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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Correspondence of the Oregon Superintendency
1874
Southern Oregon-related correspondence with the Oregon Superintendency for Indian Affairs.

 
U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Oregon Jan. 2nd [1874]
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of circular from your office containing regulations for travel of officers, employees &c. of the Interior Department, to take effect Dec. 1st 1873 with letter accompanying the same.
    The language of the circular ("All accounts presented by officers, clerks or other employees of this Department as aforesaid must in future have appended thereto a copy of the letter or order of detail &c. &c.") would seem to indicate that in future special orders for travel must be procured from the Department before any accounts for traveling expenses will be allowed. Please inform me if this is the intention of the order, as the situation of this agency would render a strict compliance with this requirement almost impossible. Our mail facilities are so scanty and irregular that if I have business to transact in Portland I can usually gain from three days to one week by going myself in preference to transacting it through the mail. The interests of the Department frequently require my personal attention to business in Portland & Salem when there would be no time to procure an order from Washington. I would therefore respectfully ask if it is the intention of the regulation that orders for travel must in all cases be procured before expenses for the same will be allowed.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Com. Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 451-453.



Siletz Agency Oregon
    Jan. 2nd [1874]
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of letter from your office of Dec. 2nd making inquiries respecting certain changes of employees at this agency.
    Frank M. Stanton was employed to take charge of the thresher Sept. 6th 1873 @ $5.00 per day for himself and team. As stated his employment was necessary for the reason that I had no one capable of managing the thresher except Supt. of Farming Bagley, whose services were required elsewhere. We are so far from any point where machinery can be procured that if through unskilled management the thresher should become broken, the loss of time and expense of repair would go far towards paying for his services. His team was required because we had not enough on the reservation available to run the thresher and reaper. Mr. Stanton worked 21 days in Sept. and 11 in October, being finally discharged Oct. 27th, stormy weather preventing work a number of days during that month.
    In my report of commencement of service of Shasta Costa George, an Indian entered as assistant farmer, I followed the record furnished me by Agent Palmer, my predecessor.
    I can find no record of my letter reporting his discontinuance. The circumstances however were as follows. George is employed at the upper farm and informed me he desired to leave the service, and I suppose I reported that fact and being just starting for Salem or business (having just taken charge) neglected to preserve a copy of the letter. On my return the farmer in charge reported George as having said nothing about leaving and being steadily at work. As I had no record of my letter reporting his discharge I presumed no such report had gone forward and kept him on the roll of employees.
    I will in future endeavor to avoid any errors of this kind, and sincerely trust this may be the last time you will have occasion to complain of my negligence in this matter. From the tenor of my instructions I supposed it was required that the date of original appointment of each employee was required without reference to the character of his employment.
    In future I will try and guard against any repetition of this error.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 454-457.



Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or.
    January 2nd 1874
Sir:
    I have the honor to report the following changes of employees in this agency.
Discharged
    L. Lipisink Interpreter Jany. 1, '74
Jack Smith Logger "
Jim Twat Teamster "
Jack Babcock Helper, Sawmill "
Engaged
    Jack Babcock Interpreter Jany. 1, '74
Bridget Sinnott* Matron, M.L. School "    Salary $40 per week
    *Heretofore reported as Asst. Teacher & Seamstress, now changed to Matron, which more properly expresses the services performed.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Honl. Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 265-266.



Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. Jany. 5th 1874
Sir:
    I transmit, herewith, a commission appointing George P. Litchfield of Oregon to be Ind. agent for the Indians of the Alsea Sub-Agency in Oregon.
    You will please cause said commission to be delivered to Mr. Litchfield when he shall have filed the proper bond and oath of office. His address is "care of Rev. William Roberts, Portland, Oregon."
Respectfully &c.
    C. Delano
        Secretary
The Commr. of
    Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 718-719.



Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. January 6th 1874.
Sir:
    I invite your attention to the accompanying copy of a communication, dated the 2nd inst., this day received from Hon. J. H. Mitchell, U.S. Senator from Oregon, representing the necessity that exists for a reduction of the area of what are known as the "Siletz" and "Alsea" Indian reservations in Oregon, and request that the subject be referred, at once, to Inspector Kemble for personal investigation and report thereof, at an early day, to the Indian Bureau.
    In forwarding the communication of Senator Mitchell to Inspector Kemble, he may be informed that the views therein expressed are concurred in by this Department, insofar as they relate to a reduction of the reservations in question to limits that will afford sufficient land for the Indians occupying them.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        C. Delano
            Secretary
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
   

United States Senate Chamber
    Washington January 2nd 1874.
Hon. Columbus Delano
    Secretary of the Interior
My Dear Sir:
    By Executive Order under date of November 9th 1855, an Indian reservation was established in Western Oregon, designated and known as the "Coast Range" Indian Reservation, "subject to future curtailment if found proper."
    This reservation extended from Cape Lookout on the north to a small stream about ten miles south of the Siuslaw, a distance of over ninety miles, and from the Pacific Ocean back to its boundary line, averaging about twenty miles in width and forming an area of over eighteen hundred square miles, which includes within its boundaries some of the finest grazing and timber lands in Oregon.
    On the 21st day of December 1865, the President of the United States, by Executive Order, released a certain portion of it, that is to say, a strip twenty miles in width, immediately north of the Alsea River, running back from the ocean to the western boundary of said Coast Reservation, and restored this portion to the market, thus dividing the Coast Reservation into two, since known as the "Siletz" and "Alsea" reservations.
    Upon these two latter, as near as I can ascertain, there are, all told, only about fourteen hundred Indians, distributed as follows: North of the Salmon River about one hundred and twenty-five, on "Siletz" about one thousand, on "Alsea" about three hundred. Those roaming north of Salmon River down into the Tillamook country are fragmentary bands of Indians, never really under the direction or control of any agency. That so large an extent of country, over fourteen hundred square miles, the present aggregate area of the "Siletz" and "Alsea" reservations should be there held for the benefit of these Indians, thereby excluding settlers and preventing the settlement of this country, so much to be desired, is, in my judgment, and, so far as I can ascertain it is the judgment of the people of Oregon, a policy which is not called for, either by any vested rights of the Indians or the demands of justice.
    I, therefore, most respectfully but earnestly urge upon the attention of your Department, and through it upon that of the Executive, the following suggestions: that, by Executive Order, the following portions of the "Siletz" and "Alsea" reservations may be thrown open to settlement and released from such reservations, that is to say, all that portion of the "Siletz" lying north of a line running due east from the mouth of the Salmon River, also all of the "Alsea" Reservation, excepting a tract twenty miles in width, to be designated as follows: the north line of the reservation to commence on the Pacific Ocean at a point five miles south of the mouth of the Alsea River, and running due east to the eastern boundary of said reservation, the south line to begin at a point on the Pacific Ocean twenty miles south of the north line, and running due east to the eastern boundary of said reservation.
    This would leave an area of over four hundred square miles in the "Alsea" for the accommodation of the three hundred Indians, and about six hundred square miles for the "Siletz" Indians, retaining, of course, the agency buildings and grounds, etc., etc. in each case.
    This is a matter of vital importance to the people of Western Oregon. The Indians certainly cannot be prejudiced by such action, while the general settlement and prosperity of the state will be greatly advanced.
    The present reservations give to each Indian man, woman and child about eight hundred and twenty-five acres of land, while under existing laws a white person who is the head of a family--perhaps with from six to ten children--gets by paying well for it 160 acres, while his wife and children get nothing.
    I am in favor of a humane policy towards the Indians, and believe in dealing justly with them, but I am opposed to a policy that discriminates so largely in favor of the Indian, and against the white pioneer and settler.
    I therefore respectfully and earnestly urge these considerations upon your serious attention, and hope they may meet with your prompt action.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 720-728.



House of Representatives,
    Washington, D.C., Jany. 10th 1874.
Hon. Edward P. Smith
    Com. Ind. Affairs,
        Sir,
            Herewith I submit for payment two sets of vouchers in triplicate, one set for $311.00 and one set for $41.60, both payable to J. B. Congle of Portland, Oregon. I know of my own knowledge that the supplies as stated in the vouchers were furnished by Mr. Angle for the use of your Department, and that the bill was to be paid in coin
or its equivalent as certified by late Superintendent Odeneal. I would respectfully urge that they be paid at the earliest possible moment, as the claim is now long overdue. Please advise me of your decision in the matter.
I am respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Nesmith
            M.C. Oregon
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 72-74.



United States Senate Chamber
    Washington Jany. 10th 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Enclosed please find letter addressed to me by Hon. Samuel Case, late Indian agent at Alsea, also one of the peace commissioners to Modocs, enclosing vouchers, amounts, &c. &c. I earnestly hope these amounts may be acted upon and so far as possible and consistent with law and the regulations of the Department allowed and amounts put in deficiency bill. Mr. Case should certainly be paid for the time he was acting as peace commissioner either as such commissioner or as agent. I would be glad to be advised upon all questions contained in his letter to me that I may be able to advise him fully at as early a day as possible.
Very respectfully
    J. H. Mitchell
   
Newport Oregon
    December 5th 1873
Dear Sir,
    I have the honor to enclose herewith my account for services and expenses as special commissioner to settle difficulties with the hostile Modoc Indians during the months of Feb. and March 1873. You will confer on me a great favor by presenting this account to the Department and ordering it paid. If you succeed in collecting the amount forward to my address Newport, Benton Co., Oregon.
    This account has been presented to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs once by me for settlement and been returned for correction. They require me to produce sub-vouchers for my traveling expenses and subsistence while on the expedition to the Modoc country. This it is impossible for me to do unless I should travel the route over again, and that is impracticable, therefore I have made a sworn statement to correctness of the account, and that should satisfy the Department.
    The Acting Commissioner Clum writes me that the charge per diem cannot be allowed from the fact that I was employed at Alsea Sub-Indian Agency as special commissary at the time and subsequent to my appointment as commissioner to settle Modoc troubles. That is even so, but before I accepted the appointment on the 8th of February in the city of Salem I resigned my position as special commissary, and the agency was put in charge of James Craigie as superintendent of farming, while I was absent.
    On my return from the Modoc country Hon. T. B. Odeneal again saw fit to place me in charge of the agency as special commissary.
    So I see no grounds for the refusal of my pay. Again: When Superintendent Odeneal settled with me (by certified vouchers) for  my pay as special commissary for the first quarter 1873, he deducted from my salary the time I was employed as a peace commissioner to hostile Modocs. I am certainly entitled to pay for my services from some source, and I claim it from the Department at Washington and the price agreed upon by the government as pay of peace commissioners.
    You will confer on me a great favor by collecting this account for me.
    The expense of transportation and subsistence was paid from my individual funds, and I am in actual want of it.
    I have in my hands certified vouchers from T. B. Odeneal to the amount of some twenty-five hundred dollars, which was contracted prior to June 7th 1873, the date of which I was relieved as special commissary, Alsea Agency. A great portion of the vouchers I cashed myself, and are now my property. Can you inform me to whom these accounts should be presented for settlement. My salary from January 1st to Feb. 7th and from March 21 to June 7th 1873 yet unpaid for services as special commissary at Alsea Agency. When, and by whom, are the accounts of that agency to be paid up to the time of the abolishing of the Oregon Superintendency.
    I was relieved from duties as special commissary at Alsea Agency June 7th 1873, paid [illegible] in certified vouchers by T. B. Odeneal without as much as one word of instruction as to whom my accounts were to be presented for settlement .Can you inform me.
Your most obedient servant
    Samuel Case
To
    Hon. J. H. Mitchell
        U.S. Senator
            Washington D.C.
P.S.    I have in my hands claims against the Alsea Sub-Indn. Agency prior to June 7th 1873 in the form of certified vouchers from Supt. Odeneal the amount of $2637.08 in currency, and $129.20 coin, which I will forward to you for collection in a few days. The most of these accounts I have paid out of my own funds from the fact that nearly all of them were accounts contracted by me for the use of the agency and for which I became personally responsible.
Your most obedient servant
    Samuel Case
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1049-1058.  Accounts not transcribed.



Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. January 12th 1874.
Sir:
    I return, herewith, the letter of L. S. Dyar, U.S. Indian agent for the Klamath Indians in Oregon, which was enclosed in yours of 10th instant.
    Your recommendations that the application contained in said letter, for permission to purchase two good horses for the service of his agency, is approved.
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servt.
        B. R. Cowen
            Acting Secretary
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 730-731.



Siletz Indian Agency
    January 14th 1874
Sir
    My predecessor, Agent Palmer, left certified vouchers for the following amounts due employees at this agency. As it seems doubtful whether he will complete his statement of indebtedness in time to include in an estimate for this Congress, I am requested to forward you the amounts that if possible steps may be taken to secure their payment. The vouchers are for services rendered at this agency, are duly certified, and I think the appointments have all been approved, viz.
    L. Shogren $703.33     Shasta Costa George $193.00
J. C. Mann 593.33 F. M. Rice $383.31
Joseph Howard 181.33 Geo. W. Whitney 686.67
J. E. Peterson 426.66
    The services were performed over one year ago, and the parties are in need of the money. If the indebtedness of this agency is included in the estimates to be presented to this Congress, I respectfully ask that these amounts may be included.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servt.
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Com. Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 458-460.




Klamath Agency Ogn.
    Jan. 15th 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affairs    Sir
        I send by this mail to Senator Mitchell a statement--with vouchers--of claims against this agency, except such as can only be made up from accounts of Superintendents Odeneal and Meacham. Old accts. are included in this statement, and consequently it will not agree with the one which I left with you in Sept. last, when you kindly promised to assist in securing an appropriation to settle the claims therein set forth.
    It is very essential that such an appropriation should be made during the present session of Congress as the most, if not all, of these expenses were incurred in fulfilling treaty stipulations, and serious inconvenience has already resulted from delay of payment.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 258-259.



Washington City D.C.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Aff.
        Sir
I have the honor to submit here with my account for expenses incurred as chairman and commissioner of "the Modoc Indian Peace Commission" and respectfully state my reason for delay to be on acct. of sickness occasioned by wounds received by me while in discharge of duties assigned me as commissioner, which have partially incapacitated me from doing any kind of business. I would therefore ask that my account be allowed without delay in order that I may meet my obligations to my family and to others who have advanced me funds. Hon. Ben Simpson will more fully explain the exigencies of the situation and is fully authorized to act for me in this matter.
With much respect
    Your obt. svt.
        A. B. Meacham
            Chairman Modoc Com.
   
[penciled slip filed with letter:]
Capt.
    If possible, have Meacham's acct. acted upon & paid to the utmost extent. He is sick at the National Hotel & not a cent of money.
C
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1059-1062.  Undated, but the transmittal is marked "Account allowed & referred to 2nd Auditor Jany. 21 '74."



Yreka Jany. 21st 1874
Hon. H. R. Clum
    Actg. Com. Indian Affairs
Sir, yours of Dec. 3, '73 came duly to hand, and should have received earlier attention, but a press of professional business prevented.
    The triplicate voucher was retained by Mr. Meacham, who said he would take it to Washington himself and see that it was paid.
    The items of the $48.00 amount I cannot now give as I kept no note of it after the certificate of the commissioners as to its correctness, supposing that would be all that was required.
    I recollect there was a pair of blankets which I think cost $14.00. They were unfit for further use after sleeping in the cave with them & I left them, also another pair that Genl. Gillem gave me to add to my comfort, as it came on quite cold. There was also a supply of hard bread with which to camp out the ten or twelve days which I lay out, also some bologna sausages, but I do not now recollect the amount of those items. The balance was for my meals & horse feed at places when I could stop, which were few--one small bill going & coming at Ball's, & one at Terwilliger's.
Very respt.
    Your obt. servt.
        E. Steele
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 267-269.  Copy of this letter on frames 907-908.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Or. Jan. 22nd 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of circular from the Department of Interior dated Dec. 19th '73 in reference to travel by officers, employees &c. of that Dept. On the 2nd of Jan. inst. I had the honor of addressing you on this subject asking information as to the intention of the regulation. As the last circular seems to require special permission before absence from his post of duty can be allowed, I desire respectfully to represent
    --that it is necessary as often as funds are placed to my credit for me to proceed in person to receive them or send by someone in whom I have confidence;
    --that our mail facilities are irregular, and I cannot transact business in that way without great inconvenience and delay;
    --that this agency is so far from any point where supplies can be purchased that it is absolutely necessary for the agent to make several trips to Portland and Salem, to purchase necessary supplies and transact other business pertaining to the agency;
    --that the time required to transmit a request for an order, and to receive the same, would be so great as to cause serious inconvenience and frequent loss to the government.
    I therefore respectfully ask a general order for leave of absence to visit Portland and Salem in this state when it shall be necessary to receive funds to purchase needed supplies and to transact such other business as shall appear to the satisfaction of the Department necessary, also to visit Alsea Sub-Agency (under my control) whenever the interests of the service may require it.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 471-473.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Or. Jan. 22nd 1874
Sir
    I have just returned from visiting the Indians at the various villages belonging to this agency.
    As I have had the honor of already stating in several letters, the potato crop was this year a total failure. I found the Indians in nearly every instance destitute of food to even a greater extent than I had anticipated.
    The weather is now unprecedentedly severe, more snow having fallen than ever before known.
    I have used the utmost economy in the distribution of what little wheat was raised, refusing in every instance to issue except to those I had reason to believe destitute of other means of subsistence. Many are now living on oats, but the severe weather has compelled them to feed the most of these to their horses so that but few have any left. It is an absolute necessity to purchase and issue flour if I would prevent suffering. The distribution of annuity goods purchased by the Commissioner has taken place. I found the quantity of flannel and dress goods insufficient and was compelled to purchase to the amount of something over $100.00 that each woman might receive a portion. The blankets have been distributed among the old, the sick and destitute, yet the present severe weather causes much suffering. The total number of grown men and women who have received shirts and dress goods is 578, and many are at the mouth of Siletz River and were not present, and many more are at work in the Willamette Valley. I have mentioned this as an indication of the number for whom I shall be compelled to provide--either in whole or in part--subsistence. If thought consistent with the interests of the Department I would respectfully ask that my requisition for funds forwarded Dec. 3rd '73 may be acted upon as soon as practicable and the full amount applied for be granted. It is my intention to perfect arrangements by which the expenses of this agency will be materially reduced, but the unforeseen failure of the potato crop, necessitating the purchase of not only food but seed potatoes, will require at least the amount I have asked for.
    Seed potatoes alone will cost not less than $1000.00 unless purchased immediately before the increase of price in the spring.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 474-477.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz January 28th 1874
Sir
    I have just had an interview with three chiefs of the Indians at Alsea Sub-Agency who desired me to write you in relation to their interests. They were unable to see Col. Kemble when he visited that agency on account of the shortness of his visit, not having received notice in time to be present at the council. They said "that the country where they lived was nearly worthless to the whites"--"that it was near the seacoast, sandy and barren and unfit either for farming or grazing"--"that in fact no white men were settled near there"--"that it was their home"--"their fathers lived and died there"--"that all of them desired to remain"--"that some people were telling them they would have to remove and their hearts were very sorry"--"that they wanted to die in their country and leave it to their children"--"they did not want any other country"--"that when they looked around them they saw nearly all their people were dead and it would not be long before they too would go and then the whites could take their land"--"that now they earnestly asked to be let alone to die in the land their fathers gave them"--"that years ago the government gave the land they now occupy to them and they do not wish to leave it"--"that they had never had trouble with the whites, never steal and never have killed any whites"--"when they want anything of the whites they do not beg but buy it"--"that no white man can say they have conducted themselves bad"--"have always been good friends to white people"--"that the government has never given them much, and now although they would like some things to help lift themselves up, yet they desire above all things to be let alone and allowed to die in the country the government has given them"--"that they came here to tell me all that was in their hearts and desired me to write to the Great Chief in Washington their words."
    In compliance with their request I have taken minutes of the conversation, which is substantially given above. What is said about the worthlessness of the country they occupy for farming and grazing I believe is true, and it would seem that the request they make is but reasonable and just. These Indians have never received much from the government and now do not ask anything but the privilege of living and dying in the country the government has once given them as their own.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Com. Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 467-470.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Feb. 4th 1874
Sir
    In a communication dated July 21, 1873 I represented to you the necessity of the permanent location of the band of Piute Snakes of which Ocheho is the chief. This band, whose old home is Warner Valley, was subdued by Gen. Crook and at the close of the Snake war, or soon after, was induced to come to Camp Yainax upon Klamath Reservation where they have been fed and clothed during the winter season and allowed to return in the spring to their old haunts in and around Warner Valley, where they have supported themselves by hunting, fishing etc. until winter set in, when each season, with a great deal of trouble and labor, they have been brought back again. Last season Ocheho was determined not to return, and refused to do so until Col. Bernard, who is stationed at Camp Bidwell, visited him by order of the Military Dept.--as I understand--and gave him the choice of the two reservations Malheur and Pyramid Lake--and it appears that when he found himself brought to that point he was very anxious to be allowed to come to Klamath, and by his request, and by the suggestion of Col. Bernard, teams were sent from Yainax and he with most of his band were brought in.
    Warner Valley as well as all that section of country is being settled by whites, and the time has come when Ocheho's people should be permanently settled upon some reservation and obliged to remain there and provision made for their support.
    Heretofore they, with other bands of Snakes, have been provided for from funds appropriated for "support of Shoshones and Bannocks and other tribes in Southeastern Oregon and Idaho" $20,000 per annum having been apportioned to Yainax. This is sufficient, provided it be continued, but it appears to me that some specific treat stipulations should be made with all the Snake Inds. upon this reservation so that both the agent and Inds. might know what to depend upon. Especially should some understanding be had with Ocheho by which he, with his people, should be obliged to remain upon this reservation during the whole year, or else taken to some other, and provision be made for their support there.
    It is important that immediate action be taken, or else when spring comes they will leave for their old hunting grounds.
    Doubtless the reason for Ocheho's wishing to remain at Warner is that he sees that the country is full of cattle, and he can live easily by theft. The citizens have already complained of his killing cattle, and should he be allowed to remain there during the winter he is almost sure to commit depredations when he gets hungry.
    Should no action be taken in the matter please advise me as to whether I shall allow him to go back to Warner next spring, and what course I shall pursue..
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 266-270.



Washington D.C.
    Feby. 6th 1874
Hon. Mr. Clum
    Chief Clerk &c.
        My Dear Sir
            I desire to ascertain just how much has been paid and how much is yet due for U.S. government to Klamath, Modoc & other Indians in pursuance of treaty of 1865 as considered to said Indians for their release of all lands on which they claimed an interest outside of the present limits of the Klamath Reservation, also how much said Indians have received in all in pursuance of said treaty, and how much and what is yet due them.
Very respectfully
    J. H. Mitchell
        U.S.S.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1102-1104.



Indian Reservations.
    Senator Mitchell is contending for a reduction of the area of the Indian reservations at Siletz and Alsea, so as to open to settlement all that part of the present reservation of Siletz north of the mouth of Salmon River, and also to change the north line of Alsea Reservation from the mouth of Alsea River to a point five miles south. These changes would open some fine country for settlers and also give access to some of the best cedar timber on the coast. It is also proposed to take from the south side of Alsea Reservation a strip of country extending twenty miles along the coast and thirty miles in the interior. These changes would not be to the disadvantage of the Indians, but of great value to settlers.
Feb. 10th 1874
Office Alsea Indian Agency Oregon
    Sir--I enclose an item clipped from the Portland Bulletin which concerns the Indians of this reservation to a great extent which ought to be thoroughly understood before any action is taken upon the matter. Part of the item is not true. It would be a great disadvantage
to remove the Indians from their lands and rivers. There are a few questions arise here which should be answered. 1st. How many and what class of people  are asking for these lines to be moved. 2nd. Where do the Alsea and Siuslaw Indians get most of their subsistence. 3rd. What is the reason that the country south of the Siuslaw, a distance of twenty-five miles to the Umpqua River, is uninhabited by white settlers. Answer: It has been opened for settlement for years, but it is a worthless, barren country. The first question I will not answer fully, but this I will say, that the river is the best kind of fence or dividing line. I am referring to the Alsea River. I had not known before that any white man wanted the Siuslaw country. I am in hopes the Indian can have a full hearing on this subject. Inspector Kemble did not remain long enough for me to get the Indians from the Siuslaw; his visit was too short for them. He heard what those present had to say on the subject, which I suppose he will report. One thing to be kept in mind is that these two tribes are on their own original soil, and they do not want to give them up. If any is taken from the Alsea it should not be near what is asked, for they should retain some of the river. The lumber men have not expected near five miles. I did not see the petition to the Hon. Senator for this move. The Indians are quite stirred up about matters. Hoping that this will attract your attention and particular notice, I remain
Your obt. servt.
    Geo. P. Litchfield
        Special Commissary in Charge
E. P. Smith
    Commissioner
        of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 902-905.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency, Or.
    Feby. 16th 1874
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 21st ultimo, enclosing extracts of Inspector Kemble's report of inspection at this agency.
    I desire to reply to statements made therein, and to the suggestions of your letter based upon them.
    That you may clearly comprehend the subject I will quote such portions of his report as I deem necessary to answer.
    "The best proof of their (the Indians) general progress in material matters is the statistics of their own farming this year. I have the honor to append a statement which I caused to be prepared, showing the number of bushels of wheat and oats raised by such individual Indians engaged in farming during the past season. It will be seen that one hundred and eleven persons have been engaged in grain raising, and that the yield aggregated 5,765½ bushels of wheat & 2,943 bushels oats."
    The statement referred to in to the above extract was on file in this office, and the substance was communicated to your office in my monthly report for October. The grain was raised by 111 families instead of 111 persons. Estimating three persons to a family would make the number of Indians engaged in grain raising exceed three hundred.
    "School. . . . There were present 11 girls & 14 boys at my examination of the school."
    At the time of Inspector Kemble's visit here the weather was extremely severe, consequently the small number--the average attendance is 40. It's contemplated to have two Sisters of Charity here at an early day. I anticipate beneficial results from their management.
    "The funds $4900 out of which he is required to pay the employees--except teachers--and the allowance for incidental expenses $600 are not sufficient to carry out the designs of the government."
    Correct. The money absolutely necessary is contained in my estimate for funds transmitted to your office under date of January 2nd.
    "A commissary or clerk is employed at $1200 per annum, and if such an officer and salary are needed here, they are necessary at every reservation I have visited."
    Such an officer has always been provided at this agency. There is more necessity now than ever before, as during my administration I've had no farmer or supt. of farming, having attended to those duties myself. I regard the services rendered by the present incumbent of the office as indispensably necessary to my administration and of great benefit to the Indians and the pay $1200 per annum currency--very moderate.
    "The physician is paid a similar salary without being required to furnish his own medicines as at many other reservations."
    A competent physician cannot be obtained here for less than $1200 per annum.
    The expenditure of treaty money for labor referred to is fully explained in my monthly report for October, and my account current for 3rd qr. '73 exhibits the disbursements.
    "To carry on the work of the agency properly will require a larger appropriation of monies. Unless this can be provided, I would recommend a reduction of offices and salaries."
    To reduce the salaries from their present rates would be to abolish the offices, as persons to fill them cannot be found at less salary than now paid. To abolish the offices would be to thoroughly destroy the benefits the Indians have already received in encouraging them to labor and remain on the reservation. They would speedily become discontented, demoralized & the results would be very deplorable. I will add that such a course would suit many white persons who are anxious to get their lands and who would encourage the Indians to their destruction.
    "I find that it cost the government during the past summer one dollar per bushel for each of the 2600 bushels of grain harvested. This is more than it would have cost to have bought the grain in the market. The $675 paid for harvest hands, as already stated, came out of one of the annuity funds. It will be better while funds remain so low to discontinue the agency farm and buy the grain required for agency purposes of the Indians."
    There is an error as to the grain costing $1.00 per bushel. The wheat cost nearly that figure. The 2600 bushels of grain, including all farm labor, cutting hay, stacking straw &c., did not cost $1500, all of which money was paid to the Indians. It's a matter of record that the first wheat raised here cost $5.00 per bushel and the expenditure was a good one, as the Indians were taught to work.
    In my judgment the agency farm should be continued for at least two years, when most of their treaties will have expired, and if the Indians make the same progress they have for the past two years the land and property can then be given them, and they will be better able to apprehend its value and make better use of it than at present, and at which time I confidently believe the majority will be able to manage their own affairs without the aid of the government.
    "It would add to the revenue of these Indians if their sawmill could be furnished with a larger water wheel, and the present wheel used to run the grist mill alone."
    The necessity for this was fully explained in the report of sawyer & miller of the agency given to Inspector Kemble. I hope to be able to make the change.
    "Some means must be provided to give the Indians employment on their reservation after their small fields are sown or harvested and thus prevent their wandering to the adjacent towns."
    I know of no better way to continue the agency farm. Expending their annuity money amongst them for labor (with the exception of buying agricultural implements &c.) as in the purchase & distribution of annuities, all receive & many who are not deserving. With the system of working only those willing to work will receive anything. Many of the leading Indians favor the plan indicated and are willing [that] their annuity money be expended on the reservation giving them employment.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
        Washington D.C.
   

[penciled note attached:]
    Annuities both of goods and money during the coming year will probably be expended only in payment of labor, not put into the hands of the Indians per capita. The alternative of loss of employee force or more funds is not at the option of the Department. More funds cannot be procured, therefore the expenditure for employees must be reduced. As this reduction can probably be made upon the clerk better than upon any other, the attention of the agent is called again to this subject. The opinion of the Office stated in letter of the _____ respecting agency farming is still maintained. The fact that the annuities expire within 2 years is an additional reason why the Indians should be taught to work for themselves and not on a common farm. It is hoped with the control of the funds to be expended for Indians the agent will be able to direct them as to prepare these Indians for self-maintenance when the govt. shall cease to aid them.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 285-297.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz February 16th 1874
Sir
    I respectfully ask leave to call your attention to the condition of this agency. As has been frequently stated in my letters, the potato crop was an entire failure last season, necessitating not only the purchase and issue of flour, but also potatoes for seed. At present prices [of] seed potatoes for the whole reservation will cost at least $1000.00, and as the price is advancing, unless soon purchased will cost more than that. Until I know what amount of funds will be allotted me, I do not wish to incur debt unless absolutely compelled to do so. Already I have had to buy flour, and if any potatoes are planted this season must soon make arrangements for their purchase. I therefore respectfully ask that the funds intended for my agency the 1st and 2nd qrs. 1874 be forwarded immediately. If I could know at the beginning of each half year what amount of funds I will receive, I could adjust my expenditures to meet it. As it now is, I can only conjecture from past experience.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Com. Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 479-480.




Clear Lake Cal.
    Feb. 22nd 1874
To
    The Hon. the Comsr. of Indian Affairs
        Sir,
            It was my misfortune to be named as an actor on a farce gotten up last winter at Washington familiarly known as "The Modoc Peace Commission," of which A. B. Meacham was "manager."
    At the close of my part of the performance, at the request of manager Meacham I signed the enclosed voucher to enable him to settle his accounts with his principals at Washington.
    As I charged the government only with the money advanced and expended in its service, after the delay of a year it is rather tantalizing to have the voucher instead of the money returned to me. As Mr. Meacham himself used $20. of the money and knows to a certainty my expenses could not be less than the balance charged I can see no reason for making any change in the voucher first presented. I therefore enclose it herewith.
Very respectfully
    Jesse Applegate
Commissioner of Indian Affairs
    Washington City D.C.
   

Washington City
    Jun 29 '74
Hon. Jesse Applegate
    To secure payment make your time (number of days) and an itemized statement of expenses, and send to office of Commr. Ind. Affairs, Washington City.
With much respt.
    Your obt. svt.
        A. B. Meacham
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 27-30.  See subsequent letter of July 15, below.



Office Alsea Agency Oregon Feb. 24th 1874
Sir
    In reply to your letter of Dec. 29 referring me to Agent Fairchild in regard to an estimate for funds, I would say that prior to receiving your letter Agent Fairchild had informed me that he had already sent an estimate for this agency based upon the indebtedness of the last six months, which is not enough to purchase seed and to make the improvements that the service require this present season. I wish to call your attention to the school and building fund that has been expected and needed for some time, which was in the hands of the late Superintendent Odeneal when his office was abolished. Since that time I have not heard from it. Inspector Kemble told the Indians while here that he would recommend a school and also a physician for them. He was much surprised to see how that these Indians were and had been neglected in the past. He told them that he would urge the necessity of these additions and improvements--as the seasons are short for work here on the coast, that we should commence improvements early in the spring. As it will be some weeks before I can get my commission, I am in hopes you will instruct Agent Fairchild about the matter. As I am extremely anxious to make a good showing this season as [in] the past I could not owing to the existing circumstances.
    Hoping this will meet with your favor and attention, I remain
Your obt. servant
    Geo. P. Litchfield
        Alsea Agency
            via Newport
                Benton Co.
                    Oregon
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 917-919.



Office Alsea Agency Feb. 24th 1874
Sir--
    I am in receipt of your letter of Jan. 7th stating that I had been appointed sub-agent for this agency. Owing to the situation of affairs which need my attention here, and also the inclemency of the weather, I shall not be able to go to Portland for some weeks perhaps yet, as I will have to go there to get my bond approved. To make the trip now it would take near two weeks (owing to bad roads). It will take much less time in settled weather. There is an error in the middle letter of my name. The letter was directed correct, which was George P. (but was written on the bond George D.). I can easily have it corrected, as I am the only one of the name here in Oregon, and all the correspondence before has been correct. Hoping this will be satisfactory, I remain
Your obt. servt.
    Geo. P. Litchfield
        Special Commissary in Charge
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 920-921.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Feb. 28th 1874
Sir
    Your Statement of Funds remitted to me for 1st & 2nd qrs. 1874 is at hand.
    Permit me to call your attention to the fact that you have furnished funds for the payment of only one interpreter while the treaty with the Klamaths and Modocs provided for two--two interpreters are constantly employed--and needed--upon this reservation, one at Klamath Agency and one at Camp Yainax on the eastern portion of the reservation.
    This, I have no doubt, is an oversight which you will rectify on rect. of this communication. If I am not to be allowed funds for the payment of two, as provided by treaty, please inform me immediately that I may discharge both of those now employed at close of the present quarter.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 280-282.



Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or. Mch. 2nd / 74
Sir:
    I have the honor to report the following operations of this agency for the month of February.
    The preparation for spring work on their farms has kept the Indians on the reservation, & the mechanics of the agency busy in repairing plows, harrows & wagons. As the supply of agricultural implements is very small & those here old, broken & generally used up, the carpenter & blacksmith are constantly occupied in repairing & in fact there's work enough at this agency for twice the force of mechanics.
    The sanitary condition of the reservation is good.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 355-356.



Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or.
    March 3rd 1874.
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of 3rd ultimo.
    I very much regret "that the appropriation for Incidental Expenses Indian Service in Oregon" is so very nearly exhausted that only $500 can be sent to this agency. Of the $40M for said service, this agency would have received $3,500 for the year '73-'74.
    [This reservation] Is entitled to $8,000 at the lowest. I sincerely hope the efforts referred to to have the amt. for this branch of the service increased may be successful.
    I refer you to my estimate for funds. Nothing less can carry on this agency.
    I also refer you to my annual report for 1873 [as] to the condition of the Indians of this agency, and I earnestly invite your careful attention to the matter of reduction of employees in my letter of 13th ultimo.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 298-300.



Washington D.C. March 4th / 74
Hon. Secretary of Interior
    Washington D.C.
        Dear Sir--
            In answer to your communication to Senator Mitchell under date of Feby. 14th enclosing copy of a letter from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, referring to my letter dated Dec. 11th 1873 in relation to fruit trees furnished by N. B. Clough to the Indian Department, in Oregon, in 1862 & 1863, and stating that the papers in the case have been mislaid and cannot now be found.
    I have the honor to state that I herewith enclose a bond for double the amount of the vouchers which were assigned to me, and ask that the claim be settled on a statement made up from papers and affidavits now on file in the Indian Department, and paid out of any money which may be used for that purpose.
    By so doing you will very much oblige one who has waited a long time and is very much in need of the money.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        W. C. Griswold
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1119-1121.  Contract of Griswold, Wadsworth and Hobbs not transcribed.



Klamath Indian Agency
    Jackson County, Oregon
        March 7th 1874.
To the Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Department of the Interior
        Washington D.C.
Sir,
    I have the honor to state that in August 1871 I was engaged as miller of this agency by Superintendent A. B. Meacham, and continued in that capacity in charge of both the saw and grist mill until the 31st of December 1873, at which time my services were dispensed with by Mr. L. S. Dyar, the Indian agent now in charge of the Klamath Agency. No motive was assigned by Mr. Dyar for thus suddenly terminating by contract, nor do I know of cause on my part, either on the grounds of competency or character or conduct. I may state that since my services were dispensed with the sawmill has not been in operation a single day. As to competence, the certificate of Mr. R. C. Kenny of Salem Mills, Oregon, now I suppose on file with the papers in my case on the occasion of my engagement with the Department in August 1871, will I trust be amply satisfactory. In regard to character and conduct I confidently refer to the following named army officers at Fort Klamath, with whom I am personally acquainted, namely Lt. Colonel Frank Wheaton, commanding, Asst. Surgeon H. McElderry U.S.A. and Lieut. J. Q. Adams, 1st Cavalry. To each of these three officers I have mentioned my case, and though they expressed the warmest interest in my behalf, they, as officers of another Department of the government, did not feel at liberty to take any initiative steps towards testifying as to my competence and character, with a view to my reinstatement.
    I am on the very best of terms with all the Indians on this reservation, and can honestly state that one and all of them wish to have me back again in my former capacity. In support of this statement I enclose a petition to that effect from the chiefs of the Klamath Indians, all of whom understand English and the nature of the petition in question.
    I feel satisfied that I have ever performed my duty both to the Department and to the Indians, and respectfully ask the Supt. of Indian Affairs to cause such investigation into the merits of my case as he may deem proper or necessary, and if satisfactory and agreeable to the views of the Department to take the proper steps to have me reinstated in my former capacity of miller at this agency.
    Being a married man with a family of 9 children, the sudden and unlooked-for termination of my contract will occasion me considerable hardship.
    Craving the indulgence of the Superintendent of Indian Affairs for thus addressing him, and trusting that this application may receive a favorable consideration from the Department,
I have the honor to be, sir
    Very respectfully
        Your obedient servant
            John Loosley
                Late Miller Klamath Indian Agency
   
Klamath Indian Agency
    March 6th 1874
    We, the following named Klamath Indians now on the Klamath Reservation, wish to have Mr. John Loosley back again to run the sawmill. We have great confidence in him. We understand the meaning of this petition. Since he left we have not been able to run the mill.
    Head chief Blow his mark X
Sub-chief Allen David his mark X
Sub-chief Pit River Charley his mark X
Sub-chief George Old Man Chiloquin his mark X
Sub-chief Smith River Jack his mark X
Dave Hill his mark X
Tecumseh his mark X
Alley Tecumseh his mark X
Hanley his mark X
Carney his mark X
Lalakes his mark X
Snipe John his mark X
Dr. John his mark X
Ealy his mark X
Bobb his mark X
Link River Jim his mark X
Link River Lomey his mark X
Sam May his mark X
Tom his mark X
Dr. Tomson his mark X
Captain his mark X
Oregon City Jim his mark X
Chin-Chellock his mark X
Old Man John his mark X
Long John his mark X
Charley Brown his mark X
Jim Parker his mark X
Chiloquin John his mark X
Jola his mark X
Pete his mark X
Pit River Dick his mark X
Johnson his mark X
Bobb his mark X
Davis Bobb his mark X
Glaman his mark X
Ben Choak his mark X
Segas Kenny his mark X
Jack or Bobb Wittle his mark X
Greenbacks his mark X
Alexander Wilson his mark X
Allen David George his mark X
Big Doctor his mark X
Pelican Man his mark X
Sampson his mark X
Lobett his mark X
Old Man Hull his mark X
Blow Wilson his mark X
Long Jim his mark X
Allen David Bill his mark X
Smoke his mark X
Charley Choke his mark X
Link River John his mark X
Patt his mark X
Handle his mark X
Thomson his mark X
Klamath Indian Agency
    Jackson County Oregon
        March 21, 1874
    We the undersigned certify that we witnessed the consent of the aforesaid Klamath Indians to their signature to this petition, and further that each Indian understood the meaning of this petition.
Edward Piening
    Beef contractor, post of Fort Klamath, Ogn.
John Loosley
    Resident of Klamath Agency
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 936-942.



House of Representatives,
    Washington, D.C., March 9th 1874.
Hon. Edward P. Smith
    Commissioner of Ind. Affrs.
        Sir,
            I enclose with this two vouchers, one for $300 and one for $3375, issued by Ind. Agent Joel Palmer in favor of W. G. Harris. it is a long time since these debts were contracted, and it is a peculiar hardship that he should be kept out of his money. If you have no money applicable to the payment of those claims I would respectfully request that you include the amount in your estimate to Congress.
Respectfully your obt. svt.
    J. W. Nesmith
   
Siletz Indian Agency
    Oregon Jan. 3nd 1873
W. G. Harris Esq.
    Lebanon Or.
        Dear Sir
            Your letter of the 15th of last month only reached me by last mail.
    I believe I have written you already why the amount due you is unpaid, viz., that Congress in making appropriations for the fiscal year beginning July 1st 1873 provided that "no portion of the money so appropriated should be paid for any expenses or indebtedness incurred prior to said fiscal year." When I received money for the two last quarters of 1873 (the first, by the way, I had received with trifling exceptions), I was cautioned gainst paying any account incurred previous to July 1st 1873.
    I wrote at once to the Department, calling attention to the fact that many people had waited long for their money and ought to have it. To this they returned answer that such was the law and that my bonds would be held responsible for all money placed in my hands but said that if I would send a detailed statement of the debts, steps would be taken to either pay them or secure an appropriation from Congress for that purpose, also directing me to send a separate statement of Gen. Palmer's debts. I long ago sent the statement of my own indebtedness and applied to Gen. Palmer for a statement of his. He has not yet furnished it because his accounts are not yet finally made out, and I could not give it of course, as he took all his books away with him. I have several times asked him for it, and it may be he has sent it to Washington. This is the way the matter stands. I am positively prohibited from paying any of his debts till money is furnished for that special purpose. If he gets that statement so that it can be sent to Washington in time to include in the appropriation bill I have no doubt but the money will be promptly paid.
    This is my individual opinion based on the letters I have received from the Department.
    Now, Mr. Harris, I am aware that a gross injustice has been done you and that your case is one of peculiar hardship, but what can I do?
    As far as my own salary is concerned, I have already used a large proportion of it in paying such debts as were the most needy. I suppose Gen. Palmer is to be blamed for an error in judgment in purchasing your horses without fully informing you that the time of payment was doubtful, but I suppose he judged from his experience when Supt. of Indian Affairs that the money would be promptly furnished and perhaps was somewhat deceived by his official superior. The most of those whose vouchers are issued and properly certified have sent them to Mr. Mitchell in Washington to try and collect. Whether it will do any good I do not know. Perhaps it would be as well for you to enclose yours in a letter to him stating all the facts of the case and he may hurry up their payment.
    I beg to assure you of my earnest sympathy and readiness to do all in my power to assist you in getting your money.
Truly yours
    J. H. Fairchild
        U.S. Indian Agent
   
Siletz Ind. Agency March 31st 1873.
Dear Sir
    Enclosed please find a set of certified vouchers for the amount due you. By presenting these vouchers to my successor Mr. Fairchild, or perhaps to Supt. Odeneal, they will, I presume, be paid as soon as funds are received applicable to the payment of such accounts. It is possible however the agent may feel inclined to forward the account to the Department at Washington for approval before paying the amount.
    I regret exceedingly the necessity which compels resorting to this roundabout way of paying a demand that ought to have been paid long ago, but it is the only means left me, for there is not a dollar in my hands to meet even traveling expenses. Were you acquainted with all the facts connected with this matter and the reasons for a failure to pay, you might feel less offended.
    The bill of expenses and services will be put in a separate voucher. Please send the bill of it to Dayton, as the memorandum has been mislaid, and I could not recollect the items.
Joel Palmer
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 89-94.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Oregon March 9th 1874
Sir
    In several of my letters, particularly in that of Jan. 22nd, I had the honor to call the attention of the Department to the necessity of issuing food to these Indians. I have already issued the wheat raised last year, reserving only what was absolutely necessary for seed, and have purchased and issued 100 bbls. flour. Fully appreciating the fact that the present policy of the government is bitterly opposed by many who will use any means to create an unfavorable impression in the minds of the people, I have used all the economy possible in the distribution of food. I have personally inspected the houses to see that they were really destitute, and where they had provided a stock of fish refused to issue flour unless in payment for work performed for the government. With all my care, however, the whole stock of provisions is now exhausted as there have [been] from 500 to 800 to provide for. A larger stock than usual of fish was provided last fall, but the failure of potatoes rendered a larger consumption necessary, and there are now few families that have any on hand. As many as could find employment have been permitted to go outside the reservation to labor, but the winter has been one of unusual severity, and but few have been able to find work. The whole stock of flour on the reservation would not last 1 week, and to prevent depredations on cattle belonging to settlers in the vicinity I shall be compelled to purchase flour at mills outside and let the Indians pack it in, as the roads are impassable for wagons. I see no way to avoid this expenditure unless I take the risk of the Indians killing the stock of settlers, which of course I cannot do, as a collision would be certain to follow. I expected sufficient flour to last us till spring would be hauled to points convenient to the reservation last fall, but the parties were so late making their preparations that the roads became impassable for loaded teams and I was compelled to rely solely on the stock already provided. I trust hereafter a sufficient amount of wheat may be raised here to prevent similar destitution even should the potato crop prove as last year an entire failure.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 484-487.



House of Representatives,
    Washington, D.C., March 10th 1874.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner of Ind. Affs.
        Sir:
            Will you please furnish me with the evidence on file in your office of the loss of public monies for which J. W. P. Huntington, late Supt. of Ind. Affairs in Oregon, was accountable?
    I purpose to introduce a bill for the relief of the estate of Mr. Huntington and his sureties and wish to use such evidence of the loss of public money on the steamship Brother Jonathan in July 1865, as may be on file in your office in support of the bill.
    The funds lost on the "Jonathan," for which Mr. Huntington was responsible, were in charge and possession of Wm. Logan, late Indian agent for Oregon, who was lost on said steamship.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Nesmith
            M.C. for Oregon
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 97-99.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Mar. 12, 1874
Sir
    On Nov. 18th last, I sent to your office papers relating to flour contract, and on the 28th of the same month I sent all papers relating to beef contract for this agency. Both the flour and beef were furnished according to contract, and one half of the amount paid on delivery, and now the contractors are pressing me for the remainder, but as I have received no word from you regarding the approval of the contracts I cannot pay them. I would respectfully call your attention to the matter of the approval of contracts and inquire how soon these persons may expect their money.
Very respectfully
    L. S. Dyar U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 283-284.  The contracts referred to were with James H. Callahan and Joseph Robnett.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz March 13th 1874
Sir
    Enclosed I have the honor to hand copy of agreement entered into with ex-Agent Palmer for rent of certain unoccupied grazing lands on this reservation. Gen. Palmer has long been acquainted with these Indians, having when Superintendent of Indian Affairs treated with and located them here, and is favorably remembered by them. His influence has been good and invariably exerted for their benefit.
    I have heard but one opinion expressed, i.e., an earnest desire that he might occupy the tract in question. It is at present useless to the Indians except a few who live there and whose possession is guaranteed.
    The tract in question contains but a limited quantity of grazing land, and what there is is scattered along the ocean beach in small prairies from the mouth of Salmon River to the southern boundary of the reservation. To render it possible to occupy the tract for the purposes named it will be necessary for the lessee to expend a large sum in opening roads, bridging streams, building barns, corrals &c. before he can take possession, and the character of the country is such that he must be at considerable expense for herders to look after his cattle. Under these circumstances the sum named in the contract is undoubtedly as large as could be realized as rent from any responsible person. Though the sum is not large, yet invested each year in stock it will soon amount to quite an item and have the beneficial effect of turning the attention of the Indians to stock raising. Probably the utmost limit of its capacity for grazing is the number named in the lease. I would therefore respectfully recommend the approval of the contract, believing it will result in unmixed good to the Indians.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 481-483.



Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. March 24th 1874.
Sir:
    I approve the recommendation of your letter of 23rd instant, that Agent Fairchild be authorized to purchase, in accordance with his request, for the service of the Siletz Agency, such quantity of seed potatoes as the funds in his hands available for that purpose will permit.
    The letter of Agent Fairchild is herewith enclosed.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        C. Delano
            Secretary
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 734-735.



Treasury Department,
    Second Comptroller's Office,
        March 24th, 1874.
Sir:
    I have respectfully to request that you will furnish this office, at your earliest convenience, copies of such evidence as may be on file in your office of the loss of money for which J. W. P. Huntington is held accountable by the destruction of the steamer which was transporting the same to Mr. Huntington.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servt.
        J. M. Brodhead
            Comptroller
E. P. Smith Esq.
    Commissioner Indian Affairs

NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81,
Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 136-137.




Treasury Department,
    Second Comptroller's Office,
        March 28th, 1874.
Sir:
    Referring to your letter of June 2, 1870 to the Second Auditor, you requested him to suspend for the present sundry vouchers therein specified "for the reason that drafts issued by the late Superintendent Huntington to the gentlemen named have been protested, as I (you) am advised by the present Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon."
    Since the receipt of this letter two of the drafts there mentioned, in favor of Messrs. Bowen and Cramst, have been paid through the Treasury.
    I have respectfully to request that you will inform this office whether the remaining three issued in the name of Amos Harvey have been paid; if not, what has become of them.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servt.
        J. M. Brodhead
            Comptroller
E. P. Smith Esq.
    Commissioner Indian Affairs

NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81,
Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 138-140.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Apr. 10, 1874
Sir
    In answer to your letter of March 16th 1874 I have to say that the agent and employees at this agency have not received one dollar nor one pound of subsistence from the government supplies since I have been in charge of the agency. The agent has received simply his salary and nothing more. The employees have received their salary and 75 cts. per day as subsistence. At Yainax Station the white employees receive their salary and 75 cts. per day as subsistence, and the Indian employees receive subsistence from the government supplies.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 287-288.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Apr. 16, 1874
Sir
    Of funds now placed to my credit for subsistence, support etc. of Shoshones and Bannocks, I find that quite an amount will probably be unexpended on June 30th next, unless expended in the purchase of stock cattle. This would be a very judicious purchase as the Inds. at Yainax Station have no cattle, and the range there is the best in this whole section of country, no stock having suffered there the past winter, although the severest season known for many years, and all kinds of stock in the surrounding country having died by thousands. I respectfully ask permission to expend such of the above-mentioned funds as are not absolutely necessary for other objects in such purchase. I also ask permission to purchase one mowing machine, and one horse rake, from those funds. These articles are very much needed, and can be bought as cheaply without advertising and the cost of advertising saved. I ask permission so to purchase.
    I have funds to my credit for the purchase of stock cattle for the Klamath Inds., which I propose to expend this spring. Will it be necessary to advertise for the purchase of stock cattle? I am confident that I can make a better selection, and consequently a better bargain for the Inds., without advertising. Please advise me immediately on these questions, as these purchases must be made soon if approved.
Very respectfully
    L. S. Dyar
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
   

[penciled note filed with letter]
    State the law governing such purchases and authorize to advertise and submit bids to this office with report as to whether he can do better on open market--Commissioner says--advertise and report & state whether you can do better by rejecting the bids--
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 289-293.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz April 20th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of March 23rd in reply to a communication addressed by me to Senator Mitchell.
    On the 5th of July last I had the honor of addressing a letter to the Department in which I explained at some length the situation of affairs here, and the impossibility of carrying on this agency without incurring debt unless I could have some information in advance of the amount of funds I would be likely to receive each year. In that letter I used the following language--"As this agency has been heretofore conducted at least $20,000.00 is necessary each year." After explaining the farm work performed I said--"If I can get $20,000.00 per annum I can continue to operate both these farms to the great advantage of the service. I would therefore respectfully ask if I am authorized to continue both these farms as well as the one at the agency and employ competent farmers with the expectation that I am to receive the amount from the incidental fund necessary to meet the expenses &c." On the 12th of August I received notice of $10,000.00 placed to my credit from the incidental fund for the 3rd and 4th qrs. of 1873. In the letter accompanying the following language occurs--"It is impracticable to state in advance what amount can be spared for the service of your agency during the next two quarters, as it depends in a great measure upon contingencies that may arise. It is believed however that by exercising prudence and economy the farm labor referred to in your letters may be continued without involving your agency in debt." On the 3rd of December I addressed a letter to the Department with requisition for funds for the 1st and 2nd quarters 1874 in which, after referring to the position in which my agency was placed by the failure of the potato crop, I earnestly urged that the funds intended for me might be forwarded early enough to reach me by the beginning of the quarter. February 26th I received notice of funds placed to my credit as follows--
    Interpreter at Alsea Sub-Agency $500
Pay of agent at Siletz 750; pay of Interpreter $250 1000
Support and maintenance of school 500
Incidental expenses including pay of employees   2500
Total $4000
Of this, however, only $2500 was available for the necessary incidental expenses of the service, barely sufficient for pay of employees during the 1st quarter 1874. In my letters I have explained the situation of affairs here. It is impossible to keep the Indians on the reservation without food. By no fault of our own the principal item of their subsistence was last year entirely destroyed. For this some substitute must be found, or they must be permitted to go outside and seek subsistence. The extraordinary inclemency of the winter rendered this impossible to many, and I had only the alternative of purchasing flour.
    In this connection I beg leave to call the attention of the Department to the very different situation of this agency from most others. Here are no large tracts of prairies on which herds of cattle and horses may graze, affording means of subsistence when all others fail. The only pasture land in any amount is in small tracts on the coast, a long distance from the Indian villages. These Indians are poor, very poor, and when their crops fail they have no resource except the bounty of the government. Many are living on fish alone, but not many secured sufficient in the season to last through the winter. Most other agencies are provided with mills--here there is none.
    Already there is a feeling that they are treated unfairly by the Department, and I feared that unless some steps were taken to provide subsistence they might resort to the slaughter of cattle belonging to settlers in the vicinity, and thus produce trouble and expense much greater than the cost of flour. They have been urged for seventeen years to give up their old customs and adopt those of the whites. This they are trying to do, and to require them to go back to their old methods of procuring subsistence, which they had abandoned, would seem to nullify all the instruction they have received. I beg to report the statement contained in my letter of last July respecting the very embarrassing position in which an agent is placed with no certain amount of funds on which he can rely. Unless this is the case he has nothing on which to base his estimates for expenditures and can only guess what amount of labor he can perform.
    It is absolutely necessary during the 1st and 2nd quarters to put in crops and lay plans for the coming summer and fall. I respectfully submit that he cannot manage his agency with such care but [that] he is almost sure to be involved in debt.
    At most other agencies the Indians have more or less means of support themselves. Here they rely on the agent for everything. They may raise oats, but they cannot sell them, for there is no market. They may raise wheat, but there is no means of grinding except our horse mill, which requires our best teams so that when the mill is in operation all other work must cease. They have no teams--they look to me for the means of putting in their crops. They have no seed. I must furnish it or prepare to support them next winter. They have no means of providing clothing, that also I must provide for them. It will be seen from this statement how necessary it is that I make my purchases in advance, or at least make arrangements by which when it becomes absolutely necessary I can procure needed articles. If I knew that I would get $20,000 per annum or $15,000 or $10,000 I could adjust my estimates accordingly.
    I am aware that if funds are not appropriated by Congress, they cannot be supplied to me, but I desired to explain the very embarrassing position in which I am placed, without any definite amount on which to rely.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 494-499.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz April 20th 1874
Sir
    Your communication of March 16th in reference to subsistence furnished agent or employees at this agency is just received.
    In reply I have the honor to state that since the visit of Inspector Kemble none has been issued. Prior to that time the teacher of the Manual Labor School received subsistence in addition to his salary which was deemed inadequate for the service performed. Inspector Kemble, however, disapproving the arrangement, it was immediately discontinued.
    In this connection I desire to ask if the agent is entitled to subsistence from stores belonging to government. I am informed that it has heretofore been customary for the agent to draw subsistence for himself from govt. stores, and I desire to be informed if it will be allowed.
    The distance from any point where supplies can be procured is so great that the present pay ($1500.00) is hardly sufficient to support the agent.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 500-501.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Apr. 21, 1874
Sir
    On the 16th inst. I wrote you asking permission to purchase stock cattle and farm machinery from funds now in my hands for subsistence, support etc. of Shoshones and Bannocks.
    I wish now to ask permission to also purchase six wagons and six sets of harness for Indians and two (2) good wagons for govt. use at Yainax from the same funds. Those Inds. have long been promised this stock, wagons &c., for which I am asking, but thus far have never received any of these things, and now that the money is on hand sufficient for the purpose I greatly desire that it should be so used. Will it be necessary to advertise for the wagons & harness? I am sure that I can do as well without advertising by purchasing the wagons of Mr. E. E. Ames of Sacramento Cal., genl. agt. for this coast of the Studebaker wagon.
    Please inform me if I may expect the usual appropriation ($20,000.00) for Shoshones & Bannocks next year.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 295-297.



Apr. 22nd 1874
    Office Alsea Agency Oregon
Sir--
    In reply to your letter of March 16th I would say that the employees have subsisted upon their own resources wholly. The commissary expects the usual amount allowed for subsistence under like circumstances. By past reports you will see there has been no agent here for some years past.
    I still urge your attention to the distress of this agency financially [of] which I have often spoken.
Yours respectfully
    Geo. P. Litchfield
        Special Commissary in Charge
            Alsea Agency
                via Newport
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 963-964.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Apr. 25, 1874
Sir
    I send by mail today my money accounts and Report of Employees for first quarter 1874. The sickness and death of a little son have caused delay.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 298-299.



Newport Oregon
    April 29th 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Com. of Ind. Affairs
        Sir    There is a tract of land lying north of that portion of land recently leased by Genl. Joel Palmer around the Nestucca River, Grand Ronde Agency, comprising all the country from Palmer's northern line to the north line of said Ind. agency, which if possible I should like to lease from the Dept. for a term of years for stock raising purposes. This range is not now, nor has it been used or occupied by any Indians. I would pay a fair price per annum for it. Please inform me if the rental is possible and to whom must I apply for endorsement. Ample security will be given for good behavior &c. while on the land.
Yours respectfully
    R. A. Bensell
        Newport
            Benton Co.
                Oregon
To
    Hon. E. P. Smith
        Com. of Ind. Affairs
            Washington D.C.
Ref. Senator Mitchell U.S.S.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 72-73.



Portland Ogn. May 4, 1874
Genl. J. Eaton
    U.S. Comr. Edn.--My Dear Sir--I gave Dr. W. C. McKay, who has charge of the "Warm Spring Scouts," now visiting the East, a letter of introduction to you.
    While he conducts this band of scouts, who did so much to close the "Modoc War," & while he entertains the public with their native habits, he hopes to do some good to his countrymen. He is about one half of Indian blood. I have known him since 1848. He was educated at Wilberham, [Mass.], Castleton Vt. & Geneva N.Y. from 1838 to 1843. He is intelligent, sober, reliable & gentlemanly. He endorses fully Genl. Grant's policy with the Indians.
    He is a Protestant, & he sees the designs of evil of some, who use the govt. to further their own plans.
    I hope he will meet through your introduction some high [men] in authority & to aid in perfecting the good work of Pres. G. & making it a success even after the administration changes.
    If Genl. G. will notice these "Warm Spring Scouts," who really made Genl. Crook victor over the Snakes & Genl. Davis of the Modocs, he will hold them in lasting bonds. A fringed or gay blanket each from the Presdt. or Great Father will be a heritage of more value than gold to them.
    Our elections for state & co. school supts. occur June 1st. Mr. Elliot will doubtless be chosen for this county.
Our state Bible soc. is moving to supply every child of school age with a Testament.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 818-820.



Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. May 9th 1874.
Sir:
    I return the letter of Agent Dyar, submitted with your report of the 7th instant, in which the agent requests authority to purchase for the Indian Service, at the Klamath Agency, 8 wagons and 6 sets of harness.
    Agreeably to your recommendation, authority is hereby granted for the purchase of the articles named, provided there are funds on hand applicable to the payment of said purchase.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        B. R. Cowen
            Acting Secretary
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 741-742.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz May 12th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of circular No. 2 of April 1st from your office making inquiries respecting killing of whites by Indians or killing or capture of Indians by whites &c.
    In reply I would have to say that no such case has occurred in my jurisdiction since the first day of January 1873.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 504-505.



Klamath Agency Ogn.
    May 13, 1874
Sir
    In your letter of 1st inst. in which you authorize me to advertise for cattle and articles needed at this agency, you require me to submit the bids with my report to your office before it is decided as to whether I shall accept the lowest responsible bids or purchase in open market. Such a course would defer the matter until after June 30th, when--if I understand the law--the funds in my hands would revert to the U.S. Treasury unless a contract were made before that date.
    If I am correct I respectfully ask that I be permitted to accept the lowest responsible bids at once and make the necessary contracts before June 30th.
    I shall advertise immediately, giving 30 days time.
    I greatly desire an immediate answer.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 310-312.



Klamath Agency Or.
    May 16, 1874
Sir
    By letter bearing date Nov. 18, [1873] you inform me that my accts. for second qr. 1873 had not been received at your office.
    They were mailed on July 10th 1873 and were probably lost in transit.
    I have the honor to forward herewith duplicates of the same.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 308-309.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency, Or.
    May 17th 1874.
Sir:
    Complying with your circular letter of March 27th, I have the honor to make the following requisition for this agency.
    1 threshing machine, 10 horsepower.
    1 reaper & mower--combined.
    These articles are needed here and should be here by the 1st of August.
    The coming harvest promises to yield 10 to 15M bushels of grain.
    The machine on hand is old, used up, worthless.
    Referring to the following extract from circular, "If, for any reason, such funds can be put to a more beneficial use for Indians by the purchase of other articles, or by any other expenditure than the purchase of goods or supplies you will so report."
    The Indians of this agency, having received their allotment of land as per treaty stipulations, are anxious to make improvements in building &c. Remaining on the reservation during the winter, they consume all their stores and in the spring have to seek work outside. The allotment of lands has made it necessary to make new roads, which will require a great deal of labor. Therefore in my judgment the most beneficial use that can be made of the money due the Indians--excepting the amounts for school purposes--is to keep them employed on the reservation, making such improvements as will be of permanent value and of common benefit--paying them for their labor and letting them purchase such articles as they most require.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 338-340.



U.S. Surveyor General's Office,
    Eugene City, Oregon, May 18th 1874.
Sir,
    On the 1st of August 1873, at which time the office of Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon was discontinued, I had in my possession Indian Department vouchers issued by Genl. Palmer, late Indian agent at the Siletz Indian Agency, Ogn., amounting in the aggregate to $688.33 currency. The vouchers are as follows.
    Jos. Howard, services as Asst. Farmer Dec. '72 & 1st qr. '73 200.00
B. Metcalfe, services as Asst. Blacksmith 4th qr. '72 & 1st qr. '73 168.33
Adam Metcalfe, services as Asst. Farmer 3rd & 4th qr. '72 & 1st qr. '73 320.00
all of whom were regularly authorized and approved employees at the Siletz Indian Agency. Is it possible to have these vouchers paid? The money to the entire amount has been advanced to the parties to procure the necessaries of life, they being poor, and having no other resources. I do not forward the vouchers herewith, but will send them at once if so directed.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        R. P. Earhart
            Late Chief Clerk
                Late Oregon Superintendency
Hon. H. R. Clum
    Actg. Comr. Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 437-439.



Grand Ronde Agency Oregon 19 May 1874
The Honble. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington District of Columbia
            Sir,
                I have the honor to direct your attention to the fact that a large tract of this agency along the coast is adapted to depasturing purposes, "that it is going to waste, and has been so since the agency was established," "that it can be let to settlers to run their stock upon without prejudice to the Indians' interests," "that it would bring in a revenue"--if so let, that would be of substantial relief to this agency.
    This portion of the reservation is situated N. & S. between the Siletz River and Cape Lookout, and E. & W. between the ocean and the backbone of the Coast Range, on it there scattered the remnants of the five tribes of Indians with whom no treaty was made, but they are desirous to obtain the privileges of the Indians to whom land has been given here and the lands situate on the Salmon and Nestucca rivers have been recently surveyed by the government into 20-acre lots as if designed for them. The northern line of this reservation appears to me to be encroached upon by citizen settlers (there being no map of this reservation here). In regard to this assumed encroachment I am consequently left to conjecture, but this conjecture is strengthened by the further fact that not only these already settled along that line where I suppose them to be on the reservation--but those others watching their chances to locate first, when that portion of the reservation will be thrown open to settlement soon expected to be, as alleged by them.
    I would beg leave to add that the recent surveys of the Salmon River, or Nestucca River lands, either of which would be ample for the satisfactory location of the remnants of these tribes, to wit, "the Salmon River," "the Nestucca," "the Tillamook," "the Nehalem," and the "Clatsops," aggregating between 200 and 250 souls, almost all of whom are at present on this reservation.
I have the honor sir
    To Be Your Obedient Sert.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 341-343.



Siletz Indian Agency
    Oregon May 20th 1874
Sir
    I desire to call the attention of the Department to the fund for beneficial purposes belonging to the Rogue River tribe of Indians.
    I am informed by the chief of said tribe that fully two thirds of the Indians who were parties to the treaty securing this fund are now residing at Siletz. Gen. Joel Palmer, Superintendent of Indian Affairs at the time, and who made the treaty above mentioned on the part of the United States, informs me that at least one half or more of the tribe are residing here. I respectfully call the attention of the Department to the fact that for the 1st and 2nd quarters 1873 that portion of the tribe residing here received nothing. The 3rd and 4th quarters they received $750.00, the 1st and 2nd quarters 1874 nothing, thus making $750 the total amount received by at least one half the tribe out of a total disbursement of $4500.00. There are many circumstances that render it proper that the portion of the tribe residing at Siletz should receive more than their pro-rata share of this fund.
    1st. That portion of the tribe residing on Grand Ronde Reservation have facilities for procuring subsistence which these have not. They have had the land allotted to them in severalty and been assisted to teams, agricultural implements &c.
    2nd. That agency possesses a flouring mill and sawmill for the benefit of the Rogue Rivers residing there in common with the other Indians, while this has neither, but is compelled to purchase all flour and lumber from without. For these two articles alone I have been compelled to disburse not less than $2500.00 gold within the past year, every dollar of which could have been saved and used to procure teams, tools &c. had this agency possessed the same facilities as Grand Ronde.
    3rd. That agency being located within convenient distance of market towns on the Willamette River, the Indians have opportunities of selling wheat, oats and all other produce, which the Siletz does not as yet possess. The Indians are thus encouraged to labor knowing that all their surplus produce will meet a ready sale at remunerative prices. Here the market is as yet very meager. Another consequence of the location of Grand Ronde on the border of white settlement is the advantage it affords those who wish to labor to earn necessary clothing &c.
    I would therefore respectfully ask that for the two quarters of the fiscal year commencing July 1st and ending Dec. 31st 1874 the full amount of $1500.00 due this tribe be placed at my disposal for the benefit of the portion whose homes are on this reservation.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 508-511.




Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. May 26th 1874
Sir:
    I return, herewith, the papers connected with the claim of N. B. Clough for the balance due on fruit trees furnished for the Indian Service in Oregon, in 1861, amounting to $12,000.
    Before any further action is taken by the Department in the matter, I request that Inspector Vandever be instructed to investigate the subject and make report of such investigation, with his views upon the claim. I deem it proper to take this course, in consequence of the antiquity of the claim and the remarks of Hon. Nathan Bishop, of the Board of Indian Commissioners, concerning it, as expressed in his letter of the 30th ultimo, addressed to this Department, copy enclosed.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        B. R. Cowen
            Secretary
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 745-747.



    This agreement, made the thirteenth day of March A.D. 1874 between J. H. Fairchild, U.S. Indian agent for and on behalf of the confederated tribes of Siletz Indians of Siletz, Oregon and Joel Palmer of Dayton, Yamhill Co. Oregon, witnesseth that
    The said J. H. Fairchild, U.S. Indian agent, acting in behalf of said Siletz Indians and by and with their desire and consent hereby agrees to demise and let to the said Joel Palmer and his associates that portion of Siletz Reservation unoccupied by the Indians & more particularly described as follows
    From the mouth of Salmon River on the north to the southern boundary of said reservation along the coastline and extending back from the ocean not to exceed three miles for the purposes and in the manner hereinafter named
    Sec. 1. The said premises are leased for the purposes of dairying and grazing cattle, sheep and horses with the privilege of cultivating as much land as may be necessary to provide vegetables for family use and oats for stock and cutting such amount of hay on natural meadow land--not occupied or desired by the Indians for their own use--as may be necessary to provide hay for said stock, and to erect such buildings and make such improvements as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of this agreement--to have and to hold the same for the term of ten years from the first day of May A.D. 1874 at and under the yearly rental of two hundred dollars payable on or before the first day of July in each year during the continuance of this agreement.
    2nd. And it is further agreed between the parties that the said lessee Joel Palmer and his associates shall have the exclusive privilege of occupying said tract for the purposes hereinbefore named, the rights and privileges of the Indians above excepted, but nothing in this agreement shall be so construed as to prevent the said Indians from occupying said tract for fishing, hunting, residence or cultivation.
    3rd. And it is further agreed that should the amount of stock grazed on said tract at any time exceed four hundred and fifty cattle and horses and three thousand sheep the said lessee shall pay in addition to the yearly rental of two hundred dollars as follows: For every head of cattle and horses in excess of four hundred and fifty twenty cents yearly and for every sheep in excess of three thousand ten cents yearly. And it is further agreed that the labor employed by the said Joel Palmer shall in all cases be Siletz Indians provided they are capable of performing the same satisfactorily.
    4th. It is further agreed that on the expiration of this lease or should the same become void for any reason prior to that time all buildings, corrals or other improvements made by said lessee or at his instance on said tract shall revert to the sole use and benefit of said Siletz Indians.
    5th. It is further agreed that the money received for rent of said leased premises shall be invested each year as it becomes due in cattle, sheep, horses or hogs for the sole use and benefit of said Siletz Indians under the direction of the agent at the time in charge of said reservation.
    6th. And it is further agreed that should any of said Siletz Indians kill or injure the stock or otherwise injure or destroy the property of said lessee willfully and maliciously the full amount of damages resulting from the same shall be computed and agreed upon at a council with said Indians and their agent, and the amount so agreed upon shall be paid from the annuities due said Indians or otherwise as may be agreed on.
    7th. In consideration of the extraordinary expense necessary to erect suitable buildings, barns, corrals &c. for the above purposes and building bridges, roads &c. necessary to bring said stock to the premises herein leased, it is agreed that one half the rental of said premises the first year of occupation shall be remitted to said lessee.
    8th. This lease shall be terminable at any time if said lessee or his associates shall bring or permit to be brought to the reservation any intoxicating liquors or permit any improper intimacy with Indian women or other grossly immoral conduct on the part of his employees, who shall be men of good moral character whose influence with the Indians will be for their good.
    9th. It is understood and agreed that this lease shall not take effect or be in force until the same shall have been approved by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs at Washington D.C.
    In witness whereof we have hereunto affixed our hands and seals this 13th day of March A.D. 1874.
J. H. Fairchild
    U.S. Indian Agent
Joel Palmer
Signed and delivered in presence of
M. N. Chapman
B. E. Lippincott
   
-- Supplementary Agreement --
    The parties to the foregoing instrument, to wit, J. H. Fairchild, U.S. Indian agent, on behalf of the Siletz Indians and Joel Palmer, lessee under the same, hereby agree to the following additional provisions and amendments, to wit
    Section 1st is amended in the 11th line to read--"for the term of ten years, from the first day of May A.D. 1874 unless sooner determined by the Indian Department at Washington."
    Section 3rd is amended by the addition of the following--"provided that all cases of fact with regard to their capacity to perform the labor required of them shall be determined by the agent, and it is further understood that all questions of fact arising under this instrument shall be finally determined by the agent at the time in charge."
    Section 5th of said instrument is hereby erased and the following inserted in lieu thereof.
    "Section 5. It is further agreed that the money received for rent of said leased premises shall be deposited in the nearest U.S. Depository to the credit of the United States in trust for the benefit of said Siletz Indians and to be used in such manner as may be deemed most beneficial to said Indians by the Department of Indian Affairs at Washington."
    Section 6th is amended in the 6th line to read as follows--"and the amount so agreed upon shall be paid from the yearly rental of said leased premises, the consent of said Indians to such payment having first been obtained."

J. H. Fairchild
    U.S. Indian Agent
Joel Palmer
Sealed and delivered in presence of
M. N. Chapman
Cris Taylor
   
    We, the undersigned chiefs of the confederated tribes of Siletz Indians, having been deputed by our respective tribes to act on their behalf and to represent them in the matter, do hereby certify that the foregoing article has been read to our people and its provisions explained, that they are satisfied with the conditions of the lease and that the contract was entered into with our free consent and at our request.
    In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seals this third day of September A.D. 1874.
        his
Depot Charlie X Chief of Joshuas
mark
his
George Harney X Head chief Rogue Rivers
mark
his
George X Chief of Sixes
mark
his
Aleck X Chief of Nult-noot-nas
mark
his
John X Chief of the Shasta Costas
mark
his
Charlie X Chief of the Coquilles
mark
Jerry Cass Chief of the Chetcoes
his
Joe X Chief of Klamaths
mark
his
Jack X Chief of Mikonotunnes
mark
Witnesses to the signatures
M. N. Chapman
George H. Fairchild
    I certify on honor that the above signatures were affixed in my presence and that the parties fully comprehend the nature of the certificate.
J. H. Fairchild
    U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 781-787.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz May 27th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication of the 13th inst., with the information that I can only expect $7000.00 for the service at this agency for the coming fiscal year. I beg to express my obligation for the information, although the amount is utterly inadequate for even the barest necessities of this agency, yet, knowing what amount to rely upon, I can dismiss employees and in other ways reduce expenditures till the required limit is reached.
    In this connection I venture to express the hope that the liabilities already contracted by me may be promptly provided for. I have not expended a dollar not absolutely necessary for the efficiency of the service, and to prevent suffering among the Indians. My calculations were made with the expectation of receiving from the incidental fund at least $20,000 for the current fiscal year, as per my letter of July 5th 1873 and your reply of the 28th. I desire to call your attention to serve important facts bearing on the question of appropriation of funds for use at this agency. We have neither grist nor saw mill. I need not say how materially this fact must necessarily increase the expenses here. Most agencies have both, and without them, or some convenient means of converting our grain into flour, how can we expect to keep the Indians on the reservation unless we furnish them flour? These Indians have surrendered to the United States valuable territory, with the express understanding that these mills should be supplied them. Already there is discontent among them--a feeling that the govt. has treated them with less consideration than other tribes, or what they deserve. They have expected from year to year that these mills--so often promised--would be built.
    So material a reduction in the amount expended for their benefit, when they expected increased favors, will necessarily result in distrust of the government.
    At present the force of employees at this agency is the least possible to ensure efficiency in the service, and benefit both the government and Indians.
    Of white employees I now have 1 physician @ $1200, 1 commissary $1200, 1 carpenter $1200, 1 blacksmith $1000, 1 farmer $1000 (a reduction from three farmers always employed heretofore), 2 asst. farmers @ $600 each, 1 teacher $1000, 1 matron of labor school $500. To dispense with any of these would sadly impair the efficiency of the service here, yet to bring my expenditures within the limits named ($7000) I can only keep two or three, and must discharge all Indian assistants.
    This is necessary, from the fact that our stock of agricultural implements must be replenished this season, and it is indispensable to erect a granary. It is unnecessary to say how great the misfortune to these Indians just at this time, when they need increased attention to enable them to profit by the instruction already given, to be deprived of the services of these employees. Permit me again to call the attention of the Department to a point frequently mentioned in my letters. Let these Indians once be placed in a position to secure their own livelihood and they will require little if any further assistance. If three or four years appropriation could be allotted at once, it would enable me to furnish enough teams, tools &c. that we might reasonably expect them to raise their own subsistence. A grist and saw mill should also be provided them, and the land allotted in severalty.
    The past year our efforts have been directed to a fight against starvation, and as long as only funds are supplied to meet current expenditures, without providing them means to enable them to raise their own subsistence, we must expect this to be, to a greater or less extent, the case. Let them once be fairly started with means to cultivate their land, and facilities for converting their wheat into flour, and we may reasonably require them to care for themselves. Unless this is done, I do not see how they are to become self-sustaining.
    I beg to call attention to my letter of the 20th inst. in relation to the Rogue River Fund, and would earnestly urge that the suggestions therein contained be complied with--viz.--that the full sum of $1500 due that tribe, for the 3rd and 4th quarters 1874, be paid to that portion of them residing at this agency, for the reason that they have heretofore received much less than their just share of this fund. In conclusion I would respectfully ask if I am to expect the amount from the fund for "civilization purposes," necessary to continue the Manual Labor School--viz.--$3000 per annum, and also if I am instructed to reduce my force of employees as above indicated, to bring my expenditures within $7000 per annum. As the close of the fiscal year is now near I respectfully ask instructions relative to the school as soon as may be convenient.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 512-516.



Klamath Agency Or.
    May 27, 1874
Sir
    You inform me under date of 13th inst. that it is not probable the usual appropriation for subsistence, support etc. of Shoshones and Bannocks and other tribes in Idaho and S.E. Oregon will be continued for the next fiscal year.
    Ocheho with his band of Piute Snakes has returned to his old home in Warner Valley and probably will not be particular whether he returns next winter or not, but Chocktoot's band of Snakes, numbering about 150, remain upon the reservation all the year, and have heretofore been provided for from that appropriation. They are totally unable to provide for their winter's support upon the reservation, and must be fed and clothed or starve. Fractions of other tribes also live at Yainax to the number of about 200 who have been supplied from that appropriation. Should that appropriation be cut off, and no other provision be made, Yainax Station will have to be abandoned, and these Indians left to take care of themselves, and that means starvation or war, the only fund that can be applied there being the $1200 per annum for Woll-pah-pe Snakes.
    Please inform me if I shall discharge all the employees at Yainax Station at the close of this fiscal year.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 313-315.



DEPARTMENTAL TELEGRAPH LINES
EXCLUSIVELY FOR GOVERNMENT BUSINESS.
Department of the Interior,
    Washington, D.C. May 28, 1874.
From Senate
To Hon. C. Delano
    Will regard it a special favor if you will authorize Inspector Vandever to look into Clough claim here and report without the delay of going to Oregon. Clough is in great need and ought to have had his money long ago. Can this be done?
J. H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1168-1169.



Office, Siletz Agency,
    May 28, 1874
Sir,
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter on the 14th inst., requesting the date of the discontinuance of service of Bob (Indian).
    In reply I would state that Bob was employed by my predecessor, Joel Palmer, and as there was no records of the employees in this office at the time I assumed charge, and as Bob (Indian) has never appeared upon my reports of employees, I am unable to give the date of his discontinuance of service.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comsr. Ind. Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 519-520.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz June 3rd 1874
Sir
    Enclosed I have the honor to transmit my requisition for postage stamps and funds for the two remaining quarters 1874. I have asked for $1500 from the "Rogue River Fund." For the reasons governing me I respectfully refer to my letters of May 20th and 27th 1874 and Sept. 5th and Dec. 3rd 1873.
    There can be no question respecting the justice of this claim, and that portion located at Grand Ronde (of Rogue River Indians) have so many advantages of mills, ownership of soil &c. conferred by govt. on the Indians of that agency, that they can well permit these to receive this $1500, making $2250 from $6000 [sic].
    I have asked for $6000 from the incidental fund for these two quarters. I do not forget the information received from your office one or two days since that it was probable that $7000 would be all that could be spared for this service this year.
    I shall base my estimates on that amount and if no more can be spared try and make it answer.
    But I am extremely loath to spare my blacksmith. There is no other nearer than fifteen or twenty miles, and in the spring and harvest it will be almost impossible to do without the services of a blacksmith.
    I am also extremely anxious to purchase a few teams and issue to such of the Indians as will make good use of them and attend to them properly. Some new plows are a necessity. A reaper and mower ought by all means to be provided this summer. I had intended, if I could procure funds, and it met the approval of the Department, to send a competent person to Umatilla to purchase a number of Indian horses to issue to these Indians to break to harness and work. Horses sufficiently large for fair work horses can there be bought, I am told, for from $13.00 to $30.00 coin. They are hardy, accustomed to work usage, and when broken would be of more service to these Indians than American horses, which cannot be purchased for less than from $80 to $150 dollars for a fairly good animal. There are but few of these Indians I should be willing to trust with a really good horse. They are too fond of rapid riding and driving. These Umatilla horses would be just the thing for them. They would do all the work required and be fully competent to hold their own against the Indians in rough usage. I therefore respectfully ask if it be possible that I may receive the amount I have asked for. I have also applied for $1500 for manual labor school. With less than $3000 per annum a school cannot be conducted on the manual labor school plan. For the 3rd and 4th quarters 1873 I received $1500, in compliance with my requisition. For the 1st and 2nd quarters 1874 only $500 could be spared. A manual labor school requires the services of teacher and matron. No competent persons for these situations can be procured for less than $1000 for teacher and $500 for matron. $1500 is certainly small enough for purchase of food, clothing, bedding, books &c. &c. for pupils. If therefore it is not deemed practicable to spare $3000 for school purposes at this agency the coming fiscal year I would respectfully recommend that this school be discontinued and the amount of money that can be spared (not less than $1200 per annum) be applied to the employment of teachers for a day school and purchase of crackers &c. for lunch for the children.
    There is such a desire for education on the part of the Indian children, and such gratifying progress is shown in our Sunday school and manual labor school that I earnestly hope funds may be furnished to keep two day schools in operation, if it becomes necessary to discontinue the manual labor.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 523-526.



JOHN R. JARBOE.                                                                    RALPH C. HARRISON.
LAW OFFICE OF

Jarboe & Harrison,
19 Express Building, San Francisco
June 4th 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner
        Dear Sir:
            I send herewith claim of estate of Rev. E. Thomas for losses, services etc. in the matter of the peace commissioner to Modocs.
    I have not much experience in the matter, but believe the form to be at any rate sufficient.
    The services are computed at 22 days at $10.00 per diem. This I believe to be correct.
    The traveling expenses are estimated from the regular fares between this place and Yreka, including hotel bills, etc.
    The item for clothing etc. cannot of course be verified. I get an approximate statement from the family.
    For last item I send vouchers paid by me.
    An early attention to this matter will oblige.
Yours truly
    Jno. R. Jarboe
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 750-756.  Probate documents not transcribed.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz June 4th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to enclose amended lease of a portion of this reservation to Gen. Joel Palmer as per your instructions in letter of April 6th '74.
    The delay in its transmission has been owing to the irregularity of mails and absence of the lessee from his residence.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 521-522.



Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or.
    June 5, 1874
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of 16th ultimo, enclosing application of R. A. Bensell, Esq. to lease a portion of "an Indian reservation presumed to be within the jurisdiction of this agency."
    From my investigation of the subject I'm strong in the belief that to enter into any such arrangements with Mr. Bensell will be very unwise & the source of great trouble. If the land referred to (which is occupied for hunting & fishing purposes by the Nestucca & Salmon River Indians) is to be leased by the Dept. it would be better to have the fact made public, so that it could be leased to the highest bidder.
    The Indians who claim and occupy that country have acknowledged their willingness to settle down to the pursuit of industry like the Indians of this agency--whenever the government will start
them in that direction. Much of the land of the Nestucca & Salmon country was surveyed into twenty-acre lots last year & according to arrangements made with Inspector E. C. Kemble, when here last July, to have all or as many of the Coast Indians who would accept of the reservation privileges to be at Nestucca about the 10th of Octr. last, at which time he was to return here. Most all the Indians were there and waited six weeks, but Inspector Kemble did not arrive here until Decr. 7 & the weather was then so severe, and he was so pressed for time, that his trip was indefinitely postponed & since then the Indians have heard of some arrangement being made by Joel Palmer to take cattle in their country & are greatly excited & indignant.
    In last estimate for funds sent from this office $1500 was asked for these Indians, but no attention was paid to it.
    If the facts are as stated in the report of late Supt. A. B. Meacham for 1871 concerning the Coast Indians, the right of the Department to lease these lands is questionable, he says.
    "There are several bands of Indians scattered over Oregon that do not belong to any agency. Some of these bands have never been treated with, and are the real owners of the soil they occupy or have been driven from. . . .
    "There is no evidence to show that any of the said Indians above referred to, to wit, Clatsop, Tillamook, Salmon River and Nestucca, have ever received any benefits or annuities beyond a few presents at long intervals, hence it is clear that they have never ceded to the government their country, and since the country was not acquired by legitimate conquest, it is also clear that these people have rights that ought & will someday be secured to them."
    In my judgment the better policy is for the Dept. to refuse to grant the application of Mr. Bensell.
Very respt.
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 357-361.



Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or.
    June 6, 1874.
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of April 9 (just received).
    In regard to the subject matter thereof, I have to say that the agency farm will be discontinued after the present crops are harvested, and the force of employees will be reduced at the expiration of the present quarter.
    The $500 sent for pay of employees from Jany. 1 to July 1, '74 being adequate, $2,000 will be necessary to provide for the deficiency. Please notify me by telegram--when funds are forwarded--address Portland, Or.
Very respy.
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott, U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 365-366.



Grand Ronde
    June 8th 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Dear Sir
        Having for several years been desirous of procuring the privilege of pasturage upon land under the jurisdiction of the Grand Ronde Agency situate between the Siletz River on the south, Cape Lookout on the north and the Coast Range of mountains on the east lying along the coast, known as Salmon River and Nestucca River.
    If the privilege can be procured I would like to rent for a term of years.
    There is not more than 20 or 25 Indians that live upon this portion of the reservation, and they are willing that I should come among them. It would be of no detriment to the Indian service if these lands could be occupied by persons that would do the fair thing with the Indians, but of much benefit to all parties.
    I would be pleased to hear from you, and if there can be anything done in this direction. I would like to hear from you soon. I would refer you to Hon. J. W. Nesmith of the House of Representatives and Hon. J. K. Kelly of the Senate, whom I am well acquainted with and have been for years.
Yours truly
    A. D. Babcock
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 99-102.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz June 11th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 28th ult., notifying me that my cash accounts for the 3rd quarter 1873 had not been received. As I had the honor to state in my letter of May 19th, my cash accounts for that quarter were forwarded by mail to your office with my property returns on the 11th day of Dec.
    In this connection I would say that there is great irregularity and delay in the postal service in this vicinity, and letters and packages are frequently missent, so that it is probable the missing accounts may yet reach their destination.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 528-529.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency, Or.
    June 15, 1874.
Sir:
    I have the honor to address you and solicit information in regard to the truth of reports in circulation as to Joel Palmer--late Ind. agent at Siletz--having rented from the Department for a term of years portions of lands included in the Coast Reservation.
    The Indians have applied to me for the facts in the case, several representing that they have been told by Mr. Palmer that he had so rented and that it was his intention to take a large band of cattle there, make improvements &c.
    The Indians state that they asked Mr. Palmer if I knew of the matter or had given him the authority. He replied that I had not, it being no concern of mine, that he had received his authority from the Department at Washington. They further state that Mr. Palmer said it was his intention to build at or near the mouth of Salmon River. As the lands which Mr. Palmer tells the Indians he has rented have always been considered a part of and under the jurisdiction of his agency and for the use of the Indians of the reservation, and the fact that they have contemplated using it for the same purposes as Mr. Palmer--pasturing cattle--they are very much excited over the reports and say that they will resist any attempt of Mr. Palmer to drive cattle through this reservation for the object contemplated by him.
    If Mr. Palmer has any rights by virtue of any contract with the Dept. for the use of land in or contiguous to this reservation, I desire to be advised--so that I can act understandingly in the premises.
Very respy.
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 369-371.



Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. June 22nd 1874.
Sir:
    I return, herewith, articles of agreement between U.S. Agent J. H. Fairchild of the Siletz Indian Agency, Oregon, and Joel Palmer of said state, for the lease and occupation by him of a portion of the Siletz Reservation for the purpose of pasturing stock--which was submitted with your letter of the 20th instant.
    The agreement purports to have been made by desire, and with the consent, of the Indians, but there is no evidence of that fact with the papers.
    Before approving the agreement, the written consent of the Indians thereto should be procured.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        B. R. Cowen
            Acting Secretary
The commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 757-758.



Grand Ronde, Polk Co., Oregon, 22nd June 1874
[J. H. Mitchell]
    My Dear Sir
        I arrived here on the 1st May last, have been in the mountains, but did no good there yet. I came in here a few days ago to rest and answer correspondence. I found my esteemed friend Mr. Sinnott and his family in the enjoyment of good health, the agency peaceful and prosperous, and the promise of a most abundant crop. It is really a pleasing and grateful sight to see. Notwithstanding all this apparent happiness there is some uneasiness at his door. Last year he had given to him but some five hundred or six hundred dollars to cover the expenses of the employees retained for the working of the agency, to wit, a miller to cut lumber and grind wheat for the use of the Indians, carpenters to keep on repairs [of] plows, harrows, wagons and all the necessary articles of agriculture for some 200 farms, besides blacksmith & aid in said works. Add to the above the doctor having care of the sick. Being left without funds to meet these charges and as he cannot contract debts under his engagement in the name of the government, he has been obliged to reluctantly notify them that these services will cease on the 30th inst. in consequence of want of funds. This is a sad dilemma to be placed in just as the harvest is about to be gathered. He has notified the Dept. of his situation and asked by telegraph instructions. "Will he retain these and the necessary hands to efficiently work the establishment."
    I perceive ye have liberally voted funds for the Indian Department of Oregon, to wit Alsea, Siletz and Grand Ronde, some $40,000. Now this agency has far more Indians in it than either of the others--perhaps nearly as many as the two, besides which there is some twenty times as much crop raised here as in the other two, and as the agricultural implements were all nearly worn out at the time Sinnott arrived here, and as there is much repairs to be done to them it will be an act of justice on your part to see that he gets a fair pro rata of the above-named funds to enable him to carry on this management with satisfaction. He should get at least from 1/3 to 3/5 of the above funds. He relies on you to see this agency done justice to--
    I was delighted to see you get clear of the charges brought against you. May you enjoy peace & prosperity during the term of your senatorial duties for Oregon and believe me my dear sir to be
Yours faithfully and sincerely
    John Morris
[P.S.] I should have observed that hitherto the services of the former M.D. was not satisfactory, but the agent and Indians are highly pleased with the doctor now serving. He is zealous, attentive and living at the agency with his family.
   

[note attached:]
Respectfully referred to the Hon. Commissioner of Indian Affairs. I desire to call special attention to suggestions made, which appear to be reasonable and just.
J. H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1181-1185.



Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or.
    June 24th 1874.
Sir:
    I had the honor to address a communication to you under date of the 15th inst. in regard to reports having reached me to the effect that Mr. Joel Palmer had received permission from the Indian Department to pasture cattle on that portion of this reservation known as the southwestern end. Such reports were confirmed yesterday by the presence of Mr. Palmer with a band of cattle, en route for that place.
    In the absence of information from the Department touching any arrangements made as represented by him, I deemed it my duty to protest against his action, a copy of which protest, together with his answer, are herewith enclosed.
    If Mr. Palmer, through the aid of Agent Fairchild, has secured the lease he claims, the rights of the Indians of this reservation have been interfered with to such extent that serious trouble will result from it.
    The Indians located on these lands are the Salmon River & Nestucca tribes, though receiving no aid from the Dept. by reason of treaty, have generally obtained such assistance from his agency as their necessities require & have had all their disputes settled at this agency.
    This is the first instance in the history of this agency that the exclusive jurisdiction of that portion of it, from the Siletz to Salmon River, has been questioned.
    The survey made during the summer of 1872 by John Meldrum, under instructions from the Department of Interior--of this reservation--the location of that portion situate at the coast was between the Siletz & Salmon River (the lands now claimed to be leased by Mr. Palmer) and for a distance of six miles south of the Salmon River & three miles back, was subdivided into 20-acre lots for the object to furnish such Indians of this reservation who have not yet received land, as per treaty stipulations. I have reason to believe that Mr. Palmer was aware of such survey--and in view of the fact I am [at a] loss to understand why Agent Fairchild should assist Mr. Palmer, as I consider an Indian agent located in Michigan [has] as much right to act officially in the matter as him.
    I have applied for a copy of the survey made by Mr. Meldrum, which I hope to transmit to you by next mail, which demonstrates clearly the jurisdiction of this agency over that position claiming to be leased by Mr. Palmer.
    The fact that the only outlet to the lands referred to is through the settled portion of the Grand Ronde Reservation, and the Indians being unwilling to grant the right to have any white person drive stock through it, & Mr. Palmer having no other way to get his stock in or out, is to my mind an insuperable objection to continuing any arrangement claimed by Mr. Palmer in his lease.
    Repeated applications have been made to me and to my predecessors in office for the privileges which Mr. Palmer claims has been allowed to him. They have uniformly been refused, for the reasons that the Indians interested objected to it and that it would be according to one man a special privilege which should only be granted by competition to the highest bidder.
    To avoid trouble, and for the best interest of the Indians, & as a matter of right, I hope it will be practicable for the Indian Dept. to annul any contract made with Mr. Palmer or others for the occupancy of any lands referred to in this communication.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon.
    Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
        Washington D.C.
   

Copy.
Office Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or.
    June 23rd 1874
Joel Palmer Esq.
    Sir:
        You are hereby notified not to pasture any cattle on that portion of this reservation situate north of the Siletz River. Not having been notified by the Ind. Department of any claim or right you have by virtue of a lease you represent as having received from the Indian Department, I shall regard any attempt by you to locate cattle upon any lands situate between the Siletz and the mouth of the Salmon River, over which I claim official jurisdiction, as a trespass and shall hold you responsible therefor.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
   
Copy.
On Road to Coast June 23rd 1874
P. B. Sinnott, Ind. Agt.
    Dear Sir:
        Your note of yesterday notifying me not to pasture cattle on that portion of Coast Reservation north of Siletz has been received and in reply I have to say that I have leased for a term of years all that portion of the Coast Reservation south of Salmon River, extending back from the coast three miles. This lease was obtained from Mr. Fairchild, the agent at Siletz, and at the request of the Indians upon that reservation and the approval of the Indian Department at Washington City.
    Your protest is of course right & proper, not having been notified by the Department. But my right comes from a higher source than the agents, and I hold myself accountable to that authority and shall avail myself of the privileges secured by the lease until it be annulled by the power that granted it. The lease expressly stipulates that no rights of the Indians in respect to settlement or occupancy is to be restricted on account of the lease per this privilege. A valuable consideration is to be given as provided in the lease, the original of which has been transmitt[ed] to the Department at Washington, and Mr. Fairchild and myself each hold a copy.
Very respectfully yours
    Joel Palmer
P.S.
    I am aware that a little feeling is expressed by a few disappointed aspirants for such privileges--who would make it appear that they are the special friends of the Indian. But those manifestations do not disturb me in the least.
J.P.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 374-379.



United States Senate Chamber,
    Washington, June 25, 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Com. Ind. Affrs.
        Dear Sir--
            You will oblige me by sending me a list of the names of persons having vouchers on file in your Department against Klamath Indian Agency Oregon that will be entitled to pay out of the late deficiency appropriation, also the amount of each, also whether the vouchers in each are in proper form for settlement, and if not, what defects exist. I would also urge the immediate settlement and payment of these claims. Please advise me how soon they will be passed upon by your Department.
Respectfully
    J. H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1173-1174.



Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. June 27th 1874.
Sir:
    I return the papers connected with the claim of N. B. Clough for furnishing fruit trees to certain Indian agencies in Oregon under a contract made with W. H. Rector, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, in the year of 1861.
    The evidence in this case does not show that the terms of the contract requiring Mr. Clough to attend to the cultivation of the trees for two years following their delivery have been complied with.
    The payment, by the Superintendent, of the first installment of the purchase money--which by the terms of the contract was to become due upon the delivery of the trees--is now, prima facie, conclusive upon the government as to the question of such delivery, but inasmuch as the evidence before the Department is unsatisfactory upon this point as well as upon the one already referred to, you are hereby requested to instruct Inspector Vandever to visit the different agencies where the trees are alleged to have been furnished, and personally investigate the subject and ascertain by competent testimony whether all the trees agreed to be supplied were actually delivered according to the contract, and if the contractor, for two years following said delivery, attended to their cultivation as thereby required.
    Until the report of Inspector Vandever, under the instructions which you are hereby authorized to give him, shall have been received, a decision of the case will be withheld.
    Please submit the form of instructions to the Inspector for approval.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        C. Delano
            Secretary
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 759-762.



Copy.
Hd. Qrs. Camp Bidwell, Cal.
    June 28, 1874.
To the
    Adjutant General
        Dept. of California
            San Francisco, Cal.
Major:
    At the urgent request of "Ocheho" I have the honor to write the following:
    "Ocheho" says that last fall at the request of the government he went to Yainax (after having said he would not). The winter was very hard, his people suffered much from want of food and clothing, and that twenty-five died during the winter. He wants to live at peace with the white people, and wants to remain in this country where they were raised. He says he is now collecting seeds, roots & game for the winter, and will not again go to Yainax. He says if there is clothing and rations for his people why can't they be given him here as easily as at Yainax. He says they only feed or attempt to do for them during the cold weather, turning them away in the spring before the game or vegetables come. He says if they knew they were to remain here during the winter and summer, he could collect sufficient for the winter and spring and not have to suffer as they do every spring when they are sent from Yainax. The above are "Ocheho's" own words. I am of the opinion that he will not again go to any of the reservations. His band is small; many of them work for the whites. A few years if they remain here winter and summer at peace will put them out of the way as a wild band of Indians.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        R. F. Bernard
            Capt. 1st Cav.
                Comdg. Post
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 869-872.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency, Or.
    July 1st 1874.
Sir:
    Referring to my communication of the 24th ultimo, I have the honor to enclose a copy of the survey of this reservation therein mentioned.
    Upon investigation, I find that the land claimed to be leased by Mr. Palmer is embodied in this reservation, and surveyed sections of it subdivided into 20-acre lots, some of which are occupied by Indians, and all of which was designed for that purpose, also that the entire country from the Siletz to the Salmon River is a part of this reservation.
    I stated in my last that I had reason to believe that Mr. Palmer was aware of such survey. At the time the survey was being made Mr. Palmer was U.S. Ind. Agt. at Siletz and passed through this agency. I will also state that during the time Mr. Palmer was agent it was well understood between my predecessor and him that the jurisdiction of this agency was over that country. Further, at the time Mr. Palmer is as Supt. of Indian Affairs for Oregon this reservation was established and he showed the Indians that portion of it, telling them that they could then use it for fishing and hunting grounds, and in the future, when they became advanced in civilization--as they now are--they could use it for farms and pasture.
    These are facts of which there are living witnesses ready to testify on oath.
    The Indians who have lived there have drawn such supplies as could be afforded to them from this agency--given by the consent of the Indian [Department] from the annuities supplied for treaty stipulations, their disputes have always been settled here. In fact they have been recognized as belonging to this agency and dealt with accordingly.
    In conclusion, I repeat the hopes expressed in my last letter that any contract made by the Ind. Department per the occupancy of the lands referred to, will be annulled at once.
    I regard the presence of Mr. Palmer as an intrusion and trespass, a violation of the rights of the Indians, and no consideration that he can give will satisfy the Indians of the justice of his actions.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affairs
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 390-396.



Office Alsea Sub-Agency
    July 1st 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to state that on the 30th day of June I received receipted for the Indian Department property belonging to this sub-agency from J. H. Fairchild, U.S. Indian agent and am at this date in full charge & possession of the office and effects of this agency.
    My post office address is at Newport, Benton Co., Oregon. The nearest telegraph office is at Corvallis, Benton Co., Oregon.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        Geo. P. Litchfield
            U.S. Sub-Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner &c.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 998-999.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency, or.
    July 2nd 1874
Sir:
    I have the honor to report the following engagement of employees.
    Dani Holmes, Indian, Interpreter at $500 per annum July 1, '74
    C. D. Folger, Supt. of Farms & Mill at $1000 per annum July 1, '74
    As I advised you on the 30th ultimo, all the employees, except the sawyer, have resigned. In order to make the saw & grist mill of this agency self-sustaining and a source of revenue to the Indians and to carry on the farm work--until the farms are abandoned--a supt. of all is absolutely necessary. The person engaged is well qualified for the position & the salary moderate.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affairs
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 402-403.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz July 6th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of March 20th in relation to medicines needed at this agency for the coming year. Having been delayed in transmission, your letter has but just reached me.
    The amount paid for medicines at this agency during the past year has been about $250.00, a large portion of which is still on hand.
    Just previous to the reception of your letter I had purchased a small invoice of medicines, and it is believed but little more will be required, though the demand varies so much no exact estimate can be made.
    The number of Indians depending on this agency for medical treatment will not vary far from 1000, number of other persons 32, consisting of families of employees.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Com. Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 540-541.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz July 6th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to report no public funds in my hands for the week ending July 4th 1874.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P.  Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 538-539.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz July 6th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to transmit the following brief report of the condition of affairs at this agency during the month of June.
    As stated in my last report, the most of our Indians have been absent from the reservation the past month, laboring for farmers in the Willamette Valley and earning subsistence, clothing, horses, cows &c. Of course, they have been removed from my immediate notice, but I have been careful to keep thoroughly informed as to their conduct while off the reservation. I am glad to say that, with the exception of two who have been intoxicated, the report has been good, the universal testimony with the above exceptions being to the good behavior of the Indians. And even those who had been intoxicated declined any further leave of absence on the ground that they feared they might be tempted to drink again and bring disgrace on the Siletz Indians. Fearing that some of them might get into trouble if permitted to visit the different towns outside, on the Fourth of July I determined to organize a celebration at the agency and for that purpose provided a dinner with the usual Fourth of July accessories, plenty of powder and firecrackers.
    The Indians, to the number of from three to five hundred, assembled. The meaning of our celebration of that day was explained to them. They were reminded of the progress they had already made and urged to continue to strive for improvement. Everything passed pleasantly and agreeably; the Indians were highly pleased, and no single thing of any importance occurred to mar the harmony of the occasion. It is believed that few more orderly, peaceable, quiet and well-dressed assemblies met to celebrate that day, and in few places was it observed in a more interesting manner.
    As a general thing, the health of the Indians has been better than in previous months. The school has been prosperous, the scholars making rapid progress. They have now been dismissed for a vacation of two months. Whether it will be resumed will depend on the amount of funds appropriated for that purpose. Its usefulness is just now beginning to be manifested, and it is to be hoped that funds will be provided for its maintenance. One and a quarter years have now elapsed since I took charge of this agency, and I am induced to look back to see what improvement, if any, has been made, what mistakes have been made, what errors are to be avoided in the future and what measures are best to be adopted that these Indians may soonest reach the position designed by the government of a civilized self-supporting community. In regard to the first, no one can deny but the advancement has been great. One year ago only one (the chief) was the owner of cattle; now at least fifteen or twenty own cows. Five or six families are making butter for sale. At least twenty have earned teams by their labor for farmers in the vicinity. Several have built themselves good, comfortable houses and barns; all are earnestly desirous of improvement. On Sabbath a well-dressed, quiet and orderly congregation assembles to listen to divine service. Our Sabbath schools are well attended, and the general condition of the Indians is far above what it was one year ago. With respect to the last a mill is a necessity without it, and some amount to be expended in teams and agricultural implements to be issued to those disposed to make proper use of them. I do not see how they are to become self-supporting. The land should be divided, by all means, and thus allay the excitement and irritation constantly arising from this source.
    I would therefore respectfully recommend that the land be allotted in severalty, that a saw and grist mill be built, the appropriation of three thousand dollars per annum heretofore made for school be continued and an amount not exceeding five thousand per annum be allotted for a few years for the purchase of teams, harness, agricultural implements &c. for distribution among them. Let these measures be adopted and I fully believe the Siletz Indians would soon become self-supporting.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 542-546.



Grand Ronde Indn. Agency Oregon
    July 7th 1874
Sir
    I have had the honor to report under date of July 2nd as [to] engagements of employees for this agency.
    C. D. Folger, Supt. of Farms & Mills at $1000 per annum date July 1st. I was induced to do so by some political friends of mine. In my judgment Supt. of Mills is unnecessary, as the miller in charge is attentive and industrious and a good miller [and] is well qualified to fill the position he now occupies.
    I also visit the mills nearly every day myself, so I think you had better disapprove of engagement of Supt. of Mill.
    In regard to Supt. of Farms I leave you to approve or disapprove. I attended the business of farmer since I came here myself and now that the farm is to be discontinued after harvest [sic]. (This is private, please destroy.)
Very respectfully your obedient servant
    P. B. Sinnott, U.S. Agent
   
Hon. E. C. Kemble and myself arrange about the mill as it now runs which I think is to advantage to Dept.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 404-405.



United States Senate Chamber,
    Washington, July 9th 1874
Hon. C. Delano
    Secretary of the Interior
        Dear Sir,
            Enclosed please find a communication from Hon. Ben Simpson, present Surveyor General of Oregon, calling my attention to the application I made last winter for an executive order throwing portions of Alsea and Siletz Indian reservations in Oregon open to settlement.
    Impressed as I am with the justice of my application, and believing as I do that such executive action would in no wise interfere with any of the rights of the Indians, and at the same time be an all-important step in the settlement and material development of our young state, I again appeal to you for favorable action on such application. I am not aware whether Inspector Kemble has made any report on the matter or not. If not, or if such report was adverse I trust you will give the application your personal attention and action, and in such event I will cheerfully aid in furnishing any further information that may be necessary to a correct determination of the whole case. The sentiment expressed in Mr. Simpson's letter is but the sentiment of the whole people, the Indians not excepted, as I am told. I should be pleased to hear from you as soon as convenient, as I am being very much pressured by my constituents.
Respectfully
    J. H. Mitchell
   
Eugene City Ogn.
    June 29th 1874
My Dear Senator
    I am of the impression that to make the changes of the Alsea Reservation as are agreed upon last winter would be of great public utility, and the people are clamorous for it. I cannot see for the life of me where an objection can be raised by the Ind. Department. As you will see in your written statement that to move the line five miles below the mouth of Alsea River will not affect the Indians but will greatly accommodate the whites as they can then use the timber which the Indians have no use for. I believe the Indians should be protected in all their legitimate rights, and I am the last one who would wish to trespass upon them, yet I must say I regard it as a great outrage to deprive the whites of their rights as citizens. As I stated before the timber along the Alsea River would be of great value to the white citizens, while it is of no value whatever to the Indians, as it is some 8 or 10 miles from their settlements and they have all the timber they need for all purposes, and so far as land is concerned my plan gives them a country twenty miles square at least, and I am of the impression that there is not to exceed three hundred Indians on that reservation all told.
    Now I would ask in all candor if it is right that white people should be kept out of that country when it can be made of so much value to them and of no value whatever to the Indians. I certainly think if the President could know the facts that he would not hesitate one moment in opening that portion to settlement which I have before referred to, that is, making the reservation twenty miles in width up and down the coast, commencing at a point five miles below the mouth of Alsea. I hope you will pardon me for mentioning this matter so often. I do it because the people are so anxious about it and think they ought to have it.
Yours respectfully
    Ben Simpson
Sen. J. H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1186-1191.



United States Senate Chamber,
    Washington, July 9th 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Dear Sir
            I will be pleased if you will cause a copy of your communication to me of 6th inst. in reference to Klamath Indian vouchers, also a copy of statement accompanying it to be forwarded to Indian Agent L. S. Dyar of Klamath Agency at your earliest convenience.
Respectfully
    J. H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1192-1193.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz July 10th 1874
Sir
    I respectfully ask leave to call your attention to my letter of June 3rd in relation to the continuance of the manual labor school at this agency. A new fiscal year having now begun, it is necessary for me to know whether I am to retain my teacher.
    I therefore respectfully ask if the sum of $3000.00 per annum heretofore allotted this agency for the establishment and maintenance of a manual labor school will be continued another year, or if I am instructed to dismiss my teacher and matron and disband the school.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
   

[Penciled note filed with above letter:]
Shall we authorize the continuance of school at the expense referred to?
What funds were issued last year & what amt.
$3,000 [illegible] fund.
Let school be continued, but agent should, if possible, use some of the "Incidental Fund" for the purpose.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 558-561.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Oregon July 11th 1874
Sir
    I respectfully ask your indulgence for again calling your attention to the demoralizing effect on the Indians of residence off the reservation among the whites. I am aware this is not in accordance with the policy of the government, yet I am powerless to prevent it. There being no market attainable for anything but flour, and we having no mill on the reservation, the Indians have no means of procuring flour, clothing, groceries &c. but their labor. The people living on Yaquina Bay are principally engaged in fishing, oystering and lumbering. Having small parcels of land that they cultivate, they purchase nothing we could furnish, except flour. This they are obliged to procure from San Francisco or the mills of the Willamette Valley. Had we a grist mill these Indians could in great measure supply this demand, and thus find a good market for their labor, and the means of supplying all their wants, while they would no longer be compelled to leave the reservation every summer, and it would no longer be the case, as at present, that our lessons must be commenced over again with many on their return in the fall.
    Many also in spite of all my precautions succeed in procuring liquor from sometimes unprincipled white men, but usually from some of the Chinese residents of the towns in the Willamette Valley. It is almost an utter impossibility to secure evidence in such cases sufficient to convict. I am glad to believe that the most of our Indians would refuse liquor if offered them, but all are not so. At all events they should, as a general thing, be kept on the reservation, and I regret extremely my inability under present circumstances to do so.
    I would respectfully ask therefore that as soon as practicable funds may be furnished me to build a grist and saw mill at this agency.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 547-549.



Salem, Oregon
    July 13th 1874.
    The case of Indians from the reservations visiting and loitering about the towns in the Willamette Valley to the annoyance of the inhabitants and their own demoralization has come to my notice since I have been here (on special duty under the orders of the War Department). I learn from all hands that Mr. James Brown, formerly messenger at the Superintendency here, was very efficient in times past in securing the return of such Indians to their reservations and that he has a large acquaintance with Indians and has much influence with them and that he desires to be employed again in the same work by the Indian Dept. I accordingly take the liberty of recommending Mr. J. Brown for the position referred to--as a measure of benefit to the public service.
Respectfully submitted
    Jas. A. Hardie
        Inspector General
            Bvt. Major General U.S.A.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Indian Affairs
   

Salem Oregon July 13th 1874
Hon. Edward P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Sir,
            Since the abolition of the office of Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Oregon there has been great complaint upon the part of the people growing out of the fact that small bands of Indians are constantly leaving the different reservations surreptitiously and wander about the settlements to the great annoyance of the people. The duty of looking after those vagrant bands seems to be ignored by all the agents. Indeed, it would be difficult for them to leave their respective agencies for that purpose. During the existence of the office of Superintendent, James Brown, who served as messenger to the Indian Department in Oregon for nearly twenty years, attended to the business of gathering up and returning to their proper reservations those wandering and fugitive people. I would earnestly recommend to you that James Brown be again employed in the duty of looking after those people. I am satisfied that his employment in that capacity will result in great benefit to the government and the Indians and relieve the citizens from a great annoyance.
    Brown is a thoroughly reliable and competent man, is well acquainted with the Indians, speaks their language and commands their respect. I earnestly recommend his employment.
I am respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. W. Nesmith
   
OFFICE OF THE
Oregon Bulletin Printing and Publishing Company
CORNER OF FIRST AND ASH STREETS.

Portland, Oregon, July 14, 1874
Sir:
    All along the Oregon Coast, as well as throughout the Willamette Valley, and in some portions of Eastern Oregon, Indians belonging upon established reservations are roaming at will, camping near the towns, where their time is devoted to drinking, dancing and carousing, selling their women to white men of the lowest order for the whiskey upon which they become intoxicated. This has ever been so to some extent, and was found by me to be one of the most prolific sources of trouble I encountered while in office, and even then the time of the messenger was almost wholly employed in traveling around through the country, looking after and returning this class of Indians to the reservations, and detecting and bringing to justice the degraded offenders who dealt illicitly with them and sought to reduce them to their own level.
    Over a year has elapsed since the abolishment of the Oregon Superintendency, and the records of the courts disclose the fact that not a single individual has been prosecuted since July 1873 for selling liquor to Indians (except a few cases which had been commenced before that time), while it is notorious that more of this kind of traffic has been carried on, and that there has been double the amount of drunkenness among the Indians during the past year than ever before. For this condition of affairs it cannot be said that agents are blamable, because if they do their duty and attend to their business as they should the whole of their time is required at the agency.
    The interests and welfare of the Indians and a proper respect for the rights of peaceable citizens demand that something be done to remedy the evils spoken of, and I therefore join with Inspector-General Hardie in his recommendation that Mr. James Brown be employed by your Department as "messenger to Oregon agencies" to look after this class of Indians and see that the laws are enforced against invaders of the rights.
    Mr. Brown was messenger in the Superintendent's office over eighteen years. There is hardly an Indian in Oregon with whom he is not acquainted, and they all know and respect him. He understands their language and can induce them to obey whatever he directs them to do. He is honest, trusty, energetic and being one of the best of detectives it is not easy for violators of the law to evade him.
    As a measure calculated to greatly improve the morals of the Indians, bring offenders to justice and relieve law-abiding and peaceful citizens of the presence of bands of drunken, wandering vagabonds, the appointment of Mr. Brown recommends itself to everyone who understands the situation as the best and most economical that could be adopted.
    In regard to the ability of Mr. Brown to accomplish all I have said he can, and even much more, I would refer you to Attorney-General Williams, Senators Mitchell and Kelly and Mr. D. P. Thompson. The last-named gentleman can also explain to you fully the deplorable condition of a large portion of the Indians in Oregon.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        T. B. Odeneal
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
   

Dayton July 16th 1874
Honl. J. H. Mitchell
    Dear Sir
        It has been represented to me that our mutual friend J. Brown is an applicant for appointment to the position of Indian messenger to look after and gather up the straggling vagabond Indians infesting the white settlements.
    It is notorious that there are many such Indians constantly wandering from their reservations and prowling about the towns and settlements to the great annoyance of the white settlers, induced and encouraged by the dissipated and reckless of our own population, who seek only the gratification of their own passions, greatly to the injury of the Indians and demoralization of our youth. The absence of the controlling influence of the Superintendent's office, such as messenger or traveling agent, is greatly needed, and I know of no one better suited for such a position than One Arm Brown, as he is called, for he is known by our entire population, as well as the Indians, and known too to be of indubitable courage and energy and thoroughly acquainted with all their places of resort and with a soundness and tact well suited to such a position. The very fact of his appointment would tend to lessen these evils, for the reckless of both classes would feel insecure in their carousals.
    I hope you will use your influence to procure his appointment and proper instructions to guide him in his work--and we can all vouch for his fidelity.
I am dear sir
    Very truly yours
        Joel Palmer
   
Portland, Oregon, July 16, 1874.
My Dear Sir:
    Doubtless you well know Mr. James Brown, who has long been a messenger of the Indian Superintendency of Oregon. By General Hardie, Inspector Genl. of the army, now here, Mr. Brown has been recommended to the Indian Office as a most suitable person to gather up straggling Indians who are annoying the towns and settlements, and to take them to their reservations. He is the most efficient man in Oregon for this duty, and he desires to engage for it. He is our true friend, and can be depended on always. I hope that it will fall in your way to recommend him to the Indian office for this service.
Very respectfully
    H. W. Scott
Hon. Geo. W. Williams
    Washington, D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 139-150.



United States Senate Chamber,
    Washington, July 13th 1874
Hon. C. Delano
    Secretary of the Interior
        At the recent session of Congress an appropriation of $10,000 was made, to be used, I believe, in getting Indians onto appropriate reservations in Oregon and Idaho &c. &c. There is much of this kind of work in that country requiring a person fully informed as to the character of the Indians. Such a man is James Brown, who for over twenty years has served as a messenger in the Oregon Superintendency with great fidelity. I presume no man west of the Rocky Mountains has had any more experience with Indians than Mr. Brown. In fact, his services to the cause in Oregon are invaluable and almost indispensable. I respectfully ask that he be employed at a salary of $150.00 per month to act as a special agent in the state of Oregon, subject to the call of the permanent agents, to look after and collect the wandering bands and perform such other duties as may be assigned him. Enclosed please find an article in a leading Republican paper of Oregon in reference to Mr. Brown, which speaks for itself and which I fully endorse.
Respectfully
    J. H. Mitchell
   
[Article from page 2 of the July 2, 1874 issue of the Portland Daily Bulletin:]
ARISTOCRATIC DEMOCRACY.
    The Albany Democrat last week puts forth this:
    "One-Arm Brown writes back from Washington to a Salem friend that he visited the President and was received in the most cordial manner. Grant had evidently heard of his heroic defense of the murdered settlers on Lost River at the breaking out of the Modoc War. One-Arm Brown and Ulysses Grant! Whew!"
    If there is any point in the above it is to ridicule President Grant for having admitted "One-Arm Brown" to his presence, and received him "in the most cordial manner." Nearly everybody in Oregon knows James Brown, or as he is usually called, "One-Arm Brown"--he having lost one of his arms when crossing the Plains many years ago. He is a plain man in his garb and appearance, as honest in his everyday transactions as any, and he has for about twenty years served as a messenger in the Oregon Indian Superintendency, under every change of Administration or Superintendent, with such cleverness, tact, ability, devotion and fidelity as to have gained for himself the implicit confidence of those under whom he served, and the good opinion of all who know him. During his many years of service as messenger he performed duties which required unusual qualities of mind, in the way of shrewdness, cunning, tact and reticence, in dealing with hostile predatory Indians, and with these qualities he united others of body quite as essential to the successful execution of the service--a light frame, a tough and wiry nature, a capability to withstand uncommon privation and exposure, and an apparently tireless constitution, which enabled him to perform astonishingly long and continuous fleet journeys on horseback through the wildest and roughest regions of the Indian or uninhabited country. Day or night, rain or shine, in hottest summer or coldest winter, when the word of command was given to Brown to mount his horse and ride hundreds of miles away into the perilous wilderness, beyond the confines of civilization and far from shelter or rescue in case of real danger, he was always ready to respond to the call, and uncomplainingly, dutifully, even cheerfully, he proceed to its execution. He rarely, if he ever, failed to accomplish all that was expected of him on such missions. Thus employed and thus trusted, we believe Brown acquired as thorough and useful a knowledge of the Indian tribes and bands, and of everything connected with the Indian Bureau, within the bounds of the Oregon Superintendency, as is possessed by any person on the Coast. It is very reasonable to infer, therefore, that on his visit to Washington he should have been honored by the President, and we are quite sure that from no other person could the President have received so much and such varied, correct and useful information respecting our Indian affairs. It is another evidence of the sterling sense and unpretending republican simplicity of President Grant that he cordially received One-Arm Brown. And, we will warrant, that if he listened to his narrative on Indian matters he could not better have applied the time so passed to the advantage of the people of Oregon, or of our frontier settlers particularly. It was an opportune moment, too, in view of the resignation of the Brunot Indian Board and the consequent changes in the Department as to the manner of dealing with Indians.
    The Democrat man, in trying to ridicule the President for his reception of One-Arm Brown, reveals his own sorry and contemptible nature. Pretty Democrat is he, to affect contempt of Brown because he is a poor, plain, unassuming man, and to turn up his nose at the President for having stooped to recognize one so plain and so humble in life! The patrician blood of the Democrat's [Mart V.] Brown is almost chilled or curdled at the idea of the President of the United States condescending to receive and cordially greet the plebeian Brown with one arm! Some civet, good apothecary! This humble plebeian namesake has come between the wind and his nobility of Albany, and his fastidious sensibilities, so refined by associations at Salem, so beautifully displayed at Forest Grove one bright Sunday morning, and so much more high-toned by reason of a late election, cause him to "Whew!" lest he should suffocate at word that One-Arm Brown, who smells of Indians and horses, has actually been cordially received by the President! To think that General Grant, the great soldier and now chief magistrate of these United States, could be so shockingly vulgar as to allow Brown with only one arm to shake hands with him! "Whew!" Paugh! Great I Am Brown, Brigadier General of the State Militia of Oregon, a hero of the Forest Grove Sabbath morning street brawl (in which he took a General's place far in the rear, out of all danger), and chosen of his party for Democratic [State] Printer, would scorn to stoop so low as to shake hands with any plain and honest man. His Democracy has attar of roses to perfume it, kid gloves to handle it, fine raiment to clothe it, and the pride of the purse-proud to sustain it! We fear lest the damp atmosphere of Oregon may mold or make feculent this high-flown sort of Democracy. Showy purple by time and wear becomes at last a dirty brown, and would-be aristocrats have come to black the boots of plain and honest men they had in former days affected to despise. We predict, let the Democrat Brown and One-Arm Brown be placed in any city in the East, each upon their merits, or to narrate what they could tell of life on this Coast, of advantage to this people and of information about Oregon, and the worthier Brown of one arm will receive from every respectable and honored person a "cordial reception" such as President Grant extended to him, while the less-worthy Brown who ejaculates "Whew!" at him will be allowed to pass unnoticed, unhonored and unknown. But we wonder how the plain and hard-fisted Democrats of Oregon like the codfish pride of their Printer-elect in ridiculing the President for having shaken hands with an humble, honest man!
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1221-1228.



Klamath Agency, Or.
    July 15, 1874
Sir
    Your letter of 2nd inst. relative to subsistence allowance to employees is at hand, and in reply thereto I beg leave to say that the amounts heretofore paid at this agency are the smallest for which "good service can be obtained."
    I have found it exceedingly difficult to obtain suitable persons--such persons as I know it to be for the good of the service to secure--for the sums which I have been paying. This reservation is one of the most isolated on this coast, and the cost of living here is very much more than on many others, and good business men with families can do better "outside" than to come here even for that amount.
    I have reappointed such of the employees on this reservation as have heretofore been receiving subsistence allowance at salaries as specified below which is the least for which they will remain, or for which other suitable person can be obtained.
     Wm. S. Moore--Miller at $1250.00 per year (1000) *
Wm. H. Watson--Blacksmith at $1250.00 per year (1000)
Jno. Kuykendall--W. & P. Maker at $1250.00 per year (1000)
Sikes Worden--Supt. of Fmg. at $1250.00 per year (1000)
M. T. Dyar--Teacher at $1250.00 per year (1000)
E. W. Hammond--Teacher at $1050.00 per year (800)
Wm. Kuykendall--Carpenter at $1050.00 per year (800)
E. W. Watson--Matron at $  750.00 per year (500)
Jas. Haver--Comsy. at Yainax at $1400.00 per year (1200)
Enoch Loper--Blacksmith at $1050.00 per year (800)
 $11,550
    It requires no indifferent talent to properly keep in repair and run the saw and grist mills, and this is done by one man--the miller. The blacksmith at this agency is a thorough workman, capable of doing any kind of work in his line and in the most workmanlike manner, and is also a good gunsmith, and his place cannot be filled for any less money. The same can be said of the carpenter and wagon & plow maker. The physician who was here during the past year resigned at its close because the salary was inadequate, and because he could make two or three times as much elsewhere.
    M. T. Dyar performs double duty--that of teacher and also commissary or clerk--for which on some agencies an extra person is allowed, and is the hardest worked employee on the reservation.
    The position of "Commissary in Charge" at Yainax Station is a very trying and responsible one, and suitable persons will not accept that position for a less amt. than that given above. I had great difficulty in finding a suitable person for that place.
    I desire as much as anyone to retrench in the expenses of the agency but at the same time I know that it is not economy to comply indifferent service, even at low salaries.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
H. R. Clum Esq.
    Actg. Comr.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 331-335.  *The numbers in parentheses are penciled to the side; their meaning is unclear.



Clear Lake Cal.
    July 15th 1874.
To Hon.
    The Commsr. of Indian Affairs
        Sir,
            I write to thank you for your courteous letter of the 13th ult. and to say,
    That for my services on the Modoc Peace Commission I have made no charge against the government.
    The money I advanced to the chairman of that commission, as he has no doubt charged the government with it in his accounts [that] should be paid to me by him, and I sent the account to you that you might see he was willing to aid me in collecting it from the government a second time.
    To be a fool is a misfortune; to be a rascal is a fault.
Very respectfully
    Jesse Applegate
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 43-44.



Office U.S. Dist. Atty. for Dist. of Oregon
    Salem Oregon July 15th 1874
Sir,
    At a term of the U.S. Dist. Court for this district held in April last among other matters presented to the grand jury was a charge against a man in Clatsop County for selling intoxicating liquors to Indians. The evidence is positive, and but one question is presented about which there is any doubt. It seems from all I can learn in the matter that the Indians to whom the liquor was sold were of the Tillamook or Clatsop tribes or both, and it also seems that these tribes have never been treated with, have never been on any reservation or under the care of any agent. I understand that all Indians within any state were deemed to be under the charge of the Superintendent of Indian Affairs for that state whether they have been treated with or not. But we are in this awkward situation now. The Superintendency for this state has been abolished. The Indians in question having never been on any reservation are not properly under the charge of any Indian agent. You will see by the act of Feb. 13th 1862 St. at Large p. 339 that it is a crime to "sell, exchange, give, barter or dispose of any spirituous liquor or wine to any Indian under the charge of any Indian superintendent or Indian agent &c &c." Now does this leave the whites at liberty to sell to those Indians as much liquor as they choose, and is there no redress?
    Again, this liquor was sold after Odeneal's term had expired, that is, after the 1st of July but before he had actually ceased to be Superintendent. He still occupies the office, but for the purpose only as I understand of closing up his affairs. The indictment which the grand jury found alleges, I think, that the Indians in question were under the charge of Odeneal as Superintendent. In your judgment will proof that he was in office in that manner be sufficient to maintain an indictment alleging that the Indians were under his charge. If they were not, what was their status, and in whose charge are they now? There is no question but what the party sold the liquor, but there is question as to our ability under the law, as it now is, to convict. An early answer to the questions herein contained will greatly oblige
Your obt. servant
    Rufus Mallory
        U.S. Dist. Atty. for Ogn.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1204-1207.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz July 16th 1874
Sir
    I respectfully ask your attention to the enclosed communication just received. Several of our Indians are absent without leave and I presume are those referred to. As I am entirely without funds, I am unable to comply with the request to return these Indians to the reservation, or to feed them when here--till after harvest--unless funds are supplied me.
    I would therefore respectfully ask that my requisition of June 3rd may be acted on as soon as practicable, and also if I am instructed to issue food to these Indians when returned to the reservation, they being destitute of other means of support.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
   

To Hon. J. H. Fairchild U.S. Indian Agent
    We the undersigned citizens of Coos County, Oregon would respectfully ask that the Indians now in Coos and Curry counties belonging to the Siletz Reservation be taken tot he reservation as soon as possible. In support of this request we would state that a number of said Indians are constantly in the habit of getting drunk, lying around the streets and behave very disorderly.
    D. L. Watson Chas. W. P. Mack
J. A. Waller Wm. Utter
T. E. Helding J. G. Coffey
J. T. Owen Robert Slater
John C. Manning Wm. Waters
H. Bruster W. F. Hill
J. C. Wing Henry Rhodes
C. C. Dryden Henry Casterlin
C. B. Cole L. H. Zigler
F. A. Chenoweth W. A. Luse
Jno. E. Metz J. T. Cordun
Alexander Smith W. F. Slocum
David Morse Sr. C. W. Gregg
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 552-554.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz July 24th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication of the 25th ult. enclosing contract made by me on behalf of the Siletz Indians with Joel Palmer for lease of a portion of this reservation. As I have had the honor of stating in my letters to the Department, scarcity of food has compelled me to give permission to many of our Indians to go outside the reservation to labor, and they have not yet returned. I expect them now very soon, when I will convene them in council as directed. As the contract was entered into at the request of the Indians, I apprehend no difficulty about them signing the same. In this connection, I respectfully ask information respecting the northern boundary of this reservation. I am informed that Mr. Sinnott, agent at Grand Ronde, claims jurisdiction over all the Coast Reservation north of the mouth of Siletz River.
    On this point, I would remark first that I understand the Siletz Reservation when located was intended to extend on the north to the mouth of Salmon River. Second--that several Indian families, who unquestionably belong to this agency, have long had their residence north of the mouth of Siletz River. They receive annuities from this agency and come to me for the settlement of their disputes, and the jurisdiction of this agency has never been questioned over them.
    I am not aware that any Indians are living on the tract in questions, who acknowledge themselves as belonging to Grand Ronde.
    The boundaries have never, I believe, been very accurately defined, and to prevent all future conflict of jurisdiction I respectfully ask that they may be so now.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 563-565.



Office Alsea Sub-Agency
    July 31, 1874
Sir,
    In reply to your letter of April 1st 1874 requiring information as to the number of Indians killed by whites or whites killed by Indians &c.
    I have the honor to state that no Indians belonging to this agency have been killed by whites, nor have any whites been killed by these Indians since the passage by Congress of the resolution referred to in your letter.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        Geo. P. Litchfield
            U.S. Indian Sub-Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner &c.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1003-1004.



Washington City D.C.. Aug. 3rd 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Com. of Indian Affairs
        Sir
            Enclosed please find triplicate vouchers in favor of Geo. Harney, interpreter at Siletz Agency, Oregon for $83.33--also duplicate vouchers in favor of T. Cunningham & Co. for $490.79 for hardware furnished the Indian agency at Siletz, Oregon. Also "duplicate" vouchers of Bob Metcalfe for $106.66 for services as blacksmith at Siletz Agency in Oregon. Also duplicate vouchers of M. N. Chapman for $250 for services as commissary at Siletz Agency in Oregon.
    Also duplicate vouchers of G. R. Duval for $180.55 for services as wagon & plow maker at Siletz Agency in Oregon.
    Also duplicate vouchers [in] favor of F. M. Huddleston for $149.32 for services as a laborer at Siletz Agency in Oregon.
    Also duplicate vouchers favor of Ben Simpson for $99.94 for lumber for the use of the Siletz Agency in Oregon.
    Also duplicate vouchers favor of M. N. Chapman $13.36 for one office stove furnished the Siletz Agency in Oregon.
    Also duplicate vouchers favor of Umatata for $315.32 for services as ferryman and expressman for Siletz Agency in Oregon.
    Also duplicate vouchers favor of Lorenzo Palmer for $208.32 for services as superintendent of farming at Siletz Agency in Oregon.
    Also duplicate vouchers favor of C. Dickenson for $19.12 for seeds furnished the Siletz Agency Oregon.
I am very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        D. P. Thompson
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 541-564.  Vouchers not transcribed. The voucher of Umatata spells it "Umatartar."



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz August 3rd 1874
Sir
    Enclosed I have the honor to transmit proceedings of council held July 29th at the mouth of Siletz River with that portion of Indians belonging to this reservation and living between there and [the] mouth of Salmon River. I believe it is the universal wish of all the Indians that this lease should be perfected. I very much regret that the necessary absence of so many has rendered it impossible to convene a council as per your instructions. As their passes will soon expire, however, I shall probably be able to do so soon. I think there can be no question but the boundaries of this reservation have ever been regarded as extending to the mouth of Salmon River on the north, though I respectfully ask that they may be authoritatively defined.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Washington D.C.
   

    Minutes of a council of a council held July 29th 1874 at the mouth of Siletz River with portions of various tribes of Indians belonging to Siletz Reservation and living on the tract in question, respecting the lease of a portion of said reservation to Gen. Joel Palmer.
    Mr. Fairchild, the agent said--I want to talk to you a little. I do not want a long talk, for I do not consider it necessary. Some time ago at the council you all said you wanted Gen. Palmer to live on a part of your lands to raise cattle, paying you a fair price for the privilege. Since then I have heard that the Grand Ronde Indians do not like it. As you live on this tract and the Grand Ronde Indians do not, I consider it your country, and now I want to know your real minds. If you are still of the mind you were at the council I want to know it. The Chief at Washington also wants to know certainly if it is your mind that this lease should be carried out, and if so wants you to put your names to this paper. I will read it every word and have it carefully explained, and I want you to tell me all your mind and if you still think as you did at the council put your names to this paper.
    (The lease was then read and interpreted and its provisions carefully explained.) Now I want to hear from all of you. As Skaley is a chief here it will be well for him to speak first.
    Skaley--I have nothing to say. This matter was all settled last winter by all the Siletz Indians. I was not there, and I am glad to hear this lease read today. I am glad to hear of this. I think it is a good thing. I think you are doing a good thing for the Indians in making this lease. I am glad to see Gen. Palmer here. Last winter I had nothing to eat but fish and mussels, and if Gen. Palmer comes I know I can work for him and sometimes get flour and beef. Long ago when he was Superintendent he brought us here. I heard what he said at Port Orford in my country. He brought us from there on a fine ship. When we passed this place he called us all on the deck of the steamer and pointed out this country and told us that all below the mouth of Salmon River was to be our home. Our hearts were glad to see this country, and we have always considered it ours. Gen. Palmer did not tell the Grand Ronde Indians this was their country.
    Leggins--Skaley has told my mind. I will not talk now. My heart is very sore. My children have both lately died, and I am old and can say but little. If Gen. Palmer lives here he will help us. It is very good for him to come, though probably I shall never receive any benefit from the rent of this land. The first time I saw Gen. Palmer I was a boy, then when I saw him again in my country I was a man. Why do the Grand Ronde Indians want to prevent our leaving this country. It was never theirs. This country was given us by Gen. Palmer long ago. We make no use of it, and I think it good for Gen. Palmer to live here and rent it of us.
    George, chief of Sixes--The Grand Ronde Indians are always trying to get the best of us in some way. They say we are like horses and eat oats. It is true we do not get all we want and are hungry many times. At Grand Ronde the agent has mills and can give the Indians flour, while our agent has none. It is good for Gen. Palmer to come here. All the old people knew him long ago, and if any of his cattle are killed it will not be the old people that will do it. If Gen. Palmer lives here he will not permit bad white people who come to the coast in the summer to abuse us. This is really Skaley's country, since he lives here all the time and he takes good care of it. He has no plow or harness. I would like it if he could have those things, for I would like to see him raise oats and potatoes.
    Old Man Charlie--I have not thought much of this matter, but I like it. I think as Skaley has said. I saw Gen. Palmer long ago in my country. I was not old then; now I am old. I think it good for him to come here. We all look on Gen. Palmer as one of our people. No matter who is agent, the old people of Siletz will always regard Gen. Palmer as one of their chiefs. My heart is glad to think he will come here. Long ago he was a good friend to us, and we all like him. He has always been our friend. I live here all the time.
    Jim--I think the same as the others. It is good for Gen. Palmer to come here. I will not say more because I am not a chief.
    Jonas--I have nothing to say. I agree with the others and so do all the Indians.
    Agent Fairchild--If you are all through I will say a word. I have written what has been said and shall send it to Washington. I am glad to hear that you do not forget old friends. I have taken no part in this talk or tried to influence you one way or other other, but now that you are all done I will say that I regard this lease as a good thing. Gen. Palmer has been a good friend to you, and your rights are carefully guarded in the lease, while the amount received as rent if carefully invested will soon be a handsome sum. It is true we have no mills, but we must be patient and perhaps we will get one soon. I will give Skaley a plow and harness his fall. If I have none belonging to the government I will give him my own harness. I have nothing further to say, and if you are all through we will break up the council.
    Attest--Joseph Howard, Interpreter
    I certify on honor that the above is substantially a correct transcript of the speeches made at the council held at the mouth of Siletz River on the date given above viz. July 29th 1874.
J. H. Fairchild
    U.S. Indian Agent
   
Mouth of Siletz River
    July 29th 1874
    We the undersigned members of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians and residing on the tract leased by the within article--viz.--north of the mouth of Siletz River and south of the mouth of Salmon River--do hereby certify that we have heard the foregoing paper and the lease read, that we are fully acquainted with its provisions and freely and voluntarily consent to the same and that it was entered into with our full consent and at our request.
    his
    Skaley X Port Orford Indian     Lease read and explained
mark and signatures affixed in
his presence of
George X Chief of Sixes     J. H. Fitzgerald
mark     Joseph Howard
his
Leggins X Sixes
mark
his
Stewart X Tututni
mark
his
Old Man Charlie X Mussel Creek
mark
his
Jim X Tututni
mark
his
Jonas X Tututni
mark
    I certify on honor that the above signatures were affixed in my presence by the parties whose names are attached and that they are the heads of families who reside on the tract in question.
J. H. Fairchild
    U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 566-572.



Siletz Indian Agency
    Oregon Aug. 4th 1874
Sir
    I respectfully ask leave to again call your attention to my requisition for funds for the 3rd and 4th quarters 1874. As the mail is very irregular, and letters &c. destined for this agency, and sent from here, are frequently lost, I have thought it quite probable my requisition might never have reached your office. Our harvesting is now at hand, when it is absolutely indispensable we should have some new implements. We require also repairs to our threshing machine and some new castings. These we must have if we expect to save our grain. I therefore would respectfully urge that my requisition for funds made June 3rd may be attended to immediately.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. Commissioner Indian Affairs
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 573-574.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz August 12th 1874
Sir
    I respectfully ask if I have authority to issue to the Indians such cows, young heifers, horses &c. as are not needed for the service of the government, taking especial care, of course, that the issue is made to none but those who have given evidence that they will properly care for them, and requiring a fair return in labor or other service beneficial to the whole tribes. I have already made temporary issues to several of unbroken heifers, and they have cared well for them, and are highly pleased, several having realized considerable from the sale of butter. There is a great anxiety among them to possess cows, and I am constantly importuned to sell them such Dept. cows as are not used.
    Great improvement has taken place in this direction within the past year, and many are now laboring for parties outside the reservation, taking cows in return. I desire to encourage this tendency, as it gives the Indians more interest in their homes, besides providing a source of future revenue, and encourages habits of industry and order.
    In this connection I would say that as soon as our harvest is completed, it is my intention to reduce my force of employees to the lowest possible limit, in compliance with suggestions from your Department, and in future confine farming operations to raising sufficient forage for govt. stock, and providing for the old and destitute among the Indians. Heretofore we have raised supplies for issue, and used Dept. teams to prepare land for such Indians as had no teams.
    In future, as much as possible, I desire the Indians to raise their own crops and depend on their own exertions. This measure will release several teams of oxen and horses, for which we shall have no use. If the Indians can know that the teams will be their own, they will care for them better and take more interest in them than if they suppose the ownership still vested in the govt. I am convinced that these teams issued in return for an equivalent, and care being taken that none but those capable of properly caring for them receive them, will greatly assist and encourage the Indians and relieve the govt. from all care for many who now require partial support. As I am not fully satisfied that I possess authority to make such result I respectfully ask instruction on that point.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 577-580.



Office of Catholic Commissioners
    for Indian Missions
        Washington, D.C. August 14th 1874.
To the Honorable
    Edw. P. Smith
        Comr. Indian Affairs
            Sir
                In conformity with the desire of the agent of the Grand Ronde, in Oregon, I beg leave to request that the said agent be authorized to enclose and cultivate as much vacant ground as he chooses, for the use of the school of the agency & its teachers, and to purchase, out of this year's school fund, if he judges proper, a few heads of cows, say a half dozen or a dozen for the same use.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Charles Ewing
            Cath. Comr.
                for Indn. Missions
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 440-442.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Aug. 14, 1874
Sir
    In obedience to your circular letter dated Apr. 1st 1874 requiring a report of the No. of citizens and soldiers killed by Inds. and of Indians killed and captured by soldiers during the year 1873 and first six months of 1874. I enclose herewith a statement of No. of Modocs killed and captured during the year 1873 and also a list of soldiers and citizens killed by Modocs during same time.
    It will be remembered that the murders of white settlers by the Modocs took place during the latter part of 1872; consequently they are not included in these statements.
    Capt. Jack and three others were hanged by the military at Ft. Klamath but are not included in the enclosed statement. These Indians were not on their reservation when killed or captured.
    Under whose orders it was done will be better understood at Washington than by myself.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
   

Statement
of number of Indians killed and captured by U.S. soldiers
in the Modoc war during the year 1873
   

No. Killed
      Men 7
Women 8
Children 3
   
No. Captured
Men, women and children    159
   

    The above statement is as nearly correct as I can make it from data gathered from the most reliable Modocs now on this reservation--near relatives of Capt. Jack's band--and I think it is entirely correct.
    In addition to the above list of killed four Ind. men were murdered by unknown white men while being conveyed to military headquarters after their capture, and three were killed by the bursting of a bombshell which they were trying to open for the purpose of securing the powder it contained.
    I have been totally unable to ascertain correctly the dates or circumstances of these deaths.
L. S. Dyar
    U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 349-354.  Tabular list of 51 soldiers killed in action or died of wounds not transcribed.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Aug. 19, 1874
Sir
    In answer to your letter of 4th inst. relative to the appointment of Dr. B. P. Quivey as physician at this agency, and asking the reason for the "increase of salary" I will say that Dr. Odell, the former physician, received $1000 as salary and 75 cts. per day as subsistence allowance, amounting in all to about $1272 per annum, and instead of increasing the compensation of [the] physician, I have reduced it $22 per year, and I find it difficult to obtain a competent physician for that sum.
    I have never before been required to furnish proof of the qualification of physicians, and judging from the tenor of late communications that any report that I may make may not be deemed sufficient, I will forward to you as soon as they can be obtained by mail, certificate from disinterested, reliable persons showing Dr. Quivey's fitness for the position.
    If the idea has obtained that I am not conducting the affairs of this agency honestly I would respectfully suggest the propriety of sending an inspector here at once to investigate matters.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 356-358.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Aug. 19, 1874
Sir
    In answer to your communication of 6th inst. I wish to explain matters very fully, so that there need be no misunderstanding in the future.
    1st. The appropriation act approved June 22nd 1874 provides (as per treaty) $9,600.00 for pay of "Regular Treaty Employees," such as Physician, Miller, Blacksmith, Teacher &c. Now, you will perceive that the salaries of the "Regular Employees" named in my letters of the 15th and 18th ult. amount to just that sum, viz.
    W. S. Moore--Miller $1250.
W. M. Watson--Blacksmith 1250.
Jno. Kuykendall--W. & P. Maker 1250.
S. Worden, Supt. of Farming 1250.
M. T. Dyar--Teacher 1250.
E. W. Hammond, Teacher 1050.
Wm. Kuykendall, Carpenter 1050.
B. P. Quivey--Physician   1250
Total $9600
    Mrs. E. W. Watson, Matron, as I understand, is not a "Regular Employee," but an incidental one, and is to be paid from "incidental funds." The same is true of C. S. Moore--Teamster, Hatton & Garnett--Mail Carriers and Indian Farm and Mill Laborers.
    2nd. James Haver, Commissary in Charge at Yainax Station, and Enoch Loper--Blacksmith at the same place, are not "Regular Treaty Employees," but are incidental, and should be paid from incidental funds. Yainax Station is situated about 40 miles from Klamath Agency and is an entirely separate institution, heretofore supported from funds appropriated for "Subsistence and Support of Shoshones and Bannocks, and other tribes in Southeastern Oregon," and was established especially for the benefit of Snake and Piute Indians which are not subjects of any treaty, and the appropriations for Klamaths & Modocs do not apply there. It is absolutely indispensable that those persons should be employed at Yainax, and it cannot be done from the regular employee fund for Klamaths & Modocs without rendering my efforts at Klamath Agency almost an entire failure. I would therefore request that you provide for the payment of Commissary in Charge, and Blacksmith and such Indian Laborers as may be necessary at Yainax Station from Incidental or other funds.
    If I misinterpret the law approved on the 22nd of last June, and am restricted to $9,600 for all employees, including those at Yainax Station, and Teamster, Matron, Indian Laborers &c. at this agency, I am simply forced to a complete failure--that is all.
    Please explain these matters fully to me, and until I receive your answer I will make no change from my report of 15th ult.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 359-363.



Washington City Aug. 22nd '74
Rev. Father Brouillet
    Father--
        In September and October 1872, I was employed in allotting the lands of the Grand Ronde Indians to them individually.
    I was instructed by the then-Superintendent Odeneal to levy to those Indians who had no lands on the Grand Ronde Reservation and more particularly to the reservation half-breed Indians that if they were not suited at Grand Ronde they could have their lands on the Coast Reservation, which was then being surveyed into twenty-acre lots.
    Most of the half-breeds availed themselves of this offer and were not allotted land on Grand Ronde Agency. I do not know that they have taken their lands on the Coast Reserve.
Respectfully yours
    D. P. Thompson
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 648-649.



Salem Oregon August 22nd 1874
Sir
    In regard to the claim of N. B. Clough for furnishing fruit trees to the Siletz, Grand Ronde and Warm Spring Indian agencies referred to me for investigation, I have to state--
    That while in San Francisco on my way to Oregon, N. B. Clough, the claimant, and Wm. H. Rector, the former Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Oregon, called upon me and made the statements under oath which I herewith enclose. Upon my arrival at Portland, Oregon, I found Mr. James B. Condon, who was U.S. Indian agent in charge of Grand Ronde Agency at the time the contract was made and the trees delivered. I examined Mr. Condon on oath and have reduced his statements to the form of an affidavit, which is signed and sworn to by him.
    He recollects the delivery of the trees at Grand Ronde Agency in the fall of 1861, but he cannot state positively how many trees were delivered. He seems also to know that trees were delivered and set out at the Siletz Agency--and that Clough on two occasions visited these two reservations to look after the trees. Rector is very positive in his statement about the delivery of the trees--at each of the three reservations--and the visits of Clough to attend to their culture. The Indians on the Siletz and Grand Ronde reservations which I have visited recollect the trees being brought to them, but cannot state the time. They appear to have been careless about them, and let their stock run among the young trees, and this resulted in great destruction.
    The statement of those connected with these reservations with whom I have conversed is that the Indians never took any care of the trees until within the last few years, and now they seem to value the fruit highly. I found a good many trees in bearing at the agencies, which are said to be the remains of the trees set out in 1861 by Mr. Clough. So long a time has elapsed since the delivery of the trees that it is next to impossible to find any persons who have any definite knowledge of the matter. The Hon. Mr. Nesmith, the former Superintendent, and now a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, has made a statement regarding the trees that is on file in the Department. He called upon me here in Salem and said that he did not doubt the justice of the claim, that he knew of Clough giving the trees his personal attention, but to what extent he could not say.
    Clough it appears no longer owns the claim; he has transferred it to other parties, whose names probably appear in the papers at Washington.
    I transmit herewith the additional evidence I have taken.
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servant
        Wm. Vandever
            U.S. Indian Inspector
Hon. Commsr. Indian Affrs.
    Washington
        D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 706-711.



Salem Oregon August 22nd 1874
Sir
    I transmit by today's mail reports of inspection of Grand Ronde, Siletz and Alsea Indian agencies.
    The special matter of the jurisdiction of agents Fairchild and Sinnott, also the proposition to diminish the Alsea Reservation, and also the matter of the Palmer lease, I have referred to in said reports, with recommendations to which I call your attention.
    Not having time to copy my reports in a fair hand, you will please excuse interlineations & erasures--as I am a poor clerk.
    I proceed from here to Klamath and thence to Malheur and Nez Perces.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. Vandever
            U.S. Indian Inspector
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 712-714.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Aug. 26th 1874
Sir
    I respectfully ask indulgence for again calling your attention to the very great necessity of a remittance of funds for use at this agency. Many articles are indispensable for our threshing which I cannot purchase without money.
    The season is fast passing away, and the rainy season will soon be here, after which it will be useless to think of threshing grain, and the most of it will be lost.
    I respectfully ask therefore that the funds apportioned to this agency may be remitted as soon as possible.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 581-582.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Aug. 26th 1874
Sir
    I respectfully ask to call your attention to my letter of July 10th '74 with requisition for funds to pay liabilities incurred by me during the 2nd quarter of 1873, as previously reported to your office. In this connection I would observe that some of these debts were contracted with the expectation of immediate payment, as, for instance, those incurred in returning fugitive Indians, by direct order of my official superior, and with the distinct promise of funds to meet all expenses.
    Those for payment of employees should be paid as soon as practicable. The parties have now waited over a year, and some of them have been compelled to borrow money to support their families and are paying interest on it yet. The supplies are absolutely essential to the proper interest of the service and were furnished at regular cash rates with the expectation of soon being paid.
    I respectfully ask therefore that the funds necessary to liquidate these demands may be forwarded immediately.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. Commissioner Indian Affairs
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 583-585.



"Champoeg" Marion County Oregon
    August 27th 1874
Hon. J. H. Mitchell
    Dear Sir
        I understand that there is an effort made at present to have Mr. P. B. Sinnott removed from the Indian agency at Grand Ronde and place the agency at that point in the hands of those representing the Methodist Church &c. &c. This I think would be an unwise step on the part of the Department, and one that is uncalled for at this time &c.
    Mr. Sinnott is a Catholic, and it has been understood to be the policy of the government to leave this agency in the hands of the Catholics &c. Acting with this understanding the Catholic sisterhood have already gone to considerable pains and expenses in erecting schoolhouses there and are now maintaining a large school for the education of the Indians for the reservation, and I am sure that a change in the agency now would of course necessitate the withdrawal of the Sisters and closing of the school on the reservation &c. So as a Catholic I respectfully submit that this would be a great hardship and an injury to them that is uncalled for &c. &c. As representing the Catholic claims Mr. Sinnott gives entire satisfaction, and if you can use your influence in having him retained as agent you may depend and rest assured that your kindness will be remembered in a substantial manner if ever the opportunity offers by your Catholic friends in Oregon &c. &c. A short time since Mr. C. D. Folger told some of my Catholic friends in Portland that he was going to get the agency of the Grand Ronde Reservation through your influence &c. &c. But I told them that I did not believe a word of it, that you was too well acquainted with his ungovernable appetite for strong drink &c. &c. Even if Mr. Folger was a Catholic he never would do for an Indian agent, having this unfortunate appetite for whiskey--and which is so unpopular at present &c. Excuse me for being so lengthy &c.
I remain as ever
    Your most sincere friend
        John B. P. Piette
   
    Respectfully referred to Hon. Commissioner of Indian Affairs. I fully agree with the writer, Mr. Piette, who is one of Oregon's best citizens and a leading Catholic. I should be pleased to be advised on receipt of this whether any change is contemplated in the agent at Grand Ronde. I trust none will be made.
    Hoping to receive a reply I remain
Yours truly
    J. H. Mitchell
Sep. 10 / 74
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1249-1252.



Klamath Agency Oregon
    September 2nd 1874
Sir
    I transmit by today's mail report of inspection of this agency.
    Tomorrow I leave overland for Malheur, three hundred miles distant. There is no public conveyance, and I am obliged to improvise an outfit and take camp equipage. I find the distances are so great between agencies in Oregon, and the roads so mountainous, that more time than I anticipated is required, and the expense much greater than the rate of compensation allowed by the rules of the office.
    Malheur not having been visited last year, I feel bound to go there this.
Very respty. &c.
    Wm. Vandever
        U.S. Indn. Inspector
Hon. Commsr. Indian Affrs.
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 715-716.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Sept. 2nd 1874
Sir
    I would refer you to your letter of the 4th ulto., and also to my answer of the 19th ulto. relative to the qualifications of Dr. B. P. Quivey, lately appointed Physician at this agency.
    I enclose Dr. Quivey's statement concerning his studies and practice and also certificates of Drs. Watkins and Hawthorne, two of the leading physicians in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Hawthorne has charge of the state insane asylum, and Dr. Watkins is one of the most eminent physicians in the state. For proof of these statements I would refer you to Atty. Gen. Williams and Senator J. H. Mitchell, and to the latter gentleman for testimony in regard to Dr. Quivey's fitness, they being personal acquaintances.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
   

Portland Ogn. Aug. 25, 1874
To Whom It May Concern--
    I hereby certify that I have been acquainted with Dr. B. P. Quivey for several years, that he has ever sustained a good character for uprightness, that is a competent druggist and for several years has been engaged in the practice of medicine for which he is qualified by study & experience.
   
Klamath Agency Sept. 2nd 1874
    This is to certify that I studied medicine two years with Drs. Hawthorne and Loryea in the Co. Hospital at Portland.
    I attended two full courses of lectures in the University of the Pacific, the terms of sixty and sixty-one, also sixty-one and two, have no diploma, but have a certificate from [omission] did not take one as I wished at some future day to graduate in some eastern school. After leaving college I went into a drug store as clerk and remained there until 1865, when I was employed by P. G. S. Ten Broeck, Med. Director, Dept. of the Columbia as Acting Assistant Surgeon in the Oregon Volunteers for five months. After that I followed the drug business three years and since that time have been practicing in Hillsboro, Washington Co., Oregon.
B. P. Quivey
   
East Portland
    Aug. 25 1874
To Whom It May Concern
    I do hereby certify that I have been acquainted with Dr. B. P. Quivey for many years and that he has always sustained a good reputation. I also certify that he acted as Assistant Surgeon in the companies of Capts. Powell & Ingraham, Oregon Volunteers, that he has been practicing medicine for some time at Hillsboro in this state, and that he is a good druggist and in my opinion well qualified to practice medicine & surgery. I have no hesitancy in recommending him to those who  may require his professional services.
J. C. Hawthorne M.D.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 364-369.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Sept. 2nd 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 17th ult. in relation to annuity goods for this agency. In this connection, I respectfully ask to refer to my letter of May 12th on this subject. The Indians, at a council with Inspector Kemble, protested against any more blankets or cloth being sent them, and asked for agricultural implements or food. Inspector Kemble promised them that no more should be sent. They made the same representations to Inspector Vandever on his late visit. The Indians do not want these blankets and cloth &c.
    They ask plows, teams, tools, or if these cannot be supplied, subsistence for the winter.
    Last year I received no notice whatever that goods would be sent me till they had remained on storage over a month at Portland and the rainy season had set in. It cost me more than twice as much for freight as it would had the goods been purchased in proper season, and they were not what was required.
    I respectfully protest against blankets, cloth &c. being sent these Indians, against their distinct remonstrances. Every dollar appropriated for this agency is needed for more important purposes. If the commissioners will purchase for us 20 plows and leather, harness, buckles, rings, collars &c. so that we can have our Indians at work this winter making harness--which is greatly needed--we will be very thankful. If they will purchase these articles in time to be got here, before the roads become impassable, we shall be glad to receive them, but unless the purchase is made very soon it will be useless. I most respectfully suggest that were the money in my hands now I could expend it to much better advantage, as I know what is needed. We have suffered already and may lose a large proportion of our grain from withholding funds. I most earnestly ask that they be forwarded at once if possible.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. H. R. Clum
    Act. Commissioner
        Washington D.C.
   

Siletz Agency Sept. 2nd 1874
P.S.--I respectfully desire to add that if the comsrs. purchase supplies for this agency they must be shipped by the 20th inst. from Portland, or the chances are the rainy season will set in and it will be impossible to get them before next spring. There seems to be no probability that they will complete their purchases in time for this agency. I respectfully protest against the funds appropriated for service here being used to make purchases that the lateness of the season renders useless. I wish I could impress on the mind of the Hon. Commissioner how much this agency has already suffered through failure to receive funds this season. If our funds are to be withheld till the Board make their purchases I hardly know what we shall do. I refer to Inspector Vandever for proof how much funds are needed. My employees are suffering for want of the necessaries of life. I have used my own means and involved myself in debt to help them till my credit is nearly exhausted. At the very most I shall not ask the Board to purchase over $1000 as I have no confidence in getting the articles in this season. Were they a month earlier I should ask them to purchase plows &c., but unless they can be brought in this fall, in time for the fall plowing, the purchase had better be deferred till next spring, when something else may be more necessary. I ask indulgence for expressing myself so strongly, and again most earnestly ask that my funds may be forwarded immediately, at least my own salary for the quarter if no more is possible.
    Rains commence here from two to four weeks earlier than in the Willamette Valley. It is very discouraging, after--in compliance with my advice, with the assurance that I would help them--these Indians have worked so hard to raise a good crop of grain, now to see it rot in the ground for want of a few dollars to purchase cradles, scythes &c., will be a far greater injury than the mere loss of the grain could be. They have used their wages to purchase food to last them through harvest, and have no money to buy agricultural implements themselves.
    I earnestly hope no further delay may be experienced in remitting funds.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. H. R. Clum
    Act. Com. Ind. Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 586-590.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Sept. 4th 1874
Sir
    Enclosed I have the honor to transmit the signature of the Indian chiefs to a written endorsement of the within lease to Gen. Joel Palmer. As it was impracticable to give the signatures of all the Indians, they authorized their chiefs to sign for them. I ask indulgence for my long delay in forwarding this, but for reasons previously given it was impracticable to forward it sooner. In this connection I would remark that I have carefully refrained from influencing the Indians in this matter.
    Were any other man than Gen. Palmer the lessee I should doubt the propriety of the measure, but knowing him as I do, believe his influence will be good. Inspector Vandever has doubtless placed your office in possession of all the facts long before this time.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J .H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 591-592.



Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or.
    Sept. 5, 1874
Sir:
    Referring to your communication of July 25, in which the appointment of C. D. Folger as Supt. of Farms & Mills at this agency is not approved, for the reason given "that as there is a miller engaged there can be no necessity for such employee," I now have to state more fully my reasons for engaging such employee, which I hope will lead to a reconsideration of your decision. In the report of Indian Inspector Kemble, in regard to the saw & grist mill of this agency, he states as follows.
    "It would add to the revenue of these Indians if their sawmill could be furnished with a larger water wheel, and the present wheel used to run the grist mill alone. They have an abundance of water power & plenty of saw logs very convenient, and their grist mill is the best in this section of the country.
    "Some means must be provided to give the Indians employment on their reservation after their small fields are sown or harvested and thus prevent their wandering to the adjacent towns. Their mills, properly managed, might go far towards rendering them self-supporting." Agreeing with Mr. Kemble and to the end that the mills could be made not only self-sustaining, but yield a handsome revenue over all expenses, I contemplate the purchase of a new wheel out of the treaty money due the Indians of this agency--by their consent--for the fiscal year ending July 1, '75. This arrangement will increase the power of the sawmill, making it produce 8 to 10M ft. of lumber per day worth $64 to $80, and instead of being an item of expense as now, would give employment to a great many Indians in getting out logs, teaming & working in the mill. The sale of lumber for which there is a demand for all that can be made--paying all expenses--and as above stated yielding a revenue besides. To accomplish this a manager or supt. is necessary to sell, deliver & direct the workings of the mills--the sawyer & miller--one person attending to both, would necessarily be occupied at his business either sawing & grinding wheat & to take any of his time would defeat the object sought for, and the mill being located nearly three miles from the agency buildings and my other duties requiring all my time I could not attend to the business myself. I regard the engagement of the employees named as more important than a carpenter or blacksmith. As with the revenue which the Indians will derive from such an arrangement will enable them to hire such work done, you will understand that the entire expenses of running the mills including the salary of the employees named or also the miller will be paid from the proceeds of the sale of lumber. Another consideration is the fact as the present is the last appropriation for these Indians under their treaties and all told does not amt. to $15 for each Indian & the prospect not being favorable for any increase in the future--any means by which their revenues can be increased should be encouraged, especially as in the case under consideration the Department not being subject to any expenditure. Submitting this statement I respectfully ask that the engagement of C. D. Folger as Supt. of Farms & Mills be approved.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 422-426.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Sept. 5th 1874
Sir
    Your letter of 17th ulto. in which you state that $24,700.00 is all that will be allowed for the Ind. Service at this reservation for the present fiscal year is before me, and in reference to the same I beg the liberty to state as briefly as possible a few facts relative to the matter, and then whatever may result the responsibility will not rest upon me.
    Throughout the Modoc War it was generally believed that the Indians upon this reservation were upon the point of breaking out and joining Capt. Jack, and several times reports were circulated that they had done so, but although their fathers, sons and brothers were with Capt. Jack, and although they saw him whipping the soldiers for six months, not one reservation Indian proved unfaithful to the treaty, or in any way assisted the renegade band, but on the contrary rendered efficient aid in guarding govt. and individual property in many ways and also acted as scouts for the U.S. army.
    Now, after having conducted the concern safely through such an ordeal I feel that my words are entitled to some weight, and I wish to say that the amount stated by you as having been set apart for these Indians is positively insufficient to meet the absolute wants of the reservation, and as Inspector Vandever says in his enclosed letter to you, the Indians at Yainax must starve or steal unless further provided for, and when Inds. are compelled to plunder for a living you need not be told the result.
    Heretofore $20,000.00 have been apportioned to the Indians at Yainax of the funds for "Subsistence, Support etc. of Shoshones & Bannocks and other tribes in Idaho and S.E. Oregon"--besides regular treaty and incidental funds--and until last year they needed every dollar of it, but beef and flour having fallen very much in price in this section of country, the contracts for those articles were very low, the former at one half the amount heretofore paid, and for this reason something remained with which to buy stock cattle.
    Now, after purchasing the necessary articles of clothing for the destitute, and allowing for the indispensable incidental expenses of the service, not a dollar of the $24,700.00 will remain with which to buy food for the Yainax Indians.
    Schonchin's band of Modocs, numbering 100, although subjects of the treaty, cannot be subsisted upon their pitiful share of the annuity fund, and Chocktoot's band of Snakes of about 150 by this allowance are to be fed, clothed and cared for for $1200.00 a year--Woll-pah-pe fund. These bands, with the 130 Yahooskin Snakes, it is necessary to keep at Yainax. The Modocs were first put upon this, the western portion of the reservation, with the Klamaths, but they could not agree, and under the leadership of Capt. Jack they all, except Schonchin the old chief, ran away, and this was the beginning of the Modoc difficulty. Subsequently a portion returned to Schonchin, and they were placed at Yainax, where they are contented, and where it is necessary that they should remain; and as they are away from their old homes and means of subsistence, and as agriculture is a failure, they must be clothed and fed through the whole winter or suffer.
    Chocktoot's band of Snakes are in even a more helpless condition. Summer Lake Valley, their old home, is a warm valley abounding in food for Inds. in their wild state, and to force them to stay upon the reservation where there is very little game or roots, and then provide but $1200 for their support, is simply murder.
    Those Indians must stay at Yainax, and consequently Yainax Station must be kept up, and this requires employees which have to be provided for from money outside the regular treaty, and when this is done, and the other necessary incidental expenses met, nothing will remain for the purchase of food, and but very little for clothing for those Indians.
    At least $5000.00 above the $24,700.00 already set apart is absolutely needed for those Yainax Indians, and in this opinion Inspector Vandever fully agreed with me, and if Ocheho should be brought back this fall, as much more will be needed.
    Should this not be provided I shall be obliged to give up the school, which is now very successful, beside other important treaty provisions, and then not be able to meet the difficulty.
    I shall send the commissioners at Portland a very light estimate for annuity goods, hoping you will telegraph to them to double it, and also send me funds with which to purchase the necessary food.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 372-378.



Sheridan, Yamhill Co.
    Oregon Sept. 7th 1874
Hon. J. H. Miller, U.S.S.
    Washington D.C.
Dear Sir,
    Having heard that efforts are being made to have Mr. Sinnott removed from his position as agent on the Grand Ronde Indian Reservation, I feel it my duty to represent to you that Mr. Sinnott has proved himself to be one of the most efficient and best Indian agents who has ever been on the reservation. He has taken more interest in the Indians and has given better satisfaction to the people living in the vicinity of the reservation than any other agent who has been here, and by his uniformly honest and upright conduct has secured the confidence of both Indians and whites. A petition to have him retained in his present position would undoubtedly be signed by everyone in this vicinity.
    Knowing that you are carefully watching our best interests, I hope you will not allow him to be removed.
    Mr. Sinnott is a staunch Republican and gave us material aid during the last canvass in this county.
I remain respy. yrs.
    J. Lamson
   
Respectfully referred to the Hon. Commission of Indian Affairs. The writer--the Hon. Jeremiah Lamson--is one of Oregon's oldest and most respected citizens. I fully concur with him in reference to the subject matter of his letter.
J. H. Mitchell
Sep. 20, 74
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 4-7.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Oregon Sept. 8th 1874
Sir
    Referring to my letter of the 12th ult. and your communication of the 17th notifying me that $19,500 had been apportioned for the service at this agency the current fiscal year, I respectfully ask if I am authorized to issue horses, cows &c. to these Indians, where it can be done without injury to the service, provided, of course, I am perfectly satisfied the stock will be well cared for, and requiring payment for the same as the law directs.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 599-600.




Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. Sept. 9th 1874.
Sir:
    I return herewith the report of Inspector Vandever and additional evidence in the claim of N. B. Clough for fruit trees furnished the Indian Service in Oregon in 1861, which accompanied your letter upon the subject, addressed to this Department under date of 5th instant.
    Inasmuch as it appears from the report of the Inspector that Mr. Clough has fully complied with, and fulfilled the terms of, his contract, this Department is aware of no reason for longer withholding the balance due, provided there are funds within the control of the Indian Office applicable to the payment thereof.
Very respectfully &c.
    B. R. Cowen
        Acting Secretary
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 767-768.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Sept. 9th 1874
Sir
    I would respectfully request that an exception be made in favor of the Indians of this reservation in regard to Sec. 3 of the act of June 22nd 1874 requiring Inds. upon reservations to perform labor for the annuity goods &c. paid to them, and that the agent be allowed to enforce the rule so far as in his judgment is best for the good of these Inds., and this request I make for the following reasons.
    1st. These Inds.--Snakes excepted--know how, and are willing to work, and do perform work during the year to nearly or quite the full value that they receive, and in a large measure support themselves, their annuity fund being small. This is a cold, frost climate, and agriculture is a failure, consequently these Inds. are obliged to be diligent all through the summer season in order to lay by food for winter, and what little help they get from govt. should be gratuitous, and in addition to what they do for themselves.
    2nd. Many of these Inds. are helpless and have no near relatives able to labor for them, and it is to this class that a large portion of the food furnished goes.
    3rd. These annuity goods and articles of subsistence are given out in the winter season mostly, as they are needed, and when it is impossible for them to labor to any advantage, and it is impracticable to oblige them to labor during the summer season for what they are to receive in the winter.
    4th. These Inds. regard the annuities which they receive as being their just due for the country which they sold to the govt. when they made the treaty, and they consider it as obliging them to pay for that which is already theirs by right.
    In many instances I can conform to the rule, but it is impracticable to enforce it to the letter upon this reservation.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 379-382.



Fort Leavenworth, Ks.
    Septr. 17th 1874.
To
    The Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
Sir,
    Being an applicant for a land warrant, having been engaged during the war of 1854 [sic] with the Rogue River Indians in the Territory of Oregon as volunteer, I most respectfully request to be furnished with the date of the removal of that tribe of Indians, which at the close of that war were collected. They were sent under guard of a body of the 4th U.S. Infy. commanded by 1st Lieut. Bonnycastle through the Rogue River Canyon farther north to the new reservation, myself being stationed at the mouth of the Canyon with a small detachment of volunteers of Co. F Oregon Mounted Vols., as they encamped at the mouth of the Canyon on this march farther north. There being a slight variation in the copy of the muster rolls of the Adjutant General's office of the state of Oregon, probably caused by the burning of the territorial capitol building in 1855, where a good many papers was lost.
    I wish respectfully to be informed of the records on file what is known and the date of the arrival of the remnants of the Rogue River Indians at the Canyon to prove by other sources the existence of Compy. F. Capt. W. A. Wilkinson, Southern Battalion Oregon Mounted Vols., commanded by Major Bruce.
Hoping sir you will oblige
    I am as ever
        Very respectfully
            Your obedient servant
                Victor Lychlinsky
                    Pvt. Co. F 5th U.S. Infy.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 892-894.



Malheur Indian Agency, Oregon.
    September 13th 1874
Sir
    I arrived here yesterday evening, after a tedious overland trip from Klamath. The distance by the route I was compelled to travel is not less than three hundred & fifty miles, and it took ten days to accomplish it. My route lay through camps Warner and Harney. Except in the vicinity of Goose Lake [Klamath Lake?] there is no settlement. From Warner to Harney is almost an unbroken alkali plain destitute of good water. From Harney to Malheur is equally destitute. This agency is situated in the mountains, on a pleasant valley watered by one fork of the Malheur River, and although the stream is small, yet the salmon runs to this distant point from the sea. The Malheur is a tributary of Snake River.
    After inspecting the affairs of this agency I will proceed to Warm Springs, thence to the Nez Perces. I will visit Umatilla and Yakima on my way back to Portland.
    James Brown, more generally known as O. A., or One Armed Brown, is here, temporarily employed by Agent Parrish. He has been recommended for an appointment to look after straggling Indians, and to gather upon reservations detached bands that are now roaming through Oregon. I take the occasion to say that Mr. Brown, who has long been in the Indian Service, appears to be well qualified for such a duty. He is everywhere known in Oregon, and is uniformly well spoken of. He is a man of great energy of character, of correct habits and good moral influence. He is well known, and well liked by the Indians. I think his appointment would be beneficial to the Indians, and to the government.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. Vandever
            U.S. Indian Inspector
Hon. Commsr. Indian Affrs.
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 717-719.



Grand Ronde Agency, Oregon.
    Sept. 15th 1874.
Dear Sir,
    In consequence of lack of funds at my command with which to compensate their service, the physician, carpenter and blacksmith, heretofore employed by the government on this agency prior to June 30th 1874, on that day tendered me their resignations. In view of the exigencies of the public service, which so imperatively demanded their continued employment, I have retained their services from day to day, through the harvest season, which is now about closed. In my judgment, the continued employment of these officers is absolutely essential to the comfort, want and necessities of the Indians on this agency. The monthly reports transmitted to your office by the physician in charge to which your attention is respectfully directed will obviously show the necessity for his continued employment. While the services of the physician will be found to be so eminently useful and indispensable to these Indians, those of the carpenter and blacksmith are none the less so.
    Respectfully urging these views upon your favorable consideration, I hope that some immediate provision will be made for the retention of these employees by the assignment to this agency of funds sufficient to compensate their services.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Indian Agency
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 427-429.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Sept. 18th 1874
Sir
    The contracts made by me near the close of last fiscal year--the papers relating to which having been sent to your office--have all been fulfilled, viz.
    Contract with A. J. Burnett (approved) for cattle dated June 17th 1874.
    Contract with N. Cooke (returned) for mowing machine dated June 20th 1874.
    Contract with S. W. Payne (returned) for harness dated June 25th 1874.
    Contract with E. E. Ames (approved) for wagons dated June 25th 1874.
    One half the price has been paid on these articles on delivery, as per agreement, and I await notification of your approval of the contracts, when I am prepared to pay the balance.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 383-385.  Words in parentheses were added later.




Salem Oregon
    Sept. 21st 1874
Gen. Wm. Vandever
    U.S. Inspector of Ind. Agencies
        Portland Oregon
             Dear Sir
You were so kind when visiting the Siletz Agency, and afterward, that I am emboldened to write, asking if you cannot help me about my funds for the current two quarters. I have not got a dollar yet, and it would be difficult to exaggerate the harm already done our agency. My employees are without the necessaries of life. I can buy nothing on the cr. of the government, for people will not trust the Siletz Agency without a price twice the ordinary, and I dare not buy more on my personal account; I am so much involved already.
    The wet season will soon be here, and then it will cost the price of the goods to get them to the agency. Indeed, the chances are it will be impossible.
    You have already done so much for us that I wish to secure your good offices in increasing the obligation.
    At the very best now--if my money comes tomorrow--it would be all I could do to get the barest necessaries into the Siletz before the rainy season sets in. These things have been written nearly every week since you left, but I hear nothing of funds.
    Can you help us? We are nearly discouraged. Some of our grain will be lost I presume, through lack of implements for harvesting and threshing. Unless funds come before the wet season sets in, we shall have to get our families to someplace where we can get food for them, for none can be hauled to Siletz. At present we are nearly out of provision of all kinds. You must remember that my employees have only received 6 months pay in 2½ years.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild--Ind. Agt.
I need not say how gratefully you are remembered at Siletz. All unite in the hope you may visit us again.
   

Portland Oregon
    Septr. 28th 1874
    Respectfully referred to Hon. Commsr. of Indian Affrs. with recommendation that Agt. Fairchild's request be granted. The money is much needed & the Indians complain that their wants are increased by delay in furnishing money.
Respty.
    Wm. Vandever
        U.S. Indn. Inspector
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 722-724.




Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. Sept. 24th 1874
Sir:
    I have approved, and return herewith, the "articles of agreement between J. H. Fairchild, U.S. Indian agent, and Joel Palmer for a lease of a portion of the Siletz Indian Reservation in Oregon," which accompanied your letter addressed to this Department under date of 22nd instant.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        C. Delano
            Secretary
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 773-774.  Approval was rescinded in letter of November 23, below.



Portland Oregon Septr. 30 / 74
Sir
    Your dispatch of yesterday authorizes me to make such purchases as are required now by agents and for which they have funds. Upon inquiry at the U.S. Depository here I find that Parrish, agent for Malheur, is the only agent who has been supplied with money out of the appropriation for the current year. I cannot therefore make purchases for any agency but his. He is now in Portland, and I will entrust the matter to his hands, merely supervising his action.
    I have written to the other agents authorizing them to procure supplies by purchase when they have received money for that purpose and not before. I fear that great inconvenience will result from the delay in making remittances in time to make purchases before the winter sets in. Several of the agencies cannot be reached with transportation after the snows begin to fall on the mountains.
    I leave here on the morning of Octr. 2nd for the Nez Perces and other agencies in that direction, and will return to Portland about the 20th and then go to the Sound.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servt.
        Wm. Vandever
            U.S. Indian Inspector
Hon. Commsr. of Indian Affrs.
    Washington
        D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 725-727.



Fort Klamath Oregon
    Octr. 2 1874
To the Honorable
    Secretary of the Interior
        Washington D.C.
            Sir
Last August 1873 or near that time Mrs. Dyar, who was reported as school teacher at the Klamath Indian Agency, was required to report the number of scholars in the school or schools reported at that agency, the number of assistant teachers, the amount of money appropriated. I very much desire a copy of the report made in compliance with the letter, which I respectfully solicit. There was no school, there were no children taught, nor was any money legitimately appropriated for school purposes. There is no school at present maintained. The assistant teacher who had been employed for a few months to the great benefit of the Indians has been discharged on the allegation of want of funds for the purpose. It cannot be, sir, that the Indian Superintendent will authorize large sums of money for purposes much inferior to that of the education and civilization of the Indians and totally neglect this important duty. Mr. Dyar manifests very little regard for the welfare of the Indians, and during the fatal prevalence of measles among them during the last severe winter and when they were suffering for food, treated them with great cruelty and neglect.
Your
    Obedient servant
        John Loosley
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1008-1010.



Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or. Oct. 3, 1874.
Sir:
    I have the honor to submit the following report of operations of this agency for the month of September.
    The month was an usual [sic] busy one, the Indians all being busy attending to the threshing of their grain. The yield of wheat & oats was universally large, but having to hire the threshing machines at an expense of 1/10 of the crop, & the very low price of grain this season, being only one half as much as last year--the next value of crops will not be as much as last year. However I think the majority of the Indians will be able to subsist this winter from the proceeds of their crops & some save enough for seed in the spring.
    Beyond the work of harvesting, nothing of especial interest has transcribed.
Very respy.
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
                U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affairs
    Washington
        D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 434-435.



Portland on Willamette
    Oct. 3, 1874.
Dear Sir,
    I have known Mr. James Brown, commonly called "One-Armed Brown," for the past twenty years, and I am well assured that his appointment to look after the Indians in Oregon, when off the reservations, and the trade and intercourse between them and the white people, would be a judicious and proper one.
    His long and faithful services in the Indian Department entitle him to favorable consideration, and I hope that you will be able and pleased to give him the position suggested. In so doing I am sure you will not only reward a faithful public servant, but conserve the public good.
I am very truly yours
    Matthew P. Deady
To the Hon.
    Commissioner of
        Indian Affairs, Wash. D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 387-390.



Office Alsea Agency
    Oct. 5, 1874.
Sir,
    In your letter dated "Office Indian Affairs, Washington, D.C. Dec. 29, 1873," of which the following is an extract: "I have to advise you that Agent Fairchild has been directed to consult with you regarding the necessities of the services at that place and submit for the consideration of this office an estimate for funds required to meet liabilities already contracted and expenses to be incurred up to the 30th of June next." In accordance with the above instructions, I conferred with Agent Fairchild and during the month of January 1874 he submitted for the consideration of your office such an estimate, for some $4800.00, to liquidate indebtedness already contracted & to defray necessary expenses of this agency up to June 30, 1874. Also at the date of my appointment in your letter of June 7, 1874 the following extract from the same, "Agent Fairchild will be instructed to certify any outstanding indebtedness incurred by him on account of the Indians of your sub-agency, to inform the holders thereof to present the same to you, and you are authorized to pay accounts so certified by him out of any monies which shall have been placed in your hands applicable for the purpose, provided you are satisfied they are correct & just."
    On account of the intimation given in the above extracts of letters from your office, I was led to believe monies would be placed at the disposal of Agent Fairchild or myself for the liquidation of all claims against this agency prior to July 1st 1874 and since July 1st 1873, and so gave assurances to parties holding claims against the same, but up to this date no funds whatever have been received applicable to said claims, except $500 for the pay of interpreter. Also Inspector Vandever took an account of the indebtedness of this place and assured me that monies would soon be received to pay the same. Hoping to soon hear from you upon the disposition to be made of the claims above referred to and to receive means to pay the same if possible, I have the honor to remain
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        Geo. P. Litchfield
            U.S. Special Ind. Agent
Com.
    E. P. Smith
        Commissioner of
            Indian Affairs
                Washington
                    D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 1012-1015.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Oct. 6th 1874
Sir
    I desire to enlist your cooperation to secure an appropriation to pay liabilities incurred in the Indian Service at this agency, the 1st and 2nd quarters of this year (1874).
    Briefly the circumstances under which they were contracted are as follows:
    As you are aware, there is no special fund for this agency. All our funds are derived from the incidental fund for Oregon (with some trifling exceptions), after other demands have been met.
    Contingencies sometimes increase these demands, so that the amount we are to receive is necessarily uncertain. At the beginning of the last fiscal year (July 1st 1873), I wrote the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, urging the impossibility of carrying on my agency without debt, unless I was informed what amount of funds would be allotted me for the ensuing year (ending June 30th 1874). I explained at some length the farm and other work carried on, and named a sum ($20,000.00 for incidental and $3000.00 for school purposes), which I declared the least possible for which the work could be carried on as before, and asked if I was authorized to continue the work, expecting the money from the incidental fund to pay the expenses.
    In reply, the Commissioner, while forwarding me for 6 months one half the sum I had declared indispensable for the year, informed me that it was impracticable to state what amount could be spared for the next two quarters, but it "was believed the work could be conducted as formerly without involving my agency in debt."
    I accordingly based my estimates for the year on the sum I had named, and made my plans for an expenditure of that amount, viz., $20,000.00 from the incidental and $3000 for school.
    Unfortunately, however, for the next 6 months the Commissioner was only able to spare $3000.00 for the entire service, except agent & interpreter's salaries $1000 at my agency, instead of $11,500.00 as I expected, and this amount did not reach me till too late to modify my estimates and bring my expenditures down to it. It was near the close of the 1st qr. of 1874 before I received any information how much could be spared and then I expected an additional appropriation.
    Under such circumstances debt was unavoidable. I regret the fact exceedingly, because this agency has heretofore acquired an unenviable reputation, which I was determined it should not deserve under my administration. This liability, however, has arisen from no negligence or ill calculation on the part of the agent, but is perhaps due to the fact that our funds depend upon contingencies that it is impossible to foresee or provide against.
    My liabilities will probably amount to something over $9000.00, perhaps a few hundred dollars more than the difference between my estimates and the sum actually sent. Part of this, however, is due to the inconvenience of being compelled to purchase without money. A detailed list will be sent to the Commissioner, and a copy will be furnished you. Your efforts in our behalf are most respectfully solicited.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. H. Mitchell
    U.S. Senate
        Washington D.C.
   

Respectfully referred to the Hon. Commissioner of Indian Affairs. I hope the suggestions of Mr. Fairchild may receive careful consideration and his suggestions adopted in estimates for coming Congress.
J. H. Mitchell
Nov. 17th / 74
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 36-40.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Oct. 6th 1874
Sir
    I desire to enlist your good offices to secure a saw and grist mill for this agency. The reasons are in brief--
    1st. There is no grist mill within less than 50 miles and consequently no possibility of flouring the wheat raised on the reservation.
    2nd. The potato crop having for two season proved an entire failure, the Indians are compelled to subsist themselves on flour and fish. More or less flour is indispensable. Last winter I was compelled to issue about 400 bbls. at a cost of not far from $3200.00.
    3rd. At Yaquina (our only market) while the oystermen and fishermen import all their flour they cultivate sufficient land to supply themselves with vegetables, oats &c. Thus while the Indians could sell all their flour at good prices, if they had a mill, at present there is no market for anything.
    4th. If they had a mill on the reservation these Indians could not only raise wheat enough to supply themselves with flour for their own use but surplus sufficient to procure their clothing, groceries &c., now in great part furnished by the government.
    5th. It requires no argument to demonstrate how great an incentive to industry would be the possession of a mill, and the certainty of a market for their surplus wheat.
    6th. With no means of converting their wheat into flour and no potatoes they must either receive subsistence from government or be permitted to go outside the reservation to earn their food by their labor.
    The first alternative is expensive, the second injurious to the Indians and annoying to many citizens, who truly think the proper place for the Indians is on the reservation.
    7th. It requires no arithmetic to prove that while with a mill they may in a few years become capable of sustaining themselves without expense to the government, without mills they never can become self-supporting.
    8th. The necessity for a saw mill is nearly as great as for a grist mill. The money an agent is compelled to pay at this agency for such lumber only as is indispensable would in three or four years furnish a saw mill complete in all particulars.
    Estimates of the cost of grist and saw mill are enclosed. I am confident that if an appropriation could be secured for this purpose the money would be reimbursed to the government, not to mention the advantages and encouragement to the Indians.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. H. Mitchell
    Washington
        D.C.
   

Siletz Indian Agency
    October 6th 1874
Estimates of cost of saw and grist mill at Siletz Indian Agency, Oregon.
      Estimated cost of saw mill including transportation and erection $5,000.00
Estimated cost of grist mill with machinery, transportation and erection complete    10,000.00
        Total cost of both mills $15,000.00
    The above estimates are intended to embrace every item of expense connected with building the two mills, except labor of regular employees are intended to provide good mills, of a sufficient capacity to supply all the wants of this reservation, and is the least amount, it is believed, for which the mills can be built.
Respectfully submitted
    J. H. Fairchild
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. H. Mitchell
    Washington
        D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 41-44.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Oct. 8th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication of the 23rd ultimo, with instructions relative to the issue of stock to these Indians. In relation [to] the lease to Gen. Joel Palmer of a portion of the reservation I would say that the portion leased is from 15 to 20 miles from the Indian villages (except a few families who subsist principally by fishing), over a heavily timbered, mountainous country, through which there is no trail at present. The manner of reaching this tract from here is by canoe down the Siletz River. It is the intention of Gen. Palmer, should his lease be approved, to construct a good trail from this agency with the assistance I may be able to render, bridging the streams and making it [in] every way suitable for driving stock. For some years, at least, this tract will not be required for the Indian cattle, as the prairies in the vicinity of the agency will afford ample grazing facilities for all the Indian stock for years to come. If, however, the tract in question should be required for the Indians, it is distinctly understood that it is to be given up at once.
    In relation to your suggestion that I make use of a portion of the funds allotted me the present fiscal year to purchase stock for issue, I have the honor to say that as yet no funds have reached me, and the near approach of the rainy season will so increase the cost of bringing to this agency such articles as are absolutely indispensable that I fear I shall have none left for other purposes. In this connection I desire to say that it is most unfortunate that funds for use here have been delayed so long. To reach this agency from the nearest landing on the Willamette River, freight must be hauled some 60 miles, over a mountainous road, which the first rains of winter render almost impassable.
    Everything indicates that these winter rains will set in within a few days. Already the road is beginning to get soft and muddy, and will very soon in all probability become so bad that it will be with the greatest difficulty freight can be brought in at all. The consequence is that transportation that in Sept. would cost from 1 to 1¼ cts. per lb. will now cost from 3 to 5 cts.
    For winter use, at least 200 bbls. flour will be needed here. In Sept. this would have cost me about $1400 delivered--now it will cost from $2200 to $3000 coin, and I do not know how long it will yet be before I am able to purchase, as I have received no notice of funds to my credit. A supply of harness material and iron is essential. I have had two or three of the Indians taught harness making, and it was my intention to employ them this winter in making harness, which is very much needed. If I am able to bring it in at all, the cost of transportation will be so great that I must reduce the bills very materially. In short $7000 in my hands Sept. 1st would have been of much more service than $9000 will be when I am able to draw it. Plows, harrows &c. will have to be purchased for use in the spring, and in view of the high price I must necessarily pay for transportation. I do not think any portion of funds will be available for the purchase of stock the present two quarters.
    In harvesting, and threshing, I have adopted the plan pursued last year--viz.--taking tolls of every eighth bushel of grain. In order to secure such help as was accustomed to work at threshing &c. I have hired all the hands necessary to work the thresher, paying them myself. No other course was possible, as the lots of grain belonging to each Indian are so small that it would be impossible for them to pay, even if they had anything to pay with.
    This will make a large payroll for the last and a part of this quarter, but if there was any market where grain could be sold for cash, the tolls would go far--if not quite--towards paying all expenses.
    As there is no market, I shall store the grain for issue to those that need it. If an appropriation could be secured for a grist mill, this grain could be disposed of.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 601-605.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Oct. 8th 1874
Sir
    I respectfully ask leave to call your attention to the necessity of securing at the coming session of Congress an appropriation to provide a grist and saw mill for this agency. The reasons for this are in brief--
    1st. There is no grist mill nearer than 50 miles, and no way of converting the wheat raised here into flour. Since the entire failure of the potato crop, we are compelled to look to flour for subsistence.
    2nd. The situation of this agency is such that the only possible market for produce is to the fishermen of Yaquina Bay. These all cultivate small parcels of land, raising what vegetables, oats &c. they require, but there being no mill near are compelled to import all their flour.
    3rd. While therefore there is no market open to these Indians for anything they could sell in exchange for flour, there is a good market for all the flour they could produce.
    4th. Flour being necessary for their subsistence and not being able to exchange produce for it, they must either receive it from government or be permitted to leave the reservation to earn it by their labor.
    5th. While there are many sick, infirm, destitute &c. who must receive from government, yet to constantly supply near 1000 persons with flour would be very expensive to government and have a bad effect on the Indians.
    To permit large bodies of them to be absent from the reservation is annoying to many white citizens and injurious to the Indians. It should not be permitted. Their proper place is on the reservation.
    6th. Had we a mill the Indians could raise not only wheat enough to supply themselves with bread, but enough surplus to procure groceries, clothing &c. by the sale of flour.
    7th. The work done in the carpenter and blacksmith shops at present gratis could--if there was anything from the sale of which money could be realized--be charged to the Indians, and payment collected in wheat, the sale of which would go far towards paying the expenses of those shops. At present it is useless to charge for the work done, as if we collect grain, the only use we can make of it is to issue to the Indians. Of course there will continue to be peculiar cases for whom work must be done gratis.
    8th. Had we a mill to convert our wheat into flour, the tolls from reapers, thresher, grist mill and the charges in blacksmith and carpenter shops would go very far towards rendering this agency self-supporting. Indeed I am of opinion that with judicious management this end would be reached in a very few years.
    9th. The necessity for a sawmill is nearly as great.
    The money we are compelled to pay for only such lumber as cannot be dispensed with would in three or four years pay for a good mill.
    The Indians are anxious to build good houses and barns. These last are very much needed, but the funds appropriated each year for this agency are required in so many directions that I am able only in a very limited manner to supply their actual necessities in this direction. I need not say how great would be the encouragement to the Indians if we had a sawmill, where they could procure such lumber as was needed.
    10th. The estimated cost of both mills is only $15,000. This is intended to provide good mills complete in all particulars, capable of supplying all the requirements of this reservation. Labor of regular employees who could be employed in building the mills is not of course included in the estimates.
    Estimated cost of sawmill including transportation $5,000.00
Estimated cost of grist mill complete in all particulars   10,000.00
    Total for both mills $15,000.00
This is believed to be the least amount of which good mills can be built at this place. Since I have occupied the position of agent here (since April 1st 1873) there has been used on this reservation, including the coming winter, not less than 1300 bbls. of flour. This has cost an average of $8.00 per bbl. coin--$10,400.00 more than the estimated cost of a mill.
    Including what will be required for the winter, I have purchased on account of the government about 817 bbls., and I know I have not purchased a pound not absolutely necessary. The balance has been bought by the Indians, employees &c., and the estimate of 1300 bbls. is undoubtedly too low. The Indians have also bought a large amount of lumber. I feel certain that more has been paid from this reservation for these two items--flour & lumber--than would build the mills complete in every particular, and that within two years. Until these mills are provided, there is no reasonable prospect of this agency becoming self-sustaining.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 606-611.



Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or.
    Octo. 21, 1874.
Sir:
    I have the honor to report that under date of July 10, 1874 I addressed the following communication to Mr. Joel Palmer.
"Grand Ronde Ind. Agcy. July 10 / 74
"Sir:
    "In order to preserve the peace of this reservation, already disturbed by your driving cattle through it, you will not be allowed to enter upon it with cattle until definite instructions are received by me from the Ind. Dept. granting you such right.
"P. B. Sinnott
    "U.S. Ind. Agt.
"To Joel Palmer Esq."
   

    In defiance of the above order, Mr. Palmer has driven two bands of cattle, numbering about 250 head, and has them now pastured at the mouth of Salmon River.
    Please advise me as to what course I shall pursue in the matter.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon.
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 436-438.



T. CUNNINGHAM & CO.
IMPORTERS & DEALERS IN

Hardware, Iron, Agricultural Implements
Wagons, Stoves and Tin Ware.

Salem, Oregon, Nov. 4th 1874
Hon.
    J. W. Nesmith M.C.
        Dear Sir
            Enclosed we beg to hand you a letter from Gen. Palmer in reply to our request for missing vouchers. We are sorry to have to trouble you again with this matter, but as we have little hopes of doing anything with Mr. Palmer we would respectfully request you to show his letter to [the] Indian Commissioner on your return to Washington. We have no idea that he will give us the vouchers. You will perceive he does not promise to give them up The a/c has been running a long time. We sold the goods for coin and were paid in vouchers for currency at full face, that is, we lost ten cents on every dollar besides the interest since the bills were made. We think this outrageous, nothing short of swindling on the part of U.S. officers, and a disgrace to the government. You will do us a favor by presenting this matter in its true light. Wishing you a safe and prosperous journey, we are
Your obedient servants
    T. Cunningham & Co.
   
Dayton Oct. 30th 1874
T. Cunningham & Co.
    Gentlemen
Your letter of 20th inst. with enclosure upon the subject of missing vouchers has been received. As you suggest, I have retained one copy of those vouchers, as I have of all others issued. It is not a departure from custom, for it has often occurred that explanations are required, and I want something that I can refer to as a guide for action. I will, however, be in Portland in a short time and will procure the missing copies, for all my papers are at Portland in the care of Mr. B. E. Lippincott. The abolishing [of] the Superintendent's office tends somewhat to derange matters, and the expense attending the settlement of accounts has already cost me over five hundred dollars, for which I can get no return, but this is no fault of creditors, though a great hardship on me. Had I anticipated a failure to obtain funds I would not have contracted liabilities. I will be in Salem in a short time.
Yours
Joel Palmer
   
[penciled note attached:]
    Write Palmer that missing voucher is necessary &c., & to forward it to this office.
    Write Cunningham of action as above, & that if voucher should not be fwd. by P. the a/c can be paid by his giving an indemnifying bond &c.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 151-155.



Department of the Interior
    General Land Office
        Washington, D.C. Nov. 4, 1874.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. of Indian Affairs
        Sir:    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a communication from your office dated 17th ultimo, respecting the action of this office touching the lands in what is known as the Klamath Indian Reservation in Oregon, embraced in the limits of the grant of July 2, 1864, for the Oregon Central Military Wagon Road.
    In reply I have to state that the odd sections falling within said reservation have been approved to the state for the benefit of the road, within the three and six miles limits, as follows:
    April 21, 1871 51,248.56 acres
December 8, 1871 37,414.51 acres
April 2, 1873   4,487.34 acres
Total     93,150.41 acres
    The treaty creating the reservation not having been ratified until 1870, and not having been brought to the attention of this office until after the approval of the lands, no formal decision upon the rights of the state has been promulgated, the question not having been examined with reference to the force of the reservation, made subsequent to the date of the grant, to take the lands out of its operation.
Very respectfully
    S. S. Burdett
        Commissioner
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames1020-1022.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Nov. 4th 1874
Sir
    Purchases of annuities and supplies for this agency have been made in Portland Ogn. by members of the Board of Indian Commissioners, and the bills sent to me for payment.
    Owing to the nature of the roads over the Cascade Mts. from the 15th of Nov. to the 1st of June it is necessary that purchases for this agency be made in the autumn for the entire year, and the above purchases were made accordingly, but were based upon the amount set apart for this agency for the present fiscal year as given in your letter to me dated Aug. 17th 1874--viz. $24,700.00.
    Being present when these purchases were made I know that the articles were furnished at the lowest possible rates and in justice should be paid immediately, and as I have funds to my credit sufficient for only part payment, I respectfully suggest the propriety of sending me the balance due this agency for the fiscal year at once, that I may promptly meet these claims.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. Commissioner
    Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 394-396.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Nov. 6th 1874
Sir
    I hereby report the discharge of Johnny, interpreter for Snake Indians, time to expire today.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P.  Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 399-400.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency, Or.
    Novr. 7, 1874
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of medicines and medical supplies, purchased of Messrs. McKesson & Robbins, for the Indians of this agency, as per invoice enclosed in your favor of Sept. 16, '74.
    The medicines arrived here Oct. 29 and opened in good order, excepting the boxes of vials of which there was 4 doz. broken, and 2 lots of chloroform nearly empty. The loss of chloroform was 1½ lb. by leakage--the package having been turned bottom side up.
Very respy.
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
    Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 456-457.



Copy.
Hd. Qrs. Camp Bidwell, Cal.
    November 8th 1874.
The
    Asst. Adjt. General
        Dept. of California
            San Francisco, Cal.
Sir,
    I have the honor to report for the information of the Dept. Commander that Ocheho with his band of Indians are now (and since last April) camped in the vicinity of this post.
    They decline to return to the Yainax Agency, and say "they will never again go where so many of their people die."
    The Indians are well disposed, but how they will subsist themselves the coming winter is more than I can see. At present, roots, seeds and some game, procured from hunting, forms their staple food.
    The winter seems to be setting in much earlier than usual, which causes the game to migrate earlier than at any period since my arrival at the post. These circumstances together with the fact of the presence of the Indians causes stock men to become somewhat alarmed, fearing that the Indians will have to subsist themselves off their cattle.
    If the Indian Department could place to the credit of the A.C.S. at this post sufficient money to purchase beef, flour & salt for the Indians, during the approaching winter, no trouble whatever need be apprehended from them. The Indian Dept. would incur no expense in the issuing of the supplies to the Indians.
    The government contract for the articles named is as follows:
Beef 7¢ per lb. coin
Flour 3 2/10¢ per lb. coin
Salt 1 5/10¢ per lb.
Very respectfully
     Your obedient servant
        R. F. Bernard
            Captain 1st Cavy.
                Comdg. Post
   
[penciled note attached:]
Anything to be done with them before policy?
No.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 886-891.



San Francisco Novem. 9th 1874
Sir
    At the suggestion of Hon. F. H. Smith of the Board of Indian Commissioners, I retained the enclosed contract for a lease of a part of the Siletz Reservation to Joel Palmer for pasturage, and refer the same back for further consideration. In a previous report concerning this lease I expressed my views fully, which report I presume had not been received at the Indian Office when the last endorsement was made thereon. It is quite important that the Siletz Reservation should be preserved to the exclusive use of the Indians. The removal of the Indians from Alsea to Siletz, which I recommended in my reports, would save the expense of one agency and benefit the Indians. To accomplish this it is quite important that the Siletz should be kept free from the encumbrances contemplated by this lease, which gives Genl. Palmer the right to occupy large tracts of land and to make valuable improvements as well as to introduce numerous settlers with their families to the Indian lands. There are only two hundred & fifty Indians on the Alsea Reservation. They have no tillable land there; they are intermarried with the Siletz Indians and are on friendly terms with them, and there is no use for an agent there. All that is necessary to be done for them can be supervised by the agent at Siletz, to whose reservation they ought to be removed.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. Vandever
            U.S. Indian Inspector
Hon. Commissioner of Indian Affairs
    Washington
        D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 738-740.



Albany Ogn. Nov. 10th 1874
Hon. Commr. Ind. Affrs.
    Washington City D.C.
        Sir:
            Believing that if the Indians of the reservations bordering on this valley are permitted, as is now the case, to live a part of the time off the reservations and near our cities and towns, that special guardianship is necessary to prevent the terrible effects to Indians and whites of prostitution and intemperance: also that the agents cannot be spared from their agencies for this police duty, which requires a man promptly on the scene who knows the Indians in character and personally from long official intercourse, and having confidence in James Brown, for many years messenger under myself and other Indian Superintendents, and always efficient and faithful, I, as I learn others are doing, recommend him for such oversight of Indians when off the reservations and in the settlements of this valley as your Bureau may conclude upon.
Very respectfully yr. obt. svt.
    Edward R. Geary
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 697-698.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Nov. 11, 1874
Sir
    Enclosed please find for your approval contracts and bonds of N. Fisher and J. H. Miller for the delivery of 44,000 lbs. [omission?] and 6000 lbs. of wheat, respectively, at this agency. Also all the papers relating thereto.
    Mr. Geo. R. Justus, the lowest bidder for the flour advertised for (20,000 lbs.), on being notified that his bid was accepted, immediately dispatched teams with a portion of the flour without waiting to make out the usual papers, i.e., the "contract" & "bond," which was a very wise course, as the Cascade Mountains were liable to become impassable at any time by reason of snow. He has already delivered one half of the amount, and the remainder is on the road and will be delivered in a day or two. His bid, as you will see with the enclosed, was $3.32 1/5 per hundred, and is more than one cent per lb. less than flour was ever before bought in this section of country.
    As the flour is so nearly delivered I deem it unnecessary to make out the usual papers in his case and would respectfully ask your approval of the purchase accordingly.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 401-416.  Proposals not transcribed.



Grand Ronde Agency,
    Oregon 14th November 1874
Honble. Commissioner of Indian Affairs
    Sir:
        I beg leave to inform you that the citizens of this section of the country are making efforts to have the reservation lands on the coast, west of this place, thrown open to settlement, and as there is no highway to it except by passing from the Yamhill Valley through by this place, such a step if effected would lead to disturbance with the thickly settled Indians along the road, but if the coast lands was inhabited from Siletz River to Cape Lookout with the Siletz and Alsea Indians, and so consolidated with this agency conformable to the rumor afloat, it would thus keep all the Indians together, thus throwing open to settlement the two vast tracts of reservation known as Siletz and Alsea, both south of the Siletz River. Citizens then in quest of settlement could have the benefit of the harbors, forests and minerals abounding thereon, so much prized in that section of the country, and the government whilst adopting that course would effect annually a saving of some $30,000. In addition, the remnants of the five non-treaty tribes situate between the Siletz River and Cape Lookout, who have applied to me for allotments of land in the same manner provided for and supplied to the Indians here, can be brought into the consolidation and the Indians here would hail with satisfaction such an arrangement.
    The late surveys on the Salmon and Nestucca rivers into 20-acre lots in apparent anticipation of the foregoing is ample for these ends. And Mr. D. P. Thompson, who surveyed these lands [and] is thoroughly conversant with all the bearings of this subject, is now in Washington and may be consulted on the subject.
Very respectfully
    Your most obedient servant
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Indn. Agent
                Grand Ronde
                    Oregon
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 458-460.



Grand Ronde Agency Polk County
    Oregon November 14th 1874
The Honble. J. H. Mitchell
    U.S. Senator, Washington D.C.
        My Dear Sir,
            Now that the expiration of the treaty with the Indians of this reservation is at hand it will be expedient that in the coming session of Congress a fitting appropriation be made for its maintenance. I therefore respectfully call your attention conjointly with the Hon. J. W. Nesmith--Ye, the active representatives for this state in Congress, to the fulfillment of this duty.
    Our requirements will be under the following head for the efficient working of the agency.
    First, a physician, carpenter, blacksmith, miller and sawyer, a helper as commissariat & farmer. Contingent help in emergencies. Medicines, schools and school teachers. Boarding house for pupils and teachers. Hospital, none has even been erected, but means was provided by the govt. in treaty but squandered if the means was given. Annuities for Indians including agricultural implements. Support for the aged and decrepit, assistance to non-treaty Indians of the coast if called in under the protection of the govt. In my address to Mr. Nesmith of yesterday's date I itemized the foregoing more particularly, setting amounts to each one.
    I also beg leave to call your attention to a controversy arising out of a lease of land made by the Siletz agent, Mr. Fairchild, to Genl. Palmer and associates of that portion of the reservation situate between the Siletz and Salmon rivers, comprising some 40 sections, principally prairie. This tract of land will sustain 2000 head of cattle and 5000 head of sheep given away for the nominal sum of $200, involving the dangerous consequence of driving the stock through the densely populated portion of this reservation with the possible and probable chances of strife and conflict with the Indians settled along the road, a road built long since by the Indians of this agency.
    Preceding the coming session of Congress it may be proper for me to direct your attention to the fact that the Salmon River, the Nestucca, the Tillamook, the Clatsop and the Nehalem tribes have not been embraced in any of the Indian treaties. They still dwell on their own hunting and fishing grounds. I am informed they have not compromised their rights to these lands by conquest or treaty. They have informed me they are anxious to come under the protection of the government and accept homesteads after the system established here with the other tribes, and surrender to the govt. any and all title they have to the coast land where they reside & as they state have resided from time immemorial.
    There is a rumor afloat here that the Alsea and Siletz Indians are to be moved onto the lands north of the Siletz River, intending thereby to consolidate the entire of the Coast Indians under the management of this agency. The Indians here have no opposition to any such arrangement, and my own opinion is that whilst all the reservation south of the Siletz River so suited to settlement on a/c of its mines, timber and harbor could be thrown open, it would also be a saving to the govt. of some 30,000 dollars a year.
    With the view to settlement, the coast from the Siletz River to the Nestucca River has been cut up into 20-acre lots by surveyors D. P. Thompson and Meldrum. Mr. Thompson is at present in Washington, and as he knows all about that district it would be advisable to consult him on any step of that kind to be taken. Mr. Morris told me he forwarded the map to you of his labors in those mountains. If it would add any further information you might be pleased to allow Mr. Nesmith to see it.
    I recd. but 1500 dollars incidental funds to meet my engagements for the 6 months (July last to Decr. next) to pay employees, the physician, carpenter, blacksmith, miller and sawyer, commissariat & farmer. Transportation of annuity goods &c. &c. falling short $1400, for which amt. an additional assignment will have to be made. Have Mr. Commissioner Smith to attend to this when he is making provision for the support of this agency for the 6 months following ending June 30th 1875, failing which I will be obliged to dismiss the employees, as I am constrained under my instructions [against] going into debt for this agency.
    I would also beg leave to remind you that the late Superintendent Mr. Meacham has an unsettled account of some 7000 to 10,000 dollars school fund of this agency. He should be made [to] degorge it for the benefit and use of those to whom it rightfully belongs.
I remain yours faithfully
    P. B. Sinnott
I should have added to the above that the Catholics are for the military having the management of the Indian Dept.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 56-60.



Washington D.C.
    Novr. 17, 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. of Indn. Affairs
        Sir:
            I have the honor to state that during a recent visit to Oregon my attention was drawn to a contract between J. H. Fairchild, U.S. Indian Agent, and Joel Palmer, in the hands of Inspector Vandever, and I requested him not to deliver the same to the contracting parties until the further action of the Department, for the following reasons:
    1. That the contract turns over to Mr. Palmer a portion of the best land of the Siletz Reservation estimated at seventy-five square miles area, for a price which is a small percentage of the real value of the rental.
    2. That while the contract was evidently drawn in good faith, intending to guard the interests of the Indians, it virtually places it in the power of the lessee to bring upon the reservation a colony of white men, almost without limit as to numbers, involving a risk of conflicting interests with the Indians for which the small amount of rental is no adequate consideration.
    3. That the occupation of the tract named would constitute a material obstacle in the way of bringing the Alsea Indians upon this reservation, should the Department determine upon such removal.
    4. That while the lessee is represented as a man of unblemished reputation, especially friendly to the Indian, the settlement of a white colony, not connected with the Indian Service, upon a reservation is at variance with the established policy of the government, and calculated to establish a dangerous precedent.
    I respectfully solicit a reconsideration of the action of the Department in the light of the above considerations.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        F. H. Smith
            Indian Commissioner
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 439-443.



Office Klamath Agency
    Oregon, Nov. 18, 1874.
Sir,
    Enclosed is a communication from N. Luning Esq. relative to the settlement of lands within the Klamath Reservation claimed by the Oregon Central Military Road Co.
    In a letter dated Oct. 16th 1873 I gave you my opinion in the matter quite fully, and I have no reason to change that opinion. By solemn treaty the U.S. govt. gave all the lands within the limits of the reservation to the Indians and must make that promise good or else commit a positive breach of faith, which I fully believe will cost many times more than the price of the lands in question.
    These lands embrace the valley of Sprague River, which is the only safe winter pasture on the reservation and the only reliance of the Indians in case of a hard winter.
    Gen. Wm. Vandever, U.S. Indian Inspector, understands the situation quite well, and I would respectfully refer you to him.
    This matter demands prompt attention, and especially so as to the Oregon branch of the Central Pacific R.R. is located very nearly on the exact line of the wagon road, and will doubtless be built at an early day.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian
        Affs.
   

San Francisco, Nov. 6, 1874.
Hon. L. S. Dyar
    Indian Agt. Klamath Reservation
        Jackson, Oregon.
Dear Sir,
    Sometime in August last you were waited upon by Messrs. Colby and Pengra, agents of the parties in interest, who own the grant of land made to the state of Oregon and known as the Oregon Central Military Road Grant, which extends through and embraces a portion of the Indian reservation. You were informed by them that under our instructions they were authorized to take possession of and to lease or sell said lands to actual settlers, and that it was their intention to at once proceed to do so, to parties applying for the same. They report that you, as agent of the government, earnestly protested against such action, and requested us to delay action until you would lay the matter before the Department at Washington, urging as a reason that the Indians knew nothing of our ownership of the land and that any action in the matter as indicated by us would inevitably cause great discontent among the Indians and end in another Indian war. You also informed them that the Department were in correspondence with you on the subject, and would probably soon take some action in the matter. As we are in constant receipt of applications for the lease or purchase of these lands, we most respectfully ask you to inform us what action, if any, the Department has taken in the matter, and if none has been had, please forward this to the Department.
    We would also represent that the agency has occupied the land for several years, while we have been paying large sums for taxes annually, and that we now desire to get possession of the lands in order that we may dispose of them to actual settlers.
Very respectfully
    N. Luning
        Chairman Executive Committee of Owners
R. F. Parks
    Secretary
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 417-422.



Siletz Indian Agency
    Oregon Nov. 21st 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication of the 20th ult. with instructions to allot lands to such of the Indians as may desire. I have, in compliance with your direction, been busily engaged in establishing the boundaries of the different claims and placing the allottees in possession. In most cases I have been compelled to establish natural boundaries, streams &c., as the stakes of the former survey have nearly all disappeared, and the plat is so incorrect as regards the direction, position &c. of the river as to render it almost useless.
    I am convinced this measure will do more to elevate and improve these Indians than any other that could be adopted. It has produced great satisfaction already, and they are industriously engaged in preparing to improve their farms.
    They say they are now, for the first time, satisfied they will be permitted to remain on the land given them by the government.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 617-618.




Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. Nov. 23rd 1874.
Sir:
    I return, herewith, the lease made to Joel Palmer by Agent Fairchild of a portion of the Siletz Indian Reservation for pasturing purposes, which was approved by the Department on the 24th September last.
    I also return the letters of Inspector Vandever and Commissioner F. H. Smith, which were enclosed with your report of the 21st instant submitting said lease, with request that the approval thereof, for the reasons given, be annulled.
    Agreeably to your recommendations, I have caused the approval of the lease to be canceled, and you will advise Agent Fairchild and Mr. Palmer of the fact.
Very respectfully
    C. Delano
        Secretary
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 779-780.



Washington City Nov. 27th 1874
Hon. Edward P. Smith
    Comr. Indian Affairs
        Sir
            I had the honor to call your attention to the fact on my recent visit at your office that a letter was written and forwarded about the 9th inst. from San Francisco by the parties in interest, who own the grant of lands extending through the Klamath Indian Reservation, to L. S. Dyar, the agent in charge, and that Mr. Dyar was asked to refer the subject of the letter by copy to your Dept.
    I would respectfully ask that you furnish me a copy of said letter as soon as received by your office, and likewise a copy of any letter or recommendation upon the subject contained in said letter by the agent to your Dept. written in connection therewith.
Respectfully yours
    B. J. Pengra
        Agt. of parties in interest owning said grant
P.S. Address
No. 469, M. Ave.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 206-207.



U.S. Indian Agency
    Siletz Or. Nov. 27th 1874
Sir
    Referring to your communication of the 2nd ult. in returning article of agreement between Joel Palmer and myself for the lease of a portion of this reservation and directing me to procure his assent to certain conditions and return to your office, I have the honor to state that Inspector Vandever, desiring to examine said lease, directed me to leave it in his hands till he should communicate with your office on the subject. This will explain my failure to return as directed.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 619-620.



Office Siletz Agency
    November 30, 1874
Sir,
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 29th ultimo, approving the appointment of Mary E. Cook as Teacher and requiring further information respecting the qualifications of Dr. F. M. Carter as Physician and the actual date of his commencement in his present position.
    I will state that Doctor Carter commenced service upon the agency Oct. 8th 1874.
    For information respecting qualifications I respectfully refer you to the enclosed affidavit.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. Ed. P. Smith
    Commissioner
        Washington
            D.C.
   

Siletz Agency Oregon
    Nov. 24, 1874
J. H. Fairchild Esq.
    U.S. Ind. Agent
        Sir,
            In accordance with your instructions, I have the honor to submit the following.
State of Oregon      )
County of Benton   )  ss.
    I studied medicine under Dr. W. H. Watkins at Portland, Oregon and attended medical lectures and obtained my diploma at the Willamette Medical University, Salem, Oregon. I practiced medicine for two years at Elk City, Oregon prior to my appointment to my present position at this agency.
Frank M. Carter
Subscribed & sworn to before me this 30th day of Nov. 1874.
M. N. Chapman
    Notary Public
Approved.
Josiah Curtis
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 621-623.



U.S. Indian Agent
    Siletz Or. Dec. 4th 1874
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication of the 5th ult. making certain inquiries in relation to this reservation, to which I have the honor to reply--
    1st. "Is there sufficient land on the Siletz Reserve south of a line running due east from the mouth of Salmon River . . . where divided into allotments to meet the wants of the Indians belonging to Siletz Agency?"
    Ans. Yes.
    2nd. "How many Indians live and what amount of arable land lies upon the reserve north of said line, and what number and kind of improvements have the Indians thereon?"
    Ans. To answer these inquiries with exactness would require a special trip to the country alluded to, difficult and dangerous, if not impossible, at this season, on account of high water &c.
    I give below the best information I have been able to collect, presuming it to be substantially correct, and premising that if required I will proceed to that section of country and obtain the desired information. 1st. The Indians living there do not exceed seventy-five souls, old and young. They are the remains of the tribes that formerly lived there, and are consequently in their own country. 2nd. There is a tract of fair arable and good grazing land near the mouth of the Nestucca, several miles long by from one to three miles broad; the rest of the country is in general mountainous, with only small bodies of arable land on bottoms of streams &c. 3rd. No improvements other than their huts in which they live. They subsist by fishing. Immediately on the north bank of Salmon River near the mouth is the farm of John, a Grand Ronde Indian, who has several acres under cultivation.
    3rd. "Could the Indians north of this line be induced by offers of homesteads to remove south of it, or to Grand Ronde Agency?"
    Ans. Our exact answer to this, as to the previous inquiry, would require a special trip to the country, but I have no doubt but they could easily be induced to remove, especially if to the offers of land were added a few blankets &c. &c.
    4th. "1st. How many Indians, and 2nd what amount of arable land, and 3rd what improvements are on the Alsea Reserve north of a line running due east . . . from a point on the Pacific Ocean five miles south of the Alsea River?"
    Ans. 1st. About 100 souls. 2nd. Very little in small bodies of one and two acres on the river. 3rd. Twelve or fifteen small board houses and their little garden spots.
    5th. "How far north or south of the agency buildings would such a line run?"
    Ans. About four miles north of the agency.
    6th. "1st. How many Indians live, and 2nd what amount of arable land, and 3rd what improvements are south of a line running twenty miles south of the above-described line?"
    Ans. 1st. About 128. 2nd. None to speak of--a very little grass grows in places through the sand. 3rd. No improvements of any value.
    7th. "1st. How many Indians live, and 2nd what amount of arable land lies between these two lines?"
    Ans. 1st. About 112. 2nd. A strip of inferior land something like 1½ miles long by ¼ mile wide. Soil very thin, being composed of vegetable matter on the sand of the sea beach.
    8th. "Could all the Indians at the Alsea Agency be peacefully removed to the Siletz with the inducement of a homestead for each family?"
    [Ans.] Of course no positive answer can be made to this inquiry without conference with the Indians. Many of our Indians are intermarried with the Alseas, and they assert that the latter would be only too glad to remove from the sandy, sterile country they now inhabit to the Siletz reservation, especially if mills could be provided where the wheat could be floured. With this opinion I entirely coincide. Some without doubt would object at first, but I think there would be no difficulty in overcoming their objections.
    Unless specially instructed to do so, I should hardly feel myself justified in seeking information on this point from the Alsea Indians, except through their agent.
    9th. "Would there be sufficient arable land upon the Siletz, south of a line running due east from the mouth of Salmon River . . . to meet the wants of the Indians belonging to both agencies?"
    Ans. Yes, undoubtedly.
    I am also directed to offer such views as may seem to me proper on this subject.
    The cordial feeling between myself and Agent Litchfield of Alsea makes it a matter of some delicacy to express my views on this subject, especially as I know they differ from his.
    1st. Both my predecessors at this agency, agents Simpson and Palmer, repeatedly called the attention of the Department to the propriety of this measure advocating the removal of the Alsea Indians and abandonment of that sub-agency. I see no reason to differ with them in this matter.
    2nd. I believe all disinterested persons who have examined the Alsea Reservation will concur in saying that the Indians can never support themselves there by agriculture. There is not enough good land.
    3rd. As long as they depend on hunting and fishing for subsistence, they can never become civilized. This is self-evident.
    4th. They are so intermarried with the Siletz tribes that there would be no controversies or jealousies such as would be the case were they taken among strangers.
    5th. Here is enough arable land to supply the wants of all the Indians of both agencies, and our Indians have made considerable progress in the arts of civilized life.
    6th. Should they come here they would naturally seek residences among their relatives of the Siletz and thus quickly learn all that the latter could teach them.
    7th. Coming here they would have the advantages of a good school, and all the active organization of an agency in successful operation with no additional expense to the government.
    They would be brought into active competition with Indians already considerably advanced.
    8th. Should the measure be determined upon, a grist and saw mill will become even more necessary than at present, in fact indispensable.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 625-632.



Klamath Agency Ogn.
    Dec. 9th 1874
L. S. Dyar I.A.
    Sir
        The medical supplies and hospital stores arrived on Thursday Dec. 3rd in good condition having been well and carefully packed, not an article broken. The drugs are of the best quality, the weights and measures are correct, the vials overrun the count nearly a gross. The hospital stores are all O.K. with one exception: the pocket case of instruments, a two-fold case (Shepard and Dudley's make) is charged ($20) twenty dollars; a similar case of Tiemann's make could be purchased in Portland, Oregon for ($10) ten dollars.
Yours respectfully
    B. P. Quivey
        Agency Physician
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 432-434.



Department of the Interior
    Washington, D.C. December 11th 1874.
Sir:
    I return, herewith, the papers which accompanied your report of the 9th instant, in behalf of the appointment of James Brown of Oregon as special agent to exercise an espionage and control of Indians who leave their reservations and annoy the citizens of that state.
    Agreeably to your recommendation, authority is hereby given for the appointment of Mr. Brown, for the purpose indicated, at an annual salary of two thousand dollars, including the expenses of travel and subsistence, provided there are funds in the control of the Department applicable to the payment of such expenses.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        C. Delano
            Secretary
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 790-791.



Salem Oregon
    December 14th 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner
        I have arrived at home in good health and spirits.
    Everywhere I have been successful in securing the cooperation of agents when I have met them personally.
    While my arrangements are yet incomplete they are in a fair way for success.
    I have just secured O. C. Applegate with two Klamath Indians.
    One speech of Dave Hill, an Indian, where it can be heard will do more to make public sentiment against military management than half dozen white man's speeches.
    My company from present proposals will consist of 2 Modocs, 2 Klamaths, 2 Rogue River, 2 Cayuses, Toby Riddle and her husband.
    What about Satanta. Can it be arranged for me to take him and Big Tree. They would make my company complete. I intend to have my company before a Washington audience before the close of Congress.
    I am confident that I can affect public sentiment on the Indian question.
    If Satanta can be had please telegraph me at my expense Salem, Oregon.
Very respectfully
    A. B. Meacham
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 62-65.



Washington City D.C.
    December 28th 1874
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commr. Indn. Affrs.
Sir--
    By an act of Congress approved July 2nd 1874 there was granted to the state of Oregon to aid in the construction of a wagon road from Eugene City by way of the Middle Fork of the Willamette River, and the most feasible pass in the Cascade Mountains near Diamond Peak to the eastern boundary of the state, alternate sections of public land designated by odd-numbered sections, for three sections in width on each side of said road.
    Said lands were by the legislative assembly of the state of Oregon in September following granted to the Oregon Military Road Company, and have so far as the public surveys have been extended been located and approved to said company by the state and by the United States.
    Said lands conveyed and belonging to said wagon road company by virtue of said acts have recently been conveyed by said company to B. J. Pengra of Oregon, and by said B. J. Pengra to Nicholas Luning, Edgar Mills, N. D. Rideout, W. H. Parks, G. W. Colby, W. C. Belcher, John Boggs and others of the state of California.
    Since making said grant, the government of the United States by its authorized agents have located what is known as the Klamath Indn. Reservation, by treaty approved February 17th, 1870, which reservation includes within its limits a portion of the lands belonging to said grant, and is occupied by the Klamath and Modoc tribes and Yahooskin band of Snake Indians.
    Acting as the authorized agent of the above-named parties in California to whom said entire grant now belongs, myself and G. W. Colby--one of the parties in interest--went upon said company's lands, within the limits of the reservation, in August last for the purpose of leasing the same to the parties applying therefor. Upon our arrival at the office of L. S. Dyar, the local Indian agent, we were informed by him that the Indians on the reservation had never been informed as to our title to that portion of the grant included in the reserve, that a knowledge of said ownership had been carefully kept from them for fear of difficulty and renewed war by them, that the subject was "undergoing investigation between himself and your office as to how the matter could be treated so as to avoid difficulty with the tribes occupying the reservation," and urgently requested us to desist from leasing the lands to parties to become occupants, as we were doing with our lands outside the reservation.
    As an evidence that the matter was then under advisement, and that steps would soon be taken to remove the Indians or indemnify the owners of the land, your letter of September 17th 1873 in which you state "the wagon road has the unquestioned right to these lands," and other correspondence following, was shown us.
    Upon this evidence and the earnest request of the agent Mr. Dyar, we withheld action so as to give time to mature a plan of settlement without causing trouble with the Indians.
    The parties owning these lands have waited patiently to the present expecting that some measure would be devised by your office looking to a peaceable settlement of the matter. Up to this date we are not advised of any steps being taken looking to necessary legislation or otherwise. I have therefore to inform you that I am instructed by the owners of the grant to propose to your office as an equitable settlement of this matter, and to indemnify them for the lands taken by the government, that Congress pass an act at its present session allowing said owners to locate in lieu of their lands embraced in the Klamath Reservation an equal number of acres of any vacant government lands elsewhere and authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to issue such certificates as will enable them to make such locations.   
    To the end that this matter be now attended to, I have respectfully to request that the above proposition be presented with your special recommendation to Congress.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        B. J. Pengra
            Agt. parties in interest
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames  227-233.




Last revised March 3, 2017