldiers, which is also offensive to the Indians, they considering the soldiers more friendly to the Pit River Indians than they are to the Klamaths.
    I request that  you authorize subsistence to these captives until they can be otherwise attended to and advise as to what shall be done. Mr. Nurse might take charge of them.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. Kelly Capt. 1st Cav.
            Oregon Volunteers
                Commanding the Post
J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. of Indian Affairs
        Salem
            Oregon
P.S. Since writing the above I have seen la Lake and several other chiefs; they all profess great friendship and say they have been using their influence with other tribes and feel well pleased at the change among themselves as regards good order &c.
    La Lake has not resigned.
Wm. Kelly Capt. &c.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 154.



Fort Klamath Oregon
    April 8, 1865.
Sir,
    Mogen-kash-kit called on me today with a message from Paulina and a message from Tus-sham-e-che, a Pit River chief whose country is between the Modoc country and Goose Lake.
    Paulina sent me word that he had been among several tribes of the Snakes and advised them, as well as his own people, to be friendly with the whites, not to molest them in any way, and to come and make arrangements with you as soon as the snow is off the ground. He says that he will call and see me as soon as he can travel here after the snow is off the mountains and wait at the fort until he gets his wife sent to him, and hopes that she will not be ill treated on the way. He will have his people here as soon after as you may wish to meet him. The old one-eyed man that attended the treaty has been badly torn by a grizzly bear. The Indians set fire to a hill where the bear was in and he rushed on the old man and bit him badly besides burning him, the man being so exhausted that the flames caught him before help came.
    The Pit River chief and his brother came to Mogen-kash-kit's camp on the east of the reservation four days ago and told Mogen-kash-kit to tell me that they wished to come and live among the Klamaths, that they did not like to live with the other Pit River bands, that they were almost famished, had no arms, food or clothing of any account, and they now wished to come here with their band and live in peace with the whites and with the Klamaths.
Mogen-kash-kit said they spoke the truth, and that they had every appearance of being in distress, had no clothes on excepting a breech cloth, and that their bodies was daubed with pitch and grease. They will come as soon as you desire them, and await your answer.
   
Mogen-kash-kit also represented that the Snakes were suffering from starvation. La Lake, Kelogue, Mogen-kash-kit and Blogue each made speeches expressing their pleasure, good will towards the whites, and that they would aid in arresting any Indians who should molest or trouble the whites. They also blarneyed me some on the good advice, wholesome law and abolishing of former modes of retaliation, and on giving them other hearts, or minds, than those they had before the troops came among them.
    I would respectfully recommend that some provision be made to subsist visiting Indians from other tribes on business here, and hope that arrangements may be made for the safe transportation of Paulina's family here.
Very respectfully, your obt. servt.
    Wm. Kelly Capt. 1st Cav. Oregon Vols.
        Comdg. Post
J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. of Indian Affairs
        Salem Oregon
P.S. The Pit River Indians came in by advice of Winnemucca.
Wm. Kelly Capt. &c.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 153.



Fort Klamath Oregon
    April 8th 1865
Sir
    La Lake and several of the Klamath Indians called on me today for the purpose of representing a case of killing of one of their squaws named Bah-lucks by a Shasta Indian named Jack or Go-las-to-pal near Yreka lately. They first asked permission to go and take Jack before he could be informed of their knowing about the affair, but I of course declined to permit them. La Lake says that there is but one squaw who knows about the affair. Her name is Ke-naw-conse, and she is afraid to inform on him until he is secured, as he told her that he would kill her if she attempted to inform on him. She is a half Modoc and lives near Yreka.
    The Indians rely on you and request me to say that the Shasta Indians have first broke the agreement made a year ago, and they expect you to see justice done for them, and La Lake further requests that the information be kept secret until Jack is secured.
Very respectfully your obedient servt.
    Wm. Kelly Capt.
        1st Cav. Ogn. Vols.
            Comdg. Post
Mr. Steele
    Indian Agent
        Yreka Cal.
Copy respectfully forwarded for the information of Mr. Huntington.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, no number.



Amity Yamhill Oregon April 24th 1865
J. W. P. Huntington Esq.
    Salem        Sir
        Your letter of 12th inst. came duly to hand, in due course, informing me that Agent Harvey is unable to find any such Indians as Joe & Jack of the Umpqua tribe. Peter is one of the chiefs of the Umpqua tribe of Indians. Joe was also a chief and is now dead. Jack is sometimes called Jake and is on the reservation. The dog you speak of as Breyman's was an Indian dog, and the Indians had him at the time with those that killed my sheep.
    Now, Mr. Huntington, the excuse above is the veriest pretext. Umpqua Peter and others of his tribe while in this neighborhood with a pass from the agent let their dogs kill my sheep that I had gone from Oregon to the state of Vermont and bought at a high price and drove them over on the plains at great labor and risk and expense and frequently at great danger of life. And I have proved all of those facts by good eyewitnesses and have got up the proof as yourself said was right & proposed and [at] considerable expense. I visited the Grand Ronde and saw Agt. Harvey, who agreed to pay me in three weeks or as soon as he got money, which he was looking for at that time, and which money he has long since got.
    Now, sir, there was no guesswork about this. The dogs were seen killing the sheep, and that too in the presence of the Indians, and the Indians was arrested on the spot by Mr. Delashmutt & son, and their horses taken from them, but I had all confidence in my government and the officers acting under it, released the Indians and their horses and did not harm them, and my lost bucks were killed. I have seen the Indians myself with my naked eye and their dog coming from the dead bucks and have followed them to their camp to ascertain their names, and Mrs. Lewis and sister also seen the Indians in the lot where my bucks was. Now, sir, under all these circumstances would you ask to send the papers to Washington City without paying me. I beg on you again to pay me without further delay. I know it is in your power to do so, besides I don't want but justice.
    I have stated you already that the Indians wounded two more of my bucks at the same time and one of them died [a] few days afterward, caused by the wounds. Hoping that this will not insult you but may meet your approbation, I enclose you sixteen cents revenue stamps to fill the deficiency on my affidavit.
With every sincere regard I am yours
    Very respectfully your most obt. servt.
        Donald McLeod
Please write to me soon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 163.



Fort Klamath Oregon
    April 26th 1865
Sir,
    La Lake, and a large crowd of the Klamaths, called on me the day before yesterday for permission to go to Yreka in force to capture and punish or kill a Shasta Indian named Shasta Jack, or "
Go-las-to-pal," who they accuse of killing a squaw belonging to the Klamaths known as Bill's squaw, or "Bah-lucks." They represent that this Shasta Indian has killed several of their tribe and some of the Modoc tribe and notwithstanding that an agreement was made last year between the Shastas, Modocs and Klamaths, that there should be no more depredations committed by either bands. The Shastas are first to break the agreement and should be punished. I of course refused them permission to go for any such purpose, but I have given La Lake and five others a pass to go to Yreka to represent their case to the proper authorities there, and I have sent Sergt. James Barkley as an escort for their protection and to see that they did not abuse the privilege granted them by assaulting other Indians.
    They represented that the Modoc tribe wished to go also, but I have informed them that I should punish any Indians, Klamaths or Modocs, who should attempt to make war on other Indians friendly to the whites.
    Sergt. Barkley leaves tomorrow with the delegation, and I have instructed him to see the Indian agent, or some other person having authority to apprehend the accused Indian.
    At the request of the Indians I have written to Mr. Steele of Yreka some time since on this subject, but have not yet heard from him.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. Kelly Capt. 1st Cav.
            Oregon Vols.
                Comdg. the Post
J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. of Indian Affairs
        Salem
            Oregon
P.S. The Indians have complained to me that Overton was hunting and trapping on their lands, and they did not wish to have him do so. I ordered Mr. Overton to discontinue such practice on the reservation laid off by you. He has left with [word cut off]. Mr. Overton had been trapping for Mr. Nurse, and I was sorry to have to interfere with him, but 
[word cut off] the justness of the Indians' complaints.
W.K. Capt. &c.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 173.



(Copy)
Headquarters Fort Klamath Ogn.
    April 26th 1865
Special Orders
No. [blank]
    Sergeant James Barkley of Co. "C" 1st Cav. Oregon Volunteers will proceed to Yreka, California tomorrow as an escort for the protection of La Lake and five other Klamath Indians who are permitted to visit Yreka for the purpose of presenting to the civil authorities such evidence as they may have relative to the killing of one of their women by a Shasta Indian who habitually resides near Yreka.
    Sergt. Barkley will rest one day at Yreka and return to this post via Cottonwood, Siskiyou County, California, calling for the mail on his return.
    The A.A.Q.M. will furnish transportation, forage and actual necessary expenses.
Wm. Kelly Capt. 1st Cav.
    Oregon Volunteers
        Commanding Post
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, enclosure to No. 173.



(Copy)
Respectfully forwarded for the information of Mr. Huntington.
Wm. Kelly, Capt. 1st Cav.
    Oregon Vols. Comdg. Ft. Klamath
Headquarters
    Fort Klamath Oregon
        April 26th 1865
Sir;
    On receipt of this letter you will order all Indians lurking around Jacksonville, without permission from Mr. Huntington, yourself or from some other lawful authority, to repair forthwith to this valley, and hereafter no such Indians will be allowed to remain in the settlements without a written permission from an officer of the Indian or Military Department. I have permitted Peter and three other Indians to go in with horses to remove those at Jacksonville.
I have the honor to be very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. Kelly, Capt. 1st Cav.
            Oregon Volunteers
                Commanding Post
D. C. Underwood
    1st Lieut. 1st C.O.V.
        Comdg. Detachment Co. "C"
            Jacksonville
                Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, enclosure to No. 173.



Portland, May 3rd 1865.
J. W. Perit Huntington Esqr.
    Supt. of Indian Affairs,
        Sir,
            Some time since I think you expressed a desire to have "Indian Dave," a convict in the penitentiary, pardoned. If such is your wish, please write me at your earliest convenience and I will pardon him.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        Addison C. Gibbs
            Governor of Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 174.



Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem Oregon May 13th 1865
Sir
    I have to acknowledge the receipt of sundry letters and enclosures from you relative to Indians and Indian affairs in the Klamath Lake region and thank you for your zealous kindness in looking after their interests.
    My check upon the Asst. Treasurer San Francisco for $1000.67 in payment for flour issued to them under your direction is enclosed herewith, together with triplicate vouchers which you will please sign and return to me by mail.
    I am now making preparations to proceed to Fort Klamath and to spend some time in that vicinity for the purpose of negotiating with and controlling the tribes there.
    I desire to have  you convey information of this to the Snake and Pitt River Indians especially and to other tribes beyond, if there be any, in order that they may be prepared to meet me. To Paulina and his people you may say that the women and children whom I captured last October are now safe at Fort Vancouver and will remain in my possession until I have satisfactory evidence that it is the intention of him and his people to cease their depredations upon whites and settle and remain upon a reservation. Whenever I am convinced that his intentions are peaceable I will deliver his wife and the other women captives to Fort Klamath.
    I am very glad to notice that you have taken measures to expel the vagabond Indians from the white settlements in Rogue River Valley. Their presence there is a pest to the whites and a curse to themselves, and I trust you will succeed in compelling them to remain away from the valley.
    The expedition of La Lake to Yreka can result in no good. If these Indians choose to go down into Shasta Valley (out of their country and out of this Superintendency) they cannot expect any aid from the government to enable them to come out victorious in their petty quarrels with other Indians and with the abandoned whites who are low enough to associate with them.
    Hoping that you will continue to meet with success in your endeavors to control the tribes in your vicinity, 
I have the honor to remain
    Very respectfully
        Your obt. servt.
            J. W. Perit Huntington
                Supt. Ind. Affrs. in Oregon
Capt. Wm. Kelly
    Commanding
        Fort Klamath
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 679.



Salem Oregon May 22nd 1865
Sir
    I had the honor to tender the resignation of my office dated 12th Nov. 1864. I have not as yet received any advices of the acceptance of the same, nor indeed of its receipt. In consequence of the depreciation of currency upon this coast, I have found the pay of a sub-Ind. agent inadequate to the duties thereof, and to the support of my family. For these reasons, I tendered my resignation at above date, and hoped to have been relieved from duty ere this in order to engage in some other pursuits for a livelihood. In absence of advices concerning resignation, or instructions by which to be governed, I have visited Supt. office and rendered accounts to fractional part of 2nd qr. ending May 13th 1865. By reference to said accounts it will be seen that funds amounting to ($298.77/100) two hundred & ninety-eight & 77/100 dollars remain on hand. I shall anxiously await instructions from your office as to date of acceptance of resignation, the final closing up of my accounts--disposition of funds in my hands, reception of salary etc.
I have the honor to remain
    Very respectfully
        Your obt. servt.
            Amos E. Rogers
                U.S. Ind. Sub-Agent
                    in Oregon
W. P. Dole
    Commissioner of Indian
        Affairs Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 1019-1021.




Fort Klamath Oregon
    May 26th 1865.
Sir,
    Some two weeks ago I was informed that the Modoc Indians were dissatisfied with the treaty made with you last October and that they were influenced by some evil-disposed persons at Yreka. The Modocs have set aside Schonchin and selected Kintpuash [Captain Jack] as their chief. I understood that Kintpuash told Mr. Potter, a justice of the peace at Yreka, that himself or people would not stand by the treaty made by Schonchin so far as coming on a reservation and leaving their own country was concerned. La Lake, with a friend of Schonchin sent for the purpose, informed me.
    I told La Lake to inform Kintpuash that his advisers were misleading him, and that he should not listen to them, that he was present and a party to the treaty and would be expected to adhere to his consent then given. La Lake with all the Klamath chiefs and headmen (excepting Chiloquin) went to see Kintpuash and the Modoc Indians on the matter.
    Today they returned and called on me to inform me of the result of their mission.
    La Lake asked Kintpuash why he should state to Potter and others that he had not sold his lands, that Potter had told him so and so did a Modoc Indian. Kintpuash answered, "I do not believe that Potter told you or anybody else anything of the kind. I think you speak false, or not true. I have sold my land forever, and so far I will keep my word. The whites may come and live on it. But I will never go to the Klamath country to live. This is my country, and I want [to] and will remain here. The bones and ashes of my fathers before me, and of my relations and friends are here, and I want to remain, that my bones and my ashes may be with them. I did not accept gifts at the treaty when you did, and I do not want to receive any. I only want to be allowed to remain in my own country. The distance from my houses (or camps) to yours is not far. I want you to remain in your country, and I will remain in mine."
    La Lake then said to Kintpuash, "Why do you talk so for? Are you getting up out of a sleep? Did you not hear and understand what was said at the treaty? You say I lie; why do you say so? You know that your people heard you say so, and admit it by saying you want to remain here. The agent did not say you could always remain on your land, and you know he did not. Why did you not tell the agent that you wished to remain and not say so now? Do not get foolish notions in your head; it is too late now. You should have done so at the treaty. We are witnesses to what you agreed to do at the treaty; who is making a fool of you? You are chief; do you allow your 'cultus' ["worthless"] people to rule you? It is true that all of your people were not present at the treaty, but Mr. Huntington told you to see your friends, give them good advice and tell them what he had said to you."
    La Lake says that there was thirty-two of the Klamaths with him at the Modoc country trying to advise Kintpuash, and after talking two days Kintpuash said he did not want to talk anymore, that the Klamaths or anyone else could not alter his mind. He did not want to go to the Klamath country, or to give the Klamaths his mind, that if any depredations were done about that country, the Klamaths would say that it was done by the Modocs. That was all that he had to say.
    Schonchin then said, "I understood what Mr. Huntington said at the treaty, and I do not want to deny or set aside what was said. I was chief when the treaty was made, but since then I have no friends, my people do not wish to go to Klamath Lake, but if required I will go if I have to go alone, without any of my people. I sold my land, and I mean to keep my word with the Indian agent. I know all of the Modocs and I was the one who talked for them, and I will adhere to my part of the treaty. That is all I have to say."
    The two Pit River chiefs who heretofore sent [word] that they wished a treaty with Mr. Huntington were [present] with twelve of their band. They now deny that they sent any such word to me, and say that two army officers passed through their country lately, and [told] them that the soldiers were coming to their country, and they would soon be better off than they now are, that they were now poor without pants, shirts or other clothes, but they would soon have plenty.
    Paulina is expected here tomorrow. He has been waiting at
Mogen-kash-kit's [camp] until the return of the Klamaths.
    Indian Charley from the Dalles has arrived here day before yesterday. He reports the roads very bad, and a great deal of snow and water.
I have the honor to be
    Very respectfully
        Your obedient servant
            Wm. Kelly Capt. 1st Cav.
                Oregon Volunteers
                    Commanding the Post
J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem
            Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, enclosure to No. 192.  Some words at the last three paragraphs were obscured; those in brackets are tentatively supplied.



Headquarters, Fort Klamath
    June 1865.
Sir
    Some time ago June 3rd I arrested an Indian named Ski-ish-cus-cut, a medicine man of the Klamath tribe, for threatening to cut loose the government ferry boat on Link River and for sending a drift over the rapids and destroying a canoe belonging to a friendly Indian. He was a very bad Indian, the one that stole a carpet in Jacksonville two years ago. He was brought to me by Kelogue, Blogue and other Indians as being evil disposed. I had him confined and a ball and chain placed on his leg, and ordered him to work. While out working on the 6th inst. he attempted to make his escape from the sentinel, Private James Carr, Co. I, 1st Oregon Infantry, and was shot by him while crossing a log over the creek, in rear of the officers' quarters. He had attempted to cut his chain with the ax on the morning he was killed, and attempted to get the sentinel to carry his ball, perhaps to have an opportunity to hit him with the ax. The body of the Indian was delivered to his friends to [be] buried according to their custom. But they were informed that if any other Indians should be arrested and die while in our charge, they might not get their remains. The Indians attach no blame, as they had warned the fellow before not to attempt to make his escape or he would be killed.
I have the honor to be
    Very respectfully
        Your obedient servt.
            Wm. Kelly, Capt. 1st Cav.
                Oregon Volunteers
                    Comdg. the Post
J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem
            Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, No. 205.



Headquarters Fort Klamath Oregon
    June 2nd 1865
Sir,
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter transmitting check for $1000.67 for flour issued to the Indians at this post last winter and herewith return receipt. I also enclose an agreement signed by Paulina, or Pau-ni-nie, and two other chiefs of small bands of Snake Indians.
    Pau-ni-nie came for the purpose of professing friendship, and to let it be known that he had no hand, act or part in an affair which happened since he last seen me in which two of his chiefs, two men and two squaws were killed by the whites.
    He represents that those Indians had visited a house or camp where there were white men, that at the same time there came other Indians from where the sun comes from, that the latter Indians after having tobacco given them by the whites, and after doing some trading, they stole eleven horses and twenty head of stock the same night and that the whites, supposing them to be all concerned, attacked the Indians belonging him and killed them. He says he was not there and did not know anything about the matter until the return of some of his Indians, and that none of the stolen property came to his country. This occurred at some big water east of this post, perhaps Snake River.
    I asked Pau-ni-nie to send one of his Indians to guide a drover named McGrath, who lives near Yreka, to Canyon City, but he seems afraid to send one lest they might be killed by the whites, as they could not understand our language. I have informed Pau-ni-nie what you desired me to say to him, and I have requested La Lake to communicate with the other bands of Indians in his neighborhood, that they may be prepared to meet you.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. Kelly, Capt. 1st Cav.
            Oregon Volunteers
                Commanding the Post
J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. of Indn. Affairs in Oregon
        Salem
            Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, enclosure to No. 197.



    BODY FOUND.--The body of Shasta Jack, who was arrested some time ago by the officers of this place on charge of killing a Modoc squaw and delivered to that tribe in accordance with a treaty made with them, was found on Wednesday by some of his own tribe in Shasta River. His hands and feet were tied and his throat cut. Besides these little inconveniences he had been scalped. The tribe took him to Long Gulch and had a good powwow over him.

"Home Intelligence,"
The Semi-Weekly Union, Yreka, California, June 10, 1865, page 3




Office Superintendent Ind. Affrs.
    Salem Oregon June 19th 1865
Sir
    The claim of Donald McLeod for depredations alleged to have been committed by certain Indians of the Umpqua tribe of Indians has been presented to this office referred to Agent Amos Harvey, and by him presented to the Indians, and payment having been refused by them the same has been returned, and at the request of the claimant is now transmitted to your office for further action.
    The papers consist of the sworn statements of Donald McLeod, the claimant, marked "A," the affidavits of witnesses in support of the claim marked "B," "C," D" and copies of the letters of Agent Amos Harvey and the claimant McLeod, marked respectively "E" and "F." I also transmit a manuscript copy of the state law of Oregon in relation to depredations of similar character committed by dogs belonging to white men, marked "G."
    In relation to the statement of Agent Harvey that the Indians cannot be found, it is proper to add that it has since come to my knowledge that the Indian known as "Jo" died soon after the depredation is alleged to have been committed. Of the Indian known as "Jack" I have no knowledge more than what is derived from the papers.
    I am requested by Mr. McLeod to solicit an early examination of the case in your office and adjudication of the same.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oreg.
Hon. Wm. P. Dole
    Commissioner &c.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, pages 686-687.  Original on NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 881-883.





Office Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Salem Oregon June 19th 1865
Sir
    An application has been made by Rev. J. B. A. Brouillet, Vicar General of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Oregon, to the Indian Bureau at Washington for permission to establish a school for the education of Indian children at Grand Ronde Reservation, the same to be in connection with the Catholic Church already established at that place, and under the control and management of the Sisters of Jesus and Mary.
    The matter having been referred to this office, it becomes necessary to call upon you for information.
    You will therefore report to this office upon the subject, stating in your judgment whether the Indians and the service will be benefited by sanctioning the proposed measure, or otherwise, and giving your reasons for so determining in detail, together with any facts or information having a bearing upon the subject.
    A copy of the communication of Rev. J. A. B. Brouillet, V.G., to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs is herewith transmitted.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Org.
Amos Harvey
    U.S. Indian Agent
        Grand Ronde
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 687.




Office Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Salem Oregon June 29th 1865
Sir
    In compliance with your request for my opinion as to the "propriety of purchasing Indian annuity goods in the Atlantic States for the Oregon Superintendency, together with such facts as may be within my knowledge in relation to the cost and character of the goods which have been sent from the Department at Washington" and whether it would not result in a saving "of money to the government and benefit to the Indians to allow the Superintendent or agents to make the necessary purchases themselves," I have the honor to submit the following for your information.
    Prior to my appointment as Superintendent, the practice appears to have been to make the purchases by the Superintendent or the agent having charge of the tribe, and in the remittance of the funds for the first half year of my incumbency (1863) no change was made, the funds for annuities of all the tribes being remitted and in due time turned over to the agents, and by them expended. On the 2nd day of May 1863, however, Commissioner Dole advised me that it was his design to change the practice, and cause the goods to be purchased in the "Atlantic cities," and in pursuance of this plan I was directed to transmit my estimate of the articles required for the Indians in the entire Superintendency in such time as to reach Washington "not later than 1st October" 1863, and I was especially enjoined to "a strict compliance with the instructions" upon my part. This letter was received on the 2nd day of June 1863, and acknowledged on the following day. A copy of it marked "A" is hereto appended for your information.
    On the 18th day of June Commissioner Dole informed me that he had ordered certain goods to be purchased in New York, without waiting for my estimate of what was required, and enclosed a list of the goods he ordered. On the 15th day of July Mr. J. B. Gordon, special agent, wrote enclosing invoices of goods purchased in New York and Baltimore, and advising me of their shipment. On the 24th September I forwarded to the Commissioner a carefully prepared estimate of the articles which it was deemed most expedient to purchase for the Indians, which of course did not arrive at Washington until after the purchases for that year had been made. No further communication has ever been received by me from the Commissioner's office upon this subject, but on the 4th of July, 1864, I received a letter from Mr. J. B. Gordon, special agent, advising me of the purchase and shipment of annuity goods for all the tribes in Oregon.
    No allusion to this purchase has ever been made in any letter received from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and this omission cannot be chargeable to the failure of the mails, for my monthly statements of correspondence sent to Washington had been found to correspond with the records of the Commissioner. The goods purchased in 1863 were shipped via Panama, at enormous freight, and arrived at the several agencies in time for distribution the same year. The goods bought in 1864 were shipped via Cape Horn, did not arrive here until the present year, and could not be distributed to the Indians for whom they were designed until very recently. Indeed, a portion of them designed for the Shasta Scotans, Umpquas, & Rogue Rivers are yet in this town. Thus the Indians have been one year without annuities, and much dissatisfaction exists among them in consequence.
    The time and manner in which the goods have been shipped have been most unfortunately chosen. The goods for 1863 were not only shipped by the costly Isthmus route, but they were subjected to exorbitant charges for packing, drayage &c. (for detail of which see comparative schedule, marked "B"), and the bulky nature of some of the articles was such as to make the freight a great deal more than the value of the goods after delivery. Handled axes, hatchets, pitchforks, garden hoes &c. were cased in huge pine boxes, to be transported over the route from Baltimore & New York to Warm Springs & Umatilla The transportation of the bulky wooden handles was five times the value of the articles, handle and all, after delivery, while the Indians would have thought it no hardship to have made the handles themselves out of the timber which grows upon their own reservation.
    The purchases of 1864 were all shipped via Cape Horn and San Francisco to Salem. Salem was the proper destination of no part of the goods. Your familiar acquaintance with the country enables you to see at once the absurdity of shipping goods bound for Warm Springs or Umatilla up the Willamette River to Salem, thence down the river to Portland toward their final destination.
    The goods designed for Siletz Agency afford a still more marked instance of mismanagement.
    They have been transported from San Francisco to Salem at a cost of about $75 per ton, and now the most economical way to get them to their destination will probably be to ship them back to San Francisco again, at like cost, and thence direct to Siletz at a cost of about $16 per ton.
    The only other alternative is to transport them on pack mules from Salem to Siletz, which probably will not cost less than $100 per ton.
    In regard to the quality and suitableness of the goods shipped, it has generally been such as could have been anticipated when the purchaser was entirely unacquainted with the country, or the Indians who inhabit it. There has uniformly been an unfavorable discrepancy between the invoices and the articles actually shipped. I shall not swell this letter to the mordant length necessary to point out all of these failures or swindles, but a few of the more glaring must suffice.
    "Merrimac" prints are named in the invoices of both years. This, as is well known, is the best and most costly sort of calico, and the prices paid have corresponded with the invoice quality, but not a yard of Merrimac calico has ever been put in the package.
    On the contrary, the article shipped has always been of a very inferior quality, such as can be bought for twenty-five or thirty percent less than "Merrimac," and is worth to the Indians, who are expected to consume it, less than half.
    The article shipped as "cotton duck" was a light and inferior article of common drilling.
    A considerable part of the thread sent was rotten and utterly worthless. The needles, the buttons the fish hooks & lines were of the most inferior description, and of very little value to the Indians.
    Spoons enough were brought to give nearly half a dozen to everyone of the tribe, and they were so worthless that the Indians generally refused to carry them away after they were given out. "Fancy mirrors" costing $5 per dozen were sent. They proved to be little looking glasses, about two inches in diameter, and worth absolutely nothing to the Indians.
    A lot of "steel weeding hoes," handled, proved to be little affairs, intended for the use of some delicate lady, if indeed they were intended for use at all. Scissors & shears in inordinate quantity and utterly worthless in quality were sent.
    Tinware packed in roomy cases until the freight was far in excess of the value. Fry pans of thin sheet iron, utterly worthless, and so esteemed by the Indians. In short, the entire purchases show either ignorance of the Indians' wants, or design to defraud them. If the purchases are made intelligently and honestly in New York, it may be that the government and Indians will be as well served, but if the invoices hitherto bought are to be taken as a sample of those to be bought in future, it would be as well to spend half the amount here. No merchant of any interior town in Oregon or Washington ever thinks of buying his stock of goods in New York, and the same reasons which impel individuals to buy at the nearest wholesale mart apply with tenfold force to such purchases as are necessarily made by the government. The facts which I have detailed in my judgment make evident these propositions:
    1st. The purchase of goods should invariably be made by a person acquainted with the Indians and their wants, and with the character of the climate and country where they are to be consumed.
    2nd. That purchases should be made at the wholesale mart nearest to the agency where they are required.
    3rd. That purchase in New York and Baltimore necessarily involves enormous transportation charges, or else the withholding of the goods from the Indians for a year. For your further information I take the liberty to transmit herewith a comparative schedule, marked "B," showing the purchases made in Baltimore and New York in 1863 and 1864, together with my estimate made in 1863 of the articles four which, in my judgment, the annuity funds should be expended.
    A careful examination of this schedule will give you a pretty thorough understanding of what has been purchased and where, and it will also advise you of what in my judgment ought to have been purchased.
    Hoping that my report will be found satisfactory,
I have the honor to be
    Very respectfully
        Your obt. servt.
            J. W. Perit Huntington
                Supt. Ind. Affrs. in Ogn.
Hon. J. W. Nesmith
    U.S. Senator
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, pages 692-695.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency
    Oregon June 30th 1865
Dear Sir,
    I herewith most respectfully submit my report for the quarter ending June 30th 1865.
    In relation to the sanitary condition of the Indians, it will be seen by the following report that no epidemic, or contagious, disease has prevailed during the last quarter. And indeed, a great number of the cases treated have been of a chronic character, either originating in secondary, or tertiary, syphilis, or from a hereditary taint, or when primary syphilis has been neglected in its early treatment.
    Of acute diseases inflammation of the lungs, or of the stomach and bowels, were the more common. Nearly all of these cases yielded to treatment, where aid was sought early and the prescription was carried out. The want of regular diet, together with the reckless exposure to which these people subject themselves, is calculated to induce disease, and in many cases prevent the salutary influence of medicine.
[tabular material not transcribed]
    Of the whole number there were treated males 195, females 140. As to ages there were treated 5 years and under 64, over 5 and under 10 years 20, over 10 and under 20 years 56, over 20 and under 40 years 156, over 40 years 39; total 335.
    All of which is respectfully submitted.
W. C. Warren
    Resident Physician
Amos Harvey Esq.
    U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 21; Letters Received, 1863-1865, no number.



The American Telegraph Company.
Salem Oregon July 7th 1865
Recd. Washington July 20 1865
Hon. W. P. Dole
    Comr. Indian Affairs
        273 Vt. Ave.
The necessity for an agent in place of Amos Rogers is immediate & urgent. We recommend Lindsay Applegate.
J. W. Perit Huntington
    In. Service Or.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 872-873.



Coast Reservation Oregon July 14th 1865
Dear Sir
    I received your letter dated April 25 in which you state my claim against the Indian Department for $168.00 will be paid on the receipt of my vouchers at your office and the amount forwarded to me.
    Please send the amount of
    I send my vouchers to your office in this letter. When you receive them please send the amount to me direct to Thomas Clarke, Superintendent's office, Salem, Oregon care of Superintendent Indian Affairs, Oregon.
Yours truly
    Thomas Clarke
Charles E. Mix
    Acting Commissioner
        of Indian Affairs
N.B. There is one of my vouchers I sent to your office in 1862. It is now on file there. Here is the other two.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 732-733.



New York 18th July 1865.
Sir,
    Having been the first Superintendent of Indian Affairs of this government to Oregon, I took great pains during my three years' stay in that country to learn the leading cause that was so rapidly sweeping off or destroying the Indians of that country. Several bands since then have become almost extinct; one band, the Clatsops, I believe, are all dead. The only disease that is causing this destruction is venereal. Commissioner W. P.  Dole was well aware of this fact and some two months since when I last saw him he had made up his mind to save the uncontaminated Indians on the Pacific Coast by furnishing them with a lately discovered prevention which the Surgeon Genl. of the United States caused to [be] tested at the Venereal Hospital in Washington, it being there proved to be a perfect protection against taking that awful disorder known as syphilis, or gonorrhea.
    As I am the discoverer of this prevention, I will know the great amount of good that would result from its use among the Indian tribes under treaty stipulations on the Pacific side.
    I notice those treaties allow the Commissioner to furnish such articles as he deems the most useful to the Indians; therefore this article would make no additional expense to the govt. Enclosed is a circular connected with the article.
    I would be pleased to hear from you on this subject.
I have the honor to
    Be very respectfully
        Your obt. servt.
            Anson Dart
The Hon. the Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
Bonded warehouse Nos. 63 & 4 South St., N.Y.

NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 735-736.



Department of the Interior,
    Washington D.C. July 20, 1865
Sir,
    I return herewith the papers that accompanied your report of the 6th inst., in relation to the suspension of certain items in the accounts of late Agent George H. Abbott of Oregon.
    Agreeably to your recommendation the suspensions may be removed and the accounts allowed, the explanations of the agent proving satisfactory.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. P. Usher
            Secretary
Wm. P. Dole, Esq.
    Comr. Indn. Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 974-975.




Fort Klamath, Oregon
    August 2nd 1865.
J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
Sir:
    La Lake, chief of the Klamaths, has signified his desire to relinquish his authority as chief among his people, on account of some petty feuds and dissatisfaction among them. After conversing with Capt. Kelly upon the subject, I am convinced that it would be impolitic to recognize any other of the Klamaths as chief at present, and I have promised La Lake that I would sustain him if he would consent to still be the head of his people. He says if you also desire it he will not yield his authority, but remain chief. I hope you will encourage him to hold his position.
Very truly
    Your obt. servt.
        W. V. Rinehart
            Maj. 1. Oregon Infy.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 22.



Fort Klamath, Oregon
    August 7th 1865.
J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs Oregon
Sir:
    Your note, asking for a small cavalry force to remain with you during the sitting of your council, is received. In reply I have to say the detachment must necessarily be very small, but I will send Captain Kelly with what available men he has except barely enough to herd the cavalry horses.
    He will be instructed to join you today and remain as long as you may need his presence.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        W. V. Rinehart
            Maj. 1. Oregon Infy.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 21.



State of Oregon, Executive Department
    Portland, August 10, 1865.
J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem Oregon
Dear Sir:
    Enclosed please find a letter from Abraham Patterson of Canyonville, Ogn.
    I would respectfully recommend that these Indians and all others in the state be taken to a reservation as speedily as possible and kept there. Nearly every week I have applications for troops to protect the citizens from Indian depredations. I am aware that there are not troops enough in the Department to guard all points at once. These Indians have got to be collected sooner or later. It will cost no more to do it at one time than another; I think it ought to be done as soon as possible. I presume it is not necessary for me to urge you to exert your influence for the accomplishment of this desirable object. You are as well aware of the necessities of the case as I am.
I am, sir,
    Very respectfully
        Your obt. servt.
            Addison C. Gibbs
                Governor of Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 4.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency
    August 14th 1865
J .W. P. Huntington Supt. of Indian Affairs
    Sir
        I have concluded that it would conduce much to the benefit of the Indians at this agency to remove the Indian trading post away from Fort Yamhill. If there is nothing in the way Mr. Hosford will enter  into bonds to conduct the store strictly according to law.
    Your answer to this will be thankfully received by yours truly.
Amos Harvey
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 7.



Fort Klamath Oregon
    August 28th 1865
Sir
    You will receive by this mail a bid to furnish 18000 pounds of shorts, in lieu of flour, and two thousand pounds of flour at Fort Klamath for the use of the Indians from John S. Drum. He is a good Union man and is responsible. If his "bid" is accepted please let me know by the same mail that you notify him.
    I have just returned from Jacksonville. No news of importance; have not heard anything of the Snake Indians yet. An expedition to consist of 50 cavalry and 30 infty. to leave here on the 30th for Steens Valley, and to remain there this winter. It goes out under command of Capt. Sprague.
    Let me hear from you soon.
Yours respectfully
    D. C. Underwood
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
        Salem Ogn.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 25.



Fort Klamath Oregon
    September 14th 1865.
Mr. J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. of Indian Affairs
        Sir,
            I have the honor to return herewith Col. Drew's letter of the 24th in 1865 Hon. Mr. Nesmith, referred to me by you at the time of your last visit to this post.
    The claim of Mr. Anderson is a just one, and embraces the account for fresh beef that I have already sent to you. The beef was issued not only to George's band, who are entirely without foot and whose chief was taken care of by Col. Drew, by hanging him near Jacksonville because he refused to come to this country to starve, but it was issued to a great many others who were in as much need and who must have died of starvation had they not have been partially fed with the beef issued.
    I respectfully recommend that the account be paid by the Indian Department, and I certify on honor that I had no interest directly or indirectly in any of the said issues made to the Indians.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. Kelly Capt. 1st Cav.
            Oregon Vols. U.S.A.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 49.



Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem Oregon Sept. 17, 1865
Sir
    Your official bond duly executed, with the sufficiency of the sureties duly certified by the judges of the U.S. Circuit Court, and having your oath of office attached, has been received at this office and will be transmitted to the Department at Washington.
    Your commission is herewith enclosed, and upon its receipt you will be authorized to act in official capacity, governed by the laws [and] regulations of the Indian Department and the instructions which you will from time to time receive from this office. Your compensation will be at the rate of $1000 per year to commence from the date of this.
    For the present you will not be authorized to incur any expense (except necessary traveling expenses) beyond the salary of interpreter. You will appoint a suitable person to that place at a salary of $500.00 per year and cause him to take the oath of allegiance before entering upon his duties. This office must be advised of the date of his appointment.
    A schedule of certain property formerly in the possession of Sub-Agent Amos E. Rogers, now in keeping of [blank] Holbrook for me, is enclosed. You will forthwith obtain the property from Mr. Holbrook, take the same into possession and account for it in your property return. Blank receipts for your signature covering this property and that left for you at Fort Klamath are herewith enclosed. You will sign them and return to this office without delay.
    You are assigned to duty in the Klamath and Rogue River region, it being expected that the Klamath [and] Modoc tribes, the several bands of Snakes and the small number of Indians, stragglers and others who are lurking about the mountains of Jackson and Josephine counties.
    This office is well advised of the condition of the Klamath, Modoc and Snake tribes, down to dates as late as August 15th, but of the other Indians mentioned, and of all of them subsequent to the date mentioned, information is desired. You are therefore directed to make at as early a day as possible a full report of the condition of affairs, coupled with such recommendations and suggestions as you may think proper.
    Blank forms for your accounts will be sent in due time, and instructions sufficient to enable you to complete your returns.
    Stationery from this office will be furnished upon your requisition.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Lindsay Applegate
    U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
        Ashland
            Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-187  3, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, pages 710-711.




Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem Oregon Sept. 17th 1865
Sir
    My annual report for this year is herewith submitted.
    The Indians of this Superintendency may be properly divided into two classes:
    1st. Those which have been collected upon reservations, are controlled by the government under the supervision of agents, receive annuities and other benefits from appropriations, and are making more or less progress in agriculture and civilization.
    2d. Those who are hostile to the whites, retain their savage habits and mode of life, and are not controlled by agents.
    The first class number 5571, located at the agencies designated as Umatilla, Warm Springs, Grand Ronde, Siletz and Alsea. The Statement of Tribes of Indians in Oregon, which is herewith transmitted, marked "A," shows the number of each tribe as well as the total at each agency, the name of the agent or sub-agent under whose management they are, the amount of money appropriated for their benefit per capita, and some other interesting particulars concerning them. The reports of the several agents and subordinates which accompany this report give details of their conditions, which it is unnecessary to repeat here, and I shall confine myself to a few general remarks upon each agency and some statements and suggestions applicable to all of them.
Umatilla Agency
    The reservation for the Cayuse, Walla Walla and Umatilla tribes is a fertile tract of land well adapted for grazing, and parts of it of superior fertility.
    It has the advantage of proximity to extensive white settlements of miners and others, and the consequent ready and profitable market for produce and domestic animals.
    Its disadvantages are the frequent and constant intercourse of the Indians with the whites, and tendency to dissipation and debauchery which results therefrom.
    The progress made in agriculture in the three years during which I have had supervision of them has been most commendable. The crops which I saw during my visit there in the early part of this month were, many of them, such as no white farmer need be ashamed of, and each year increases the breadth of land in cultivation.
    In conversation with the Indians a desire for agricultural implements and facilities, in preference to the goods usually distributed as annuities, was uniformly expressed. The great want of the mills provided by the treaty will be supplied by another year (the appropriation made by the last Congress for that purpose being now in process of expenditure), and I am gratified to be able to report that the work is being done in a thorough and substantial manner.
    When the mills are complete, there is no reason why this colony of Indians may not become thrifty and prosperous. They own large numbers of horses and some cattle, which subsist on the natural herbage of the country and find a ready sale to the travelers and miners in the vicinity.
    Details of the numbers, value &c. of their domestic animals, as well [as] of their crops for 1864, are given in the "Consolidated Return of Farming," marked "B," herewith submitted.
Warm Springs Agency
    The late Agent William Logan, who was in charge of this agency, perished on the steamer Brother Jonathan, which was lost on the 30th of July last between San Francisco and Portland.
    The vacancy thus created has not yet been supplied, and there is therefore no agent's report for this year, but the reports of the several employees give a satisfactory account of the operations there, which I am enabled to confirm by personal observation. The crops are not so good as last year, partly because of severe drought, no rain having fallen from March until August, and partly in consequence of the ravages of grasshoppers.
    These insects appear to be identical with the locusts of Egypt, and return in countless myriads at intervals of several years. When they come they destroy the vegetation of large districts with a suddenness and completeness quite incredible to those who have not witnessed it. When I passed the agency in July, en route to the Snake country, a field near the agency of nearly thirty acres attracted my notice as promising a good yield of wheat. Upon my return the crops had been harvested by the insects, leaving the ground as bare as a barn floor. The loss was total.
    The crops on other parts of the agency suffered, some much and others little, but enough has been secured for the subsistence of the Indians the coming winter. There being no miller and sawyer employed then at the time the reports of the employees were submitted, no account of the production of lumber &c. is given.
    The sawmill has been run a large part of the time and a large amount of lumber made. I estimate it at 25,000 or 30,000 feet, which has been used by the Indians for building and fencing purposes, and for repairs and erection of agency buildings.
    The flouring mill has ground all the grain of the Indians. The mills are the best in the Superintendency, and are admirably adapted to the purpose for which they were designed.
    The Indians own horses and cattle, but in less number than those at Umatilla, and their horses are much inferior, but they manifest great desire to accumulate property of this sort, and the abundant bunchgrass of their reservation is ample for their maintenance. Particulars of their stock and agricultural productions are given in the "Consolidated Return of Farming," before referred to.
    The permission which was incorporated into the treaty 25th of June 1855 with these Indians, which permits them to hunt, fish, gather roots, berries &c. upon lands outside the reservation, is not only unfortunate because it gives the Indians access to white settlements, but it is the greatest obstacle in the way of their civilization. They will often labor industriously to put in a crop, and then prolong a trip to the fisheries on the Columbia River, or to the Cascade Mountains for berries and game, until the whole product is destroyed.
    The school for the same reason is rendered nearly useless, and the Indians while near the white settlements become so enfeebled and demoralized by dissipation and debauchery that they are unfit for labor when they return to the reservation.
    The last Congress made an appropriation for a supplemental treaty with them, which was placed in my hands last spring. I had made arrangements to meet the Indians upon my return from the Snake country in August, but the death of Agent Logan so disarranged affairs that I thought best to defer it. The Indians are very reluctant to surrender the right, and I am by no means sure that they can be induced to do it at all. I intend to make the attempt in the early part of next month and will report upon the subject when the result is known. '
    The death of Agent Logan, and the manner of it, made a deep impression upon these Indians. When among them I was met with a universal expression of sorrow for the loss thus sustained, and respect for his memory. His long acquaintance with them made him familiar with their character and wants, while the even-handed justice with which he arbitrated their disputes, punished their misdeeds and distributed such favors he was enabled, was uniformly acknowledged.
    His loss is a calamity to the government as well as to the Indians, and his place will be difficult to fill. Long and intimate personal acquaintance gave me high appreciation of his character and virtues, and I regret that the willing tribute I could pay to his sterling worth is not appropriate in such a paper as this.
Grand Ronde Agency
    The Indians collected at this agency (which is located upon a small addition to the Coast Reservation) are those which have been longest in intercourse with whites, and have therefore acquired more of the vices and virtues of civilization. They are tractable and peaceable, live nearly altogether in houses--some having very good ones--and depend mainly upon the cultivation of the soil for subsistence.
    Some of the more thrifty and enterprising live very much as their white neighbors do, well housed, well clad, well fed, and often have produce to sell, have good fences and thrifty young orchards &c. &c. Others are vagabond, who beg and steal, or prostitute their women rather than work. Then there are all intermediate grades. But there is a proneness to whiskey drinking, debauchery and idleness among them, greater than with Indians who have lived more remote.
    They own a few horses and cattle and have a laudable ambition to increase their property of this sort, which of late has been pretty rapidly gratified.
    The mill dams here are much out of repair--as indeed are all the agency buildings.
    I recommend an appropriation of one thousand dollars to put them in good repair during the coming summer.‘
    A fishery has been established on the‘coast at the mouth of Salmon River for the benefit of this agency. A road to it has been constructed, a small seine and other fixtures purchased, and an abundance of salmon as well as other fish of good quality are easily obtained. The effect is very good in removing one great inducement which has existed to the Indians to straggle off, that is, the absence of fish at the agency, and the ease with which an abundance of them can be caught on the Willamette and other rivers. A reference to the "Statement of Indian Tribes" and the "Consolidated Return of Farming," before referred to, will give additional information concerning this agency.
Siletz Agency
    The tribes here, although not parties to any treaty, and having but very meager appropriations expended for their benefit, have made excellent progress in agriculture, and their location is rapidly assuming a partially civilized appearance. The number located here is double that at any other reservation, but only a very small part of them draw any annuities or have ever had any money appropriated for their benefit.
    The salaries of the few employees in the service there, and the other expenses of the agency, have been mainly met from the fund appropriated for removal and subsistence of Indians not parties to any treaty. The want of means has crippled the agency much, especially in the lack of farming implements and teams, those on hand being mainly so worn out as to be nearly useless.
    The sawmill erected by Agent Simpson in 1863 is in good condition, and capable of producing lumber enough for the present wants of all the Indians, but the grist mill has never been of any use. It was erected several years ago, at a large cost, in an unsuitable location, and has since been so damaged by flood as to require rebuilding before it can be used.
    The burrs and irons are of the best quality, and I have recently directed Agent Simpson to have them taken care of, but a new building must be built, and prudence as well as convenience require that a new site should be selected. My previous reports, and those of my predecessors, have called attention to the non-ratification of the treaty of 1855 made with the tribes now located here and at Alsea.
    The same discontent exists now as heretofore, and indeed is increasing. It is often aggravated by the interference of designing persons who tell the Indians that they have no treaty, that the government is neglecting them, while it treats other tribes so much better, and advise them to leave for their own country. This advice is sometimes followed, and would he oftener were it not for the vigilance of the agent.
    I repeat my former recommendation that the treaty of 1855 be ratified or a new one authorized, and I also recommend an appropriation of ($4000) four thousand dollars to rebuild the grist mill, and one of five thousand dollars ($5000) to be expended in the purchase of teams, agricultural implements and seeds.
Alsea Agency
    This agency is small in number of Indians, the extent of its operations and the amount of money expended there. The Indians like those at Siletz were parties to the unratified treaty of 1855, and the same apprehension exists among them of removal.
    They have made some progress in farming, but less than at other reservations, and derive a large part of their subsistence from fish, of which a great abundance are easily taken. Some course in relation to them should be determined on without delay. If they are to be removed to another location, the sooner it is to be done the better. If they are to remain permanently where they now are, they ought to be advised of that intention, and assisted to make homes for themselves that will be attractive. Their location has plenty of fertile land, is not likely to attract the cupidity of the whites, and consequently be liable to encroachment.
    The only objection that I see to allowing them to remain is the expense of keeping up a separate agency, when, if they were taken to Siletz, the whole expense of Alsea would be avoided.
Education
    The number of schools in the Superintendency is five, located one at Umatilla, one at Warm Springs, two at Grand Ronde and one at Siletz. The last named and one of those at Grand Ronde are kept upon what is known as the " manual labor plan."
    The others are "day schools." The testimony of agents and teachers, as well as of other persons who have opportunities of judging, is uniform in confirmation of the opinion expressed in my previous reports that manual labor schools alone are likely to produce any beneficial results among the Indians. It is usually quite impossible to secure that regularity of attendance on the part of children which is essential to the success of day schools, and even if this is attained, the good influence of a few hours' attendance in the day is counteracted by the greater length of time they are associated with their savage parents,
    Education of Indians in Oregon and Washington was first attempted by missionaries of various religious denominations more than thirty years ago, and it has been prosecuted by them, by teachers employed by the government and by others ever since. The teachers may some of them have been inefficient or incompetent, but the majority have been devoted, zealous men and women, often inspired by a lofty determination to give their lives to a noble work. Presbyterians and Methodists, Roman Catholics and non-professors have vied with each other, and the result has been not one Christianized or an educated Indian is to be found.
    There are one or two instances of Indians who have been taken to the eastern states, and there, cut off from their savage associations, some learning has been instilled into them, and they have perhaps imbibed some of the truths of Christianity. But these instances are rare, and I do not think one can be found in this Superintendency (outside of the lately established manual labor schools) who can read as well as the average of the six-year-old boys in the Atlantic States. These facts indicate a radical error in the plan adopted. In my judgment the mistake is in supposing the savage mind capable of comprehending or containing--not alone the exalted teachings of divinity, the abstruse subtleties of theology, or the pure morality of the Bible--but the lesser ethics which children of enlightened society imbibe unconsciously with their mother's milk, and teach each other with infantile prattle. These things to us are trivial and insignificant. The grown-up savage can easier be taught the differential calculus than brought to a faint conception of them.
    The first efforts with an Indian child should be through the stomach--give him plenty of wholesome, nutritious food. Then let him be warmly clad. The next step is to teach him to labor, instill habits of industry, and associate him with industrious people. He may then be approached cautiously with books. Such a system, carried out with patient labor and with earnest energy, can be made to improve and elevate the race. Reverse it, and put the book in use at the beginning, and the result will not only be useless--it will be absolutely pernicious.
    In a word, the hoe and the broadaxe will sooner civilize and Christianize them than the spelling book and the Bible.
    The manual labor schools at Grand Ronde and Siletz have produced good results and promise better in future. The scholars are kept in an enclosure six days in the week, cultivate a small tract of land, the boys performing that labor and the girls needlework, housework &c. and at the same time due attention is given to elementary studies.
    I have several times received tolerable specimens of penmanship from scholars of both these schools.
    I again recommend such legislation as will convert all the schools in the Superintendency into manual labor institutions, and urge upon you a careful consideration of this subject.
Reservations
    There is a constant tendency to encroach upon reservations by whites, arising sometimes from widely different motives. Often it is some vagabond white who wants to make a furtive living by stealing on the credit of the Indians, or by illicit traffic in whiskey or other contraband pursuits. Sometimes the advance of population, the discovery of some new route of travel, rich mineral deposit, valuable fishery or good harbor, makes the land reserved suddenly valuable, and cupidity overcomes respect for the law or regard for the rights of the Indians. Oftener, perhaps, than either one, the attraction is the mere fact that the imaginary line which is made the boundary says to the adventurous seeker after a new home, "Thus far shalt thou go," &c., and the same motive which induced our first parents to eat of the one tree in preference to any other, forthwith magnifies the value of the forbidden tract a thousandfold.
    The agents are constantly coming into controversy with these interlopers, and sometimes the aid of [the] military is invoked in support of the law.
    Much acrimonious feeling is thus unavoidably engendered among whites, and the Indians are constantly harassed with the apprehension that their last home is to be taken from them. An obvious cause of this aggressive disposition on the part of citizens, most of whom in all else are law-abiding, is the frequent concessions which have heretofore been made to the universal greed for new land. The remedy is plainly such legislation as will determine the policy of the government and assure the Indians of protection and deter aggressors.
    My report for 1864 gave a brief account of the attempts to settle in the vicinity of Yaquina Bay upon the Coast Reservation. At a late date I was called upon by the Hon. J. P. Usher, Sec. of the Interior, for a full report upon the subject, which was furnished under date of Dec. 12th 1864. A copy of this report marked "C" is herewith transmitted, and I respectfully ask that it be printed with the present report and considered a part of it.
    The litigation commenced by the intruding parties was decided in favor of the agent in the court of the 2nd judicial district of this state, and upon appeal to the Supreme Court that decision was sustained. To the suggestions as to the propriety of surrendering a part of the reservation to settlement, I invite your careful attention. The boundary between the part surrendered (if any) and the part between, continued in reserve, should be determined by actual examination and survey. I recommend that the Superintendent and the agents at Siletz and Alsea be authorized to determine and survey the same, and that an appropriation of five hundred dollars to defray to pay the expenses thereof be made.
Indians Not Under Supervision of Agents
    The second class of Indians referred to are estimated at 4900 souls, nearly all of whom live in the country east of the Cascade Mountains and south of the Blue Mountains. They are the Klamaths, Modocs and the several subtribes of Snakes known as Yah-hoos-kin, Woll-pal-pe, Wah-tat-kin, I-uke-spi-ule, and Hoo-ne-boo-ey. Congress having made an appropriation for treating with and subduing these Indians, I proceeded last October, under instructions from your office, to make a treaty with the Klamaths, Modocs and Yahooskin Snakes. This object was attained, and a full account of the expedition was transmitted to your office in my letter of 10th December last. A copy of that letter is hereto appended, marked "D," made a part of this report, and I hope will be printed with it.
    Last June, acting under further instructions from your office, I proceeded to the Snake country, designing to consummate a treaty with such of the Snake Indians as could be reached. Two of the women and one of the children captured in the previous expedition were taken along under guard, the other woman and child being left, too sick to travel, at Warm Springs, and through them and the partially friendly Klamaths I got in communication with Paulina, or Pah-ni-nee, chief of the Woll-pah-pe Snakes, and after a few days' conference, during which I had no small difficulty in overcoming their fear of just retribution for their barbarous and long-continued war upon the whites, the treaty was agreed upon, committed to writing, and duly signed. The treaty was transmitted to your office on the 1st September inst. It will be found upon examination to call for the expenditure of a very small amount of money when ratified.
    Indeed, it is mainly an addendum to the treaty of 15th October 1864 with the Klamaths and Modocs, bringing the Woll-pah-pe tribe onto the same reservation, giving them partial benefit of the same employees and buildings, the only additional expenditure being the moderate sum stipulated for establishing them in their new home and the small annuity to be given them. Indeed, the two treaties taken together will be found to include a greater number of Indians, cede a larger extent of territory, and anticipate smaller expenditure than any other treaties ever negotiated in this region. I earnestly recommend their ratification, and trust you will endorse this recommendation to the Senate.
    The several tribes of Snake Indians have never been friendly with the whites, but their hostility cannot be said to have been systematic and determined until within the last eight or nine years.
    The amount of property destroyed and the number of lives taken by them in that time has been enormous. A partial "List of Depredations" committed by them has been compiled from the newspapers of the state and other sources and is herewith submitted, marked "E." This does not probably include all of their depredations upon the whites. Besides these are several raids made upon the Warm Springs Reservation, in which large amounts of stock have been stolen and many lives taken.
    In one of these attacks made in 1859, Agent Dennison being then in charge, the Snakes stole a large number of horses, variously stated at from 500 to 700, and all the cattle of both Indians and Department. But a small part was ever recovered.
    Numerous military expeditions have been sent against them, but the nature of their country, their nomadic habits and fierce character gave the Indians such advantage that it is no exaggeration to say that ten good soldiers are required to wage successful war against one Indian. Every Indian killed or captured by the military has cost the government fifty thousand dollars at least.
    Economy, then, indicates that it is much cheaper to feed them than to fight them.
    Once settled upon the Klamath Reservation the Woll-pah-pe tribe will be the means of bringing all the others in. Indeed, Paulina is the war chief--the recognized leader in all their warlike expeditions.
    His submission will soon no doubt be followed by that of Howluck and Weahwewa, and with them the last of the hostile bands.
    I confidently expect to be able to treat with all of them without any additional appropriations.
    In negotiating these treaties, and in traveling through the hostile country I frequently found it necessary to call upon the military authorities for assistance, and it gave me pleasure to say that they were uniformly ready to extend such aid as was necessary. Gen. B. Alvord, Col. G. B. Currey, Major W. V. Rinehart, Capt. Wm. Kelly and Lieutenants Halloran, Applegate [and] Underwood all responded cheerfully to such demands as I made.
Protection for Records
    The business of the last fifteen years has accumulated a large amount of official papers and records in this office, which are liable to loss in case of the destruction by fire of the building containing them. Their loss would be a public calamity. Besides, there is often a considerable amount of public funds deposited in the office.
    The iron safe now in the office is too small to contain a fifth part of the books and papers, and besides is very old and insecure. In case of fire, its contents would almost certainly be consumed. A new one should be purchased large enough to hold all the records, and I respectfully recommend an appropriation of an amount suitable for that purpose.
Conclusion
    It is due to the agents and employees of the Superintendency to say that they have generally discharged their duties efficiently and faithfully. Their reports, which accompany this, will confirm what I say and give further information upon the subjects referred to by me.
I have the honor to be
    Very respectfully
        Your obedient servant
            J. W. Perit Huntington
                Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Oregon
Hon. D. N. Cooley
    Commissioner &c.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, pages 711-721.



Grand Ronde Sept. 20th 1865.
    Sir    I send you enclosed the carpenter, sawyer and farmer's report and four specimens of boys' writing. When I got here on Monday evening the school was dismissed for a week and the scholars scattered, and as the threshers came on Tuesday we have all been busy trying to secure the wheat. I have seen but those four scholars, and they wrote what they did on the back of a book on the ground. I will see hereafter that you will have specimens of their writing with each annual report.
    We had heavy rain yesterday and last night, but today looks favorable for any weather. The wheat is considerably injured, but we are all doing all we can to save it as well as possible.
    I think I will be over next week.
Very respectfully
    Yours
        Amos Harvey
J. W. P. Huntington Supt. Ind. Affairs
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 36.




Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem Oregon Sept. 26th 1865
Gentlemen
    Your bids for furnishing flour to the Indian Department at Fort Klamath, being the lowest, is accepted.
    Contracts in duplicate are herewith transmitted for your execution. The price as proposed by you in coin has been converted into legal tender at present rates. It is expected that the "shorts" will be the article known in Oregon under that name, and in the eastern stats as "middling," and that it will be of good quality.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affrs. in Oregon
John S. Drum
Alexander Martin
    Jacksonville
        Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 723.



Hd. Qrs. Fort Klamath Ogn.
    October 1st 1865
J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        for Oregon
            Salem Oregon
Sir:    Enclosed herewith I have the honor to transmit for your information a letter from Mr. Steele of Yreka, Cal. relating to the Modoc Indians. I attach no importance to the letter myself, but you may regard it differently. Mo-shen-koska came in a few days ago and reported that Howluck and some of his tribe were within two days' ride of his camp and that Howluck was anxious to see you and make a treaty.
    I sent Mo-shen-koska to bring Howluck to see me. They have not yet returned.
    I can get no definite information from Paulina. Capt. Kelly killed one of
Weahwewa's Indians near Warner's Mountain while he was escorting Mr. Pengra, and Mo-shen-koska reports that Capt. Sprague's men fired at a party in the same vicinity two weeks later. He says the Indians do not know what to think of this. I tried to explain to him that although you had invited them to come in and make peace, until they did come or send someone to say they would come, the soldiers did not know their hearts and must look upon them as enemies.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        W. V. Rinehart
            Maj. 1. Oregon Infy.
                Comdg.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 51.



Grand Ronde Agency
    Oct. 1 1865
Sir
    Your letter enclosing a copy of one from the Vicar General proposing to establish a school at this agency under the control of Sisters of Jesus and Mary was duly received. In it you ask me to state whether in my judgment it would be an advantage to the Indians and service to sanction the proposed measure.
    In answer I do not think such a school would be of much benefit to the Indians. What they need is practical teachers of all the ordinary labors of farm life together with the common branches of an English education, which I think is much better understood and taught by teachers that have spent their lives on a farm than by those who have spent theirs in cloister. So far as my observation has extended, Catholic schools in Protestant communities are mostly confined to literary and fashionable attainments instead of the practicable matters of common life, and from the best information I have been able to obtain, the Indian schools on this coast under the charge of Catholic teachers--while they have succeeded [in] inculcating the peculiar dogmas of popery on the minds of their pupils and making them familiar with the routine of church ceremony, they have as a general thing had very poor success in developing the intellect and forming a sound moral character, and they have almost entirely failed in giving them a knowledge of the common branches of an English education.
    Another objection to Roman Catholic teachers is they are all either priests or nuns, setting no practicable example of married life, a matter in which the Indian needs to be educated in--both by example and precept--as many of their difficulties and troubles occur for want of properly understanding the duties and responsibilities of the conjugal state, also another objection is the exclusive nature of their religion, holding and teaching that all who do not conform to their notions and ceremony are not only in error but sure of eternal damnation. With these ideas instilled into the mind of the Indian, what agent or employee can expect to secure their good will or exert a healthy and beneficial influence over them unless he be of the Catholic faith, and we have had practical illustration of this on this agency. Mr. Croquet, the Catholic priest, who [was] here part of the time, has been telling the Indians that if they had the school they would do much better by them and that if any of the children who are attending the present school should die they would go to the "bad place" &c. &c., at least as the Indians say, and give this as a reason why they are afraid to let their children attend. The fact is I have found that nothing but evil has heretofore resulted from what little connection the priests have had with the Indians under my charge and instead of recommending that they be appointed as teachers I would much sooner think of asking for authority to keep them away from the reservation altogether.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        Amos Harvey
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem
            Oregon

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 43.



Office Superintendent Indian Affairs,
    Salem, Oregon October 3rd 1865
Sir
    I have the honor to transmit herewith the official bonds of Lindsay Applegate, sub-Indian agent, and of Wm. H. Barnhart, Indian agent. They will be found upon examination to have been properly executed, and the sufficiency of the sureties is duly certified by the judge of the U.S. District Court.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Hon. D. N. Cooley
    Commissioner &c.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 945-946.



Office Superintendent Indian Affairs,
    Salem, Oregon October 3rd 1865
Sir
    In consequence of the suspension of mail service between Sacramento and Portland, we are totally without postal communication with every part of the world. I therefore send the matter which has accumulated in this office, including my Annual Report, and quarterly accounts, by Wells Fargo & Co.'s express. Some packages designed for the 2nd Auditor of the Treasury are enclosed in the same case, for economy's sake, and I have to ask that you will cause them to be delivered at the proper office.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Hon. D. N. Cooley
    Commissioner &c.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 947-948.




Headquarters Fort Klamath Ogn.
    Oct. 6th 1865
J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem Oregon
    Sir: I have the honor to inform you that "Paulina," chief of the Snakes, arrived at this post on the 4th inst., bringing with him a brother-in-law of "Howluck," Snake chief.
    He represents that all the Indians of his tribe who stipulated to come in are now in Mo-shen-koska's country and that he would like to talk with yourself or Mr. Applegate.
    He also says "Howluck" and his Indians are three days' ride from the council ground and want to see you for the purpose of making a treaty.
    I have appointed the 20th of the present month as the day you or Mr. Applegate will meet them and have said [that] I would write you to this effect.
    I think the Indians will keep their promise to meet you, and have to request that you will notify me of your pleasure in the matter at your earliest convenience.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        W. V. Rinehart
            Maj. 1. Oregon Infy.
                Comdg.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 52.



Office Indian Affairs
    San Francisco, October 9th 1865
Sir
    I am in receipt of a letter of date Oct. 2nd inst. from E. Steele, late Superintendent of Indian Affairs for N.D. [Northern District] California, in which he states that he has been called upon by a delegation of Indians known as the Modocs inhabiting the country about Goose Lake with whom he formed a treaty when he was Superintendent of Indian Affairs, and they state that arrangements are being made for their removal to Upper Klamath Lake by the Oregon Superintendency.
    They claim that their lands and residence is in this state, that they have complied with the treaty made with Mr. Steele, and they desire to remain on their present location, which they say is in this state, and "so writes Mr. Steele."
    I have been unable to visit that portion of the state and am unadvised as to the facts in the law. I have written Mr. Steele stating that I would write you on this matter.
    I should be pleased to hear from you on this subject and learn the true state of affairs, as Mr. Steele writes me that trouble is anticipated if the Indians are removed as anticipated.
Very respectfully
    Charles Maltby
        Supt. Indian Affairs, Cala.
Hon. J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem
            Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 53.



Ashland Mills, Oregon
    October 14th 1865
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. of Indian Affairs
            Dear Sir,
                My commission as sub-Indian agent, with accompanying documents, has been received.
    The property of the sub-agency for which you sent and order on Holbrook after some delay I found in possession of one Daniel Hopkins at Jacksonville, who says he receipted for the articles when left in his charge by Sub-Agent Rogers and he refuses to give them up unless on an order directed to him or on the return of the receipt given by him to Rogers.
    In pursuance of instructions I appointed O. C. Applegate as interpreter on the 12th of the present month.
    In accordance with instructions I now make requisition for stationery sufficient for my purposes in carrying on the duties of my office.
Your obedient
    Humble servant
        Lindsay Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 48.




(Telegram)
Salem, October 14, 1865
To
    Lindsay Applegate
        Indian Agent
            Jacksonville
    Howluck and other Snakes will be at Klamath on the twentieth. Go there immediately. Instructions by mail.
J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 728.



Office Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Salem, Oregon, October 17, 1865.
Sir
    At the request of the parties interested, I ask your attention the claims of George Megginson and Thomas Briggs, certified vouchers for which (amounting to $195 in each case) were issued by Indian Agent B. R. Biddle, June 30th 1862, and transmitted to your office with my letter of 26th December 1863. The receipt of the vouchers has never been acknowledged, and the claimants are wholly without evidence of their claims, except such as [is] in possession of the Department. The persons named were many years in the service, are [in] every way meritorious, and there cannot be a question as to the justice of their claims or the regularity of the evidence in support of them. They ought to be paid without any further delay.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Hon. D. N. Cooley
    Commissioner &c.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 949-950.




Office Superintendent Indian Affairs,
    Salem, Oregon October 17, 1865.
Sir,
    In reference to the inquiries of Thomas Briggs about a claim for services rendered at Siletz Agency in second quarter 1862, I have to say that said claim was transmitted to Washington by me on 26th December 1863 with a favorable report and a recommendation that it be paid forthwith. Since that date I have heard nothing of it.
    I do not know of anything that I can do to expedite the payment of this claim. If I did, I would do it promptly and cheerfully.
    I have this day written to the Commissioner, calling his attention to the subject, and if your address is furnished this office, I will take care that you are promptly advised of any action the Department may take in the matter. This letter will be enclosed to Mr. A. D. Barnard of Corvallis, because I am ignorant of your address.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Thomas Briggs
    Corvallis
   

Hon. W. P. Dole
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Sir
            Please find the recommendation for payment [of] the claim [of] Geo. Megginson & Thomas Briggs for service under B. R. Biddle, agent, Siletz Reserve.
Very respectfully
    A. D. Barnard
        Atty.
            Thos Briggs    G. R. Megginson
Corvallis Oct. 19, 1865
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 716-720.



Office Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Salem, Oregon, October 17, 1865
Sir
    I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 15th August last, directing that record be kept at each agency of "all business transactions from day to day, and that in addition to records of correspondence they will likewise preserve one copy of all vouchers, accounts current, property returns &c. to be delivered to their successors in office."
    I have this day addressed a circular letter to the several agents in this Superintendency, enjoining a compliance with your instruction. Your letter, however, is not clear upon one point. Is it the intention to make the copies of "vouchers, accounts current, property returns &c.," required to be retained at the agencies, supersede those hitherto deposited in this office? Or must the agents make an additional copy to be a part of the record of the agency? The latter course will compel all accounts to be made in quintuplicate, and I respectfully submit that additional clerical assistance must be provided for the agents if the demand for that sort of labor are to increase as hitherto. The copy deposited in the Superintendent's office is easily accessible to all the agents, as well as to other parties concerned, and the necessity for the fifth copy does not appear to me to be great.
    I take this occasion to say that the copies of accounts deposited in this office by the several agents have been preserved with care, and are filed in such manner as to be readily inspected.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Hon. D. N. Cooley
    Commissioner &c.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 951-953.





Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem, Oregon, Oct. 21, 1865
Sir:
    When I sent [a] telegraphic dispatch to you, directing you to proceed to Fort Klamath, I hoped to be able to meet you there about the 25th instant, but I now find that it will be impossible to do so. It will, therefore, become necessary for your to represent the government in intercourse with the Indians there and especially the Snake tribe.
    You, having been personally present and acted as interpreter at the council of Aug. 10 held in Sprague River Valley, are fully informed of the results of that council and the stipulations entered into by the Snakes of the Wollpahpe tribe. I understand that in pursuance of the agreement then made the chief "Paulina" and his people are now at Fort Klamath, or in that vicinity, and you will endeavor to pursue such course in regard to them as will ensure their remaining and good conduct. Further instructions will be given you at a future day with reference to them, the design of this letter being chiefly to guide you in the course to be pursued with the other tribes of Snakes who are said to be in the vicinity of Klamath.
    If Howluck and Wyoniwa can be induced to come to the Klamath Reservation and remain there it will be a practical end of the Indian war so far as Oregon is concerned. You will therefore turn your chief efforts towards securing their assent in accordance with the invitation you heard me make through "Paulina." I am informed by Maj. W. V. Rinehart, now commanding Fort Klamath, that a part of them were within a short distance of Sprague River on the 6th instant and that he made arrangements for them to come on the 28 to the Fort. If they complied with this arrangement they are there now, and you will endeavor by issues of moderate amounts of subsistence, and such other conciliatory measures as you may think advisable, to make them remain and prepare them for complete negotiations next spring. You are not authorized to conclude any formal treaty with them for the purchase of their land that matter, and indeed all others involving promises on the part of the government in its future management of them being reserved for future consideration. Of course, I cannot, at this distance, and with my limited information undertake to lay down rules which will cover every case that may possibly arise or provide for every contingency that may happen. Much, therefore, is necessarily left to your discretion, enjoining only a reference to the general instructions here laid down, and the law and regulations which have relation to the case in hand. You will take care to report fully and frequently to this office, giving detailed information as to the condition of affairs and making such suggestions as your judgment dictates as to the measures proper to be adopted.
    I made contract some time ago for seventeen thousand pounds of shorts and three thousand pounds of flour to be delivered at Fort Klamath. Eleven hundred pounds of the flour will be used to replace that amount loaned to me by the Commissary (Act. Asst.) from the public store at Fort Klamath. Of the remainder you are authorized to take possession and account for upon signing and enclosing to me the blank receipts herewith transmitted. I should also remark that I made arrangements with Maj. Rinehart for some small issue to be made, if necessary, from the Commissary stores, to be replaced out of such flour as may be on hand belonging to the Indian Department. You will ascertain whether he has made any issue under that arrangement, and if so, replace the amount, taking the same up in your property account as issued by yourself.
    All your property accounts must be returned to this office in triplicate, and it will be well for you to retain a copy (the fourth) for your protection and information. The abstracts of issues, which are vouchers for that part of the account, must be signed by the recipients, and witnessed by at least two white persons and the interpreter, with a certificate that they were personally present at the time.
    The subsistence under the contract referred to it is presumed will be amply sufficient for the wants of the service at that point the ensuing winter. Should an emergency arise which temporarily requires a larger amount, you will communicate with this office and await further instructions. No provision has been made for subsisting of the Klamaths and Modocs, for the reason that it is supposed that they have laid up sufficient to keep them alive through the winter. A small issue to the chiefs, or to those that may happen to be absolutely destitute and suffering, will be permitted, but you will bear in mind that the provision is made for the Snakes, and if directed to others it must be only in cases of the most urgent necessity. The amount of funds at my disposal for these purposes is small, and economy of the strictest sort in these expenditures is imperatively required.
    In regard to the Klamath and Modoc tribes, no detailed plan can be laid down until action can be had upon the treaty of 15th October 1864 by the U.S. Senate. You will, however, report upon their condition and purchase for the use of their reservation five yoke of young, likely oxen, provided they can be obtained at reasonable price in time to get them up to Link River this fall. Funds to pay for them will be duly furnished.
    The sum of $250.00 of the fund appropriated for "General and Incidental Expenses" will be placed at your disposal at first opportunity, and you will be required to account for that sum under your official bond.
    Maj. W. V. Rinehart, in command of the Fort, will afford you such military assistance as you may require not inconsistent with the other demands upon that branch of the public service. You will exhibit this letter to him, and to Lieut. D. C. Underwood as well, in order that they may understand the policy which it is designed to pursue.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Lindsay Applegate
    U.S. Indian Agent
        Fort Klamath, Ogn.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, pages 735-737.



Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem, Oregon, Oct. 28, 1865
Sir:
    A package of stationery, as per schedule enclosed herewith, is sent by Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express to Jacksonville.
    You will receive the same, sign the blank receipts herewith enclosed, returning them to me, and take the several items of stationery up upon your property return, to be properly accounted for as belonging to the United States.
    I take this occasion to mention that all items of property belonging to the United States, however insignificant in value, must be entered in your property account and returned on hand each quarter until disposed of according to law. This will include purchases, property receipted for from other officers, and all other public property.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Hon. Lindsay Applegate
    U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
        Jacksonville
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 743.



Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem, Oregon, Oct. 28, 1865
Sir:
    Your letter of 9th instant concerning the Modoc tribe of Indians, and the statements of late Supt. Agent Steele about them, has been received. I am glad of the opportunity thus afforded of giving you correct information concerning them.
    The Modoc Indians live on the line between California and Oregon, and number about 700 all told. They claimed the country from about 40 miles west of the Lower Klamath Lake to the divide between Lost River and the waters of Goose Lake. They do not live about Goose Lake, and never did. That region is inhabited by a tribe who sometimes call themselves Snakes and join the marauding bands further north, and sometimes find it convenient to be friendly with whites, when they call themselves Pah-Utes or Washoes. Gov Nye, of Nevada, gave them some presents last year. Their language is a dialect of the Shoshone or Snake, and altogether distinct from the Modoc. The Modocs are intermarried with the Klamaths, speak a language almost identical, and might not improperly be considered a part of that tribe. About half of the Modoc country is in California--that of the Klamaths wholly in Oregon.
    In February 1864, late Supt. Agt. E. Steele induced a few of them and of the Klamaths to visit Yreka, and made a sort of arrangement with them which was reduced to writing and signed by Mr. Potter on behalf of the Indians, and Mr. Steele on the part of the U.S. The name of J. D. Keane, sheriff, was also attached, though what or whom it represented does not appear. The Indians gave verbal assent but did not sign. You will find this document on page 108 of the Report of the Commr. Ind. Affrs. for 1864 (No. 28). This action of Mr. Steele was thought insufficient by the Department, and they therefore directed late Supt. H. E. Wiley, myself and one of the Oregon agents to conclude a treaty with them. These instructions will be found on page 112 of the book referred to (No. 30). Supt. Wiley was unable to come, and the Commissioner directed me to proceed without him, which I did, and the treaty was made. The Klamaths and Modocs were both parties to it, and a part of the Klamath country was set apart as a reservation. They all made this treaty willingly, and never have expressed any dissatisfaction with it until very recently. I visited the country last August, and had a conference with them. Schonchin (spelled Schonge sometimes), the chief of the Modocs, was present and complained with some earnestness of the delay of the govt. in moving them to the reservation and opening the promised farms &c. &c., and those with him seemed quite anxious to go. He also complained much of some white men in and near Yreka, part of whom were living with squaws (Mr. Potter has one) persuading his people to live near Yreka. He thought they would gain nothing by living with whites. The same parties, he also said, had persuaded a part of his people to refuse to recognize him as chief, and to appoint one Kintepoose chief (a case of secession after the explosion of the Southern Confederacy). Kintepoose was one of those who signed the treaty, and has a great fondness for whiskey, according to Schonchin. I also learned that the Klamaths and Modocs were in the habit of buying ammunition from the whites in Yreka and trading it to the hostile Snakes east and north. A very large part of the depredations committed up there in the last two or three years have been done with ammunition bought at Yreka and Jacksonville. To break up this traffic, I sought to prevent the Indians from visiting those places, but as there was no agent there nor authority to appoint, and no money applicable to their use, the effort was futile. It did however alarm those who desired the presence of the Indians (and squaws) in Yreka, and they have assiduously endeavored to make dissatisfaction, but they have as yet succeeded only to a very limited extent.
    It is not true that the Oregon Superintendency has yet made any effort to remove the Indians to the Reservations. It cannot do so, because there never have been any appropriations made for the benefit of these tribes. If any are made, and placed in my hands, I shall cause the removal to be made, and I anticipate not the slightest difficulty in doing so.
    My practice has universally been to separate Indians from the white settlements as much as possible and in carrying it out I often come in contact with whites who seek to thwart the object, but the policy is very much the best for the Indians, and I shall therefore continue to follow it.
    I have conferred on this subject with Capt. W. Kelly, late in command at Fort Klamath, with Maj. W. V. Rinehart, now in command, and with other officers at the Fort. They coincide with me in these views, and their long and intimate acquaintance with Indians in question entitles their opinions to consideration. I do not think it essential that the Indians should be taken to the Klamath Reservation. If the govt. desires to make a separate agency and reservation for them, it may be done elsewhere either in California, Oregon or Nevada. The only objection would be the extra expense this occasioned.
    Your letter was sent by W.F.&Co.'s express, and as I usually send my letters through the mail some delay was thus occasioned in its receipt.
I am sir,
    Very respectfully
        Your obt. servant
            J. W. Perit Huntington
                Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Hon. Chas. Maltby
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        in California
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, pages 743-745.



Ashland Mills, Oregon
    October 31st, 1865
Sir,
    In relation to matters on this sub-agency, and in regard to my transactions as sub-agent, I have the honor to report as follows:
    Having received telegraphic dispatches from you stating receipt of letter from Major W. V. Rinehart informing you that "Howluck" was in the vicinity of Fort Klamath, I started immediately for Fort Klamath in obedience to your desire, where I arrived on the 18th instant and immediately sent a message to "La Lake" requesting an interview with him on the next day.
    Major Rinehart informed me that "Paulina" had been at the fort some time before with a brother-in-law of "Howluck" and had stated that "Howluck," desiring a treaty, was then in "Bly" or "Mo-shen-koska's country" (about the 6th instant) where he saw him.
    I concluded that the best policy to pursue would be to send out a deputation of Klamaths to see "Howluck," taking with them Paulina, who was said to be in Sprague River Valley, and induce Howluck to come into the fort and enter into negotiations calculated to secure a peace with his tribe, and appointed Tuesday the 23rd instant to meet him. I saw La Lake on the day after my arrival, and he readily agreed to take some of his principal men and set out immediately to see "Howluck."
    On Monday the deputation arrived from Bly or Sprague River Valley, reporting that "Mo-shen-koska" in company with Paulina had gone to see "Howluck" on the confines of his country and had found him unwilling to treat, saying that he could fight the whites yet longer, that he felt like a wild elk with long antlers and laughed at Paulina for his becoming a peace man. I was at a loss to know what had caused the impression that "Howluck" wanted to treat but concluded that he may have really talked of peace, being convinced of the unprofitableness of war, yet now perhaps delays to come in, thinking to make a peace more profitable by getting extra presents as an inducement.
    It is my impression that he will be willing to treat by spring, as the winter campaigning by the troops will certainly convince him that Paulina's condition is far better than his own.
    "Paulina" and two other principal men of his tribe, viz, "Inhaltock" and "Chat-chat-chuck," returned to the fort with "La Lake" and with them I had a talk on the 27th instant, having remained until that time awaiting instructions. "Paulina," I am convinced, is acting in good faith, and I have no doubt has made use of all his endeavors to have "Howluck" and "Weahwewa" forsake the war path. I explained to him the positions of the boundaries of the reservation and the necessity of his immediately coming within its limits that his people might not be taken for those of "Howluck" or "Weahwewa" by the military, and gave him to understand that the war would be rigorously prosecuted against the last-named chiefs as long as they persisted in hostilities, but as soon as they were ready for peace I would meet them as a friend. "Paulina" as a proof of his sincerity offered to accompany Major Rinehart if he made a campaign into "Howluck's" country and show him the whereabouts of that chief, taking with him if desired a portion of his war party to assist in chastising his old friends, but whom he seems to consider his enemies as long as they are enemies to the government under whose protection he has come. His people were not all upon the reservation, he said, but he would bring them within its limits immediately that the military might not molest them.
    I left Fort Klamath for home on the same day of the talk with "Paulina," and fifteen miles this side of the fort I met the bearer of instructions from you. Examining them and finding I could do nothing of advantage in their pursuance at the fort which could not be done on a future visit, I did not return there.
    Making inquiries I find that there are a dozen Indians near Flounce Rock on the Rogue River and John Day wagon road. These are principally squaws detained there by white men who reside in the vicinity. A similar state of things may be found at Kanaka Flat above Jacksonville, where a number of squaws are kept by miners there.
    It is rumored that there are a few Indians on Illinois River and at other places in Josephine County, and in regard to them I am seeking information and hope soon to be able to report on their numbers, location and condition before long.
    Under the present circumstances, there being no funds provided to purchase subsistence for these stragglers in Jackson and Josephine counties, it might be well to let them remain where they are until spring, or until Congress takes action on the Klamath treaty, as they have no doubt provided for the winter.
    The Klamaths I believe have laid up ample supplies for the winter, but I think it would be advisable to make some small issues to the chiefs, and perhaps to some others, to prevent disaffection. "La Lake" has adopted a more rigorous system of government, has erected a prison house and confines all those disposed to question his authority or violate the rules of justice. As some of the Klamaths have opposed "La Lake" by cause of his want of spirit, I think his plan is a good one to convince them of his power and his disposition to enforce his authority. Since leaving the fort I have learned that on the 27th instant he had five Indians (men) bound and confined for disrespect shown him, and I have written to Major Rinehart, requesting him to inquire into the matter and see that Indians were confined for good cause and not inhumanely treated.
    I am informed that the states' rights doctrine is being agitated by ex-superintendent Steele and others of Northern California to dissatisfy the Modocs with the treaty, so as to keep them within reach of Yreka in order to secure their trade. The Indians it is reported have all left their country and gone onto Butte Creek, a tributary of the Klamath, rising near Mt. Shasta. The Indian trade is said to be a principal reason of the remaining vitality of the town, and I believe the Yrekans, or some of them, are striving hard to induce the Indians to remain within the state limits. Steele and others wrote some time since to Major Rinehart, saying that the Modocs were within the state of California and hence not under the supervision of the Oregon Superintendent, or something of like effect, ignoring the fact that an appropriation was made to treat with certain tribes of Indians, not regarding the whereabouts of all members of those tribes, and put it into your hands to carry out the treaty &c. As far as state lines are concerned the greater part of the Modoc country is in Oregon, as the Modocs claim most of the valley of Lost River.
Your obedient servant
    Lindsay Applegate
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Superintendent of Indian Affairs
            in Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 62.



Fort Klamath Ogn.
    November 9th 1865
Hon. J. W. P. Huntington
    Sir
        Martin & Drum have delivered at this post for the Indian Dept. 17000 pounds of shorts & 3000 pounds of flour. It is stored here in [the] government warehouse.
    There is nothing new here; everything is going along about the same as usual.
    I have been trying to get out of the service for some time, but have not succeeded yet, but am in hopes that I will soon. I am in hopes to get out by the 1st of Dec. If I do, I will probably be at Salem sometime this winter.
    Applegate is not here; there is an agent need here very much. Capt. K.'s squaw called on me yesterday, having Indian Frank with her, and said the Capt. had deceived her (he having promised her that he would come and get her this fall) and that he was a "cultus" ["worthless"] man anyway, that she wanted another man, and that she wanted Frank. She said that by living with the Captain she was all the same as "sitcum Boston" ["half white"] and suggested the propriety of my marrying them. I told them that it was rather out of my line of business, but I told them I thought there would be no harm done if she should sleep with Frank for the present, and when the gent got here he could marry them. They departed in great spirits, thinking that I had really married them.
    I do not think Howluck will come in this fall, although he was disposed to do so ar first, but after Capt. Kelly left you on Sprague River he and his men (Capt. Kelly's), [killed?--word cut off] an old Indian, an uncle of Howluck's, who was old and harmless, and showed no disposition to fight, or make any resistance--and at the same time Kelly was doing this it appears that some of Howluck's men were with Mc[cut off] and Pengra, on friendly terms, and expressed a great desire to quit fighting and come in and treat with them.
    But when Howluck heard of the death of his uncle, and heard that Kelly had come direct from the treaty ground, and knew that messengers had gone out to see the Indians, telling them to quit fighting &c., he said he would not come in to be killed like a woman--this is what the Indians tell me.
    Let me hear from you occasionally, and let me know how times are in that part of Oregon.
Yours respectfully
    D. C. Underwood
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 97.



Ashland Mills Oregon
    November 15th 1865
Sir,
    Since returning from Fort Klamath I have been looking after a chance to procure an ox team as required by instructions of October 21st and find I can get a team of five yokes of serviceable oxen at an average of $110 per yoke, and I can also get a good breaking plow for $50, and a wagon at $150, making a complete outfit for $750 in legal tenders, and $600 without the wagon, but the wagon I consider as necessary as the balance of the outfit. Spring wheat I can procure at $2 per bushel if desired. I can take the team to Link River if required, but from present appearances the oxen could be wintered here at little expense.
    I am of opinion that I can get the team to Link River at any time between now and Christmas, and to take them there would perhaps be best, as in that case the oxen could be used there in time to put in a spring crop. As $110 per yoke will perhaps seem a high price for oxen, I have thought it well to state that owing to the scarcity of oxen in this valley, $110 in legal tenders is considered reasonable here for a yoke of young, likely oxen. Please further instruct in regard to this matter.
Your obedient servant
    Lindsay Applegate
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Superintendent of Indian Affairs
        Salem, Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 68.




Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem, Oregon, Nov. 15, 1865
Sir:
    I transmit herewith enclosed fifty dollars "legal tender" for services as interpreter in Snake Ind. Treaty Expedition. Also vouchers in triplicate for same amount, which you will please sign and return to this office by mail.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
                By C. S. Woodworth, clk.
Hon. Lindsay Applegate
    U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
        Ashland
            Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 750.



Warm Springs Agency
    Nov. 16, 1865
Captain
    I have just learned that a party of four men from Cañon City bound for Jacksonville was attacked by Indians (probably Weahwewa's Snakes) at the springs where the Deadmond murder was committed, about two miles northeast of the head of Willow Creek. The men were at breakfast when the Indians (said to be numerous) were first observed. Their horses were grazing at a little distance, and the men made an effort to reach them. The Indians got between the horses and the men, and also between the men and the camp, thus cutting them off from both. The men made good their escape and all crossed the Deschutes fifteen miles below the place on the 13th. One of them reached the house of "Haller" at Oak Grove yesterday morning; the others have not been heard from yet, but have probably reached the settlements on the Tygh. They were without food for several days and much exhausted. The Indians got five horses, four guns, fifteen or twenty oz. of gold dust, and all the provisions, ammunition, camp equipage &c. belonging to the party. The place where the attack was made is about thirty-five miles east or southeast from here, and we are somewhat apprehensive that the marauders may visit the agency for the purpose of repeating one of those raids which they have been in the habit of making so profitable in years past. I send you this, the first information I have, and will send such additional facts as may reach me.
    I learn also that a quartermaster's wagon, escorted by twelve men, was recently attacked on the Cañon City road, the men defeated and driven off, and the wagon and mules (with the freight) captured by the Indians.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Capt. Charles Lafollet
    Comdg. Camp Polk
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 751.



Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem, Oregon, Nov. 28, 1865
Sir:
    Your letters addressed to this office are written on foolscap paper. For convenience of filing it is necessary that all correspondence should be upon quarto post size, and but one subject should be included in each letter. All agents and sub-agents are required to comply with this regulation.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Lindsay Applegate
    U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
        Ashland, Jackson Co., Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 756.



Camp Alvord Oregon
    December 3rd 1865
Sir
    I have the honor respectfully to represent that in my opinion a visit by you to this camp, accompanied by a guide, interpreter &c. for the purpose of communicating with the Indians in this vicinity, many of whom are constantly prowling about this camp, hiding in the mountains during the day and making their inroads during the night, would notably result in making terms with them. I believe that they are short of supplies for winter use. They have not been as successful as usual during the past summer in capturing from the whites stock of various kinds, nor do I think they have succeeded in gathering as much seed and roots as heretofore upon which to live.
    There is in the vicinity of Warner's or Christmas lakes, and Harney and Malheur lakes, a large band of Snakes. These can be found, and it is believed that with the assistance of someone who understands their modes of conveying intelligence they could be induced to come into communication with the agent. Orders have been issued from the headquarters of the Department to prosecute a vigorous campaign against these Indians. This will be done on the part of the troops at this post if it is possible at all during the winter to travel through this country. I do not think however that an expedition can leave this camp before the middle of January, on account of the incompleteness of our camp buildings, the exposed condition of our forage &c. (our hay being eight miles away), all of which ought to be completed and secured before an expedition leaves in search of Indians.
    This length of time if you think it advisable to come at all would give you or your agent time to get here.
    The benefit of a peace with these Indians to the state and territories in which they have their lurking places can readily be appreciated by you, and I am of those who believe that every possible means that is likely to result in peace should be used to secure that result. The advocates for extermination will admit the fallacy of their doctrines when they have attempted to put them in practice.
    This is intended  as a private communication; a copy will not be sent to headquarters, but if you should contemplate coming, or sending [an agent], you might make a transcript of its contents and forward to the Dept. headquarters in order that they might be apprised of your coming and furnish me or whoever commands this camp the necessary instructions.
Respectfully your obt. servt.
    F. B. Sprague Capt.
        1st Ogn. Inf.
            Comdg. Camp Alvord
Hon. J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 137.



Washington D.C. December 6th 1865
Dear Huntington,
    I have settled the question of purchasing goods upon this side for the Indian Department upon the Pacific Coast, and no more will be sent.
    In my report I get after Dole sharply, as well as "Caleb Lyons of Lyonsdale." The former has sunk into contempt, and the latter I think will certainly be ruined. Secretary Harding as well as the present commissioner seems to be determined to have an honest administration of Indian Affairs. It affords me pleasure to be able to state that your department is in good repute here, and your administration is perfectly satisfactory.
    We have just commenced our steps to have a portion of the Coast Reservation vacated. We were somewhat perplexed about the boundaries, but upon consultation with Dr. Bailey and Elijah Williams, who are here, we determined on the following.
    Commencing ten miles south of the Siletz agency, thence west to the ocean, thence south along the ocean to the Alsea River, thence up said river to the eastern boundary of the reservation, thence north along said boundary to a point due east of the place of beginning, thence west to the place of beginning. How will that do? I think that we will succeed in getting the above-described district vacated by an executive order, but in the event of a failure I will try to have it done by legislation.
    I thought it best to have a strip vacated, and thus try to get an appropriation for the removal and subsistence of the Indians south, to the north of the vacated strip, and have the remaining southern portion vacated. Knowing the anxiety of our people to occupy the Yaquina Bay and obtain an outlet to the ocean, I did not like to have the application dependent upon the uncertain contingency of obtaining so large an appropriation as you ask for in your communications to the Commissioner of the 12th of December 1864. I think that if we get the strip vacated the Indians will suffer no inconvenience, and it will not interfere with the procuring [of] the necessary appropriations hereafter.
    I got a letter from Simpson a few days since, but have not time to reply now. Please show him [this] and present him my kind regards.
Your friend
    J. W. Nesmith.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 131½.



Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem, Oregon, Dec. 8th, 1865
Sir:
    Your letter of 5th ultimo, concerning the two squaws named Polly and Mary belonging to the Klamath tribe and now sojourning at the Dalles, is just received and attention given to its contents.
    In view of the impossibility of travel between Dalles and Klamath at this season, and the manifest impropriety of putting Klamath Indians upon the Warm Springs Reservation, I consent that the two women named remain at the Dalles until further notice, upon condition that you and other responsible citizens of your vicinity will guarantee that supervision shall be extended over them (without expense to the government) to the extent that they commit no crime or gross immorality, and further that you promise in case this restriction is disregarded by the squaws to inform me of the fact without delay.
    I should state, in justice to Marshal Keeler, that I requested him to expel all Indians from the Dalles. I did not suppose there were any Klamaths there, or I should not have directed their return to their own country at this season of the year, when it is clearly impossible that they can do so.
    This permission in regard to these two women must not be considered a precedent to justify similar requests in future.
    The policy of the government is the segregation of the Indians upon reservations designated for them. My instructions are explicit and exacting that this policy be carried out. My endeavor will be to comply with them in letter and spirit.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
Hon. Jos. G. Wilson
    Dalles
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 9; Letter Books H:10, page 761.



Washington D.C. December 8th 1865
J. W. P. Huntington Esq.
    Supt. Ind. Affairs.
        Dear Sir,
            Your letter of the 3rd of November enclosing copies of correspondence with Chas. Maltby, Supt. of Ind. Affairs for California, reached me this morning. I went at once to the Indian Department to inquire about the matter and was informed that the office had received communications upon the subject from Maltby and that [the] Commiss. was interesting himself in the matter, but I did not examine the papers, as the Commissioner was about starting to new York I deferred it and asked that no action should be had in the matter until I could be heard. I will show the papers as well as all others which you sent to the other members of our delegation. The Commissioner has in his annual report strongly recommended the confirmation of your treaty of the 15th of October 1864, and I do not think that it will be in the power of Congress to defeat it.
    Maltby is an old "skeezix" ["rascal"] who got appointed because he once lived in Springfield and knew Mr. Lincoln, and that is about all the qualification he has for the place. Cooley, the present Com., is a bright, intelligent gentleman, and I am much pleased with him, and what is better he appears to be pleased with me. I will send you a copy of his report as soon as I can get hold of it.
    I wrote you at length a few days since, and have only to report that you and the Oregon agent are all right at the Department. I brought on an immense amt. of Department business, which has occupied all of my time since I have been here, and I was never more crowded with business in my life.
    I have filed with the Secretary of the Interior a memorial signed by all our delegation in relation to the vacation of a portion of the Coast Reservation, and have strong hopes of success.
    I have also filed a paper with the Com. of Ind. Affairs showing the balances of appropriations due to Barnhart's Indians and asked that the amount be remitted to you. Keep me fully posted in relation to this business of your office, and it shall have my earnest and prompt attention.
Your friend
    J. W. Nesmith
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 131.


Washington D.C.
    Decr. 11 '65.
Commissioner of Indian Affairs
    Please inform the subscriber whether there is any merit in the enclosed papers, which are hereby respectfully submitted. By communicating the facts in the case you will oblige
Yours very respectfully
    Alfred Schicking
        Box 200

NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 1028-1029.




Phoenix December 11th 1865
Mr. Huntington
    Dear Sir
The honorable probate court of Jackson County has appointed me to settle the estate of my brother, J. M. Anderson.
    I want to inquire whether you have received any instruction to pay for the beef that my brother furnished the Indians at Klamath Lake.
    I fell in company with the honorable Mr. Nesmith as he was on his road home last spring, and he informed me that he had the papers directing you to pay the same.
    If he carried the papers back with him I will have to write to Washington for them.
Yours truly
    E. K. Anderson
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 103.



Ashland Mills Oregon
    December 18th 1865.
Sir
    I start today with my interpreter for Fort Klamath. My principal purpose is to look after the Snake Indians and issue to such of them as are entitled to subsistence such an amount as will supply them for the remainder of the winter.
    I am informed that Paulina's people are not all on the reservation, and I will endeavor to bring them within its limits speedily.
    Possibly something may be done towards bringing "Howluck" and "Weahwewa" to terms, and I will probably go into their country with a detachment of troops from Fort Klamath to see if anything can be accomplished.
Your obedient servant
    Lindsay Applegate
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Superintendent of Indian Affairs
        in Oregon
            Salem, Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 111.



[Telegram]
Washington Dec. 27th 1865
To J. W. [P.] Huntington
    Supt. Indn. Affairs
        Salem
    The Pres. has relieved from reservation the following boundary commencing at a point two (2) miles south of the selected agency thence west to the Pacific thence south along said ocean thence to mouth of the Alsea River thence up said river to the eastern boundary of the reservation thence north along said eastern boundary to a point due east of the place of beginning thence west to the place of beginning. Letter by mail.
D. N. Cooley
    By W. S. line to Atkinson 29th
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 121.



United States Senate Chamber
    Washington, December 27th 1865
Dear Huntington,
    I wrote you some time since of my efforts to have a portion of the Coast Reservation vacated, and have just succeeded in getting the order made. The Commissioner of Ind. Affairs has sent you a dispatch today notifying you of the fact.
    I had some difficulty in fixing the boundaries of the vacated strip, but upon consultation with Bailey & Elijah Williams they thought that the boundaries designated would be the best, and so I put them into the memorial.
    I also set forth in the memorial that there were no Indians on the strip proposed to be vacated.
    The question of vacating that portion south of Alsea can be reserved for future action.
    I hope that this vacation will be satisfactory to the people who desire an outlet to the coast, and I do not believe that the Indians will suffer any inconvenience from it.
    Senator Williams have [sic] gone to Richmond to take a look at the headquarters, or hindquarters, of the late Confederacy. I should have asked to have gone, but had too much to attend to here.
Yours truly
    J. W. Nesmith
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 22; Letters Received, 1865-1866, No. 147.



United States Senate Chamber.
    Washington Dec. 27th 1865
Dear Sir,
    If the order has been made to vacate the portion of the Coast Reservation in Oregon please send me a copy of the order
And oblige
    J. W. Nesmith
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 614 Oregon Superintendency, 1864-1865, frames 1017-1018.



Grand Ronde Indn. Agency
    Decr. 30th 1865
Dear Sir
    I write to ask you to do me a favor.
    I received from the Second Auditor a letter dated Feby. 25th 1865 of which the following is a copy: "Your acct. 2nd qr. 1863 under your bond of 31st October 1863 has been adjusted and a balance of $139.03 found in your favor differing from your account $14.03, which difference you will find explained by the enclosed statement."
    A short time since I received from the same office dated Aug. 14th 186[5] the following letter:
    "Your property account for the 4th qr. of 1862-1863 & 1st & 2nd qrs. of 1864 have been settled and found to agree with your returns. Your property account stands balanced and closed on the books of this office."
    I presented these to Mr. Huntington, who doubted his authority to pay the balance without instruction from Washington and advised me to get you to call at the Indian Department and either get money or instruction for him to pay it.
    If you will be so good as to attend to it you will greatly oblige me.
    We are all in usual health and the Indians are enjoying the holidays in fine glee, so far at with whiskey [sic].
    I know of nothing more to write that would be of interest to you.
Very respectfully
    Yours
        Amos Harvey
Hon. J. W. Nesmith
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frames 312-314.




Last revised November 26, 2016