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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Correspondence of the Oregon Superintendency
1868
Southern Oregon-related correspondence with the Oregon Superintendency for Indian Affairs.


Office Siletz Agency
Oregon Jan. 1st 1868
Sir:
    I have the honor to submit this, my report of the affairs of this agency for the month of December 1867.
    The Indians under my charge are generally quiet, and nothing has occurred in the past month to make any material change in their relations to the whites, that being of the most friendly character.
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servt.
        Ben Simpson
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Ind. Affairs
        Salem Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, no number.



Philadelphia 10th Jany. 1868.
The Hon.
    The Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Dear Sir
            I take the liberty of sending you the few lines attached, copied from the Congressional Globe, and the copy of a letter from Judge Nelson, late Chief Justice in Oregon.
I have the honor to be
    With great respect
        Your obt. servt.
            Anson Dart
   
SEE CONGRESSIONAL GLOBE, 2nd Part, Page 1460
THIRTY-SIXTH CONGRESS.

Remarks of the Hon. C. C. Washburn, of Wisconsin.

    Mr. Chairman: I regret that my friend from Kentucky should feel called upon to oppose this bill. If there ever was a just private claim before Congress, then this is one. Let me state the facts in this case. In 1850, Anson Dart, then, as now, a citizen of the state of Wisconsin, was appointed a Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon; previous to that time he had received an appointment to the position of charge d'affaires to the Argentine Confederation. There is a letter on file from Mr. Clayton, then Secretary of State, stating that his appointment was agreed upon to that office, with a salary of $4,500 per annum, and an outfit of like amount. About that time this Superintendency of Indian Affairs for Oregon was created, and it was desirable to have some gentleman to fill that place who was acquainted with Indian affairs, some gentleman who had experience among the Indians. Dr. Dart was solicited to accept the office of Superintendent and forgo his appointment to the Argentine Confederation. The reasons for this was his known fitness fur the appointment by reason of his high character and familiarity with all matters pertaining to the Indians. A brother-in-law of George Catlin, the celebrated painter, and in company with him he had visited nearly all the Indian tribes from the frontiers of Mexico to the Red River of the North, and had acquired a familiarity with the language and manners of the red men, such as few other persons possessed.
    It is not denied that this gentleman discharged his duties well and faithfully. The gentleman from Kentucky admits that fact. While he was in Oregon we had no difficulty with the Indians upon that coast; no debt of millions of dollars against the government was run up by Indian wars there--on the contrary, the total expenses of the Department on the Pacific Coast for three years of his Superintendency was only $24,000 a year. I believe Senator Bell was right when he declared in the Senate that we ought not only to pass this bill, but in addition to give him a handsome testimonial for those services.
Mr. Edwards said:
    Mr. Chairman: It was fully proved that he was a faithful officer; that he managed the affairs of the Superintendency with great economy; that the whole expenditures of his Superintendency, including authorized presents and supplies to the Indians, did not exceed $24,000 a year*--that peace was preserved during his entire administration, between the Indian tribes and the white population around them--that he negotiated thirteen Indian treaties, and was the disbursing agent for six Indian agents, and that all the money placed at his disposal had been fully accounted for. Surely then it is not too much to ask in these days of defalcation and dereliction of duty that a faithful public officer should receive at least justice on his application to this house.
In the Senate of the United States,
Mr. Doolittle made the following report, April 16, 1858:
    That Mr. Dart was appointed such Superintendent in the year A.D. 1850, and served in that capacity for the term of nearly three years; that during the period of his service he had under his superintendence the Indian affairs of all the country now included within the Territories of Oregon and Washington; that he was a faithful officer and discharged his duties in a manner highly satisfactory to the government, and that during the whole of his Superintendency peace and quiet was maintained amongst all the Indian tribes under his care. * * *
A letter from Judge.Nelson, late U.S. Chief Justice in Oregon:
    I knew Dr. Dart well, if not intimately, while he was in Oregon filling the place of Superintendent of Indian Affairs, while Oregon was yet a Territory. He was appointed to that station by Gen. Taylor, and filled it until Gen. Pierce entered upon the administration of the government. Dr. Dart was a faithful officer, attentive to his duties, pacific in his spirit, and was much respected and beloved by the Indians under his charge. There was no trouble with the Indians while he was the Superintendent--and had he continued such it is my belief that much bloodshed would have been spared and much treasure saved. I believe him to be an intelligent, discreet and reliable gentleman, and well qualified to fill the most important post connected with Indian affairs.
Signed, THOS. NELSON.
*This includes all the salaries and the cost of agency houses and traveling expenses, and in short, everything.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frames 637-640.




Canyonville January 18th 1868
To the Indian Agent of Oregon
Sir    There is an Indian boy at S. B. Briggs' in this precinct--he is doing a great deal of mischief in the way [of] killing stock and is in a habit of carrying a gun around with him. Is there no law to remove him to the reservation? If so, will you have it attended to? Please let me know.
Respectfully
    Jacob Yokum
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, No. 164.



United States Senate Chamber
    Washington, Jany. 30th 1868
Sir
    Some time since I addressed a letter to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs asking for an adjustment of the accounts of B. R. Biddle, late Indian agent in Oregon, which letter I suppose was referred to your office. I beg to invite your early attention to the matter as it has been pending for a long time & Mr. Biddle claims that there is something due him for salary.
Yours truly
    Geo. H. Williams
Hon. E. B. French
    2nd Auditor Treas.
        Washington
            D.C.
   

    Respectfully returned. In July 1866 upon a partial settlement, Mr. Biddle appeared to be indebted to the govt. $255.70. On the 23rd of Oct. 1867 papers were received at this office from him, which seemed to require an administrative examination, and they were referred to the Commr. of Indian Affairs, since which they have not been returned.
E. B. French
   
United States Senate Chamber
    Washington Feby. 8th 1868
Sir
    Allow me to call your attention to the enclosed letter & endorsement thereon.
    May I ask to have the accounts therein referred to adjustment at an early day & much oblige
Yours truly
    Geo. H. Williams
Col. Taylor
    Com. Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frames 709-714.



Office Klamath Agency Oregon.
    January 31st 1868.
Sir,
    I have the honor to report as follows for the present month. The weather during the whole month has been extremely cold, and as a consequence the lake has been hard-frozen and most of the country snow-covered.
    The Indians in their warm winter quarters have been comfortable, but as they provided little hay for their horses they apprehend the loss of some of them if the winter is long continued.
    No difficulties of consequence have arisen. Health generally prevails.
    There is a rumor prevalent that a number of Snakes (hostile) are on the head of Sprague River. If so, they no doubt contemplate mischief. The military is on the alert.
    All the time that the weather would permit the employees have been engaged in rail-making &c., and some of them continually in looking after the animals, which are now on Lost River and doing well.
Respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, no number.



Alsea Indian Sub-Agency
    Coast Reservation Oregon
        January 31st 1868
Dear Sir,
    I have the honor to submit my monthly report for the month of January 1868 as to the condition of the Indians under my charge.
    The number of tribes under my charge is four (viz.) the Coos, Umpqua, Siuslaw and Alseas. They number in all about five hundred and twenty-five.
    They are all peaceable and quiet and in a prosperous condition. They have a plenty of food to subsist on and clothing to make them comfortable. No deaths nor births have taken place in either of the tribes during the month. They are all apparently contented and doing well on the reservation and are willing and at all times ready to perform such duties as is required of them.
    They have a large surplus of potatoes, more than they can consume during the growing of [the] next crop.
All of which is respectfully submitted
    By your obdt. servt.
        G. W. Collins
            U.S. Indn. Sub-Agent
To
    Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. of Indn. Affairs
            Salem
                Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, no number.



Office Klamath Agency Oregon
    February 1st 1868.
Sir,
    I would respectfully report that I have this day appointed Henry Duncan of Jackson County, Oregon as carpenter on the Klamath Reservation. Mr. Duncan is a moral, agreeable, energetic and industrious man and I think will make a very efficient employee.
Respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. of Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, No. 186.



Office Siletz Agency
    Oregon Feb. 1st 1868
Sir
    I have the honor to submit this, my report of the affairs of this agency for the month of January 1868. The Indians under my charge remain quiet and peaceable.
    Their sanitary condition I think will compare favorably with any previous month.
    Our school is in a very prosperous condition, having an attendance of from eighteen to twenty scholars, all of whom seem to be advancing rapidly.
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servt.
        Ben Simpson
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Ind. Affairs
        Salem Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, no number.



Roseburg, Feb. 4th, 1868.
Hon. J. W. P. Huntington,
    Dear Sir,
        Please inform me whether your department has established a reservation of lands in the region of Klamath Lake, for the use of the Indians, and if so what townships and fractions of townships are included therein.
    I am preparing a set of maps of the state, university and school lands in the Umpqua Land District. In the records of the land office here I find no mention of such a reservation, nor is it mentioned either on the maps drawn at the Surveyor Gen.'s office, or on those accompanying the report of the Commissioners of the Gen. Land Office.
Very respectfully yours,
    J. H. Rogers
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, No. 174.



February 15th 1868
    Canyonville Doug. Co.
        Oregon
Mr. Huntington
    Sir
        I wish to know what to do with an old blind squaw and child that I have supported now upwards of three years. She belongs to the North Umpqua tribe of Indians. She is very old and helpless, and there are none of the tribe willing to help her. She is an object of charity. Please let me know what can be done towards supporting her. If I do not feed her she is bound to starve.
Respectfully yours
    C. S. Glasgow
        Upper settler on South Umpqua
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, No. 176.



No. 373 Penn. Avenue
    Washington D.C.
        15th February 1868
Hon. N. G. Taylor Commissioner
    Dear Sir:
        I enclose a letter of Hon. D. M. Risdon about claim of Dr. A. N. Foley for medical services &c. Please write me all the particulars and refer the claim to some Indian agent or Superintendent of Oregon for report if the claim is not in a situation to be paid.
Yours very respectfully
    B. F. Dowell
   
Eugene City Dec. 19, 1867
B. F. Dowell Esq.
    Dear Sir
        I recd. your phiz & circular stating that you would remain in Washington during the present Congress & would attend to any matters of claims. Now I have some old matters and some new & so far as old matters are concerned fees must be conditional & [I] am satisfied that your charges if successful will be reasonable. The first is a matter of claim of A. N. Foley for medical service rendered a wounded Indian at Coos Bay or Empire City, I think at the time of the removal of Coquille Indians (the matter is now much out of mind & no date present), I think by Capt. Vinearson or Rinearson by a sub and also for considerable amt. of provision furnished for which he paid to the persons whose testimony will undoubtedly be found with the claim. The claim & testimony was sent to & recd. by Rector when Supt. & he wrote that same had been forwarded to [the] Department. We waited long for ans. & received nothing. I then wrote to Huntington when first appointed or soon after & he sent me a copy of a letter written by Tom McF. Patton, who attended to business in his absence, which was unique for an official document, but you know what a wag Tom Patton is. One remark I recollect that was that from amt. provision furnished the Indian could not have been wounded in stomach. Now the fact was several other Indians & squaws remained to take care of him & you will observe the fact that the testimony is from the most eminent & reliable persons of that section at the time of the service. Patton told me that he wrote the letter & brought out copy. Rector was in Portland but I think he said he read it to Rector on his return. There was also a statement that he had seen this Rinearson & he did not recollect of having employed Foley. Now the Indian agent caused these Indians to be removed & employed the person which the claim shows employed the Dr. & the charge is as low as present charges for doctoring white men now. The Dr. has ever since the application been a resident practicing physician of this place. We postponed further prosecution for the purpose of obtaining the testimony of Rinearson & was then in the mountain regions between here & the States. We think we could then have brought matters to recollection although the testimony sent would be sufficient for all purposes in this country, but red tape required that he should have been employed by regular agent, but then on the other hand red tape should have required a regular agent to have removed these Indians. I will forward this & as soon as practicable look up memoranda. I now write wholly from memory. Justice requires that he should have compensation.
D. M. Risdon
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frames 642-645.  "Phiz" is short for "physiognomy"--a reference to the portrait of Dowell on his letterhead.




[Telegram]
Portland Feb. 24 1868
    Rec'd. Salem Feb. 24 1868 5-45 p.m.
To J. W. P. Huntington Supt. Ind. Affairs
    Arrested Jenny. Found one (1) old woman fairly young woman Sally and little girl Penny. And two men Bill & Bob. All running away from Siletz Reservation. I arrested all. Send orders.
D. Jacobi
    City Marshal
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, No. 178.



Office Klamath Agency, Oregon
    Feb. 29th 1868.
Sir
    For this month I would respectfully report as follows. The Indians have been quiet and peaceable and apparently very well contented during the month. The lake being frozen and the mountains snow-covered, they have not been able to get fish or game, but issues of flour have been made to them as their wants demanded.
    The employees have been able to do little else than care for the stock during the month. They have been able to make some rails and get out some building timber, however.
    The animals are on Lost River, where the snow has not covered the grass this winter, and are doing well. No Snakes are now known to be lurking around the reservation, and the report of some being on the head of Sprague River is thought untrue.
Respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, no number..



Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency
    Coast Reservation Oregon
        February 29th 1868.
Dear Sir,
    I have the honor to submit my monthly report for the month of February 1868 as to the Indians under my charge. I have under my charge four tribes (viz.) the Coos, Umpqua, Siuslaw and Alseas. They number in all about five hundred and twenty-five. They are all peaceable and quiet, and their health and condition is very good. They have an abundance of food to subsist on and clothing sufficient to make them comfortable, and now appear very well contented. The most of them are now employed making rails to rebuild and repair the fences around their farms.
    During the month there has been one birth in the Umpqua and two in the Alsea tribe. No deaths in either of the four tribes during the month has taken place.
All of which is most respectfully submitted
    By your obdt. servt.
        G. W. Collins
            U.S. Ind. Sub-Agent
To
    Hon. J. W. P. Huntington
        Supt. of Indn. Affairs
            Salem
                Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, no number.



Office Siletz Agency
    Oregon March 1st 1868
Sir,
    I have the honor to submit this, my report of the affairs of this agency for the month of February 1868. There has been no material change upon the agency since my last monthly report.
    The Indians under my charge still remain quiet, with some slight exceptions. This, however, is confined to differences among themselves, which is the result of their idleness in the winter season.
    Their sanitary condition is quite favorable, there being but little sickness among them.
    The employees of this agency are men of good moral habits and seem to take great interest in the improvement of the Indians. The Indian school is progressing entirely satisfactorily, in fact much more so than formerly.
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servt.
        Ben Simpson
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Ind. Affairs
        Salem Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, no number.



Newport Oregon
    March 4th 1868
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. of Indn. Affairs Oregon
        Dear Sir: I have the honor to enclose herewith receipts for horse and crosscut saw, which I have signed.
    I will here state that I have engaged a blacksmith for one month who will commence work next Monday, March 9th at one hundred dollars per month. Also one farmer for one and a half or two months at sixty dollars per month.
    At this date all is quiet and peaceable on this agency.
    All of which is most respectfully submitted.
Your true servt.
    G. W. Collins
        Indn. Sub-Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, No. 197.



Jacksonville March 5, 68
J. W. Perit Huntington Esq.
    Supt. Ind. Affairs Oregon
        Salem
            Dear Sir
Last Sept we contracted with Mr. Applegate, Sub-Agent, for 2000 # flour at 9 cts per #, which we have delivered. We expected the money, but Mr. Applegate informed us lately that there are no funds on hand to pay for the same. We then asked him to issue to us vouchers for the flour, so we have something to show, or in case we want to dispose of the vouchers to realize the money for them. Mr. Applegate said the Indian Department does not issue vouchers. We think different, therefore [we] address these few lines to you inquiring whether that is the fact; if not, please either send us the vouchers or direct Mr. Applegate to issue vouchers to us. At present we have only the receipt that the 2000 # flour has been delivered and nothing else.
With respect
    Your obt. servants
        Muller & Brentano
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, No. 192.



The Dalles City Oregon
    20 March 1868
To the Hon.
    The Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington City D.C.
            Sir
                I have sought information regarding a tract or district of country set aside as a "temporary Indian reservation" about the year 1855, from persons in this state who I thought should know the precise state that district represented in the territorial lands of the government, but so far I have been unable to elicit the least reliable knowledge on the subject. Now I propose, if you will permit, to seek the desired information through your department, but will first give what I know of the tract & how it came identified as a "special Indian" reservation.
    During the Indian hostilities of 1855 in this state, at which time Joel Palmer was acting Sup. Ind. Affairs, he, at his own suggestion, obtained from the Department at Washington permission to collect all the tribes of Indians in the western part of Oregon and temporarily locate them upon a reservation on the Pacific Coast, until such time as a "permanent" reservation should be located. The reservation selected was one thus described, "beginning at a point three tiers of townships (or 18 miles) south of where the meridian or baseline (of Oregon) falls into the Pacific Coast, thence south along the coast to the mouth of the 'Siuslaw,' thence east to the summit of the Coast Range of mountains, thence north along the S. mountain to a point due east from the place of beginning," &c. &c. The Indians were collected & a reservation was purchased of the white settlers at a place called "Grand Ronde" on the headwaters of [the] south branch of the Yamhill River, upon which some of the Calapooia, Molallas & Umpquas were "permanently located, and for the" Port Orford, Chetco, Rogue River & others a district was selected on the Siletz River, where farms were opened, buildings erected &c. This permanent location is embraced in the specially reserved tract, but lies south of the northern boundary near 35 miles, leaving this intervening tract unrepresented by them for any purpose, & through this tract flows the Salmon (or Neachesna) & the Nestucca rivers, which afford good grazing & farming lands, & which would soon be put into profitable use were it known that the settler would not be disturbed by the government. And it is [on] this fact that I solicit information, & if you feel it in your position to satisfy me, I should be very much obliged. Did a settlement upon this waste country in the least affect or disturb the rights or privileges of the Indians, I should not advocate its settlement by the whites. But as it does not, I think, for the good of the country, & for the bettering of the condition of many persons who want homes, that it should be opened for settlement.
    Hope you may find it in your power to satisfy my information--I remain
Your obt. svt.
    Courtney M. Walker
P.S. Refer you to Hon. Senator Williams of Oregon & Hon. Mr. Mallory, of House of Representatives--
C.M.W.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frames 720-723.




Office Klamath Agency, Oregon,
    March 31st 1868.
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon
                Sir,
                    You will observe that the purchases of articles during the 1st quarter 1868 have not been conducted according to the routine prescribed by the Act of March 2nd 1862, the exigencies of the service not admitting of the requisite delays. Transportation being very uncertain in the winter season over the Cascade Mountains, I have thought well to make these necessary purchases whenever an opportunity offered to send a small amount of freight to the agency. Hoping this explanation may prove satisfactory, I subscribe myself
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 6.



Office Klamath Agency,
    Oregon, March 31st 1868.
Sir,
    I have the honor to submit the following report for the present month.
    Few things of special consequence have transpired. The Indians have been quiet and peaceable.
    Fish have at length commenced running in the streams on the reservation, hence the necessity no longer exists of issuing subsistence in large quantities.
    On the 1st inst. Dave Hill was appointed interpreter under the Snake Treaty.
    Operations can be resumed in a few days, as the long severe winter is broken.
    The animals of the Department have passed through the winter safely and are now in moderately good order.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, no number.



Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency
    March 31st 1868
Dear Sir:--
    I have the honor to submit my monthly report for the month of March 1868 as to the conditions of the Indians under my charge.
    There are four tribes under my charge, viz.--the Coos, Umpqua, Siuslaw and Alsea tribes. They are all in a prosperous condition and have an abundance of food to subsist upon. Their general health is good, although very little sickness has occurred among the Umpquas and one death.
    They are all peaceable and quiet and are ready and willing at all times to perform such duties as are required of them on the farm when called upon by the farmer.
    They have got their spring wheat and oats all sowed, and most of their potatoes planted. Aside from this they have made several thousand rails to rebuild their fences around their farms.
All of which is respectfully submitted
    By your obdt. servt.
        [G. W. Collins]
            U.S. Indn. Sub-Agent
To
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. of Indn. Affairs
            Salem
                Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 24; Letters Received, 1867-1868, no number.



Empire City Coos Co.
    Oregon April 7th 1868
J. W. P. Huntington
    Superintendent of
        Indian Affairs
            Salem Oregon
                Dear Sir
                    There is an Indian here from the "Yaquina" for the purpose of having this letter written to you. He is called "Tyee Jim" and claims to be chief of a small band of Coos Bay Indians--about fifteen families all told. I have known this Jim for the past ten or twelve years as a peaceable and quiet Indian. He informs me that he can farm and raise all the produce that his tribe require for their support, without any aid from the government. He is very desirous to do so.
    He wishes the privilege of living with his tribe on a small creek about midway between Umpqua and Coos Bay called Ten Mile Creek. He says there is sufficient land suitable for the support of himself and people a short distance up the creek from the coast.
    I think the above-mentioned location will place the Indians between ten and fifteen miles from any white person and on a stream that abounds in fish. Jim has a long string of grievances--neglect, want of food &c.--which I shall pass and close by desiring you if you can, consistent with duty, permit this Indian with the few of his tribe to locate on Ten Mile Creek as they wish to do. I think there would be little if any objection by the inhabitants of this region of country to such a course as desired.
    While I disclaim any intention of annoying your office, I could see no other escape from incessant importunities than to write this letter.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        T. D. Winchester
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 23.



Office Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Salem Oregon April 7, 1868
Sir:
    In transmitting the bond and license of George Nurse, trader, you omitted to send the application, which should always accompany the other papers. You also omitted to send your own affidavit that you are neither directly nor indirectly interested with the said Nurse and do not expect to derive any profit from his trade under the license. This is required of you by law. The omissions must be supplied before the papers can go to Washington, and you are therefore directed to transmit them by mail forthwith.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Ogn.
Hon. Lindsay Applegate
    U.S. Ind. Sub-Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 10; Letter Books I:10, page 199.



Washington D.C.
    11 April 1868
Hon. Charles Mix Acting Commissioner
    Dear Sir:
        In 1856, Robt. Metcalfe, Indian agent of Oregon, hired a pack train of James Clugage to transport supplies for the Indian reservation near the mouth of Umpqua River. I think the price was $3 or $4 per day. I have a claim of the same nature before the 3rd Auditor asking $3 per day for the use of each animal which were employed at the same time transporting supplies for the Oregon volunteers. I wish to get a certificate from your office of the price paid by Mr. Metcalfe as corroborating evidence to use in the 3rd Auditor's office in behalf of my claim. It is possible Mr. Metcalfe hired Mr. Clugage's train early in the winter of 1855, or it may have been as late as the winter of 1856.
    Three and four dollars a day was very common at the time all over the country, and three dollars was the lowest cash price, yet mine has been suspended since 1861.
    Please give me the particulars to assist me in collecting a just debt and much oblige
Yours very respectfully
    B. F. Dowell
        373 Penna. Ave.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frames 646-648.




Office Klamath Agency
    Oregon April 12th 1868.
Sir,
    I would respectfully ask the appointment or the privilege of appointing school teachers soon. The department of manual labor could be taught at once. In advance of the erection of commodious buildings as school houses, the teachers can be instructing the most willing of the scholars in one of the other buildings, laying a foundation for a knowledge of the English language, teaching them to realize the importance of study and giving them instruction in manual labor in the field. I am firmly impressed with the idea that this course would be promotive of the designs of the government.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        [L. Applegate]
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 19.



Grand Ronde Agency
    April 15, 1868.
Sir
    I have to inform you that in order to get in the spring crops at this agency, it is necessary to have immediately ten yoke of work oxen and a wagon. The wagons now in use here are very old, much worn, and unfit for
heavy hauling, and there are not enough of them for the wants of the Indians. The oxen now on hand are very old, much impoverished by the late severe winter, and are not able to do half the work which younger and more efficient ones can do. We also very much need a pair of work horses and harness, if the funds of the Department will warrant, but the need for them is not so imperative as for the oxen and wagon. I respectfully request that you make arrangements to provide me with the articles named, or furnish me with funds that I may make the purchases myself.
Very respectfully &c.
    Amos Harvey
To J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affrs.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 22.



Washington April 17th 1868
To the Com. of Indian Affairs
    Sir
        At the request of Mr. N. Clough I desire to make a statement in relation to his claim now on file in the Indian office for fruit trees sold and delivered to me for the benefit of the Indians while I was Supt. of Indian Affairs in Oregon.
    Sometime in the third quarter of 1861 Senator Nesmith called at my office and stated that he while Supt. over the Indians then under my charge had promised to furnish them with fruit trees on each of the reserves, and that he had made a verbal contract with Mr. N. Clough to graft and prepare the trees for that purpose, but that before he could carry out these promises to the Indians he was removed from office and that his immediate successor had failed to carry out his plans and promises to the Indians. Although the trees had been prepared by Mr. Clough, Senator Nesmith urged many good reasons as I believed at the time why these trees should be taken and paid for in accordance with his promise to the Indians and his verbal contract with Mr. Clough. I therefore felt inclined to make the purchase. But upon examination of the funds in my hands under the different appropriations I found but three thousand dollars applicable to such a purchase. While the sum required to complete the purchase would amount to fifteen thousand dollars, upon making this exhibit to Senator Nesmith he still urged the purchase, promising to see that funds were provided to meet the balance of the purchase money on his arrival in Washington. I had much confidence at that time in the judgment of Senator Nesmith in relation to Indian affairs and also in his ability as Senator from our state to make provision for the payment that I purchased the trees of Mr. Clough, paying him the three thousand dollars then in my hands, leaving the balance of the purchase money unpaid.
    The trees were delivered in accordance with the written articles of agreement now on file in your office, but so far the payment has not been made to Mr. Clough, nor did Senator Nesmith so far as we know and believe ever make any effort to secure this payment, although he as I have learned furnished a part of the trees and received from Mr. Clough most if not all of the money paid by him to me. Having been instrumental in contracting this debt I feel it my duty to make this statement and to ask you to examine into the case with a view to its early payment. Mr. Clough is a poor man and actually suffering for this money that is justly due him.
Your obedient servant
    Wm. H. Rector
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frames 699-704.




Office Klamath Agency
    Oregon, April 20th 1868.
Sir,
    This day Mr. F. W. Vanderpool submitted his resignation as wagon and plow maker on this reservation. I have thought proper to accept the same. I have no doubt but that I can fill the place at once by the appointment of a mechanic well calculated to fulfill the requirements of the service.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Honl.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 27.



Washington April 28th 1868
To the Com. of Indian Affairs
    Sir
         In my communication of the 27th I omitted to state that N. B. Clough had not only delivered the trees according to contract but to the best of my knowledge and belief he did not supt. [sic] the planting and culture of them up to the time of my leaving the office of Supt. of Indian Affairs.
Yours truly
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. H. Rector
N. B. Clough
    Care of L. T. Rector
        Brooklyn
            Cal.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frame 706.




Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency
    Coast Reservation Oregon
        April 30th 1868
Dear Sir,
    I have the honor to submit my monthly report for April 1868 as to the condition of the Indians under my charge:
    There are four tribes under my charge (viz.) the Coos, Umpqua, Siuslaw and Alseas, numbering in all about five hundred and twenty-five. During the month considerable sickness has visited the different tribes, and one death in the Coos, two in the Umpqua, and one in Alsea tribe has taken place during the month. No births in either of the tribes.
    They have plenty of food to subsist upon. They have all their spring crops in and are now preparing for their spring hunt in the mountains.
All of which is most respectfully submitted
    By your obdt. servt.
        G. W. Collins
            U.S. Indn. Sub-Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Office Klamath Agency, Oregon
    April 30th 1868.
Sir,
    I have the honor to submit the following report for this month. The earlier part of the month being unfavorable, nothing of consequence could be done, but on the 20th inst., the cattle having arrived from Lost River, plowing was commenced, and on the 21st I employed, in order to prosecute early seeding with more vigor, four industrious young Indians. On the same instant Mr. F. M. Vanderpool resigned his position as Wagon and Plow-maker.
    The Klamath Indians have been unusually quiet and orderly during the month. Fishing is the principal occupation now, and they are now on Williamson River, where immense numbers of fish are now running. As soon as the fishing season is near over I expect to employ a number of them in rail-making. The Yahooskins are with them and similarly engaged. These Indians are all pleased with the progress of affairs on the reservation.
    I think the good being of the service would be promoted by the employment of a few white men at once to assist in plowing, planting and fencing. The Indians are unskilled in these things but may learn much by example.
    As soon in this month as the roads were in such condition as would admit of their being traveled by burdened animals, I notified that part of the Modoc nation off the reservation to come onto it, having previously appointed a council which they failed to attend. They failed to come.
    On the 28th inst. I called upon Capt. McGregor, commanding Ft. Klamath, for assistance in bringing them onto the reservation. Capt. McGregor expressed himself as anxious to assist me at once, with his whole command, but fearing censure from his superiors for having caused hostilities, in case any of the Indians should resist, has written to Gen. Crook, now commanding in the stead of Gen. Rousseau, stating the circumstances and asking instructions to enable him to assist in bringing the Modocs onto the reservation, peaceably if possible, but forcibly if required.
    I hope soon to be able to make a favorable report on this question as also on other operations inaugurated in pursuance of the treaty.
Respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Office Klamath Agency
    Oregon, May 6th 1868.
Sir,
    Considering it essential to the progress of operations on this reservation I employed on May 1st six white laborers at $75 per month including subsistence. No laborers could be had at a less compensation.
    The breaking of prairie in time for the putting in of grain this spring before too late and the enclosing of the field so as to prevent the overrunning of it by the hundreds of Indian horses require vigorous operations.
    On the 1st inst. also I employed A. Secord as wagon and plow maker.
Respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 40.



Office Klamath Sub-Agency Oregon May 8, 1868
Sir,
    I deem it my duty to inform you of the condition of affairs at this agency in respect to gambling. After being forbidden during your stay here last fall to refrain from gambling off their effects, they complied cheerfully until very lately, when they resumed their old practice, which led to serious altercation even to the drawing of dangerous weapons and a continual and annoying state of turmoil and difficulty. As the shortest way to prevent these evils, I forbid gambling altogether, and ordered
the return of articles to their original owners. With the exception of one individual they all complied. This man bid defiance to my authority, and procuring his arrest through the chiefs, the agency jail not yet being constructed, I sent him to Fort Klamath, with a request to confine him in the guardhouse.
    The Indians have just returned, stating that Capt. McGregor refused to confine him, stating that the Indians should not be forbidden from gambling, and that he would not confine anyone for that cause. This leaves the Indians victorious, and some of them manifest an utter disregard to my authority. If this state of things continues, the military aid being withheld when most wanted, it will be almost impossible to carry out the provisions of the treaty I think. Please give me the benefit of your instructions and suggestions immediately.
Very respectfully your obt. servant
    L. Applegate
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 45.



Lafayette May 10th 1868
J. W. P. Huntington Supt. Indian Affairs
    Sir I came this morning to Amity and learned that a man answering the description of Murphy paid them [a visit] on Thursday. At Dayton the hotel keeper told me Murphy had tried them a year or more since, but they drove him off for bad conduct. That on Friday morning before sunrise he saw across the bridge and instead of going up the road slipped 'round
through the brush and came out into the road beyond the toll house. He thought at the time it was to dodge the toll. He, the hotel keeper, was on the bank about one hundred and fifty yards from the bridge and says the man was about the size of Murphy and carried a carpet sack as Murphy had when last seen at Dallas. If this was the man and I think most likely it was he most likely went on to Portland, and if so I hope Brown got him. I made inquiry at the place; he has not been here. I will return to the agency tomorrow.
Yours truly
    Amos Harvey
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 42.



Siletz Agency
    May 15th 1868.
Sir,
    I am just in receipt of a letter from Sub-Agent Collins of Alsea Agency dated 14th inst., a copy of which is herewith enclosed, asking me for assistance to pursue a number of Indians that have recently left his agency for Coos Bay. I cannot at present without great injury to the service at this agency give him the assistance asked for, unless I employ other help than my regular employees.
    I have therefore most respectfully to submit the matter to you and ask for instructions.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        Ben Simpson
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem Oregon

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 72.


Copy of Letter.
Yreka May 18th 1868
To the officer at Fort Klamath.
    Capt. Jack on my return from Sacramento was in waiting to consult me; my former relations with these Indians has resulted in their full confidence in me, they having always obeyed all my orders while agent for California. They now as of former times desire to have a portion of the wild country to the eastward of us and live in peace with the Indians and citizens. They do not like reservations, and I think they are just in their conclusions.
    I shall leave for Washington in ten days, when it will give me pleasure to myself &c. to represent their true condition and wants to the heads of departments, many of whom I am personally acquainted with. I hope that they may not be disturbed as long as they support themselves and commit no depredations.
   
Yreka May 24th 1868
    The bearer of this wants to go up towards Lost River to make inquiry about Hornbuckle. Capt. McGregor has had a talk with Capt. Jack, chief of the Modocs, and has made an agreement with the Modocs which was satisfactory to both parties. Capt. McGregor will no doubt make known the agreement and see that it is faithfully carried out and the Modocs protected in their rights.
   
Yreka Novb. 3rd 1868
    This is to certify that on my late visit to Washington I presented the case of the Modoc Indians to the Department of Indian Affairs and was assured by them that they would send written instructions as to their determination that all the Indians south of the Oregon line belonged to the California agency and not the Oregon agency. The Department further informed me that [the] treaty that I made with their Indians in 1863 & 4 was the only one that as yet had not met with approval.
    Therefore I would advise the military not to take charge of Capt. Jack's Indians until advices are received from the proper authorities at Washington.
E. Steele
    Late Sub-Agt., I.D. California
   
    To Supt. Ind. Affairs for Modoc Indians or whom it may concern. The bearer, Capt. Jack of Modocs, I have known well for many years. He is well disposed towards our citizens, and has been since he has come into power. Is truly [sic] & faithful.
    He prefers not to sell his land and be forced upon a reservation, as he has seen too much of the workings of those institutions in the past.
Respectfully yours
    E. Steele
        Yreka, Aug. 2 / 69
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 616 Oregon Superintendency, 1870-1871, frames 342-343.  These four documents were copied by A. B. Meacham in 1870 from a sheaf of papers borrowed from Captain Jack; refer to reports of December 19, 1869 and January 14, 1870.



United States Senate Chamber
    Washington May 29th 1868
Dear Sir
    Your letter of April 28th I have received.
    You have already heard of the result of the impeachment trial--Andy still reigns.
    Nothing of course can or will be done in respect to appointments in Oregon. Things for the present must remain in status quo.
    I hope that your predictions as to the election may prove true; I feel a great anxiety about it, as it is the first election after Grant's nomination. Whatever may be the result of the June election I trust that we shall carry the state for Grant & Colfax.
    There is a crazy determination to cut down the Indian appropriations. We are going to have a hard struggle to prevent their total abolition in some cases. There never was such a frenzy to reduce expenses. I did not attend the Chicago convention; I handed my proxy to Walling. McCuhill had Baker's proxy. I spoke to some of our Pacific Coast friends about Gov. Woods, but they seemed disinclined to favor the movement. There are a great many aspirants in California. Let me hear from you again.
Yours truly
    Geo. H. Williams
Benj. Simpson
    Salem, Ore.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 30; Miscellaneous Loose Papers 1850-1873.



United States Senate Chamber
    Washington May 30, 1868
Friend Simpson
    Yours of April 27 is duly recd.--contents noted, for which I thank you very much. We failed to get the advanced appropriation bill through in consequence of a fight over it in the House. I had attached $10,000 for the Indians on your reservation to pay for their claim, as I intended to compensate them for opening up Yaquina Bay. It passed the Senate, failed in the House, and now [that] the regular Indian appropriation bill is before us old Ben Butler has been cutting and slashing into it without [omission] and sense of justice or reason. I see he has stricken out entirely the $50,000 for Indians in Oregon & Washington, half of which goes to your agency, I believe any on which you rely to pay employees, and in the bill he provides for only one agency in all Oregon. The bill has passed the House, so I have to fight it in the Senate; therefore if I get the $50,000 appropriated and the agents again inserted it may be as much as I can expect. I shall try also for compensation for losses; I fear however it will be vain with regard to the latter.
Yours truly
    H. W. Corbett
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 30; Miscellaneous Loose Papers 1850-1873.



Klamath Indian Agency Oregon May 31 1868.
Sir,
    I have the honor to report as follows for the present month.
The Klamath and Yahooskin Indians.
    These Indians with a very few exceptions have been quiet and peaceable. A number of them have been employed in rail making and in various ways on the farm, and they have shown considerable zeal and energy. Furnished with essential farming tools &c. many of them would, in a measure, forsake their indolent ways and become successful tillers of the ground. These Indians, as also the Modocs and Snakes on the reservation, are now engaged in collecting an edible root called by them ep'aw, but known among the whites as the Indian bread root.
The Modocs.
    High chief Schonchin and three of his people who are with him on the reservation are quiet and peaceable and disposed to be governed by treaty stipulations, but a large number of Modocs yet remain in their old country. No important change in relation to this matter has taken place since the date of my last report. Not considering it advisable to attempt to collect these people without a strong force, I yet await the action of the military. The commander of the United States forces here not being willing to act on my requisitions sent for orders to the commander of the Department, and as yet has received no reply. I am yet of the opinion that on the advent of a strong force in their country these Indians would collect and come onto the reservation, but in all probability a small force could not succeed. Notwithstanding the perplexing state of affairs in relation to the Modoc matter, I hope to be able to report a satisfactory settlement of it soon.
The Farm.
    Operations have been vigorously prosecuted on the farm. Up to the 15th inst., at which time sowing ceased, on account of the lateness of the snow eighty acres of grain were sown, a part on subdued and the remainder on newly broken land. Of corn and garden vegetables about forty acres have been planted, and plowing and planting still continue. In pursuance of your instructions a string of fence is being built from the northeast corner of the old field to the head of Fountain Creek, a distance of about 3¼ miles. The fence is about two-thirds completed, and the design is to finish it as soon as possible. Most of the rails for the fence have been made by the Indians, and have been purchased of them according to your wish.
    During the greater part of the month five white laborers have been employed in farming and fencing.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-
                Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            Salem, Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 45.



Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency
    June 4th 1868
Dear Sir--
    Again I have the honor to submit my report of condition of Indians &c. under my charge during the month of May 1868.
    The whole number of Indians in this agency is about four hundred, consisting of the Coos, Umpqua, Siuslaw and Alsea tribes.
    During the month no material change has taken place, and the same quiet and good feeling appears to exist.
    They are beginning to see the importance and necessity of civilization and endeavoring to adopt the more honorable mode of living.
    The Coos and Umpqua tribes are the most intelligent, and are making more rapid advancement toward civilization than either of the other tribes. A great portion of them manifest a good degree of taste in and about their homes in the way of neatness and order, both of person and farms.
    While not engaged on their farms they are either in the mountains for game or on the rivers fishing. And by these means are well supplied with food.
    The Alsea and Siuslaw tribes are of a more indolent nature and still desire to adhere to the Indian mode of living and appear more contented while in the pursuit of game than where cultivating the soil.
    Each and all the tribes have enjoyed good health during the month.
    No deaths have taken place and but one birth.
All of which is most respectfully
    Submitted by your most obdt. [servant]
        G. W. Collins
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Galesville, Douglas Co. Ogn.
    June 27th 1868
J. W. P. Huntington Esq.
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Sir
            I take the liberty of asking advice in behalf of myself and two others who are desirous of mining on the beach on the reservation.
    Would you grant permission to a small company to mine there? The company of course to strictly observe all of your rules and regulations.
    At your earliest convenience will you be kind enough to drop an answer and oblige.
Respectfully
    Yr. obdt. svt.
        Geo. T. Sullivan
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 71.



Office Klamath Agency
    June 30th 1868.
Sir,
    I have the honor to report as follows for the present month. The Indians with very few exceptions have been quiet and peaceable during the month. A number of them have been employed in rail making, and in various ways on the farm, and have shown considerable zeal and energy. Furnished with essential farming tools
&c. many of them would in a measure forsake their indolent ways and become successful tillers of the ground. They have been, during the latter part of the month, encamped in large numbers on the prairie collecting the camas root, an important article of diet.
    Nothing new in regard to the Modoc matter has transpired during the month, consequently it remains substantially as reported last month.
    On the farms much has been accomplished. Early in the month planting ceased on account of the lateness of the season, about fifty acres of corn and vegetables having been planted. Plowing on new land is still pursued with vigor. The fence running from the old agency to Fountain Creek has been completed, also another from Crooked River to Wood River Slough. Two bridges on Crooked River have also been built for the convenience of the agency.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Klamath Agency Oregon,
    June 30th 1868.
Sir,
    I have the honor to submit the following report for the period I have been acting as Supt. of Farming on this reservation. I entered upon the discharge of duty on October 1st 1867.
    Having been employed here in another
capacity since the commencement of operations in 1865, I had become acquainted with the nature of the soil and the peculiarities of the climate, knowledge which I found of much assistance to me in my new field of duty.
    The soil under cultivation here lies immediately on the northeastern shore of the Greater Klamath Lake, and the moisture continually rising from the level of the lake keeps it in excellent condition all summer. When favoring showers in spring have caused seeds to sprout and send down their roots two or three inches, there is no farther danger of drought on this bottom land. This soil seems to be the result of an admixture of the washings of the mountains with the debris of decaying vegetation, and as a consequence is exceedingly fertile. In its native state it is covered with a powerfully tenacious turf, and in the warm season with an immense growth of tall rye grass intermixed with wild peavine and clover. When broken this turf requires a long period in which to decay, and considering this fact, and also that the severity of winter prevents the cultivation of the soil for near four months, that the soil until thoroughly subdued will not yield good crops and that up to the autumn of 1867 but one team was employed in plowing, we may easily realize the fact that the progress of agricultural operations has been very slow on this reservation.
    After the time of my assuming control of operations on the farm, the teams were kept steadily employed in plowing until late in December, the winter coming later than usual. After the commencement of severe weather, the ground being frozen or snow covered until April, the hands were employed in getting out building timber and making rails when practicable, and in feeding and caring for the stock.
    On the commencement of the spring season operations in the fields were vigorously resumed. The teams were all employed in plowing, harrowing or in hauling rails, and the farmer and other employees labored industriously to accomplish as much as possible before the planting season should be at an end. By the 1st inst. the whole amount of ground then broken had been planted or sown. This amounted to one hundred and thirty acres, of which fifty acres were planted in corn, turnips, carrots, beets &c. and the remainder was sown in barley, wheat and oats. Early in spring a part of the farm force was employed in enclosing the farm with a substantial rail fence. This fence, which is now completed, leaves the lake shore a little south of the old agency buildings and running due east something over a half mile changes its direction northward and running in a direct line three and a quarter miles joins Fountain Creek near the falls. The said creek running due west a half a mile enters Crooked River, which running south flows into Wood River, and the last stream soon empties into Klamath Lake. These streams are impassable by stock, and hence a field of near two thousand acres is thus enclosed, much of it being fine agricultural land, and much splendid wild meadows. Most of the rails for this enclosure were made by the Indians, and in this they displayed an unlooked-for degree of industry and enterprise. After completing the enclosure I turned my attention towards enclosing a pasture for the Department animals by fencing from Crooked River westerly to Wood River Slough, just north of Council Grove. This enclosure, which is also completed, includes a larger extent of country extending southward from the fence between Crooked and Wood rivers to their junction.
    Having completed the pasture I superintended the construction of a bridge across Crooked River, opposite the site selected by Supt. Huntington for agency buildings, thus affording easy access to the pasture. I also built a bridge on the same stream north of Council Grove, that the public travel might not pass through the pasture.
    Since the putting in of the spring crop was completed the plows have been kept breaking prairie, and the crop has been properly cared for.
    So far with the means at hand it has been impossible to accomplish much with respect to commencing separate farms for the Indians. Some of them have put in small gardens, and many of them express a desire to commence cultivating the soil for themselves at a time when the requisite assistance can be furnished them. The Indians and white employees on the farm have rendered efficient service.
    To farmer S. D. Whitmore much credit is due for his continued industry and determination to do his duty, as also to farmer John Gotbrod, who evinces a faithful spirit.
Respectfully your obt. servant,
    O. C. Applegate
        Supt. of Farming.
Hon. L. Applegate
    U.S. Indian Sub-Agent.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



    Farm productions raised on the government farm, with exception of quantity retained for seed, and some vegetables for the government employees, issued to the chiefs and headmen of the Klamath, Modoc and Yahooskin Snake Indians for distribution to their people.
    A large amount of ground has been broken, and will be in fine condition for a spring crop. The Indians are encouraged to turn their attention towards farming, and much more interest is manifested in agricultural pursuits than formerly.
    The article of bald barley, of which grain a large amount can be produced next year, is finely adapted to the climate and soil and to the subsistence of the Indians. It is never injured by the frost, and the grain is nutritious, palatable and easily prepared for use.
    The seed of the yellow pond lily, called by the Indians "wocus," is a valuable article of diet, abounding in the marshes.
    [The] pounds or values of fish, feathers, cinches, gloves &c. given herein is only estimated.

Lindsay Applegate, "Statistical Return of Farming &c. at the Klamath Agency 1868," NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 2.  The return was most likely filed July 1 of 1868.



Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency Ogn.
    July 6th 1868.
Sir:--
    I have the honor to submit my monthly report of the condition of the Indians under my charge in the Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency Oregon for the month of June 1868.
    The four tribes
in this agency (viz.) Coos, Umpqua, Siuslaw and Alseas number about 527 souls. During the month no marked change has taken place in either tribe. They are all quiet and apparently contented and easily managed and governed.
    Every month shows some signs of improvement in their condition. They want not for food during this season of the year, while game and fish are so plentiful. They have a fine prospect of an abundant harvest. Crops look well and will undoubtedly produce largely.
    A large portion of the best hunters are now in the mountains (with my consent), killing and curing meat, while others are engaged in fishing on the rivers in this vicinity, thus providing food to subsist upon during harvest.
    They begin to see the advantage in providing for their future wants by laying in a plentiful supply of food while it is easily obtained.
    By realizing large crops and plentiful ones it has encouraged them in agriculture, and they seem to express a great willingness to improve their time on the farms and are fast becoming learning to be good farmers.
    At present they are comfortably clothed and appear to feel thankful for the attention paid them by their Great Father.
    There has been very little sickness among them during the month.
    Two births have taken place in the Coos tribe, and one death.
    All of which is most respectfully submitted.
Your most obdt. servt.
    G. W. Collins
        U.S. Indn. Sub-Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Office
    Klamath Agency, Oregon,
        July 10th 1868.
Sir,
    In regard to appointment and resignation on the Klamath Reservation I would respectfully report as follows.
--June 22nd 1868--
Henry Duncan resigned his position as U.S. Carpenter, and on the 1st inst. Norman S. Lee of  Lebanon, Linn Co. was appointed to fill the vacancy.
--June 30th 1868--
O. C. Applegate resigned the position of Supt. of Farming, and on the 1st inst. I. D. Applegate of Jackson Co. Oregon was appointed in his stead.
On the 1st inst.
Dr. William C. McKay of Wasco Co. Oregon received the appointment of Physician and O. C. Applegate that of Teacher on the Klamath Reservation.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W
. Perit Huntington
        Supt. of Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 86.



Klamath Agency, Oregon
    July 15th 1868.
Sir,
    If you consider it compatible with the requirements of the Indian service, I should like to appoint a sawyer for this agency.
    It cannot be but a short time before a sawmill will be erected, and prior to that time a sawyer can be detailed in assisting in its erection, or otherwise for the good being of the service.
    There is an opportunity now of securing the services of an excellent sawyer who is also a good carpenter and would be of much aid in erecting the mill.
    Such an opportunity might not again occur if the appointment be longer postponed.
    Will you please give me instruction on this point at an early day?
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 96.



Jacksonville July 17 1868
J. W. Perit Huntington Esq.
    Sup. Ind. Affairs Oregon
        Dear Sir
We sent you yesterday a dispatch to remit if convenient the money due as per the flour. You answered, as the money was sent long ago, to see Applegate. We wrote to Mr. Applegate enclosing your dispatch. We received today an answer that there is no money in his in possession for to pay for that flour. Please answer how it stands?
In haste
    Your obt. servants
        Muller & Brentano
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 85.



Alsea Indian Sub-Agency Oregon
    July 25th 1868.
Sir,
    In compliance with the regulations of the Indian Department, I have the honor to submit to you my 5th annual report of the condition of the Indians under my charge at the Alsea Indian Sub-Agency Coast Reservation Oregon.
    In this agency there are four tribes of Indians, viz. Coos, Umpqua, Siuslaws and Alsea tribes, numbering as follows: Coos tribe 171, Umpquas 83, Siuslaw 127 and the Alsea 146, making a total of 527 souls.
    It affords me great pleasure to be able to report the condition of these Indians in a flourishing and healthy state, and the affairs of the agency in a prosperous condition. The crops look fine, and at present indicate a large yield of wheat, oats, potatoes and all other kinds of vegetables grown on the coast of Oregon. This so encourages the Indians that they are fast becoming satisfied that 'tis beneficial to them to work and cultivate the soil in order to reap a good harvest.
    During the past year they have made many permanent improvements such as building houses, barns and stables, making rails, building new fences and repairing old ones. We now have under fence about four hundred acres of land, and one hundred and sixty acres in cultivation. For a detailed report of the farming operations, I will refer you to the report of the Supt. of Farming accompanying this.
    The Coos and Umpqua tribes have a very fine crop of wheat this year and are anxious to have a mill to flour their grain that they may so far adopt the state of the whites in their mode of living, and as I have already become convinced that by selecting the most suitable ground, fine crops of wheat can be raised here. I would most respectfully recommend that a small mill be purchased for the use of the Indians on this agency, such a one as they have at the Siletz Agency would be a suitable one. I am satisfied that the same amount of money could not be expended in any other way that would give the full satisfaction that this would in the way of encouraging the Indians in agriculture.
    The Coos and Umpquas are very intelligent Indians, and take pride in trying to improve their condition. They are obedient and dutiful, always ready and willing to perform duties assigned them by the farmer. The most of them have fine gardens aside from their general crop, and take pride in cultivating them.
    The Siuslaw tribe lives on the Siuslaw River and cultivate the small bottoms along its side which are very rich and produce largely.
    They have under cultivation about 30 acres of land in which they raise corn, potatoes, peas, squashes and other vegetables, which promise a good crop. They have good fisheries and put up large quantities each year.
    Last fall they sold about two hundred bushels of salmon to a company who were allowed to go in there with a small schooner and exchange clothing and provision for their fish and furs. They are but little expense to the government and give the agent but little unnecessary trouble.
    The Alsea tribe, of a more inferior
order, live on the Alsea River and cultivate the small bottoms of land, which are very rich.
    This year they have under cultivation about twenty acres, mostly in potatoes, turnips and carrots. Some of them are good hunters and kill large quantities of deer and usually exchange the skins with the other tribes for wheat, potatoes &c. &c. All of which is most respectfully submitted.
Your obt. servant
    G. W. Collins
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
To
    Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. of Indian Affairs.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Alsea Indian Sub-Agency
    July 25th 1868.
Sir,
    In compliance with your request I submit the following statement in relation to the Coos, Umpqua and Alsea Indian farms at this agency. I took charge of those farms on the 22nd of last October. I immediately proceeded to take care of the potato crop. After the potatoes were all safely housed, I then repaired to the stables for the government stock during the winter. This spring we have plowed and put in crop on this farm wheat 20 acres, oats 35 acres, timothy 9 acres. That with wheat had been sown on this farm before, making 25 acres in all. Potatoes 50 acres, peas 6 acres, turnips, rutabagas and carrots 12 acres. Indians' private gardens 12 acres. Ten acres of new land has been broke and put in crop this spring, making in all 160 acres in crop this year which all promises a good crop. Wheat will make 20 bushels to the acres. Oats 40 bushels to the acre. Potatoes
, turnips and vegetables of all kinds made a good average crop. We have made over four thousand rails, built new fences and repaired fences. Built a new barn 48 feet long and 20 wide on the old one, raised the old one three logs higher, put a shed on each side 15 feet wide for stabling Department horses and oxen. Put a new roof on all, making 148 feet long and 50 feet wide under cover. I find these Indians far more willing to perform such labor as I have required of them, and take great interest in farming. We have the prospect of a good crop of small grain here this year, and I would respectfully recommend that there should be a fanning mill purchased for this place.
    All of which is respectfully submitted.
Supt. of Farming
    J. S. Copeland
To G. W. Collins
    U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Grand Ronde Agency
    July 28th 1868.
Sir,
    I have the honor to submit the following annual report of the manual labor school under my charge.
    On taking charge of the school, December 1st, 1867, I found the scholars very much scattered. I succeeded in getting a few together, and since that time there has been a steady increase of scholars up to the present time. I have as many scholars as I can take care of in the present house. There is 30 scholars on my school list, 23 boys, 7 girls=30.
    There has been no deaths and but very little sickness since the school has been under my charge. They have been taught spelling, reading, writing and arithmetic; the girls have also been instructed in the culinary department and in needlework. Some of the girls and boys seem to take an interest in their studies. I can't say that they take that interest in their outdoor work that they should; I learn them to work but whether I will succeed in learning them to love it will have to be determined in the future. I think it highly probable that some of them will make successful farmers by proper training. We have a very fine garden this year, consisting principally of potatoes, cabbages, parsnips, carrots, beets, peas, beans and corn. We have also a very fine strawberry bed that has been cultivated by the boys, but owing to late frosts they did not yield more than one fourth of a crop this year. Our turnip crop was an entire failure; they were destroyed by bugs.
    The advantages accruing to the Indians and to the government are so numerous and obvious that they must in full force strike anyone at the first glance. All know that frequent change in instructions and modes of instruction are invariably disastrous to the interests of a school among white children, and experienced teachers know that they are much more so among Indians, who are naturally shy, reserved and suspicious and need a long acquaintance before anything like complete confidence is felt by them. Now frequent changes utterly preclude the possibility of such confidence being established.
    Again, a long acquaintance is necessary in order to obtain a knowledge of the peculiar traits of Indian character. Without this knowledge all efforts to educate them will be entirely abortive.
    Allow me here to invite your attention to the necessity of building a chimney in that portion of the building occupied by the teacher and his family during the winter, as the house is neither comfortable or healthy.
    I would also suggest, and respectfully urge upon your notice,
the utility of setting apart 20 or 25 acres of farming land for the use of the school, also the purchase of one pair of harness and horses and farming implements for the exclusive use of the school.
    In conclusion, permit me to return you my cordial thanks for the interest you have constantly manifested in the welfare of this school.
T. S. Jeffries
    Teacher
Amos Harvey
    U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Grand Ronde Agency.
    July 28th 1868.
Sir,
    In compliance with the regulations of the Indian Department, I herewith submit my second annual report.
    Since my last report, I have been engaged in a variety of work for the Department and Indians, such as making harness, wagon wheels, wagon beds, axletrees, bolsters, coffins, wagon tongues, coupling poles, sand boards, hounds, neck yokes, single and double trees, stocking plows, making plow beams, plow handles, ox bows, fork and shovel handles, doors, bedsteads, tables, boxes, cupboards, cradles and repairing wagons, plows, harrows, grain cradles, sharpening crosscut and hand saws, and a great variety of other small items too numerous to mention.
    I have also put up a block and council house for the Department and done considerable repairing on the agency buildings. I have also done about one month's work on the mills and mill dam.
    The Indians have brought in quite a number of old wagons, which they have worked for on the outside, which will need considerable repairing, almost enough to keep one man busy for a year.
    I would recommend that some new hubs be bought, so that some of the old may be replaced with new ones.
    There will be also some oak timber, paint and nails needed for the shop.
    The tools are in good repair, and but few ones needed.
Very respectfully
    J. W. Stewart
        Carpenter
Amos Harvey Esq.
    U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Grand Ronde Agency
    July 29th 1868.
Sir,
    In compliance with the regulations of the Indian Department, I have the honor to submit my first annual report.
    Shortly after taking charge of the mills (Jan. 1st 1868) the high water, which was higher than had been known for years, washed a channel 50 feet wide and from 12 to 15 feet deep around one end of the dam. As soon as the water had fallen so as to admit [work] we commenced putting in a new dam, which we completed, so that I began grinding Feby. 4th 1868, and sawing on the 19th. Since that time I have ground two days out of each week, and sawed the balance of the time, up to within a few days, when I found it necessary to clean out the race, which had been filled up considerably by the high water last winter. As soon as we have finished cleaning out the race (which will be in a few days) I think there will be water enough to run all day, even at the lowest stage.
    The present water wheel in the grist mill is an old-fashioned "tub wheel," very badly worn, and with little power unless there is plenty of water, which makes it slow grinding in the summer when the water is low. I would recommend that a new wheel be put in the place of the one now in use.
    There should be some new elevators made and put in the grist mill, also a new fanning mill for the use of the mill.
    With the repairs mentioned above, both mills will be in good running order and capable of doing all the work required of the Indians and Department.
    I have ground up to July 1st 1429 bushels of wheat, and sawed 6694 feet of lumber.
Very respectfully
    G. Shurtleff
        Miller and Sawyer
Amos Harvey
    Indian Agent Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency
    Oregon, July 29th 1868
Sir,
    I have the honor herewith of submitting my fourth annual report for the year ending June 30th 1868.
    It affords me pleasure to state that the past year has been one of unusual good health on this agency, and it is especially gratifying to know that syphilis, that bane of Indian civilization, is rapidly disappearing, and by reference to our reports for the years '65 & '66, as compared with the last year, you will perceive that this disease, so common at that time, has very greatly diminished, and during the last year I have treated but few new cases. This is to my mind is most conclusive proof of the injurious results growing out of the association of the Indians with the military, and after having been in almost constant professional communication with these people for four years [I] am well satisfied that to place them under the control of that department would be perhaps [a] rather slow, but a sure means of their final extermination by this disease, and I hope the day is not far distant when syphilis, with all its complications, shall disappear from this reservation and that we shall see these Indians making the same advancement in morals and religion that they are doing in agriculture and the arts, for on this reservation many are getting good houses and well-improved farms. The improvement in their mode of living, together with an abundant supply of good and healthy food, is highly conducive to their general good health.
    This agency has been entirely free for the last year from any contagious disease, and the diseases that have been and are most common are ophthalm
ia and intermittent fever, perhaps owing to the late and almost constant rains which have continued up to the 1st inst. In addition to the above, I have had a few cases of scrofula, rheumatism, dysentery &c. &c. for the statistics of which permit me to refer to my quarterly report just submitted.
    The diseases which I have had to treat for the last year have nearly all yielded to proper medical treatment, there having been but few deaths, and those mainly among the very old or children. Nevertheless it is very difficult to get them to take medicine and follow directions strictly, and to desist entirely from their superstitions, as many of them are disposed to intersperse the treatment by a doctor dance, or some other incantation as handed down from father to son, these in some cases thwarting the design of the physician in his course of treatment. It is also quite difficult to get them to take those remedies that are unpleasant to the taste. Still another difficulty I find in chronic cases; I find it is next to impossible to get them to continue a course of treatment for any great length of time, and indeed they are much like their more enlightened neighbors; they desire a change of treatment, or perhaps a new doctor. These difficulties appear to be gradually disappearing, but it will take time and patience to entirely remove them.
    Permit me in conclusion to call your attention to the want of hospital stores, having a good supply of medicines on hand. All of which is respectfully submitted.
W. C. Warriner M.D.
Amos Harvey Esq.
    U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Siletz Agency Oregon
    July 29th 1868
Sir,
    
I have the honor of submitting this, my sixth annual report of the affairs of this agency.
    I take pleasure in saying that the Indians under my charge continue friendly and well disposed towards the whites, and with few exceptions seem willing to accept the situation and to devote their attention to the improvement of the lands they occupy.
    They are gradually discontinuing their barbarous habits and modes of life and are beginning to appreciate the importance and necessity of "taking thought for the morrow," and of applying themselves to steady labor during the present in order to make provisions for the future.
    Heretofore their roving propensities and their complete devotion to the pleasures of the present, regardless of the future, have been an insuperable obstacle to any permanent improvement. But when they learn (as I think they are beginning to learn) that their prosperity and happiness depend upon their own exertions, their advancement in civilization will be rapid and easy.
    We have only to foster this dawning spirit of thrift and industry among them, and the complex problem of their fate as a race will be soon and easily solved. During the present year there are under cultivation on this reserve about one thousand acres of land, planted in oats, wheat, potatoes, peas and garden vegetables of various kinds. Besides this we have enclosed for pasture, meadow &c. about one thousand acres. Our crops are exceedingly promising and give promise of an unusual yield; this is especially true of the crop of oats.
    We have been very much retarded in our agricultural labors this year by the fact that the government stock on this agency is fast becoming old, worn out and unfit for use, and a fresh supply is therefore urgently needed.
    In view of these and other hindrances with which the employees and Indians have had to contend in their farming operations, their industry is truly commendable, and the results which they have achieved are extremely gratifying as well as surprising. Quite a number of substantial improvements have been made upon this reservation this year by the carpenter, Mr. Thorn. These improvements consist principally in houses, barns &c. erected for the use of the Indians.
    The Indian school, in charge of Mr. F. D. Dodge, is in a prosperous condition, and has since my last report accomplished much good. It has in attendance regularly from fifteen to twenty scholars, who seem to be acquiring some taste for mental improvement. Owing to limited means I was compelled on the first day of last December to change the character of the school from a manual labor to a day school, allowing the scholars to obtain board & lodging at their homes, though I still continued to clothe them. I am satisfied both from experience and observation that the manual labor system is [by] far the best that has yet been tried, and that it is, in fact, the only system by which we can hope to effect any permanent good. Indeed, it is obvious upon a moment's consideration that it is utterly useless to attempt to elevate any individuals of a heretofore savage race without removing them from their rude associates, and thus freeing them as far as possible from all degrading influences. So long as they remain connected with their tribes, the knowledge that they may acquire at school will be either effaced from their minds or perverted to vicious ends by those absurd traditions and superstitious myths that are continually floating about among a savage people. Besides, it is evident that among the Indians physical and mental training must go together, for it is like putting new wine into old bottles to attempt to educate a mind that inhabits a savage body--mind and body must be civilized at the same time, and while the one is being stored with useful knowledge the other must be taught sober, steady, industrious habits; under such a system, not only will the pupils be benefited, but they will contribute largely by their influence and example toward the elevation of their race from its barbarous condition. It seems to me, therefore, that an efficient manual labor school should be attached to every Indian agency, and that the agent should be furnished with ample means for providing the school with a competent teacher and all necessary appliances for maintaining it upon a firm footing.
    To keep up such a school in connection with this agency will cost about three thousand dollars per annum, and I earnestly hope that an appropriation will be made at an early day for that purpose.
    The sanitary condition of the Indians has very much improved within the past year under the care of Dr. Bensell, the resident physician.
    There has been but little sickness, comparatively, and the diseases prevailing have been generally of the venereal type. For further information on this point I refer you to the report of Dr. Bensell.
    During the past year the Indians have generally, as I have already remarked, remained quietly upon the reservation, devoting their time and attention to the improvement of their homes, but there have been some exceptions. Some of the Indians have shown a very lawless and unruly disposition, and have caused me much annoyance by escaping from the reservation and roving about the adjoining settlements in idleness and dissipation, and by exciting insubordination among the other Indians.
    These exceptions are due mainly, as I believe, to the tardiness exhibited by the general government in complying with the agreement made with the Indians at the time they were brought to this reservation.
    As you will remember, in 1856 Gen. Joel Palmer (then in charge of the Oregon Superintendency) entered into a treaty with some ten tribes of Indians, now occupying the Siletz Reservation.
    Trusting to the pledges of security at that time made to them, the Indians came here and settled upon the lands set apart for their use in the treaty to which I refer.
    From some cause, however, that treaty was not ratified by the Senate, and the affair has remained in this position from that time until now. Consequently these Indians are now, and have been for the past twelve years, utterly without any guarantees for their future security. They are now in the anomalous condition of prisoners of war in time of peace, dependent for support and even for their homes upon the uncertain charity of the government. They are mere tenants by sufferance of the lands they occupy, liable at any time to be driven from their [homes] by the constantly encroaching white man.
    They have been repeatedly assured by those who have had them in charge that this grievance would be remedied, but these fair promises have been repeatedly broken, and so the government has gone on from year to year, gradually but surely teaching this rude, simple-minded people the bitter lesson of distrust of the white race.
    The Indians are thoroughly conscious of the humiliation and insecurity of their position, and of a necessary consequence have frequently manifested their dissatisfaction by escaping when possible from a place that seemed to them intended as a prison rather than as a home for them.
    Now, however, the majority of them seem to be willing to "wait a little longer" for some action in their behalf on the part of the general government, but a few, more suspicious than the rest from their longer acquaintance with our race, are constantly endeavoring to excite discontent and insubordination among their companions. In view of these facts, it is not wonderful that this agency has been one of the most difficult to manage of any included within the Oregon Superintendency, and if matters continue as they are, this will prove in the future a constant source of annoyance to the agent and of expense to the government.
    The discontent and suspicion of the Indians on this subject has been greatly increased by the action of the government two years ago in throwing open Yaquina Bay and the surrounding lands to white occupancy.
    As you are aware, those lands formed a part of the Siletz Reservation, and quite a number of Indians had settled upon them.
    These Indians had erected houses and barns, built fences &c. with the intention of making permanent homes there, and as no provision was made by the government for paying them for their improvements, they were actually robbed of the results of their labor and were literally thrust out of their homes by the white men that came in there to settle. This has caused much anxiety and distrust among the Indians, for the evil disposed are constantly endeavoring to persuade them that this is only the beginning of aggressions on the part of the whites, and that the whole reservation with all its improvements will be taken from them in the same way. I think, therefore, that it would be an act of wisdom, as well as of justice, for the government to make provisions at once for the compensation of the Indians who have suffered loss in this transaction. To do all this will require an appropriation of about ten thousand dollars.
    In conclusion, I would state that in my opinion it would be well in order to quiet the apprehensions of the Indians and dispel their fears as to the future, for the government to make a treaty with those tribes that have not yet been treated with, and to make this a permanent reservation. This would give great encouragement to the Indians, and would induce them to labor more earnestly and industriously for the improvement of the land, since they would then regard this as their permanent home. I am decidedly of the opinion that there is no other place on the Pacific coast so thoroughly adapted for an Indian settlement and at the same time so little fitted for the use of whites as the Siletz Reservation.
    That portion of the reservation which is suitable for cultivation is situated some twelve miles from the coast, and is surrounded on all sides by high mountains which are filled with elk, deer and other game, while the streams abound in fish of an excellent quality. It is not a good grazing country, as there is no grass on the hills and mountains, what there is being confined to the bottoms and flats along the streams. The soil is fertile and well adapted to growing vegetables of all kinds.
    It also produces oats [well], and this grain furnishes excellent food for the Indians; it is easily prepared, and makes a bread which I think is far more healthful for the Indians than the bread obtained from wheat. Wheat does not thrive here and has proved almost an entire failure during the five years that I have had charge of this agency. These and other peculiarities of the country convince me that while it would be of little value to the whites, it would furnish an excellent home for the Indians. I therefore earnestly call your attention, and that of the Department, to this matter, and I hope that it will receive careful consideration.
I am sir
    Very respectfully
        Your obt. servant
            Ben Simpson
                U.S. Indian Agt.
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Superintendent of Indian Affairs
        Salem Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Klamath Indian Agency
    Oregon, July 31st 1868.
Sir,
    I commenced my service as farmer on the reservation on the 15th of November 1868.
    The soil of the farm I found excellent but overgrown with a tenacious turf, which after being turned by the plow remains undecayed for almost a year. This makes the opening of farms a slow and tedious process.
    I have been engaged in farming since the commencement of my service, whenever the weather would admit, and in conjunction with the other employees have been able to accomplish a great deal. In all my experience in laboring for the Indian service previous to my coming to this reservation, I never knew so much accomplished in so short a time by so few employees.
    The Indians show considerable interest in operations here, and many of them labor industriously.
    All of which I very respectfully submit.
Your obt. servant
    John Gotbrod
        U.S. Farmer
Hon.
    L. Applegate
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Grand Ronde Agency
    July 31st 1868.
Sir,
    In submitting this, my fourth annual report, I deem it unnecessary and useless to reiterate
the recommendations made in my former reports, but would say that I am still of the opinion of their necessity.
    The condition of the Indians under my charge has not changed materially since my last annual report; they are still slowly improving in a knowledge of agriculture and taking more or less interest in stock-raising and the improvement of their buildings and farms, in which they are taking a considerable pride in trying to make them look like the "whites," in which I have assisted them as far as I have been able, believing in "helping those that try to help themselves."
    The conduct of the Indians during the past year has been orderly, with but few exceptions, and no case of whiskey-drinking has occurred in this agency for the past two years. In this there has been a very great improvement, as it used to be an almost universal thing for these Indians to drink upon every opportunity, but the prosecution of some of the unprincipled persons engaged in furnishing them liquor--which I have been able to do through the Indians themselves--has had a good effect in putting a stop to the nefarious practice.
    The past winter was one of the most severe that I have experienced during twenty-two years' residence in Oregon, the snow covering the ground for about sixty consecutive days to the average depth of one foot, and quite a number of the Indians' horses and cattle died from starvation, and some of them feeding almost the last bushel of wheat they had, but it is a lesson they are profiting by, for the majority of them are now engaged in cutting and putting up more hay than they have ever done before.
    The severe cold froze out about all the winter wheat that was sown last fall by both Indians and Department--some 150 acres--in this we have been unlucky, this being the second year now that the most of the winter wheat has been killed, and it has almost discouraged the Indians from sowing fall wheat, and would have done so entirely were it not [that] that which lived is the best grain now growing on the agency. But as a considerable portion of their land is very foul, I shall still continue to have them summer fallow and sow as much grain in the fall as possible.
    I have had a few, as an experiment, sow some wheat in June, and if it should prove a success I think the most of it in future should be sown at that time, for it would then get such a start as not to be liable to winter-kill.
    Owing to the backwardness of the season and the scarcity of seed, together with the poor condition of the stock, a less breadth of ground was sown this spring than last, but what was put in was in better order than usual, and I think the yield will be considerable more per acre than common, as a considerable of it is on new ground which has been broke and fenced by the Indians this season.
    The number of acres in cultivation this year, and the estimated yield, is as follows
By Indians.
    Wheat 485 A. Estimated Yield 6790 Bush.
Oats 535 " " " 8375 "
Potatoes 62 " " " 6200 "
Carrots &c. 15 " " " 1500 "
Peas 12 " " " 240 "
Onions 2 " " " 300 "
Cabbage 5 " " " 5000 Head
Timothy 65 " " " 1600 Ton
Wild Grass 100 " " " 200 "
    Total number of acres in cultivation by Indians 1,082.
    The following is the number of acres in cultivation by the Department, for seed, forage and subsistence of old and destitute Indians
    Wheat 35 A. Estimated Yield 700 Bush.
Oats 35 " " " 1400 "
Potatoes 2 " " " 400 "
Timothy 30 " " " 75 Ton
    Total number of acres in cultivation this year, 1,184.
    At the early day that the reports from this coast have to be made, it is a difficult matter to estimate the amount the growing crops will yield, as was the case last year, the wheat crop falling short of the estimate from two to three bushels per acre on account of the extremely hot weather the latter part of the season, which prevented the grain from filling well, which result was not anticipated when making the estimate.
    The hay crop is about all cut, both by the Department and Indians, and will fully come up to the estimate, and I think the balance of the crops this year will, if anything, exceed the estimate, for they all look very well.
    The severe cold during the forepart of winter freezing out so much of the fall wheat, and the Indians feeding out all their oats to their stock during the snow, I found that it was absolutely necessary that I should purchase seed for them in order that they might raise a crop this year, which I did, paying for it out of their annuity funds, and issued it to them together with what the Department had on hand in sufficient quantity to raise enough subsistence for themselves and stock for the coming winter.
    During the high water last winter, which was higher than had ever been known on this stream before, a channel large enough to let the whole stream through was washed around the east abutment of the dam. As soon as the water had subsided enough, I called out all the Indians and at once put in a dam across the new channel, the Indians working cheerfully, although it was very cold and the ground covered with snow, I only feeding their teams while engaged in hauling logs, brush, rocks &c., and we had the mill again running the 4th of February. The mills have cut during the last year 78,730 feet of lumber, and ground 3,944 bushels of wheat.
    In my report for 1867 I urged upon the attention of the Department the necessity of some provision being made for the employment of a farmer and a blacksmith at this agency, and gave my reasons then why it should be done. Whether it has been recommended to Congress or not I am at present uninformed, as I have not received the Hon. Commissioner's report for last year. But I would respectfully say that some provision must be made--if it has not already been done--or it will be impossible to carry on this agency successfully, and I hope the Department will give the matter a serious consideration.
    For details in regard to the sanitary condition of these Indians, also to condition of schools, mills, shops &c., I would respectfully refer you to the reports of the several employees herewith enclosed.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        Amos Harvey
            U.S. Indian Agt.
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Klamath Indian Agency, July 31st 1868.
Sir,
    I respectfully submit the following as my report for the limited period I have been acting as Supt. of Farming.
    I entered upon the discharge of my duties on the 1st inst., finding agricultural affairs in a prosperous condition. My attention has almost entirely been turned towards the breaking of prairie and the cultivation of the gardens. The crops look well with the exception of the corn and potatoes, which were injured by the frost some time ago, but which I think may entirely recover. The grain is growing beautifully, and I confidently expect from it an abundant yield. The work cattle are in good condition, and the laborers employed in farm work are quite energetic and industrious.
    From appearances enough ground can be broken this season to admit of a sufficiency being planted next spring to subsist the Indians.
Respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        Ivan D. Applegate
            Supt. of Farming
L. Applegate
    U.S. Indian Sub-Agent.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Klamath Indian Agency
    July 31st 1868.
Sir,
    Entering upon my duties as carpenter only on the 1st inst., I am able to make but a meager report.
    Mr. Duncan, my predecessor, was appointed on February 1st 1868, but was able to accomplish but little until April, owing to a continuance of very severe weather until that time. Upon the breaking up of winter he was employed in making shingles, and then in erecting temporary buildings for the convenience of employees.
    I am now busily engaged in erecting an office, in pursuance of your instructions. I find the supply of tools limited, and would respectfully suggest the purchase of a complete set at an early day.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        N. L. Lee
            U.S. Carpenter.
Hon.
    L. Applegate
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Klamath Agency Oregon
    July 31st 1868.
Sir,
    In pursuance of your instructions I respectfully submit the following report for the period I have been acting as
wagon & plow maker.
    I entered upon the discharge of my duty on May 1st 1868. The wagons I found in good running order, and although continually employed since that time they have required little labor to keep them in order. All the plows at the agency have been stocked, several of them since the commencement of my service.
    As there is no timber in this vicinity suitable for plow stocks, ax helves &c., I would suggest the getting up from the vicinity of Link River of a good supply of oak, which is plentiful there, and of good quality.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        A. Secord
            Wagon & Plow Maker
Hon. L. Applegate
    U.S. Indian Sub-Agent.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Blacksmith Shops, Klamath Agency
    July 31st 1868.
Sir,
    I very respectfully submit my first annual report as U.S. Blacksmith on the Klamath Reservation.
    I entered on the discharge of my duties on the 8th day of October 1867. I accompanied from that date an expedition conveying annuity goods from the Dalles to this agency, the same being under the personal direction of Supt. Huntington. With this train I was employed principally in shoeing horses and in repairing the ironwork of wagons.
    On arriving at this place on the 13th day of November ensuing, I joined in the erection of a shop, after which I commenced operations with the limited supply of material and tools on hand in
repairing plows and other farming implements, shoeing horses, repairing firearms for the Indians, fabricating tools for the shop, implements for the farm and root-diggers for the Indians. And thus I have been employed in the shop up to this date.
    In order to facilitate work in the shop and greatly enhance my usefulness, I would recommend the purchase of a considerable amount of iron & steel.
Very respectfully
    Your humble servt.
        George Northy Tucker
            U.S. Blacksmith
Hon.
    L. Applegate
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Klamath Indian Agency
    Oregon, July 31st 1868.
Sir,
    I entered upon the discharge of my duty as a farmer under the Klamath Treaty on July 1st 1867. I had served a previous term of one year on this reservation as farmer under the appropriation for colonizing Indians and had become acquainted with the capabilities of the soil and the peculiarities of the climate. After receiving my appointment I labored zealously on the farm in cultivating, then in gathering the harvest, after which I turned my attention towards plowing until late in December, when the severity of winter put an end to the cultivation of the soil until spring. During the winter, when possible, I labored in conjunction with some of the other employees in rail making.
    In spring all energies were united in putting in a crop. In this we succeeded well, putting in eighty acres of grain and near fifty acres in corn, turnips, carrots, potatoes &c. and as the crops are growing beautifully we have a gratifying hope of gathering a rich harvest.
With much respect
    Your obt. servant
        Saml. D. Whitmore
            U.S. Farmer
Hon.
    L. Applegate
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Office Klamath Agency, Oregon.
    July 31st 1868.
Sir,
    My 3rd annual report is herewith submitted. The general condition of the tribes on this reservation has been quite as favorable to progress
and the development of civilization during the last year as at any time since I took charge of this agency in the autumn of 1865.
    The commencement of operations under the Klamath and Modoc treaty last fall, by which those Indians received annuity goods and positive evidence of the government's intention to deal justly by them, inspired them with confidence and increased their zeal and industry. My extensive acquaintance with Indian tribes has discovered to me but few of greater promise than those now under my charge. Like other Indians, they have their low and disgusting habits and mean dispositions, but their necessities in providing subsistence in the past have required activity, and consequently many of them are really industrious. Provided with necessary implements of agriculture, comfortable dwellings, schools for the education of the young in manual labor and the useful sciences, ample provision being made for the promotion of their sanitary condition, their progress I predict will be rapid and permanent. In the infancy of operations under the treaty so much time is required to inaugurate a complete system of operations [that] the improvement is necessarily tedious and slow. Consequently it is impossible at this time to report at this time much progress in furtherance of the objects of the treaty.
    The soil of the reservation suitable for cultivation is covered with an immense turf which requires near a year to become rotten, and the means of breaking prairie during the past seasons having been limited, enough could not be raised this year to subsist the Indians, but I am quite confident that with the means now furnished enough ground can be broken by winter to allow the planting of a crop next season sufficient to feed
all the Indians on the reservation. The sawmill not yet being erected, no buildings suitable for hospital or school houses have been erected, except some of rather a temporary nature, and physician and teachers have only lately been appointed.
    The Indians now in the reservation are the Klamath and Yahooskin Snake tribes, and a division of the .Modoc tribe, and a part of the Woll-pah-pe Snakes, treated with on August 12, 1865. The Modoc high chief and a number of his people contentedly remain on the reservation, while another portion of his tribe, much attached to their old country and influenced by low whites, remain off. Military aid, considered essential in collecting them, has not yet been furnished. For a more elaborate explanation of the condition of this matter you are referred to my last three preceding monthly reports.
    During the year I have exerted myself towards the improvement of the moral condition of the Indians in this charge, and am gratified to find my labors in that direction crowned with much success. Gambling, always a fertile source of trouble, has been checked, and quarrels and altercations are far less frequent than formerly. A rigid enforcement of rules and regulations has, in fine, secured a quiet state of things to that formerly existing on the reservation, and the future is filled with bright prospects which will be realized if the civil and military authorities should work in unison for the promotion of the designs of the government.
    A vigorous prosecution of the aims of the treaty will, during another year, find the plans of the government established on a complete working basis, and enable the agent to make a satisfactory report of the progress in agriculture and in the improvement of the moral and sanitary condition of the Indians on this reservation.
    You are very respectfully referred to the reports of employees accompanying this.
Very respectfully, your obt. servant
    L. Applegate
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Office Klamath Agency
    July 31st 1868.
Sir,
    I have the honor to report as follows for the present month. Order and quiet have reigned on the reservation during the month. During the last two weeks the Indians have been nearly all engaged in gathering wocus on the Klamath Marsh. When thus engaged, their almost entire attention being given to their business, difficulties between them are very rare.
    Operations on the farm are vigorously pursued. On the 1st inst. appointments were made as follows, to wit: Wm. C. McKay, once Physician at Warm Springs, Physician; Norman L. Lee of Albany, Linn Co., Oregon, Carpenter; Ivan D. Applegate, Supt of Farming and O. C. Applegate, School Teacher. On this inst. the following employees submitted their resignations, to wit, Sam D. Whitmore, Farmer and A. Secord, Wagon & Plow Maker.
    Capt. McGregor, having gone into the Snake country on an expedition against the Snakes, asked permission to take eight Klamaths with him as scouts, which was granted.
Respectfully sir
    Your obt. servant,
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



    As the crops are not yet harvested I can but give an estimate of the yield, judging from the present prospects. The crops raised by the different tribes I shall divide equally when harvested and let them take care of it.
    Oats and hay raised by government I take charge of and feed to Department animals &c.
"Statistical Return of Farming &c. at the Alsea Indian Sub-Agency 1868," NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Alseas Indn. Sub-Agency Ogn.
    August 6th 1868.
Sir
    I have the honor to submit my monthly report pertaining to the Indians in the Alsea Indian Sub-Agency Oregon for the month of July 1868.
    The four tribes under my charge are at the present time very quiet and contented. During the month of July a large portion of each tribe were engaged in either fishing or hunting, while others were employed tending their crops and otherwise improving their farms. The fine prospect which they have for large crops encourages them greatly. It serves to make them peaceable and quiet and more contented on the agency.
    They are all the while improving in civilization and express a great desire to live more like the whites.
    Their supply of food at the present time is by no means scanty. With the game and fish they catch, and by exchanging skins and furs for flour &c., they manage to live very comfortably during the warm season.
    The past month has been unusually healthy; scarcely any sickness has occurred. No births nor deaths have marked a change in either of the tribes.
    All of which is most respectfully submitted.
Your most obdt. servt.
    G. W. Collins
        U.S. Indn. Sub-Agent
To
    Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. of Indian Affairs
            Salem,
                Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Portland, Oregon, Augt. 7 1868
Hon. J. W. P. Huntington
    Superintend. of Indian Affairs
        in Oregon
            Hon Dear Sir,
                You are already well aware that I have a Catholic mission established with due authorization among the Indians of the Grand Ronde Reservation of Yamhill County since the year 1860, and that our mission has a chapel and a priest giving religious instruction to the Indians every Sunday. But I wish to do a little more for those poor Indians. By the present I petition and respectfully beg the permission of establishing a school on said reservation and to have a certain piece of ground of about ten acres joining the a lot or including the lot where the Catholic church is built. Having at heart the welfare of the Indians and knowing your earnest and benevolent disposition for their moral and spiritual improvement, I have no doubt that you will give my petition a kind and favorable answer.
I remain with high regard
    Hon. dear sir
        Your obt. humble servant
            F. N. Blanchet
                Archbishop of O.C.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 108.



Office Klamath Indian Agency Aug. 8th 1868
Sir,
    August 1st. inst. I left this place for Sprague River Valley to commence operations in that section of the reservation and to secure if possible an interview with Snake Indians lately hostile, but which I believed were disposed to come onto the reservation, from the fact that since the surrender of the main division of the Snake Nation to Gen. Crook signal fires have been seen on the mountains surrounding Silver Lake, conveying an idea that the Snakes inhabiting that part of the country desired a conference with Snakes on the reservation.
    I took with me two ox teams with wagons containing plows, axes, camp equipage &c. and also several of the white employees and fifteen Yahooskin and Woll-pah-pe Snakes as an escort. On the second day from the agency I arrived at Council Bluffs, where the treaty with [the] Woll-pah-pe Snakes was made on August 12th 1865. Here finding a suitable place, I commenced the erection of two log houses and the breaking of prairie as a foundation for future agricultural operations.
    On my arrival I dispatched a number of my Indians into the mountains to attempt to secure an interview with the wild Snakes. After considerable maneuvering they were able to do this, meeting, without arms on either side, ten Snake Indians on Silver Lake. These Indians said they had heard of the surrender of the northern bands, and being completely whipped themselves, had since the end of winter been desiring an interview with some of my people. They said that they, and also all the northern bands with which they had held any communication, were anxious to come onto the Klamath Reservation and receive the benefits of government clemency, of which they are in need, being reduced to an aggravated state of destitution. Two of them were brought to my camp, and in conference with them they confirmed the above details and seemed overjoyed at a prospect of being received on the reservation peaceably. They agreed to return, collect their people, and come onto the reservation in ten days. That they will do this I am convinced, also all the Indians here are of this opinion.
    In the event of their coming some provision, of course, will have to be made for them to keep them from suffering during the coming winter, as the amount which the farms will yield will be inadequate to the support of the Indians already here.
    I hail this event as one of no little consequence, giving assurance of the speedy doing away of danger from Indians in the fine valleys east of this reservation.
    I hope to be able to report the arrival of the Indians at the appointed time.
Truly and respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 114.




Office Klamath Indian Agency, Aug. 10th 1868.
Sir,
    I write to represent that the requirements of the Indian service demand the erection of a sawmill at this agency at an early day.
    The erection of granaries and buildings for storage of other produce besides grain, hay sheds and the like, made necessary by the success of farming operations, cannot be conveniently carried out without lumber. Aside from these wants the progress of operations under the treaty requires the erection at an early day of school and hospital buildings, shops and comfortable quarters.
    This want of the service is growing more aggravated daily, and I earnestly hope you will give such orders as will enable me to commence putting up the mill immediately. Postponed much longer winter may prevent the getting in of the material across the mountains, or at least the completing of the mill in time to get any benefit from it this season.
    A common sash mill I think would answer all required purposes and would require little time in building and could be constructed with a moderate outlay of funds. I shall anxiously await your reply.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 113.




Office Klamath Agency, Aug. 10th 1868.
Sir,
    As you are aware two Modocs were arrested last fall for the alleged crime of furnishing the hostile Snakes with arms and ammunition. The arrest was made by Klamath Indians through my influence, but I was not at that time aware that one of the Indians, the accessory, was an invalid and partially insane. After remaining in confinement a short time, the principal prisoner escaped and his brother, the invalid, has remained in confinement ever since, and has almost entirely lost the use of his limbs. Humanity as well as the best interests of the service demand his release, and I trust your influence will be sufficient to effect that result.
    His punishment has been sufficient to deter others from committing the same crime, and then it should be considered that the surrender of the Snakes leaves no further opportunity for acts of that kind. If he can be released the Indians would see in it an act of pure humanity and would be more contented and less hard to manage than if this crazy Indian should be allowed to die in confinement.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 116.




Office Klamath Agency
    Aug. 10th 1868.
Sir,
    I would represent that I have been obliged to employ a number of laborers on the farm and that for their payment I have received no installment of funds for a long period. It is absolutely necessary to have these hands in order to carry on successfully on the farms, and I much regret the necessity of employing in advance of funds being furnished.
    One installment for presents, subsistence &c. has been furnished this summer just sufficient to satisfy the demand of Muller & Brentano. Farmer Gotbrod is also paid out of these funds, of which there is none on hand. I hope you will be able to furnish an installment of this fund soon.
Respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 117.




Salem 11th Aug. 1868.
Hon. Huntington Superintendt. of Indian Affairs
    Honorable & Dear Sir,
In the Grand Ronde Reservation there stands not far from our church an old building which is out of use since several years (I think it is an old school house) and is going into ruins. I think however it could be repaired or at least the lumber could be used for a new building to be erected. If in your kindness you could let us have it for our school, I think it would save us some expenses & would be no material loss to the agency. I think it could be fitted up for a dwelling house for the sisters.
I remain with due consideration
    Yours very truly
        S. Goens
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 109.



Office Supt. Indian Affairs
    Salem Ogn. Augst. 20th 1868
Sir
    Application has been made by the Rt. Rev. Archbishop Blanchet of Oregon for the privilege of establishing a mission school among the Indians on Grand Ronde Agency to be taught by one or more of the "Sisters of Charity."
    You will afford the archbishop or his authorized agents such facilities as will enable them to carry out this purpose, allot to them such a piece of land as will be enough for their use, and mark the boundaries thereof by some permanent monuments. The land should not exceed ten acres in extent, and if so large an allotment will be a detriment to the interest of the Indians or of the government it must be reduced to an extent compatible with the interests aforesaid.
    Any lumber made at the sawmill which is not needed at the agency, or by the Indians, may be sold to the agent of the archbishop at cost price.
    Copies of the letters of Archbishop Blanchet and of Rev. Father Goins are herewith transmitted for your information.
    Of your action in this case you will make due report to this office.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Ogn.
Amos Harvey Esq.
    U.S. Indian Agent
        Grand Ronde
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 10; Letter Books I:10, page 242.



Office Klamath Agency
    August 28th 1868.
Sir,
    In my communication of August 8th inst. in regard to my Sprague River expedition, In informed you of a council with Woll-pah-pe Snake Indians relative to the remainder of that tribe coming onto the reservation.
    I am happy to be able to state that in pursuance to their promise made at that time they have all come onto the reservation. Their chiefs Chock-toot and
En-kal-to-ik, the former of whom was reported killed by troops from Fort Klamath last summer, are with them. They have been reduced to great extremity, having been hunted like wolves until they have eaten their last horses. Not having had any ammunition for many months, they have been able to get but little game, and their fear of the troops has kept them confined to mountain fastnesses where it is impossible to dig roots or gather wocus. They say they have long had a desire to get onto the reservation, but fear of the troops prevented them. Beside their want of provisions they are almost entirely naked, and if possible should be supplied with some blankets and clothing before winter.
Respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 111.




Office Klamath Agency
    August 31st 1868.
Sir,
    I have the honor to report as follows for the present month.
The Farm.
    Operations have been vigorously pursued on the farm. Until the 15th inst. the plows were kept running, and since that time the hands have been engaged in haying and harvesting. Being able to secure a mowing machine for use from Mr. Nurse, the trader, without other expense than the repairing of it, a large lot of hay amounting to near sixty tons has been mowed and put up securely for winter.
The Snake Indians.
    On the 26th inst. the remainder of the Woll-pah-pe tribe of Snake Indians arrived on the reservation in pursuance of the understanding arrived at in council with them, the particulars in regard to which were reported to you in a communication of the 8th inst. Paulina having been killed since he left the reservation, this band of Snakes is now under the control of two headmen named respectively Chock-toot and En-kal-to-ik. Their condition is deplorable in the extreme. Having been for a long time without ammunition and through fear of the troops who could make no distinction off the reservation, having spent most of their time in almost inaccessible places where no roots or seeds could be collected, they have been compelled to subsist on their horses, of which they now have none. They are almost naked also and unless they can receive the benefit of a considerable sum spent to provide food and clothing for them, they must suffer severely during the coming winter. For reasons already indicated in previous communications it is not likely that enough can be produced on the farm to subsist the Indians already here, hence a supply of flour, at least twenty thousand pounds, should be purchased to prevent the possibility of any of the Indians suffering for want of food during the coming winter.
    In regard to the commencement of farming operations in Sprague River Valley you are very respectfully referred to my communication of the 8th inst. detailing the particulars of my Sprague River expedition.
    Harmony and quiet have prevailed among the Klamaths, Modocs and other Indians already on the reservation. As soon as Capt. McGregor returns to Fort Klamath with his troops, an effort will be made to collect and bring onto the reservation all Indians that rightfully belong here.
    The following appointments were made on the 1st inst. to wit: P. W. Caris
Teacher, S. D. Whitmore Wagon & Plow-maker, and Orson A. Stearns Farmer.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.




Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency Oregon
    September 2nd 1868.
Sir:
    I have the honor to submit my monthly report of the condition of Indians &c. in the Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency for August 1868.
    As no material change of affairs pertaining to the Indians under my charge has taken place during the month past, I would most respectfully refer you to my last month's report for all necessary information concerning the Coos, Umpqua, Alsea and Siuslaw Indians.
    They are all quiet, and at present contented. The hay and oat crops all secured, and the wheat about ripe for harvest.
    All of which is most respectfully submitted.
Your most obdt. servt.
    G. W. Collins
        U.S. Indn. Sub-Agent
To
    Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. of Indn. Affairs
            Salem
                Ogn.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.




Department of the Interior
    Office of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C. Sept. 26th 1868
Sir:
    Your letter of the 20th July last, submitting an estimate of funds required for the Indian service in Oregon for the 3rd & 4th quarters 1868, has been received.
    In reply I have to inform you that a requisition has this day [been] issued f
or the sum of $80,100.00 to be placed to your credit with the United States Assistant Treasurer at San Francisco, California, for the proper care and disposition of which you will be held accountable under your bond.
    The enclosed tabular statement will acquaint you with the objects and purposes for which these funds are to be applied, and the appropriations from which they are drawn.
    I also enclose for your information a copy of the late Indian appropriation act, embraced in War Department General Order No. 74, by which you will perceive that most of the appropriations for the present fiscal year for the various tribes in Oregon fall short of the amount stipulated in the treaties under which the appropriations were made. This will explain to you all matters of difference between your estimate and the tabular statement of funds now remitted. In connection with this subject I refer to my letter of the 24th inst. with a statement in detail of the deficiencies in the appropriations.
    An item of $6000.00, not embraced in your estimate, is included in the amount of the present requisition. The sum was appropriated by Congress during its last session for the benefit of the Indians on the Siletz Reservation to compensate them for losses sustained by reason of [the] executive proclamation taking from them that portion of their reservation called Yaquina Bay, and is to be applied to the purchase of agricultural implements, seeds, cattle, etc.
    Your special attention is called to the second section of the enclosed appropriation act, prescribing the manner in which annuities of any character and goods purchased under the provisions of said act are to be issued to the Indians. In all such issues and distributions you will be guided accordingly.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        Charles E. Mix
            Actg. Commissioner
J. W. P. Huntington, Esq.
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Salem
            Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 130.




Klamath Indn. Agency, Oregon, Sept. 30th 1868
Sir,
    I have the honor to report as follows for the present month. The Indians on the reservation have been quiet and peaceable during the month. Most of them have been engaged in gathering berries, seeds &c. for winter, also in hunting, and a number of them are so engaged at present.
    On the 15th inst. all Snake prisoners held by the Klamaths and belonging to the Woll-pah-pe tribe of Snakes were returned to their people, now on this reservation. The Woll-pah-pe Snakes are preparing for winter, though unless provided with more than I am able to give them with the means under my control, I think they must suffer from a scarcity of provisions and clothing during the coming winter.
    The employees have been engaged during the month in haying, harvesting and erecting buildings for the comfort and convenience of persons on duty here.
    For reasons already indicated in previous communications I hope a large supply of flour will be purchased for this agency in time to be received here before winter, also that at an early day the Woll-pah-pe Snakes may receive annuity goods in pursuance of the treaty made with them in 1865.
Very respectfully sir
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indn. Affairs
        in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.




Siletz Agency
    Oct. 14th 1868
Sir
    The excitement created among the Indians, as well as the whites in the vicinity of this agency, by the unfortunate killing of Indian Frank by a white man named Ballard, has not yet abated, and I fear that the result will be more serious unless there is something done to counteract it.
    I would therefore most respectfully request that you call upon the commanding officer of this department for a detachment of soldiers to be placed at the mouth of Yaquina Bay for the purpose of quieting the present disturbance and of giving confidence and security to both Indians and whites. I enclose with this a letter from Hon. R. A. Bensell
, a citizen of Yaquina Bay.
Hoping this will receive your prompt attention
    I remain
        Very respectfully
            Your obt. servt.
                Ben Simpson
                    U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Ind. Affairs
        Salem Ogn.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 137.




THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY.
Portland, Oregon Oct. 23 1868
Comr. Indian Affairs
    I ask permission to visit Washington.
J. W. Perit Huntington
   
Department of the Interior,
    Washington D.C. October 26th 1868.
Sir,
    I reply to your letter of this date in the matter of the application of Superintendent Huntington of Oregon to visit Washington, that, as no reason is assigned why Mr. Huntington desires to visit this city, and as his presence here is not made necessary by any exigency of the public service, he had better remain at his post of official duty. His application for leave of absence is, therefore, denied.
Very respectfully
    O. H. Browning
        Secretary
Hon. N. G. Taylor
    Commr. of Indn. Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frames 669-676.



Oct. 24th 1868
    Ten Mile Creek Coos Co. Ogn.
    Dear Sir I am this far back on my way to the agency with thirty-seven Indians that I have captured on Coos River and in the vicinity of Coos Bay. We had to run three days & nights without stopping much. During the time there were a few Coos Indians with fifteen Coquells fled to the mountains and scattered so that it was impossible to follow them. I had one of my men arrested for going into a man's house by the name of J. T. Jordan near Empire City who has an Indian woman for his wife. Carr is the man's name they arrested. He was informed that there was Indian women concealed at this house or nearby in the brush; he went to the house with his gun on his arm, and seeing several squaws in the house he went inside of the door. Two of them started to leave the room; he told them to stop; he wanted to talk with them. The oldest one, the wife of the man Jordan, said she was a Boston man's wife. He told her that he did not want her; he wanted none that was married to white men. They bound him over for his appearance at the next term of court. I will give you all the particulars when I arrive at the agency.
Very respectfully your
    Obt. servt.
        G. W. Collins
            Ind. Sub-Agent
To Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Ind. Affairs
        Salem Ogn.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.




Siletz Agency
    Oct. 26th 1868
Sir
    I returned to the agency on the 21st inst. with fourteen Indians, eleven men and three women, who escaped from the reservation some two months ago. Those are the same Indians that were arrested a short time since by my employees and escaped with irons on. I found them in Yamhill County in and about the town of McMinnville. I now have them confined in the guardhouse (or at least in the night) working them in the daytime under the supervision of my employees.
    I wish again most respectfully to call your attention to the immediate necessity for a small military force in the vicinity of this agency. Owing to the limited means at my command I have been compelled to discharge some of my employees which leaves my force entirely too small to afford proper protection

Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        Ben Simpson
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Ind. Affairs Salem
        Ogn.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 139.



Klamath Indian Agency
    Oregon, October 31st 1868.
Sir,
    During the month quiet and harmony have prevailed among the Indians. They have been industriously engaged in erecting winter
houses and otherwise preparing for winter. During the month the turnips and other roots produced on the farms were mostly issued to the Indians, and they have carefully housed them for the winter. The Yahooskin and Woll-pah-pe Snakes on Sprague River are contented and preparing for the cold season.
    On the farms the newly broken ground has been harrowed with iron-toothed harrows, and will be in fine condition for a spring crop.
    A number of the employees have been engaged in erecting buildings for the convenience and comfort of employees, also for the storage of supplies at the site of the new agency.
    I hope that a large supply of subsistence may yet be furnished for the Indians at this agency before winter.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. of Indian Affairs in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency
    October 31st 1868
Sir
    I have the honor to submit my monthly report of the condition of Indians in the Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency for October 1868.
    As no material change of affairs pertaining to the Indians under my charge has taken place during the past month I would most respectfully refer you to my last monthly report for all necessary information concerning the Coos, Umpqua, Alsea and Siuslaw Indians. They are all quiet and contented at present.
    All of which is most respectfully submitted
G. W. Collins
    Indn. Sub-Agent
To Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. of Indn. Affairs
        Salem
            Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Klamath Nov. 18, 1868
Ivan D. Applegate
    Sir
        You are this day appointed commissary of subsistence for the hostile Snake Indians, your appointment to begin with the hereof and continue until further notice. Your compensation will be at the rate of one hundred ($100) dollars per month payable quarterly.
    Your duty will be to observe, take charge of and provide for the wants of the Snake Indians now encamped at Silver Lake, Mishpishmash Creek (Sprague River Valley), Fort Warner, Fort Harney, Horse Creek Mountain and other points not herein enumerated.
    These Indians as you are aware have but recently submitted to the control of the United States, and indeed have been persistent and determinedly hostile for a long time of years. They are now professedly repentant, and their professions ought to be taken with a belief in their sincerity, while that sincerity must be tempered with a distrust engendered by their well-known treachery and by an allowance for their ignorance, imbecility, intense destitution and frantic fear that any act of whites toward them is an act of hostility. Your duty is
    1st. To instruct them that their hostility to whites must cease henceforth. If depredations on them by whites are committed--whether as to person or property--they must make complaint to the nearest military officer or to the nearest Indian agent and upon each complaint sustained by competent evidence suitable redress will be given.
    2nd. They must report their number and name as far as practicable to you, and you are required to make returns thereof to the Supt.'s office at Salem as fast as the facts are obtained by you. Issues of food or any other articles from the Indian Department to them will be made through you. You will take the receipt of the chiefs and headmen therefor. Certify to the issue yourself, and if possible secure the certificate of the nearest military officer commanding a post. If no commanding officer can be present at the issue, then any commissary officer in the service will be sufficient witness, and if no such officer is present you will issue in the presence of such credible white witnesses as are present--not less than two in number and then credibility to be certified by yourself.
    3rd. Such material as may be transferred to you by the Superintendent, the sub-agent in charge at Klamath or the commanding officer at any military post, you will duly account for with proper vouchers to be taken in triplicate and forwarded duly to the Superintendent's office at Salem.
    4th. You will make ample report of all your proceedings under these instructions as often as once each month and more frequently if any emergency requires it.
    5th. You are also required to make full report of all the proceedings of the Indian Dept., the military and of citizens in your district which will give information concerning Indian affairs.
    These instructions are only preliminary and will be followed by others more explicit and in detail. On the present you will be guided by this letter and when it is deficient you will refer to the laws of Congress, the regulations of the Indian Department and your own common sense.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Ogn.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 10; Letter Books I:10, pages 253-254.



Klamath Indian Agency
    Novr. 26th 1868
    Five horses now in use of the Indian Department at the agency are worn out, crippled and worthless. They will consume much valuable forage in the ensuing winter and be entirely useless. It would profit this service if they be condemned and shot, and I recommend that it be done.
Ivan D. Applegate
    Supt. of Farming
Approved
    L. Applegate
        U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
 

    I have examined the above statement and I have also examined the horses referred to therein. They are worthless, hereby ordered condemned, branded "C" and dropped from property returns. This certificate to be an acquittal of Sub-Agent Applegate in charge.
J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs in Ogn.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 10; Letter Books I:10, page 254.



Klamath Nov. 27, 1868
Capt. McGregor
    1st U.S. Cavalry
        Klamath
    If there is a surplus of iron in the quartermaster's department at Fort Klamath, you will do a favor to the Indian service at this place in allowing the agent to borrow a small amount to be returned in May or June next. Mr. Applegate will confer with you in reference to the matter.
    Such iron as you may turn over to him you will take his receipt for, and he will be notified to notify me of the amount and kind.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Ogn.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 10; Letter Books I:10, page 250.



Klamath Ind. Agency
    Novr. 27th 1868
Sir
    I need the services of Dr. Wm. C. McKay, physician at Klamath Agency, to assist me in my intercourse with the Snake Indians in my present expedition.
    You are instructed therefore to detail him upon such services to report to me. When we have passed through the Snake Indian country he will be directed to return to his ordinary duty at the agency.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Ogn.
Lindsay Applegate
    U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
        Klamath
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 10; Letter Books I:10, page 250.



Klamath Indian Agency
    Novr. 27, 1868
Capt. Thos. McGregor
    1st U.S. Cavalry
        Commdg. Fort Klamath
    I arrested an Indian tonight who calls himself "Dick." He has been here about six weeks carefully concealed. He claims to have lived at Oregon City sixteen years and to having left there three months ago coming by way of Warm Springs Agency. I know that he was not at Warm Springs at all, and his stories are generally so contradictory that I attach no importance to them.
    I suspect him to be the Indian reported in the newspapers as "Peter," "Susin" &c., having been concerned in some affrays at East Portland and Oregon City and afterwards arrested by the civil authorities for Oregon [City], from whom he escaped. I have this day communicated with the civil authorities of Clackamas County and request you to detain the Indian in irons until the agent here can hear from them.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Ogn.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 10; Letter Books I:10, pages 250-251.



Klamath Indian Agency
    Nov. 27, 1868
To the
    Mayor of Oregon City
        I  found here today an Indian who calls himself "Dick," who has been hiding in the mountains hereabout. Other Indians report him an escaped criminal. I have caused him to be arrested and detailed until we can hear from you. Please give any information you can through the mail to Lindsay Applegate, U.S. Indian Sub-Agent, Klamath per military express via Jacksonville.
Description of the Indian
    Medium height, stout, broad face, very dark complexion, has a prominent scar on the chin.
    He has a pass signed by F. O. McClosky without date. It is much worn and was probably written long ago. He has a pass given to "Indian" "Susin" signed by E. B. Fellows dated June 30, 1867, in which Mr. Fellows that he has paid "Susin" $40 and 3 strings of beads. This Indian called himself Susin when he came first here.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Perit Huntington
            Supt. Indian Affairs in Ogn.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 10; Letter Books I:10, page 251.



Klamath Agency Oregon
    Nov. 27, 1868
Sir
    Oregon City "Dick" will be kept in confinement with suitable irons until further notice.
    Food will be furnished him enough to supply his needs.
J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs in Ogn.
Lindsay Applegate
    U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
        in Oregon
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 10; Letter Books I:10, page 251.



Klamath Indian Agency
    Oregon Nov. 27th 1868.
Sir,
    This day A. J. Brown was appointed Temporary Assistant Farmer, salary seven hundred dollars per annum. Also to have a subsistence allowance of seventy-five cents per day during the whole period of his service.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon.
    J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt. Indian Affairs
            in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 154.



Klamath Indian Agency
    Oregon Nov. 30th 1868.
Sir,
    On the 10th inst. Saml. D. Whitmore was relieved from duty here as Wagon and Plow Maker, and Saml. Grubb was appointed in his stead on the 11th inst..
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs in
        Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 160.




Klamath Indian Agency, Oregon, Nov. 30th 1868.
Sir,
    Little has occurred during the month worthy of report. As usual some disputes and misunderstandings, however of an insignificant character, have occurred among the Indians, which have been satisfactorily settled.
    The Indians have about completed their winter houses, and have otherwise made their preparations for winter. The advice and encouragement given to them after your arrival on the 20th instant were productive of much good, and the provisions made for their subsistence during the coming winter, in procuring for them a sufficient supply of flour and beef, has given them new confidence in the government and has encouraged and gratified them much.
    No trouble need be apprehended in improving the condition of the Indians on the reservation, if the government does not delay too long its duty in carrying out treaty stipulations.
    The employees have been engaged in erecting and completing comfortable buildings here, or have otherwise been laboring for the good being of the service.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon.

NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.




Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency
    November 30th 1868
Sir:--
    I have the honor to submit my monthly report of the condition of Indians at the Alsea Indn. Sub-Agency for the month of November 1868.
    The Indians under my charge are in a prospering condition. Their general health is good, and peace and quiet reigns through all the tribes under my control.
    Those that were lately returned to the reservation have apparently gone to work in good faith and are building for themselves good and comfortable dwellings and appear satisfied now to remain on the reserve.
    They all have a plenty of potatoes, wheat and dried fish to subsist on during the winter.
    All of which is most respectfully submitted by your obdt. servt.
G. W. Collins
    Indn. Sub-Agent
To
    Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
        Supt of Indn. Affairs
            Salem
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.



Washington Dec. 9, 1868
Hon. N. G. Taylor Comr.
    Indian Affairs
        Dear Sir,
Mr. B. Simpson, agent upon Siletz Reservation, desires to visit Washington in connection with matters pertaining to the Indians upon the reservation under his charge. Mr. S. is one of the best agents upon the coast; he can give us much valuable information connected with our Indian affairs in that state. I would respectfully ask that he be ordered to Washington this coming month in order to have him reach here during the month of January. It will be necessary to order him to Washington at once. I learn that dissatisfaction exists amongst the Indians upon the reservation under his charge. I desire his presence to give information to our Indian committee with respect to deficiency in the appropriations last session, which are very necessary to be passed this [session].
Yours respy.
    H. W. Corbett
I concur.
    Geo. H. Williams
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frames 633-636.




Oregon City, Dec. 14, 1868.
Dear Sir:--
    Your note addressed to the mayor of Oregon City, in my care, has been examined by me and I am enabled, upon inquiry, to give you the information you desire. Indian "Dick" was formerly a resident of this place. But sometime last winter or spring he got into a drunken row and cut up another Indian by the name of "Oregon" pretty badly. "Dick" left, and probably thinks that he killed "Oregon," but the fact is that "Oregon" recovered, and is now in the neighborhood, or was not long since.
    "Oregon" is a Klamath Indian, who has been about here ever since he was a small boy. I do not know to what tribe Dick belongs.
Yours respectfully
    W. Carey Johnson
Hon. J. W. P. Huntington
    Supt. Ind. Affairs &c.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 158.



[Telegram]
Washington Dec. 24 1868
    Rec'd. at Salem [Dec.] 24 1868 3 p.m.
To J. W. P. Huntington Supt. Indian Affrs.
    Order Agent Simpson to Washington immediately per request of Senator Corbett and Williams.
N. G. Taylor, Comr.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 203.



Klamath Agency Oregon
    Dec. 31st 1868
J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. Indian Affairs in Oregon
        Sir:
            In accordance with instructions I have the honor to submit the following report:
    On receiving my appointment on the 18th day of November last, I immediately set about collecting information in regard to the Snake Indians, lately hostile, with a view towards providing subsistence for them during the coming winter, and ascertaining their feelings towards the whites.
    On the 25th of November as you are aware I left Fort Klamath for Camp Warner and arrived there in due season, found at that place a hundred Snake Indians of all ages and sexes.
    By counciling with them they were found disposed to be peaceable, and as they are quite needy and destitute in consequence of their late surrender, having previously been driven from place to place.
    They are confidently expecting aid from their captors.
    On Oshitish-en-wax Creek on the eastern line of the Klamath Reservation, there are near a hundred Snakes who lately came in who show a disposition to remain peaceable; all express an ardent desire to be permanently settled on the Klamath Reservation.
    They too are almost destitute but express confidence that they will be provided for by the government considering that they are determined ever hereafter to remain peaceable.
    As far as I have yet been able to ascertain I am able to express an opinion that if subsisted and treated in good faith, the Snake Indians will remain friendly and any farther shedding of blood by them will be averted.
    I shall exert myself in fulfilling the instructions given me to the best of my ability.
Very respectfully
    Sir, your
        Obt. servt.
            Ivan D. Applegate
                U.S. Commissary of
                    Subsistence for Snake Indians
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, No. 167.



Office Klamath Agency
    Oregon, December 31st 1868.
Sir,
    I have the honor to report as follows for this month. Much satisfaction seems to exist among the Indians, principally occasioned I think by the progress of operations here, and the provisions made for winter subsistence.
    Some misdemeanors have been committed by the Indians among themselves as usual. In any every case of any consequence, however; the most stringent measures have been taken and summary punishment has been inflicted.
    About the 24th inst. information came that the smallpox had made its appearance in Jacksonville, when I immediately assembled the Indians, explained the horrors of the malady and instituted measures to prevent the introduction onto this reservation, where encouraged by the condition and habits of the Indians it would sweep almost everything before it.
    The Indians are as comfortably situated for the winter as their circumstances will admit of and at the agency the quarters lately prepared for the employees are quite commodious and comfortable.
Respectfully, sir
    Your obt. servant
        L. Applegate
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. J. W. Perit Huntington
    Supt. of Indian Affairs
        in Oregon.
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 25; Letters Received, 1868-1870, no number.




Last revised December 17, 2016