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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Correspondence of the Oregon Superintendency
1875
Southern Oregon-related correspondence with the Oregon Superintendency for Indian Affairs.


Klamath Agency Or.
    Jan. 2 1875
Sir
    Your letter of [the] 18th ult, "E," referring to my letter to Hon. J. H. Mitchell relative to the school at this agency, is at hand.
    You repeat that I seem to misapprehend the case, and instruct me to reopen the school as soon as practicable. I think I understand the case fully, but thus far--although I have written you repeatedly upon the subject (see my letters of Aug. 9th, Sept. 19th & Oct. 1st and yours to me of July 20th, Aug. 6th and Sept. 3rd 1874)--you fail to understand me.
    You instruct me in these letters that I am limited to $9600 for pay of all employees and that the "law is specific." I cannot pay out more than that sum during the year for that purpose.
    Not at first comprehending the law, and supposing that the pay of teamster, matron, Indian laborers &c. would be allowed outside of the $9600--as formerly--I continued my usual number of such employees until nearly the close of the 1st quarter of this fiscal year, and thus used during that qr. of the employee fund $3,392.21, leaving a balance for the remaining three quarters of $6207.79 (see letters above referred to).
    I now have employed the following persons at the salaries given, viz.,
    Miller $1100 per year--for the three qrs. will be $825
Blacksmith $1100 per year--for the three qrs. will be $825
Wagon & P. Maker $1100 per year--for the three qrs. will be $825
Physician $1000 per year--for the three qrs. will be $750
Supt. of Fmg. $1100 per year--for the three qrs. will be $750
Teacher $600 per year--for the three qrs. will be $450
Mail Carriers $30 per month recd. Dec. 31st for one qr. $90
Commissary in Charge at Yainax $1100 per year--for the three qrs. will be $825
Blacksmith at Yainax $900 per year--for the three qrs. will be $625
Total for the three qrs.    $6015
    You will see by these figures that I cannot pay a matron and another teacher--which I must do if I reopen the school--unless I discharge some of the above employees, or greatly reduce their salaries, either of which is impracticable.
    The two last named, viz., commissary in charge and blacksmith, at Yainax, although not provided for by treaty, and heretofore paid from Shoshone and Bannock funds, must, as you say in your letter of Sept. 3rd 1874, be paid from the employee fund. Could some provision be made for the payment of those two persons from some other fund I could immediately employee the necessary teachers and reopen the school.
    You state that there are $2500 appropriated, a part of which can be applied to school purposes. I am aware of this, and do not ask for further means to feed & clothe, or to furnish books &c. for the scholars.
    The commissary in charge and blacksmith at Yainax cannot be dispensed with without abandoning that portion of the reservation and leaving the Snakes and Modocs to their own will, and I am sure Inspector Vandever will tell you that that cannot be done. I can designate them as "Carpenter" and "Farmer," and thus more fully conform to the letter of the treaty if that is any object.
    The letter addressed to Senator Mitchell, to which you refer, was written in the hope that he might get some provision made for the payment of these two persons, viz., commissary and blacksmith at Yainax, in some way outside of the employee fund, and thus enable me to hire the necessary teacher and matron.
    Can I in any way pay matron and one teacher out of the $2500 referred to in your letter, or from incidental funds?
    If I must reopen the school, please tell me when I shall get money to pay these persons.
    As I have before written you, the teacher now employed is engaged in giving general instruction in making clothing and housekeeping to the Indian women, and assisting in the labors of the office.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.

NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 247-252.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Jan. 4th 1875
Sir
    In answer to your letter of [the] 23rd ult. "E" instructing me to send a farmer from Klamath Agency proper to relieve the present commissary at Yainax Station I would respectfully state that as I have no farmer employed at this time, and as I am entitled to one by treaty, I will continue the present commissary at Yainax and designate him as "farmer," with the same compensation as before. For fuller explanation see my letter of 2nd inst.
    Hon. O. C. Applegate, who until within about eighteen months [ago] has been connected with the agency ever since operations were commenced for the benefit of the Klamath and Modoc Indians, and who fully understands the peculiar condition of affairs here, will visit Washington in about one month, and he with Senator Mitchell will explain matters to you more clearly and fully than I can do by writing. I earnestly request that you allow the matter of employees to rest as it now is, after the change now above made, until you shall have seen and talked with Mr. Applegate.
Very truly
    Your obt. servt.
        L .S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 619 Oregon Superintendency, 1874, frames 255-257.



Salem Oregon
    February 15th 1875
Hon.
    E. P. Smith
        Commissioner of Indian Affairs
            Washington City D.C.
                Sir
                    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of instructions of date 14th Decr. 1874--this day received.
    I am directed by the U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon to secure some Indians as witnesses against some parties who have been selling liquors to Indians, and in obedience to such order, I start for the Siletz Agency on tomorrow. On the completion of this business, and the return of the Indians to their agency, I will make out my report for the two months, January and February, and after report monthly as per instructions.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        James Brown
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 945-947.



T. CUNNINGHAM & CO.
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS
Hardware and Agricultural Implements
Salem, Oregon March 6th 1875
Hon. Edward P. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.    Sir, Your favor of 30th December last relating to our a/c was duly received, and would have been promptly answered had we not been anxious to afford Mr. Palmer time to communicate with you and furnish the missing vouchers, which he positively affirms never were issued.
    Hon. Mr. Nesmith has written to say that he kindly offered to sign an indemnifying bond for any sum that you would name but that his offer was rejected. We regard this as exceedingly singular, to say the least. We think it unjust to authorize Indian agents to purchase goods at net cash rates with the assurance that they would be honorably and promptly paid for, and then for the Department to delay the payment for years on account of some technical informality of which we are entirely innocent and in no way responsible.
    Pardon us for taking the liberty of suggesting that nations ought to be as just as individuals and that a Department which professes to represent the humane and Christian policy of this government should be a consistent representative of commercial honesty. Our capital is worth twelve percent per annum. We are paying interest at this rate at present. We sold goods to Mr. Palmer on a coin basis and received therefor currency vouchers. The a/c has been standing nearly three years, so that we shall not receive 50% of their value unless interest be allowed.
    We write now to request you to send the form of bond which you demand to Mr. Palmer's successor or any other person and we shall sign it on payment of the a/c. Regretting that we have such an unpleasant subject on which to address you, we are
Your obedient servants
    T. Cunningham & Co.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1159-1161.



Salem Oregon
    May 8th 1875
Sir,
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 16th ulto., this day received. In justice to myself I would respectfully call your attention to the fact that my report spoke of the past and not of the future as regards the required reports. It was and is the least of my thoughts to attempt to evade any part of the duties as laid down in your letter of instructions.
    My report for April should be well on [its way] to your city by this time.
    My absence from the office sometimes may render it impossible to be as prompt to the day as I would wish.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        James Brown
            U.S. Special Indian Agent
Hon.
    E. P. Smith
        Commissioner Indian Affairs
            Washington City D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 965-966.



Salem Oregon
    May 31st 1875
Sir
    In obedience to the instructions of your office, for the past month I have the honor to report that during the first part of the same I visited parts of Benton and Polk counties in attention to complaints of some farmers. On investigation I found that they were complaining of the Indians because the Indians wanted their pay for work they had done. In one instance the farmer owed the Indian for work done 18 months ago. I succeeded in getting everything satisfactorily arranged and the Indians paid, except in once instance, and feel quite confident that I will persuade him to pay the Indian what is justly due him.
    On my return on or about the 15th inst. I got on track of parties who were furnishing liquor to Indians who are camped some two miles south of this town. The Indians have passes from the agent and are industriously working on a contract of 400 cords of wood. Most all farmers prefer to have them for wood choppers and grubbers than white men. During the night of Saturday the 29 [I] succeeded in arresting four persons in and around the Indian camp. They had been cohabiting with the Indians for several weeks, for which they gave them whisky. One of the parties proved himself innocent in the matter of furnishing the Indians with whisky. The other three were found guilty before the U.S. Commissioner, and in default of bail were lodged in jail at Portland to await the action of the next grand jury, which convenes in about three weeks, and in this transaction I succeeded in discovering five others who are sure to be convicted of the same offense. As it is impossible that they can become aware of my knowledge of their guilt, and consequently no danger of their absenting themselves, I concluded not to have them arrested, but let their case come before the grand jury, as this way will be far less expensive. When this nest is completely broken up (which I am satisfied is a fixed fact), I feel quite sure there will be no further trouble in the whisky furnishing question.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        James Brown
            U.S. Special Indian Agent
Hon.
    E. P. Smith
        Commissioner of Indian Affairs
            Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 977-979.



OREGON AND CALIFORNIA RAILROAD COMPANY.
LAND DEPARTMENT,
Portland, Oregon, June 5, 1875
Hon. A. C. Barstow
    Indian Commissioner
        I will deliver a sawmill--complete and in good running order with an engine of 45 horsepower, with a capacity of 12 to 15,000 feet-inch lumber per day of 11 hours--has sawed 32,000 feet of bridge timber in same time--with two 54-in. saws, with belting--blacksmith tools &c. &c.--in fact everything to set the mill to work without delay--on the following terms: On the cars of the Northern Pacific R.R. 40 miles north of Kalama for the sum of four thousand dollars in gold coin or its equivalent, or deliver same at Kalama where it can be loaded on vessel for seventy-five dollars additional. I refer for further particulars as to mill &c. to Father Wilbur, agent.
Very respectfully
    J. R. Moores
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1089-1096.



Treasury Department,
    Second Auditor's Office,
        June 16th 1875.
Sir:
    The claim of Frank Riddle for services as messenger &c. for the Modoc Indian Peace Commission in February, March and April, 1873, amounting to $205.00, received from your office on the 26th ultimo, is herewith respectfully returned.
    The Second Comptroller's Office desires information upon the following points, viz.: Distance from "camp" to headquarters, and such other information as will justify the charge of $25 which is made for a trip between the points named, on Febry. 24th and again on March 4th 1873, also the reasons for charging extra for horse. It is also suggested that $5 per day is a somewhat exorbitant charge for services as messenger, and should be explained, while the fact that Mr. Frank Riddle was paid $10 for services on April 11th as interpreter precludes his receiving pay as now charged on that day for services as messenger.
Very respectfully
    E. B. French
        Auditor
Hon. Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 921-923.



Salem Oregon
    June 30th 1875
Sir,
    In compliance with the instructions of your office, I have the honor to report that on the 6th inst. I accompanied Genl. Barstow, Commissioner, and Maj. Boyle to the Grand Ronde Agency and back.
    Herewith I send statement of Peter Petit, a half-breed, in relation to two old Indians and one young girl near Roseburg--about 200 miles from the agency. Agent Sinnott having no team nor money for such service, I will get an Indian of his (the old Indian) tribe, who has a wagon & team, to accompany me and go after them.
    On the 11th inst. I went to Oregon City on complaint of citizens. They complained of an Indian who has lived there for the past 14 years. At one time the citizens so respected him that they gave him 2 acres of land. He is a Columbia River Indian married to two Umpqua squaws. Of late he has become perfectly reckless. One year he cost the county near thirteen hundred dollars. I gave him a month to make up his mind whether he would prefer to be a good Indian or go to his tribe.
    On the 20th inst. I went to Albany on complaint of some citizens to induce an Indian to return to his reservation, from which he has absented himself for the past eight years. Some squaws who had been working for good families here for three or four months continuously, at wages of four dollars per week, were enticed by some white men who work on a steamboat (one the mate & one a deckhand) to get drunk. The men were arrested and bound over to appear before the U.S. grand jury.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        James Brown
            U.S. Special Agent
Hon.
    E. P. Smith
        Commissioner of Indian Affairs
            Washington City D.C.
   

Salem Oregon
    June 16th 1875
James Brown Esq.
    U.S. Indian Agent
        Salem Ogn.--Sir--
            There is at my place near Roseburg three Indians, one a very old man, nearly or quite 100 years old, perfectly blind, one old squaw, crippled of one leg and one arm, both perfectly helpless, and one young girl about 13 or 14 years old. They have been at my place for nearly two years, and I am not able to keep them, nor can I drive them off, for they are not able to go, and I am not able nor fixed so that I can take them to the Grand Ronde Agency, where they belong. They ran away from the agency 5 or 6 years ago, and have never been back to the agency. They are of the Umpqua tribe. I wrote you a letter about them three months ago, but it must have got lost. I hope if you can you will have these Indians taken away to their agency, where they will be better taken care of. Neither one of the old ones can live very many years, and the girl ought to be where she could go to school. I am poor, and it is a big tax on me to take care of them and feed them, much less send the girl to school. I am here on business but will go home in a few days.
Very respectfully
    Peter Petit
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 989-993.



Treasury Department,
    Second Auditor's Office,
        July 19th, 1875.
Sir,
    In compliance with request by your letter of the 17th instant, I send herewith settlement No. 195 of the claim of N. B. Clough for fruit trees furnished for the Indian Service in Oregon--settlement dated February 22nd 1875. The settlement contains papers numbered from 1 to 43, both inclusive.
Very respectfully
    E. B. French
        Second Auditor
Hon. Commissioner
    Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 924-925.



Salem Oregon
    August 4th 1875.
Sir,
    I have the honor to respectfully state that there is a case of surgical instruments at the Grand Ronde Agency that some years since cost the government one hundred dollars in currency. There being no doctor at the agency, of course the instruments are of no value to the Department.
    The Indians from Grand Ronde, Siletz and Alsea agencies that work in the vicinity of this place generally work for wagons, harness etc., with just enough money to get provisions. When they get sick by purchasing the medicines myself, I have been able therefore to get a doctor to visit and prescribe free. I know a good doctor at this place who will agree to doctor all the Indians who may need his services at or near this place for one year in consideration of the case of instruments. If not, contrary to the rules of the Dept. I would recommend that the arrangement be made, and on receipt of instructions for the turning over the instruments to me, I can complete the contract, with such safeguards for the faithful performance of agreement as the Dept. may direct.
    Within a few weeks past two ax wounds have demanded the physician's attention, besides numerous cases of sickness of woman and children.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        James Brown
            U.S. Special Indian Agent
Hon.
    E. P. Smith
        Commissioner of Indian Affairs
            Washington City
                D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1101-1103.



Newark N.J. Aug. 23rd / 75
    Sir:--Can you favor me with a brief statement as to the tribe from which the "Modocs" came, and how they ever obtained that name? I have made some references, but all are unsatisfactory. I trust the object will justify this liberty.
Yours respectfully
    Rev. Benj. F. Bowen
        c/o 9 Gouverneur St.
            Newark
                New Jersey
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1106-1107.




Salem Oregon
    August 31st 1875
Sir,
    In obedience to orders from your office, I have the honor to report that my time was occupied in answering complaints from Oregon City and other places till the 11th, at which time on my arrival at this place I found Hon. Benj. Simpson, special commissioner, awaiting my arrival. Next day the 12th we started for the Alsea Agency. By request of Commissioner Simpson, I remained and assisted him as best I could during his stay. I arrived at home yesterday. On my arrival I found letters from Wallula, W.T., Canyon City, Oregon and the Dalles, Oregon, all bitterly complaining of the outrageous depredations of the Columbia River Indians. I would respectfully recommend that measures be taken to place those Indians in charge of someone of the contiguous agencies, that they may be kept under control. They rob the gardens and fields, and in one or two instances they have been seen running away from newly set fires to grain & hay stacks. They are continuously stealing cattle and sheep. Altogether their high-handed proceedings are a heavy loss to the settlers.
    Commissioner Simpson requests my assistance in his efforts to induce the Nestucca Indians to remove to the Siletz, after which I shall visit the Dalles and Canyon City and drive those Indians (if possible) across the state line. The last-named place is about 350 miles from here.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        James Brown
            U.S. Special Indian Agent
Hon.
    E. P. Smith
        Commissioner of Indian Affairs
            Washington City
                D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1118-1120.



THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY.
Portland Oregon Sept. 4, 1875, 9:16 p.m.
To Comsr. Indian Affairs
    Wash.
        Have funds been sent to Fairchild to pay Moores for mill bought for Siletz by your telegram of June twenty-fifth. Telegraph authority to Fairchild's at this place to pay on receipt of funds. Answer by telegraph.
Lieut. Boyle
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1113-1114.



Siletz Agency
    Sept. 8, 1875
Sir,
    I have the honor to submit this, my report of the proceedings of the council held with the Indians belonging to Alsea Agency at Alsea River on the 24th & 25th days of August 1875.
    In accordance with your instructions I proceeded in company with Hon. Ben Simpson, special agent, to Alsea River on Tuesday the 24th day of August, there meeting with Agent Litchfield and Special Agent James Brown.
    Owing to a dead whale washing on shore near the council grounds, many of the Indians, being engaged in cutting up and carrying portions of the carcass for food, did not make their appearance until too late to accomplish much on the first day. Towards evening, however, Mr. Simpson opened the council by stating our business and asking the Indians to come to the grounds on the day following, at which time the wishes of the government would be more fully explained to them.
    On the following morning in company with Agent Litchfield I repaired to the grounds, there meeting with special agents Simpson and Brown and after an issue of beef and tobacco to the Indians the council was opened by Agent Litchfield, who said to the Indians present (some forty in number) that he had sent "their words," referring to the proceedings of the council previously held, to the Department at Washington, but that perhaps the Commissioner was absent and had not yet seen them, as he had received no reply. He then said to them that Mr. Simpson, who was Surveyor General of Oregon had come to talk to them on the subject of their removing to Siletz Agency.
    At Mr. Simpson's suggestion I made a few remarks to the Indians, the purport of which was as follows. Mr. Simpson, who as Mr. Litchfield has said is Surveyor General, has come to talk to you today, not on his own accord but to tell you what are the wishes of our government concerning you; the government has sent him here to say these things, and you must understand that they are true, as he will tell you nothing but the truth, and it will be well for you to consider well his remarks.
    I also told them of the condition and circumstances of those Indians at Siletz who had been industrious & by the aid of the government had acquired horses, cattle, plows, wagons &c. and had fields of growing grain and vegetables and were becoming like the whites, and that the government wished them to improve in the same way, and was willing to assist them if they would go to the Siletz and endeavor to help themselves. I also explained to them that the mills were being erected and would in a short time be ready to make flour and lumber for their use.
    I also told them of the amount [of] good land at the mouth of Siletz River, the abundance of fish and game in the immediate vicinity, and that farms would be given to each head of a family there if they preferred that locality to the agency proper, and then telling them that Mr. Simpson would now talk to them closed my remarks. Mr. Simpson then proceeded to tell them the wishes of the government as indicated in his and your instructions, fully, and urged upon them the necessity of complying, and also explained to them the act of Congress under which they might take land, if they desired to withdraw from the immediate protection of the government, and endeavored to impress upon their minds the many disadvantages and annoyances that would probably attend them in case they chose to avail themselves of the latter privilege, and after asking them to speak their minds closed his remarks.
    Quite a number of the Indians spoke, all mildly declining to make the proposed change and stating that they preferred to remain where they were, some remarking that their fathers had lived upon salmon and grown old and died and that they were content to do likewise, & altogether considering their circumstances and surroundings, their contentment.was remarkable.
    Mr. Simpson, after informing them that he would make a report to Department and perhaps come to see them again, closed the council, one of our Siletz Indians offering a prayer, which was apparently well received by the Indians.
    In conclusion I humbly submit as my opinion that should Agent G. P. Litchfield be transferred to the mouth of Siletz River, the government property removed and aid withdrawn, the greater portion of the Indians would before the coming spring leave the Alsea and more of their own accord without expense to the government.
    Hoping that my actions may meet with your approval, I am
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        M. N. Chapman
Hon. J. H. Fairchild
    U.S. Ind. Agent
        Siletz Agency
    `        Oregon
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1212-1218



Treasury Department,
    Second Auditor's Office,
        October 6th 1875.
Sir:
    I am in receipt of a letter from your office of this date, making inquiry concerning present status of claim in favor of Frank Riddle for $205.00 and asking if any impediment exists to an immediate settlement of the same.
    In reply I would respectfully state that the said claim was settled by the accounting offices of the Treasury Department on July 31st 1875--settlement No. 770--but subsequently it was found that the appropriation--"Civilization of Indians"--was not available in payment of the same, and hence a letter returning the requisition (No. 8,884) was sent from this office, August 11th, to the Hon. Secretary of the Interior, suggesting that the appropriation be changed to to "Civilization Fund." The requisition was returned by Hon. B. R. Cowen, Actg. Secretary of the Interior, on the following day with the required alternation, whereupon the papers having been corrected in this and the Second Comptroller's Office, the requisition was sent on or about the 15th of August to the Warrant Division--Treasury Department.
Very respectfully
    E. B. French
        Auditor
Hon. Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 930-932.



Newport O.
    Oct. 23, 1875
E. P. Smith
    Com. Ind. Affairs
        Dear Sir
    I have located several Alsea & Siletz Inds. in homesteads under recent act of Congress & ruling [of the] Secy. of Int. I find some difficulty in obtaining parties to make oath as to "abandonment of tribal relations." Can you inform me what constitutes an "abandonment of tribal relations" as understood by the Dept. There are a good many Indians desiring to locate homesteads, but there is a great necessity for someone to instruct and assist them. The co. clerk seldom will take trouble to attend to them. The distance to land office is too great for them to incur expense. The land officers by reason of not understanding their language is at a loss how to act & generally the Indian becomes discouraged and gives up the idea of getting land. In the cases I assisted I paid some of the expense, secured the necessary affidavits and am perfectly satisfied that had they been left to themselves [they] could never have obtained a claim. The Indians need an instructor & assistant to help & instruct in the duties, forms &c. &c., that is if govt. really desires Indians to become citizens & freeholders.
Yours respy.
    R. A. Bensell
        Newport
            Benton Co.
                via Corvallis Oregon
To
    Hon. E. P. Smith
        Com. Ind. Affrs.
            Washington
                D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1128-1130.



Salem Oregon
    October 31st 1875
Sir
    In obedience to instructions from your office I have the honor to report that my time has been employed in a few instances of small troubles between Indians and whites as the former are principally on the reservation, and what few are not I am pleased to say are remarkably quiet. I have been expecting to be called upon by Special Commissioner Simpson to go to the Alsea to assist in removing those Indians to their new reservation as agreed upon in the treaty lately concluded by Commissioner Simpson.
    The Nestucca Indians that moved to their new reservation are quite uneasy, as the agreement on the part of the government has not been complied with. I know not where the blame lies, for Commissioner Simpson wrote immediately, on completion of the treaty, to Agent Fairchild to send a man to render the assistance as agreed upon.
    The country surrendered by the Nestucca has quite all been taken up by farmers and stock raisers. Why the Alseas have not moved to their ground is more than I am able to say, as they--the Indians--by delegates have visited the same and are well pleased with the location. The whites are anxiously awaiting the vacation; a sufficient number stand ready to locate almost the entire lands now occupied by the Alseas. Their detention there is working a hardship on both the Indians and industrious white settlers. I would respectfully recommend that immediate steps be taken to move them to their new homes, as a month or six weeks delay will necessitate their remaining till spring.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        James Brown
            U.S. Special Indian Agent
Hon.
    E. P. Smith
        Commissioner of Indian Affairs
            Washington City D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1131-1133.



Portland Oregon Nov. 29th 1875
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comsr. of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
            Dear Sir
                About three weeks since a letter came to Siletz Agency addressed to James Bugley, and there being no one by that name in that vicinity, I, in presence of witnesses, opened it and found that it contained a notice of the appointment of an agent in place of James H. Fairchild, resigned. I knew the last name to be a clerical error (agent's name is Joseph H. [Fairchild]), and knowing that my name had been used in connection with that appointment, after a legal consultation I concluded to try to fill out the accompanying bonds and return them, to which please find enclosed. My reason for thus doing is the fact that there is a necessity for an active work with the Indians who have lately by the labors of Hon. Benj. Simpson been induced to leave their former homes and settle on the Siletz Reservation, as by a little help now they may be induced to embrace Christianity and remain. I will write you more fully of the condition of affairs when I reach home. Should the accompanying bond certificates &c. meet your approval, please make the correction in first name. I write in haste.
Yours very respectfully
    William Bagley
        Toledo
            Benton Co.
                Or.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1134-1136.



Salem Oregon
    December 13th 1875
Sir
    The late Supt. Odeneal informed me that he was ordered to forward all the paper and books of the Superintendency to Washington by express and suggested that I comply with the intent of the order. They are all the retaining papers of the office, together with the books. The express charges will be from $175 to $200 coin in advance. I did not feel justifiable in carrying out the directions without more direct orders from your office. The papers include all the papers belonging to the office, as retaining papers from 1855 to the abolishment of the office of Superintendent of Indian Affairs. Those papers have been stored in one of the rooms in the building last occupied by the Superintendent. Up to the first of January 1876 will be 2 5/12 years. Mr. T. McF. Patton claims rent for the room at the rate of seven dollars per month. Mr. Patton has made out vouchers for the amount and will send them to Washington.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        James Brown
            U.S. Special Ind. Agent
The
    Hon. Commissioner
        of Indian Affairs
            Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 1137-1139.



Siletz Agency Toledo Benton Co., Or. Dec. 14th 1875
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of Nov. 19th, marked L, by last mail. Owing to its having been misdirected it was a long time on the way, having been remailed at Drift Creek for Toledo.
    My official bond was sent to you from Portland, Or. on the 28th Nov. and in all probability has reached you before this.
I am sir your obedient servant
    William Bagley
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 620 Oregon Superintendency, 1874-1875, frames 936-937.




Last revised March 5, 2017