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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


1853 Rogue River Indian War Claims



Oregon T.
    Pacific City
        July the 30th 1852
Mr. President Fillmore
    Sir, notwithstanding you fill the highest station of any individual on Earth, yet the most humble individual may approach you and ask redress for wrongs done him.
    In view of this fact I venture to present my case before you.
    On the 30 or 31st of August 1849 on Rogue River in this Territory I was robbed by Indians of gold and horses worth about twenty-five hundred dollars. I immediately complained to Governor Lane, who at that time was Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Oregon [to] prove up my account before Judge Bryant to the satisfaction of the Indian agent, and things looked like I would get my money. Some time since that time Lane has gone out of the office, and Dr. Dart filled his place. Last spring was a year [since] I wrote to Dr. Dart on the subject, and he wrote me in answer that it was a matter he had nothing to do with that. L. A. Rice was the man for me to apply to now. L. A. Rice is an officer created by the legislature of Oregon to adjust claims against the provincial government of Oregon in consequence of the Cayuse War who had no more to do with my claim than the man in the moon, and I have no doubt Dr. Dart knew it at the time.
    I wrote to Mr. Rice and also Mr. Spalding, who was the sub-agent for that district, but he, Mr. Spalding, did not answer. He soon went out of office, and A. A. Skinner was appointed in his stead. Last fall I wrote Mr. Skinner, citing him to an act of Congress of the 30th June 1834 (as I did all the rest), the 17th section of which provides if the Indians have an annuity it shall be paid out of the first due them, and if they have none it shall under certain regulations be paid from the Treasury of the U.S. of any money not otherwise appropriated.
    He, Mr. Skinner, was not at liberty to pay me without instructions.
    The law I think makes it the duty of the President to direct the pay of such claims. I hope you will give this matter a moment's considerations, and if [it] is the duty of the President to direct the payment of such claims I hope you will do it immediately. It is almost three years since I lost my money, and if I [am] entitled to it by law I want it, if not I wish to know it, and you will much oblige your humble servant by informing me.
    Here allow me to say I am 45 years old, and on my return from California, at which time the above misfortune befell me, I have been in delicate health and ill able to labor and consequently I would try my fortune speculating. I soon invested the major part of my remaining means, 28 hundred dollars, in town lots in this place, and all of those lots are embraced in the reserve made by the government on Cape Disappointment. For this miscarriage I have no claim on the government, but if I must leave here I would be glad [to know] how soon the government would pay me for my improvements and let me go.
    It is rumored here on pretty good authority that the government will put a lighthouse on Cape Disappointment this fall. If so I would be glad to get the appointment of keeper of it, inasmuch as I am here and must do something to support my family and am ill able to do hard labor. I could send on a petition signed I think by every man in the county, but I do not know where to send it or who has the appointment power. I am a Whig and am doubtful Whig administrations will leave after the 4th March; you will much oblige me by the above due consideration and let [me] hear from you.
I am sir your humble servant
    John Meldrum
Mr. Fillmore
    President of the
        United States
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 607 Oregon Superintendency 1842-1852, frames 1262-1266.


Office Superintendent of Indian Affairs
    Dayton O.T. Nov. 12th 1853
Sir
    Frequent applications have been made to the Superintendent of Indian Affairs by citizens of this Territory for information as to the mode of procedure to enable them to recover for losses sustained by Indian depredations, and as I am so frequently importuned upon this subject, and the amounts involved in many instances being large, I would ask instructions to enable me to give the required information.
    These applications are likely to become quite numerous, and if a policy be adopted encouraging the presentation of all claims for injury or loss of property to act retrospectively with a view of being deducted from the amount allowed the Indians for their country, it is believed that in many cases the entire amount of the value of their possessions would be thus absorbed, as claims would doubtlessly be raked up, real or factitious, commencing as early as 1843. It is very likely there are instances in which the persons designated to negotiate treaties with the Indian tribes in Oregon would be warranted in pressing claims against them, but if the relinquishment of Indian title to their lands, and their consent to remove to such points as may be selected for them, rests upon the contingency of their agreement to allow such claims to be deducted from the price of purchase, it will inevitably be a serious obstacle to the accomplishment of that object.
I am sir very respectfully
    Your obedient servt.
        Joel Palmer
            Superintendent
Hon. Geo. W. Manypenny
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington City
            D.C.
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 608 Oregon Superintendency 1853-1855, frames 483-484.


    The cost of the Rogue River War, exclusive of the pay of soldiers, is said to have been $93,511.25.
"Oregon," New York Times, March 13, 1854, page 3



Copy.
War Department
    Washington 29 Sept. 1854
Sir
    I return herewith the report from your office of the 7 inst. upon the claim of Jesse Robinson for supplies furnished the troops engaged in the Rogue River War, for which provision is made by the act approved 17 July 1854.
    This report, in recommending the allowance of certain items, proceeds on the assumption that the quantity of forage for which claims have been presented is not more than the troops were entitled to under the regulations of the U.S. army. On the other hand, by computations made in the office of the Quartermaster General, it appears that the quantity for which payment is claimed is greatly in excess of the quantity required for issue, and the same is true in respect to the subsistence. I shall however regard the certificate of the quartermaster & commissary appointed by Capt. Alden & Genl. Lane as evidence of the quantities of supplies delivered to him and now to be paid for, but as regards their value, which is not like quantity a question of measure & weight, but one of skill and judgment, a discretion is to be exercised in the settlement, and I send a copy of a report of Capt. Alden upon this point for your information, as well as a copy of the report of this Department, in answer to a resolution of Congress calling for information in regard to these claims.
    With reference to the mode of reporting these claims for the action of this Department under the act above titled I would prefer a general statement of all the claims exhibiting the name of each claimant, items claimed, prices charged and prices recommended for allowance, omitting the evidence in support of the claim, and other particulars, which will have been fully considered by you before making your report.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        Jeffer. Davis
            Secretary of War
Hon. Robt. J. Atkinson
    Third Auditor

Oregon Historical Society MSS 1146, Lane Family Letters


    Know all men by these presents--that I, George L. Snelling, for divers good causes and considerations me thereunto moving, have to me noted, constituted and appointed, and by these presents do now note, constitute and appoint James Mandeville Carlisle, of the city of Washington, counselor at law, to be my true and lawful attorney in fact, for me and in my name to ask, demand and receive of and from the United States of America, and of and from the proper departments, agents and officers of the government thereof all moneys which are or may become payable to me by reason of my claims growing out of the Indian disturbances commonly called the Rogue River War, out of the appropriation heretofore made by Congress, and particularly by the act of August 1854 for defraying the expenses of the said war, which said claims have been recently examined by the board constituted for that purpose; and for me and in my name to sign all the documents, papers, acquittances, receipts and vouchers which may be necessary for the payment and receipt of said moneys at the Treasury of the United States, or elsewhere, the same may be payable; and for me and in my name and that to do all and every other lawful act which may be required in the premises and which I might or could do if personally present, to the end that all such moneys may be paid over to and received by my said attorney; hereby ratifying and comprising all and singular to the lawful acts of my said attorney in the premises.
    In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this twenty-first day of December anno domini one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four.
Signed, sealed &    )
delivered in             )                           Geo. L. Snelling
presence of            )
B. K. Morsell
   
District of Columbia      )
    Washington County    )  ss.
On this 21st day of December 1854, before the subscriber, a justice of the peace in and for the county aforesaid, personally appears George L. Snelling and acknowledges the aforegoing instrument to be his act and deed.
    Given under my hand & seal
        B. K. Morsell, J.P.
Scan in Truwe collection


Rogue River Indian Spoliation and Reservation Indemnity Claims.
    Notice is hereby given that L. F. Grover, A. C. Gibbs and Geo. H. Ambrose have been duly appointed to act as a Board of Commissioners, under the provisions of the Treaty between the United States and the Rogue River Indians--entered into the 10th day of September, 1853--to audit and adjust all claims of individuals, growing out of Indian Spoliations, committed by said tribe, or their allies, during the continuance of the Rogue war of 1853; also, to make allowance for all improvements made by settlers, on lands taken and set apart by said Treaty, as an Indian reservation.
    Said Board will organize and commence its session at Jacksonville, Oregon, on the first Monday of January, 1855, and continue in session thirty days.
    All persons having claims, as aforesaid, are urged to present them promptly, with their proof, to secure an early adjustment.
JOEL PALMER,
    Supt. Indian Aff. in Oregon.
Salem, Dec. 9, 1854.
Oregon Statesman, Salem, December 19, 1854, page 3


INDIAN WAR CLAIMS.

NOTICE is hereby given that L. F. Grover, Esq., Dr. Geo. H. Ambrose and A. C. Gibbs, Esq., have been appointed Commissioners to appraise the property destroyed by the Rogue River Indians during the late Indian war. All persons having claims for property so destroyed are required to present the same to the said Commissioners, with proper proofs, on the first Monday of January next, at Jacksonville, Territory of Oregon.
JOEL PALMER,
    Supt. Indian Affairs.
Umpqua Weekly Gazette, Scottsburg, December 30, 1854, page 3



Jacksonville Oregon Jany. 4th 1855
To Gen. Joel Palmer
    Superintendent Indian
        Affairs in Oregon
            Sir
                Enclosed please find the certified oaths of the commissioners appointed by you to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River tribe of Indians during the war of 1853, also to assess the value of permanent improvements made by whites on lands assigned as a reservation to said Indians by the treaty of 10th Sept. 1853, consummating those qualifications as such commissioners, in accordance with the instructions from your office, dated Dec. 24th 1854.
Yours obediently
    L. F. Grover
    A. C. Gibbs
    Geo. H. Ambrose
Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1872, Reel 5; Letter Book D, page 114.



Jacksonville Jany. 10th 1855
To Genl. Joel Palmer
    Superintendent of Indian
        Affairs in Oregon
            Sir
                As requested by Mr. Geary, at the time I left Salem for this place as a commissioner to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by Indians during the Rogue River war of 1853. I now write informing you [of] the organization of the board on the 1st inst., according to notice. The commissioners have taken the oath required by instructions and proceeded to business by renting a room for [an] office, heated and lighted for the rent of $75.00--the cheapest to be had, and small at that. On our first arrival here there was a large fall of snow accompanied with exceeding cold weather, which has stopped mining, raised the markets, compelled cattle to be driven in for shelter and feed--hay is now worth $50 per ton, horse feed of all kinds in proportion. Our board at the hotel is $20 per week, and horse keeping at the stable $4 per day, which we have to pay or let our horses starve. One large stable here has been crushed by snow. Expenses of traveling this side of the Calapooia average $4.00 per day.
            My vouchers reach $    90
Board of the comm.
5 weeks at least @ $20 300
3 horses 40 days @ $4 480
Room rent & fuel 75
Stationery 35
Handbills 100 & posting 50
Dr. Ambrose salary 150
A. C. Gibbs      250
$1430
    In coming here we found that no adequate notice had been given of our meeting, owing to the fact that the northern mails had failed, and from Yreka only one notice had appeared in the Herald; in fact the people did not know of our appointment and duties. We immediately ordered handbills to be printed at Yreka and posted up there, in Scotts Valley, at Cottonwood, at the head of the valley, at Sterling, Illinois Creek, Althouse and at Crescent City, also inserted [a] notice in Crescent City Herald and [Yreka] Mountain Herald.
    The board became satisfied that general and immediate notice must be given or the object of the session would entirely fail. I do not know what the expenses of the advertisements will be.
    You may think the bill I send is high, but we were paying what others are paying here now at this crisis of hard times. I wrote you a letter from the Canyon--which [I] hope you have received--I sent this letter by private hand to Umpqua. We have had no mail from the north since my arrival here. Owing to want of notice we cannot get through with claims this month. The prices for board and horse feed are cash prices here now and our men expect the money. If possible I hope you will send me $1000--as I can't get along with less--and leave my own salary unaccounted for.
    Mr. Gibbs and Dr. Ambrose say that they accepted their commission only on condition that all expenses should be promptly paid, and salary forthcoming. Mr. Dunn, member from Jackson, will leave Salem for this place so as to arrive here before the commissioners close. Please send money by him; if not send by Genl. Drew who will leave Salem at the close of the session. I do not with to leave here without paying these bills. I hardly think we can complete our duties in less than thirty days from date--we have audited thirty claims.
Yours with much respect
    L. F. Grover
Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1872, Reel 5; Letter Book D, pages 114-115.



Jacksonville O.T. February 10, 1855
Gen. Joel Palmer
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Oregon Territory    Dear Sir
            This day the commissioners close their labors in Jacksonville, and you may expect a communication from me. I feel disposed to write for a number of other reasons.
    1st. I took a trip to Sailor Diggings, a distance of 60 miles, to circulate notices of our meeting, and gained considerable information concerning Indian affairs in that direction and am sorry to say they are in an unsettled state. Large amounts of property have been destroyed by the Indians and that they are continually stealing something. This provokes the settlers and they wish the Indians kept in check or removed, and pay for what property has been destroyed.
    Some settlers say the Indians are obliged to go on the reserve--the Indians say not. Considering all the facts and circumstances, I think much care and attention will be required on the part of agents during the coming spring and summer to keep down open hostilities between the whites and Indians.
    I learn with pleasure that Robt. B. Metcalfe has been appointed sub-Indian agent and I hope he will be stationed in the Rogue River country, as I believe there will be more to do here than can be accomplished by any one person.
    Dr. Ambrose's appointment is well received here, and all agree that he will make an efficient officer.
    I think of taking up my residence in this country next summer, which perhaps makes me feel a rather deeper interest in the subject.
    We were much disappointed in not receiving the money to pay our expenses and salary, and have been obliged to borrow money.
    I hope you will pay Mr. Grover the balance due me at your earliest convenience, and he will forward the same to me.
Very respectfully your friend
    and obedient servant
        A. C. Gibbs
Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1872, Reel 5; Letter Book D, pages 141-142.



Shasta July 2nd 1855
Dear Sir
    Enclosed I send you a power of attorney [illegible] according to instructions, which I trust will be sufficient. I wish you would send me the $500 for the amount allowed me as soon as possible as I am much in want of money, which will be in full for my interest in the same. I also wish you to send me at the same time the balance due me on our private deal & oblige
Yours truly
    F. Noseret
    John Anderson
P.S.
    I have made & sent to Yreka a power of attorney to collect the amount due for services & use of horses. Please send by return of express if possible. I understand that I have 2 letters at Jacksonville either in the express or post office which I wish you to send to me.
Yours &c.
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 609 Oregon Superintendency 1856, frames 345-346.  This letter was sent to Madison B. Morris.

Testimony of Col. J. E. Ross in Relation to the
Commencement and Termination of the
Rogue River War of 1853.

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John E. Ross of said county being first duly sworn says--I resided in Jackson County aforesaid during the summer and fall of 1853. I was engaged in the Rogue River War so called. I acted as col. commanding. The first act of hostilities was committed on the second day of August 1853, by Indians called Tipsey's band--killing a white settler by the name of Edwards, and the shooting of cattle. I have learned during the continuance of said war, from a conversation with an Indian called "Jim," a principal chief of the Rogue River Tribe, that there was a difficulty between Jim and one of "Tipsey's" band in regard to a squaw. It appeared that a Spaniard among the whites had the squaw and Jim charged the wrong upon the whites. The Indian of Tipsey's band then left the camp of "Jim" declaring that he would cause a general war of extermination against the whites in Rogue River Valley. This was on the night before the killing of Edwards. From this time all the Indians in Rogue River Valley assumed a hostile attitude towards the whites and carried on an aggressive war by murdering citizens, burning houses and other improvements and property, killing and driving off stock &c., in all which acts of hostilities the Rogue River Tribe of Indians were either actors in the first instance or accessory as allies to straggling bands of neighboring tribes.
    This war continued from the date before mentioned up to the battle in the mountains in which [Pleasant] Armstrong was killed on the 24th of August 1853, when an armistice of seven days [was] declared, which was only a temporary suspension of immediate hostilities with the principal band of Rogue Rivers until a council could be held by them with the subordinate chiefs to settle upon the provisions of treaty if such should be made, or if not to determine what negotiations should be made. But hostilities did not cease, except by the band immediately entering into the armistice, until after the treaty of the 10th September 1853.
    "Jim" told me that the Indians about Grave Creek belonged to the Rogue River Tribe, and that in the difficulties in that quarter the Grave Creeks and Applegate bands were united, and acted together. I think that the Indians on Cow Creek, the other side of the Grave Creek Hills, had no connection with the Rogue Rivers in the war of 1853.
John E. Ross
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 3rd day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public



Testimony of Capt. John F. Miller in Relation to the
Commencement and Termination of the
Rogue River War of 1853.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John F. Miller of said county being first duly sworn says--I resided in the Rogue River Valley during the summer and fall of 1853, took part in the Rogue River Indian War of that year. I acted as Captain of Company "A" of Oregon volunteers in that service. I would say from what I know of the circumstances of said war that actual hostilities commenced on or about the 2nd day of August 1853 by certain Indians belonging to "Tipsey's band" so called killing one Edwards, a settler on the public lands in said valley, and shooting cattle &c. Tipsey's band was understood to be acting at that time in concert with the other Indians of the Rogue River Valley in commencing and carrying on an offensive war of extermination against all the whites of said valley.
    Actual hostilities continued from the 2nd day of August mentioned, up to the 10th day of September following, when a formal treaty of peace, and for the purchase of Indian lands, was entered into with said tribe. The hostilities mentioned were characterized by the murder of white settlers, burning their houses and other property, killing and driving off stock &c.
    I am of opinion that all the bands of Indians from Grave Creek to the head of Rogue River Valley were implicated together in their hostilities and were all under the influence and in the council of the Rogue River Tribe of Indians proper, during the period from the 2nd day of August 1853 to the 10th day of Sept. 1853 above mentioned. I have learned the facts here stated relative to the combination of various bands of Indians in said war from conversation with the principal chiefs of said Rogue River Tribe.
John F. Miller
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 3rd day January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.



Price Current of the Market of Jackson County, Oregon Territory
from 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853
During the Actual Hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853.

Flour per # .40     Axes @ 5.00
Oats   "  bushel 3.60 Sheeting per yard .30
Barley   "        " 4.60 Drilling   "      " .30
Potatoes   "        " 6.00 Duck   "      " 1.50
Onions   "        " 7.00 Cigars 8.00
Bacon   "    # .75 Buckets, tin @ 2.00
Ham   "    " .75 Brooms 1.50
Butter   "    " 1.00 Shirts--wool per doz. 36.00
Beans   "  bushel 24.00     "        cotton ticking   "      " 15.00
Sugar   "    # .50     "        white   "      " 36.00
Rice   "    " .40 Pants med. wool   "      " 80.00
Salt   "    " .50     "     buckskin per pair 16.00
Coffee   "    " .75 Blankets   "      " 10.00
Tea   "    " 1.50 Hats per doz. 60.00
Candles   "    " 1.50 Shoes   "      " 36.00
Dried apples   "    " .75 Boots   "  pair 8 to 10.00
     "     peaches   "    " .87 Hay   "  ton 60.00
Soap   "    " .75 Cabbages per doz. 3.00
Saleratus   "    " .75 Squashes   "   # .05
Tobacco   "    " 2.00 Oats in sheaf per doz. 6.00
Brandy   "   gal. 8.00 Wheat   "   bus. 10.00
Whiskey   "    " 8.00 Corn   "     " 5.00
Molasses   "    " 4.00 Fry pans @ 2.00
Vinegar   "    " 4.00 Knives & forks per set 3 to 6.00
Mining shovels 4.00 Tumblers per doz. 8.00
Picks 4.00 Camp kettles @ 2 to 6.00
Pans, tin 1.50 Cooking stove @ 150 to 250.00
    "     sheet iron 3.00 Rifle guns @ 10 to 75.00
Nails per # .40 Revolvers, navy @ 50.00
Lead   "    " .75         "          small @ 40.00
Shot   "    " .75 Oxen per yoke 200 to 350.00
Powder   "    " 2.00 Milch cows @ 75 to 150.00
Rope   "    " 1.50 Steers, 2 yr. old 75.00
Heifers, 2 yrs. old each 75.00 Chickens @ 1.50
Calves, yearling    " 50.00 Fence rails per 100 10.00
Horses @   75 to 300.00 Rails made in timber 4.00
American mares @ 200 to 500.00 Beef per lb. .30
Mules @ 100 to 250.00 Pickles per gal. 4.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John Anderson of said county being duly sworn says--I am, and was during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, a merchant in the town of Jacksonville in said county and trading in the general merchandise of the country. I have examined the foregoing list of goods with the prices severally affixed thereto and believe the same to be an average price current of such articles, as they were sold in the county of Jackson at the time of said war between the 2nd day of August 1853, and the 10th day of September 1853.
John Anderson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John F. Miller of said county being duly sworn says--I am and was during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 a farmer residing in the county of Jackson aforesaid, was captain of Company "A" of Oregon volunteers in said war, knew the prices of stock, country produce, and goods generally. I have examined the foregoing list of articles with the prices severally annexed thereto and believe the same to exhibit a fair and just price current of the same during the said war from the 2nd day of August 1853 to the 10th day of Sept. 1853.
John F. Miller
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William L. Gaylord of said county being duly sworn says--I am and was during the Rogue River Indian War a merchant, doing a general mercantile business at Jacksonville in said county. I have examined the foregoing price current and think the prices annexed to the several articles therein stated are a just exhibit of the state of the market in Jackson County during the time of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853.
William L. Gaylord
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.


Report of Commissioners on Rogue River War Claims.

Joel Palmer Esqr.
Superintendent of Indian Affairs O.T.
        Sir
                Pursuant to the special instructions issued from your office at Dayton O.T. bearing date December 20th 1854 to us communicated, the undersigned Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribes of Indians during the war with said tribe in 1853, also to assess the value of permanent improvements made by whites on lands assigned as a reservation to said Indians by the Treaty of the 10th September 1853, beg leave most respectfully to report
    That on the first day of January 1855 they commenced at Jacksonville in said Territory and after being duly, by taking the proper oath of office, certified, copies of which are forthwith forwarded to you by mail, they proceeded to the discharge of their duties.
    They determined, by the most available and reliable testimony,
    1st, the date of the commencement of the war, to wit the 2nd day of August 1853
    2nd, the date of the termination of hostilities to wit, the 10th day of September 1853. Said testimony was reduced to writing and is herewith accompanying, marked "A" in envelope.
    In relation to claims for property destroyed as aforesaid, the Board made the following order.
    That all claims presented, as far as practicable, shall be based on the affidavit of the claimant, setting forth
    1st The destruction of property for which payment is claimed.
    2nd That such property was destroyed during the actual hostilities of said war.
    3rd That such property was destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies.
    4th Such description of the property destroyed as will enable the Commissioners to assess its just value.
    In addition to the above basis of proof the Board will require the same to be represented by the testimony of two disinterested witnesses when practicable. If such testimony cannot be procured claimants must present such circumstantial or other evidence as may satisfy the Commissioners of the justice of their claims. If the claimant cannot be personally present, claims may be presented by agents, and prayed by any kind of competent testimony.
    The Board then proceeded to receive and entertain proofs of claims as aforesaid, reducing the substance thereof to writing, which will be found herewith accompanying each claim, numbered from "1 to 73" inclusive--in envelopes.
    After claimants had closed their testimony, the Board proceeded to make awards in the several spoliation claims in such amounts as the proofs and circumstances of the cases would warrant, basing their estimates of the value of all property of a current commercial rate during the war, on a price current established by the testimony of several merchants and farmers of Jackson County, in said Territory, the substance of which was reduced to writing and is herewith accompanying marked "B" in envelope, as to kinds of property not therein contained, the value of the same was established by testimony offered by claimants--always varying the estimate made according to the description and location of the property destroyed.
    Certificates of such awards made accompanying the claims and proofs numbered from "1 to 73" inclusive seriatim. The Board also issued to each claimant a duplicate certificate of the award made in each case.
    The following catalogue exhibits the result of the labors of the Board in the matter of spoliation claims as aforesaid.
    Statement of the number and names of claimants for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians during the war with said tribe in 1853 and the amount allowed to each, annexed--
No. 1.  Daniel and Ephraim Raymond $3,144.25
2.  Clinton Barney 249.00
3.  Davis Evans 1,755.00
4.  Martin Angel 200.00
5.  Michael Brennan [sic] 32.75
6.  Albert B. Jennison 1689.65
7.  William J. Newton 1600.00
8.  William Thompson & Henry Rowland 1029.00
9.  John W. Patrick & John R. Hardin 1315.00
10.  Pleasant W. Stowe 450.00
11.  Jeremiah Yarnell 100.00
12.  William S. King 250.00
13.  Cram, Rogers & Co. 250.00
14.  Edith M. Nickel 230.00
15.  John Benjamin 316.00
16.  David N. Birdseye 211.50
17.  Louis Rothermel 225.00
18.  Mary Ann Hodgins 80.00
19.  George H. C. Taylor 668.50
20.  John Markley 80.00
21.  Sigmund Ettlinger 130.00
22.  James C. Tolman 175.00
23.  Henry Helms 108.00
24.  William M. Elliott 560.00
25.  Silas & Edward Day 421.00
26.  James Triplett 500.00
27.  Nathan B. Lane 669.00
28.  John Agy 85.00
29.  James Bruce 475.00
30.  James J. Fryer 544.00
31.  William G. T'Vault 270.00
32.  Hall & Burpee 628.50
33.  John Penniger 263.00
34.  John E. Ross 4,176.00
35.  John S. Miller 477.00
36.  D. Irwin 920.00
37.  Burrell B. Griffin 1,277.00
38.  Marcena McCombs 1,020.00
39.  William N. Ballard 468.50
40.  Freeman Smith 382.25
41.  Nicholas Klopfenstein 227.50
42.  Daniel F. Fisher 173.50
43.  Thomas D. Jewett 317.25
44.  Sylvester Pease 300.00
45.  McGreer, Drury & Runnels 450.00
46.  David Hughart 90.00
47.  James Mooney 500.00
48.  John Gheen 840.00
49.  Theodore Cameron 30.50
50.  James Abraham 825.40
51.  Francis Nasarett 1464.00
52.  Galley & Oliver 500.00
53.  T. B. Sanderson 400.00
54.  Frederick Rosenstock 450.00
55.  Dunn & Alberding 2500.00
56.  Asa G. Fordyce 200.00
57.  Obadiah D. Hoxie 50.00
58.  James L. Loudon 200.00
59.  Samuel Grubb 300.00
60.  William Kahler 144.45
61.  Samuel Williams 474.00
62.  Hiram Niday 898.50
63.  John Anderson 1093.00
64.  Elias Huntington 80.00
65.  Sherlock Abrams 213.25
66.  Thomas Frizzell 476.00
67.  Miller & Rose 850.00
68.  Robert B. Metcalfe 86.00
69.  Charles Williams 67.00
70.  John Swinden 475.00
71.  James R. Davis 35.00
72.  Isaac Woolen 750.00
73.  William M. Hughes         275.    
$43,040.75
    In further pursuance of instructions the Board visited from time to time as the labors would permit the lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the Treaty of the 10th of Sept. 1853 as aforesaid, the same lying in the vicinity of Jacksonville, and made inspections of permanent improvement made by whites on said lands previously to said treaty, with a view to assessing their value. In several instances they found the same partially removed or destroyed by said Indians. They therefore deemed it expedient to take the statement of the claimants on oath and such other testimony from disinterested sources as could be obtained, to assist the Commissioners in arriving at a just estimate of the value of the said improvements at the time such claimants were dispossessed thereof by the act of the government. The amounts allowed are in a very slight degree only compensatory of the real damages sustained by settlers who were required to remove from said Indian reservation occupancy of agricultural lands in a district furnishing the best market for farming produce on the Pacific Coast, being in most instances of tenfold greater value than the improvements on the same. But the Commissioners regarded their instructions as strictly limiting their duties in the premises to the assessment of the value of the improvements on said lands, alone, and governed themselves accordingly. The awards in cases of reservation claims number from "1 to 10" inclusive--certificates accompany the process, and duplicates of the same have been issued to claimants in manner as heretofore reported with reference to spoliation claims.
    The following is a statement of the numbers and names of claimants for permanent improvements made by whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the treaty with said tribe dated Sept. 10th 1853, with the amount awarded to each claimant, and the sum total thereof--to wit:
No. 1.  Davis Evans [penciled: $250 too high] 350.00
2.  Matthew G. Kennedy 250.00
3.  John J. Cooke 390.00
4.  William Hutchinson [penciled: This and Hutchinson own the same claim you double what the sum should be] 311.25
5.  Chesley Gray [penciled: does not belong here 286.00
6.  Robert B. Metcalfe 350.00
7.  Jacob Gall 120.00
8.  Geo. H. C. Taylor 75.00
9.  Jno. M. Silcott [penciled: does not belong to this class] 100.00
10.  James Leslie [penciled: this claim is too high by 225.--]      300.00
$2,832.25
    In making awards on claims for spoliations during said war, the object of the Board has been to ascertain in favor of each claimant the just value of property actually destroyed without considering resultant damages, or endeavoring to cramp claims with the view of reducing them within the fifteen thousand dollars reserved from the Indian annuities for the purposes of liquidating such claims, believing that more ample and equal justice could be attained by pursuing such course.
    Some few claims of slight amounts for Indian spoliations during said war probably remain unpresented, but the Commissioners have spared no pains in obtaining testimony and making awards in all practicable cases, where they had reason to believe existed just claims.
    Considering the floating character of the population in the mining districts of Oregon, and the numerous casualties incident to life on our frontiers, it is believed that further time spent in session by the Board would not be expedient for the final adjustment of all claims against the United States properly cognizable by said Commissioners, all of which is most respectfully submitted.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10th 1855

No. 1--Claim of Daniel & Ephraim Raymond        (award) $3144.25

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    I, Daniel Raymond, being duly sworn, says that on or about the 27th day of August 1853 Ephraim Raymond and myself were residents of Jackson County, Territory of Oregon, and joint owners of the "Crystal Spring Ranch," so called, together with the following described property, to wit,
    One sod [sic. The house is later described as a log house. Nineteen-century capital "L"s are easily misread as "S"s.] house 32 by 28 feet one and a half story high--floored with dressed puncheons. Said house was divided into three rooms and of the value of $700.00 One barn and stable 30 by 22 feet containing a trough for feeding 12 animals, no roof on either, value $120.00. There were burned in the house the following articles 2500# flour worth $1000.00. One gross matches $3.00. 10# powder $20.00. 15# lead $11.25. 2000 percussion caps $10.00. 30# soap $22.50. 30# nails $12.00. Two sets cups & saucers $10.00. 3 sets plates $12.00. 2 sets knives & forks $6.00. 1 set table spoons $1.00. 50# butter $75.00. 40 gallons liquor $320.00. 10 gals. vinegar $40.00. 1 cook stove and furniture $150.00. 15 pack saddles and ropes $120.00. 10 saddle blankets $10.00. 5 pairs heavy mackinaw blankets $50.00. 3 water buckets $6.00. 1 grindstone weighing 90# $25.00. 3 chopping axes $12.00. 3 tons hay $180.00. 6 dozen bundles oats $36.00. 2 decanters $8.00. 1 large sized pitcher $10.00. 1 doz. glass tumblers $6.00. 5 augers $8.00. 1 brace and bits $16.00. 2 hand saws $16.00. 1 pr. buckskin pants $6.00. 6 wine glasses $4.00. 6 milk pans $9.00. 3 shovels $12.00. 10# saleratus $5.00. 50 gunny sacks $12.00. 2 prs. boots $8. 3 vests $9.00. 4 prs. pants $12.00. 6 shirts $9.00. 3 prs. drawers $4.50. 1 pr. gold scales $4.00. 2 pr. spring balances $4.00. 1 large camp kettle $3.00. 2 frying pans $4.00. 1 buffalo robe $8.00. 2 sets tea spoons $2.00. 5 gallons pickles $15.00.
    Which property was of the value above mentioned. Deponent further says that on the night of the 27th of August 1853 the above described property was destroyed by fire, which fire was kindled as this deponent is informed and believes by Taylor's band of Indians--a branch of the Rogue River Tribe. Deponent further says that he has not received the above mentioned property for his own use or benefit, or any part thereof, since the time last above mentioned, and that he has not received payment from any source for the above mentioned property or any part thereof.
Daniel Raymond
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4th day of January A.D. 1854 [sic].
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Giles Kinney of said county being first duly sworn says
    I know that on or about the 27th day of August 1853 Daniel Raymond & Ephraim Raymond were joint owners of a log house and stable situated on the road leading from Jacksonville to the Canon through the Umpqua Mountains--about 33 miles from Jacksonville--that I passed by the premises soon after and found that both of said buildings had been burnt. The house was, I think 32 / 28 feet on the ground, a story and a half high, with three rooms in the ground floor, the house was new had been built about 18 months. I would think that $700 was a low estimate for the value of the house. The stable was 30 / 12 feet, also built of logs--unfinished when destroyed. I would estimate its value when burnt at two or three hundred dollars.
    I was well acquainted with the premises, having resided there for nearly a year next before they were destroyed. I have heard the affidavit of Daniel Raymond read, am acquainted with the list of property therein set forth as having been destroyed, and know that those articles were in the house and stable at the time they were burnt, except the 40 gallons of liquor and saleratus mentioned. I know that there were liquor and saleratus, but not how much. They were using some and selling some. I know there was a large quantity of flour then but not how much. To the best of my knowledge and belief, the whole bill presented by Mr. Raymond is just and true.
    Messrs. D. & E. Raymond were at that time keeping a place of public entertainment on the road and also kept goods--such as groceries &c. for sale.
    I heard the daughter of "Taylor," a chief of the Rogue River Tribe, say that her brother, "Jim Taylor," set Raymond's house and stable on fire. I have no interest in the claim before mentioned.
Giles Kinney
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 4th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Benjamin Halstead of said county being first duly sworn, says,
    I was a neighbor of the Mr. D. & E. Raymond at the time their house and stable were burnt by the Indians about the last of August 1853. I was frequently in and about the premises while the Raymonds lived there, was well acquainted with the size and kind of the buildings--was there when they were first burnt up, was as well acquainted with the articles of furniture and merchandise in the house and stable as a neighbor might be, and believe the list of goods and chattels as well as the general description of the property burnt, sworn to by Daniel Raymond, as well as the prices of the same, are just and true, to the best of my knowledge and judgment.
    All that I know about the burning of the premises by the Indians is that they were destroyed by fire during actual hostilities in the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 and "Martha Taylor," a daughter of old Chief "Taylor," one of the Rogue River chiefs, told me that her people set the house and stable on fire--and I saw fresh Indian tracks about the premises when I first went there, while the buildings were yet burning--I have no interest in this claim.
Benjamin Halstead
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 4th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
(  seal  )
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Clinton Barney of said county being duly sworn says--I know that the dwelling house of Messrs. Daniel & Ephraim Raymond in said county was destroyed by fire, on or about the 27th day of August 1853 together with its contents--being burnt by the Rogue River Indians as I believe. I was one of the last persons to leave said house during the war, and knew what was left in the house. I have read the statement of Daniel Raymond in the matter of his claiming for property destroyed and know the same to be just and true.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Clinton Barney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
    Ephraim and Daniel Raymonds "Award" No. 1 3144.25. This may certify that the board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853 have awarded to Ephraim Raymond and Daniel Raymond claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid the sum of three thousand one hundred and forty-four dollars and twenty-five cents.
$3,144.25 L. F. Grover
Jacksonville, Oregon A. C. Gibbs
January 30th 1855 Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
       
No. 2--Claim of Clinton Barney        (award) 249.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Clinton Barney of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 27th day of August 1853, during the Rogue River Indian War, said Indians burnt the house of Messrs. D. & E. Raymond in said county in which I had destroyed the following articles of property to wit,
woolen coverlets worth 26.00
linen tablecloths     " 20.00
towels     " 6.00
linen shirts     " 10.00
calico dress     " 4.00
silk worsted dress     " 12.00
worsted cloak     " 10.00
buckskin vests (new)     " 20.00
pair buckskin pants     " 12.00
buffalo robes     " 30.00
blankets     " 16.00
pack saddles     " 40.00
lap robes     " 12.00
cans for packs     " 9.00
hand saw     " 2.00
Collins axes     " 6.00
water pails (wood)     " 4.00
pairs women's shoes     " 4.50
shovel     "        3.50
$249.00
    I have never reclaimed said property, nor received payment therefor, from the United States, nor from anyone.
Clinton Barney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
United States
        To Clinton Barney                                     Dr.
For property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians during the Indian war of 1853, as follows to wit--
new pack saddles & lash ropes 40.00
saddle blankets 5.00
pair buckskin pants 6.00
# stocking yarn 6.00
pair women's shoes 5.00
ladies' dresses 9.00
towels 6.00
tablecloths 8.00
coverlets 20.00
water pails 4.00
bake oven 8.00
hand saw 4.00
drawing knife 3.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
     Daniel Raymond of said county being duly sworn says that the above named Clinton Barney resided with his wife in my house which was burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on or about the 27th day of August 1853 and had resided there three or four months next preceding the destruction of the premises. He had at the time of the fire a quantity of household goods, clothing and saddlery which was destroyed when my house was burnt. I know that the foregoing bill by him presented is a true list of articles destroyed at that time, belonging to Clinton Barney with the exception of the articles of female apparel and use, and as to them I believe the list is true, and that the valuation affixed thereto is a just one.
Daniel Raymond
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Giles Kinney of said county being duly sworn says that I resided with Messrs. Daniel and Ephraim Raymond about a year next preceding the destruction of their house and stable by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians about the 27th day of August 1853. Clinton Barney lived with his wife in the same house some three or four months next preceding the burning of the premises. I know that the foregoing bill of goods and chattels by him presented were in the house at the time it was burnt, and were destroyed by the fire as I verily believe. I cannot be positive about the articles of female wearing apparel and use but know that there were articles of that character there. In my judgment the prices fixed to the goods are reasonable and just. I have no interest in the claim.
Giles Kinney
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 4th day January A.D. 1855.
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
No. 2 Clinton Barney's "Award" $249.00
    This may certify that the board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Clinton Barney, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and forty-nine dollars.
$249.00 L. F. Grover
Jacksonville, Oregon A. C. Gibbs
Jany. 30th 1855 Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners

[No. 3--] Claim of Davis Evans    Award $1755.00
United States of America
In a/c with Davis Evans
For
One house burnt by the Rogue River Indians or their allies during the Rogue River War between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853. Said house was 30 by 36 feet one and a half stories high 1000 feet of flooring; two fireplaces with counter and shelving suitable for bar--said house worth           1000.00
    The following goods and articles were in said house and burned at the same time
tables                                   @ $4           12.00
8 benches & stools $2 16.00
1 No. 3 cooking stove and furniture 150.00
2 frying pans $3 6.00
3 shovels for mining $4 12.00
25 yds. calico 25¢ per yd. 6.25
18 yds. heavy duck $1 18.00
8 pack saddles $6 48.00
4 bushels potatoes 20¢ per # 48.00
50  # dried apples 40¢ per # 20.00
1 keg pickles 10 gallons 30.00
10 guns $5 50.00
Also burnt by the said Indians at the same time and place
one log barn 12 by 18 feet                                                   100.00

tons hay                                  
$50           200.00
75  dozen sheaf oats $3 225.00
Also one other house burnt by the Indians as aforesaid within
    the time aforesaid situated at Evans ferry on Rogue River
    12 by 18 ft. with counter bar and chimney                      200.00
Also one keg of whiskey in saw house,
    contg. 10 gallons                                         $3                    30.00

Also  100 # flour                                
40¢           40.00
Also  25 # sugar 40¢ 10.00
Also 10 # coffee 50¢ 5.00
Also 25 # bacon 75¢ 18.75
Also 1 camp kettle, fry pan, 4 plates, 4 cups, 4 knives & forks,
    one large iron kettle, 2 axes, the whole worth                  40.00
Also  blankets                               
$6           24.00
Also one large dressed elk skin                                                5.00
    "    one ferry rope 100 yards long                                     100.00
    "    damage done to ferry boat & loss of time, lumber
     & materials                                                                        500.00
    "    loss of one riding saddle                                                25.00
    "    loss of chisels & augers destroyed in same house      15.00
    "  200 # chili beans                          
40¢           80.00
    "  150 # bacon 75¢ 112.50
    " 40 # coffee 50¢ 20.00
    " 100 # sugar 40¢ 40.00
    " 50 # Indian or corn meal 40¢ 20.00
    " 30 # salt 40¢ 12.00
    " 10 # saleratus 75¢ 7.50
    " 25 # candles $1 25.00
    " 100  papers ground coffee 1" each 50.00
    " 5 # pepper $2 10.00
    " 5 # allspice   " 6.00
    " ½  dozen mining shovels 30.00
    " 5  prs. blankets $8 40.00
    " 1  canoe destroyed Indians 40.00
    " 16 # tobacco $1 16.00
    " 6 # tea 1.50 9.00
    "   about 2 acres potatoes the amount and number of
        bushels supposed to be 100 bushels                            250.00
    "   about 1 acres in corn about 25 bushels                       100.00
    "   cabbage, onions & beans                                               100.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Davis Evans, the person who presents the foregoing amount against the Indians for property destroyed by the Rogue River Indians or their allies during the Rogue River War between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853, being duly sworn says that the above and foregoing amount is just and true and that he has not reclaimed any of the property except such as described to wit--the ferry boat; that he has not been paid the destruction of said property either by the United States or any person.
Davis Evans
Sworn to & subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 4th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Melissa Porter of said county being duly sworn says I am acquainted with Davis Evans the claimant. I lived at the house of Davis Evans on the south side of Rogue River at the time of the commencement of hostilities by the Rogue River Indians in 1853. I was taken away from this house at that time by my friends for fear that if we remained I should be killed by the Indians.
    When the family abandoned the house I was the last person who left. Mr. Evans was away with a pack train to Scottsburg at the time. There were left in the house one large dining table, one kitchen table, one card table, new oilcloths on all then, four small stools in the bar room--two or three in the kitchen besides two long ones in the dining room--two frying pans, a half dozen mining shovels--2 bolts calico, 32 or 3 yds. in each, some 60 or 80 yards of heavy duck used for covering packs and tent--also a number of pack saddles--8 at least--potatoes about 6 bushels--apples dried 100#--one 10 gallon keg pickles--don't know of any whiskey--flour between 200 & 300 lbs.--150# sugar--about 75# coffee--about 300# bacon--1 camp kettle, 4 plates--4 cups--4 knives and forks--one large iron kettle (not the camp kettle), 3 axes--five pair blankets--one large dressed elk skin--one riding saddle without macheers (Oregon saddle), a good number of augers, chisels & tools--can't tell the amount--75# chili beans--Indian corn meal 50#--30 or 40# of salt--10# saleratus--25# candles--100 weight of ground coffee put up in papers--5 or 6# pepper, 3 or 4# spice, nearly a keg of tobacco, say 16#--5 or 6 boxes of tea, one pound each. I was left in charge of the house and when I left I locked all the doors. There were 13 old guns left in the house; when I left there was a barn there filled with hay and oats--the barn was finished and covered with boards--the barn was filled from the ground up.
    I left the house on the 8th or 9th of August 1853 and returned to the place about the 10th of Sept. but found no house nor barn there. They had been burned. Saw in the ruins of the house old gun barrels--kettles & stove--shovels, broken crockery ware, some burnt tinware &c.
    The Indians came to Evans' house two or three days & nights in succession next before I left the house--they took money from the drawer about $13--liquor from the bar--all the provisions they wanted to eat and carry off--they went into the garden, eat all the melons they could and destroyed the vegetables--they told me to stay there, I should not leave. I wanted to go down to Durbin's for safety, but they would not allow me to go--said if Evans came back they would kill him and destroy all his property.
    Mr. Evans kept good groceries &c. for sale; also kept a house of public entertainment. The Indians who came to Evans' home and destroyed property and made threats were a part of the band belonging to "Jo" and "Sam," the principal tribe of the upper Rogue River.
Melissa Porter
When I came back I found the fence about the field broken down, the potatoes about two acres were pulled up and laid all over the field, potatoes scattered about, squashes and pumpkins were cut to pieces, cabbages destroyed in a manner that led me to believe that the Indians did it, corn and beans between 2 & 3 acres of each, of all destroyed. I charged the Indians who were there first with having destroyed the crops. They did not deny it but said they did not wish to talk about the matter.
Melissa Porter
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 4th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Benjamin Halstead of said county being duly sworn says, I know that after the 2nd day of August of 1853 there was a house at Evans Ferry in said county belonging to Davis Evans a log house covered with clapboards, a common sized log cabin--say 12 by 18 feet--having a fireplace and chimney--a bar counter and shelves, the last time I was in the house, a short time before the Indian difficulties. I would say that the house, bar liquor, glasses, and all were worth two hundred dollars. I mean what liquor was in sight, on the bar. There were camp kettles and blankets in the house when I was there--can't say how many--there were also provisions about the house for use of the persons keeping the ferry. I have often stopped there and taken meals, can't say how much-- (here the affidavit of claims of Davis Evans was read to the witness). From my knowledge of the supplies in the house I would think that the amount of flour, sugar, bacon &c. stated in Mr. Evans' bill was true.
    I have kept a ferry myself across Rogue River about five miles below Evans ferry. The ferry rope at Evans Ferry destroyed by the Indians was a rawhide rope--Evans' rope was about a two inch rope and would be worth seventy-five dollars, in use, as this one was when cut away.
    Evans had at the time the rope was cut away, between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853, a ferry boat at his ferry--about 11 feet wide and 40 feet long--which went down the river the time that the rope was cut. The boat has been reclaimed by Evans but with what damages to the boat or at what expense I do not know.
    Mr. Evans also had a house where he resided, on the south side of Rogue River some four miles above the ferry, the house was a log house, one story and a half high, about 18 by 20 ft. on the ground--with an addition of about the same size in length--and a shed in front some 8 feet wide with an addition in the rear about 12 or 14 ft. wide and the length of the house--which had a chimney and fireplace. There were a counter and shelves in the house, suitable for a bar--the floors of this house were made of sawn lumber throughout. There was no floor above. From my knowledge of the premises at the time it was destroyed, I would think they were worth $1000. This house was burnt during the time of active hostilities in the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, sometime between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853. I was in the house a short time before the same was burnt, and saw a lot of old guns, a cooking stove, some clothing, some flour, and all kinds of provisions--don't recollect seeing any beans or bacon the last time I was there, but Evans usually kept such things for sale.
    Evans also had a barn built of logs about 16 by 18 feet on the ground. I was there when he was building it. I saw him put hay into the barn; when I last saw the barn there was about a ton of hay in it, he was then hauling in his hay--had got it all in. Don't know whether he had any oats in the barn or not.
    I was at the place when the house and barn were destroyed, a few days after they were burnt, and would think both burnt at the same (time).
    When I saw the barn it was not finished, it was raised only 5 or 6 logs from the ground--if it had been raised to the ordinary height and covered with a roof it would have been worth $50.
    I know that Evans had a garden there--some two acres or more, had vegetables &c. in the garden.

Benjamin Halstead
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 4th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Thomas D. Jewett, of said county, being duly sworn says--I lived a neighbor to Davis Evans of said county at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. His house was built of small round pine logs. I would not think the house was worth more than $500. I went to Evans' house after his family had left it, during the war, to secure his articles from Indians. I went at the request of Evans' hired hand, took my team and wagon, found the bar with decanters &c. with some liquor &c. took the bar furniture and packed it in a box in the wagon, took all the cooking utensils I could find--mining shovels--saw no bolt of calico. I saw pack saddles there--they were old worn out saddles--did not think them worth taking, a lot of dried apples, saw some old guns there which were condemned--took one double barreled shotgun breech broke off--the barn was worth about $100, had in it 4 tons hay and 75 dozen sheaf oats--the house by the ferry was worth about $100. We took all the kegs that had any liquor in them, took all the flour, sugar and other provisions that we could find, axes and bed tick, some chili beans &c. We saw a lot of ground coffee put up in papers, which was moldy and worthless--we thought it not worth taking. I do not think the Indians destroyed the corn--the crows took most of it--the vegetables were partly destroyed during the war by someone, and part remained there after peace was declared. The ferry boat was not damaged only by the washing out of the lower planks worth about 8 cts. per foot, the boat was 11 by 40 feet.
    The property taken from Evans' house was taken to Durbin's ferry for safekeeping and delivered to Evans' hired man. I have seen several of those articles in Evans' possession since the war.

Thomas Jewett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    David Courtney of said county, being duly sworn says--At the time of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Davis Evans had burnt by the Indians one barn about 18 by 20 feet on the ground--story and a half high--filled with oats and hay from the bottom up about half of each--also had his dwelling house burnt filled with furniture, groceries, provisions and so forth. I don't know particularly what articles. The rope of his ferry was also cut away by the Indians and his boat went down the river some half mile below the ferry. The boat was damaged some 3 or 4 hundred dollars. The boat when built cost over $1000. I helped build it. The little house at the ferry was also burnt at the same time--worth over $100. The dwelling house above the ferry was worth $600 or $700.
    I have no interest in the claim. The rope cut away was worth $100 as made and put up. It cost some $200 to get the boat back to the ferry. The cooking stove and furniture burnt in the house was a large cooking stove--don't know what it was worth.
    Mr. Evans had a garden--a lot of corn, potatoes, cabbages &c. I passed along them about the close of the war and found them all destroyed--I should think the damages done to the vegetables was over $1000. I do not know that the Indians destroyed the garden, but have heard them say since the war that they destroyed the vegetables.
    I harvested the oats of Mr. Evans in the summer of 1853, can't say how much they were worth. I should judge there were at least 75 dozen of oats. I heard the Indians say at the commencement of the war that they would destroy Evans' property, and I have heard them say since that they did do it.

David Courtney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Daniel Raymond being duly sworn says--I was acquainted with the dwelling house and garden of Davis Evans, claimed to have been destroyed by Indians during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. I passed the field and garden soon after the armistice and before the treaty, and the Crescent City volunteers camped there. The horses were in the field, the volunteers were diggin' potatoes. Some four or five men were diggin'--have no doubt they took other vegetables at the same time. It was a general practice during the war for volunteers, packers and others passing to enter gardens and fields of settlers where the premises had been abandoned or destroyed, and take whatever vegetables or other things they might wish to eat or feed their horses and mules.
    They destroyed my garden, for which I have made no claim.

Daniel Raymond
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    M. C. Barkwell of said county, being duly sworn, says--I was acquainted with the house described by Mr. Halstead, belonging to Davis Evans, situated on the south side of Rogue River some four miles above the ferry. The house in general description was as stated by Mr. Halstead. I once lived in the house.
    From my knowledge of the house, and the manner in which it was finished, I should think it could not be worth more than $1000. There was a cooking stove in the house--rather a large sized cooking stove. The stove and furniture, cooking utensils &c. I should think were worth $120.
    I saw the small house on the north side of Rogue River at Evans ferry sometime in the summer of 1853. I would think the house, bar and fixtures might be worth in the neighborhood of two hundred dollars (say $200).
    I would not think the large rawhide rope across the ferry worth $75. I should not think it worth more than $50.
    The boat was a very good boat about as Mr. Halstead described--the best boat on the river.

M. C. Barkwell
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 4th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Melissa Porter of said county, as an additional affidavit, says--That at the time of Indian hostilities of 1853, about the 8th of August 1853, Davis Evans had at his residence on Rogue River an Indian canoe--I left the home in the afternoon of the 8th to go down to Durbin's; when I came back about sundown the canoe was gone. About 8 o'clock in the evening of the same day I saw four Indians coming down the river in the same canoe. The Indians tied the canoe at the landing and came up to the house--took everything they wanted. I left the house while the Indians were there in the evening, when I came back in the morning the Indians and canoe was gone. I have never seen the canoe since. The canoe was a large good Indian canoe. I have often crossed the river in it.
    There were left in the house of Evans which was burnt by the Indians two kegs of vinegar--10 gallons each and 25# butter.
    The Indians I have spoken of were of the Rogue River Tribe.

[Melissa Porter]
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 5th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Giles Kinney of said county being duly sworn says--During the time of the Rogue River War of 1853, I went down the river from Davis' ferry some half or three quarters of a mile, found Mr. Evans' ferry boat, then having found that the boat was gone from the ferry and the rope cut. One end of the boat was lying on the west side of the river--one end out of water--the upper or false bottom was gone. I do not think the water could have washed out the false bottom. I think the Indians must have torn it out. The pulleys on one side of the boat were gone. I would think it would cost $100 to bring the boat back.
Giles Kinney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Davis Evans "Award" No. 3. 1755.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853 have awarded to Davis Evans a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid the sum of seventeen hundred and fifty-five dollars.
$1755.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855


No. 4--Claim of Martin Angel    "Award" 200.00
United States of America
    To Martin Angel                                                                 Dr.
To one mule stolen from the camp on Stuart's Creek by the Rogue River Indians during the Rogue River War between the second day of August and the 10th day of Sept. 1853.
Mule worth                                                                    $200.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Martin Angel of said county being duly sworn says--That during the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, sometime between the 12th & 20th day of August 1853, he lost a mule which he valued at the time at $200--that he verily believes said mule was stolen by the Rogue River Tribe, that he has not reclaimed the same nor received payment therefor, from the United States nor from anyone.
Martin Angel
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5 day January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Thomas Pyle of said county being duly sworn says--Sometime between the 12th and 20th days of August 1853 during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I had in my possession a mule belonging to Martin Angel. The mule was then in the service in Company "A," Captain John F. Miller. The horses of the company was picketed out one night about the time aforesaid, when they were stampeded by the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe. In the morning nine of the animals were missing, not to be found, and this mule among the number. I have never seen the mule since, and verily believe he was stolen and taken away by the Rogue River Indians. The mule was a good mule; I should think it was worth at the time it was lost at least $200.
Thomas Pyle
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Martin Angel's "award" No. 4 $200.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853 have awarded to Martin Angel a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid the sum of two hundred dollars.
$200.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
January 30th 1855

No. 5  Claim of Michael Brennan     Award 32.75

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Michael Brennan of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, about the 6th day of August, I had in a house at the forks of Applegate Creek the following property to wit: two pair of blankets, two pair of cassimere pantaloons nearly new, a flannel shirt, one cotton shirt, one silk sock, one pair shoes, one butcher knife, and one tin cup. Said house was burnt by the Applegate Indians, a band of the Rogue Rivers, and I verily believe said articles of property were destroyed by the fire--I have never reclaimed any of said articles nor received pay therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Michael Brennan
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John W. Duncan of said county being first duly sworn says--I was at the house in the forks of Applegate Creek about the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, about the 9th day of August 1853, and know that Michael Brennan left at that house certain articles of bedding and clothing, such as blankets, pants, shirts &c., such things as miners generally have about camp. After we left we saw smoke in the direction of the house and supposed it had been set on fire by the Indians. I have learned since that the house with its contents was destroyed by fire at that time.
John W. Duncan
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Michael Brennan's "award" No. 5 32.75
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853 have awarded to Michael Brennan, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of thirty-two dollars and seventy-five cents.
$32.75

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855

No. 6--Claim of A. B. Jennison   "Award" $1689.65
The United States
        To Albert B. Jennison                                Dr.
To property burnt and taken by the Rogue River Indians during the war of 1853 between the 7th of August and the 5th of September A.D. 1853--
1 house 16/20--round logs plank floor
    stove & wood chimney                             $250.00
20 tons hay                                  $40 1200.00
4 scythes & snaths 20.00
1 cupboard 20.00
2 axes 8.00
1 hand saw 5.00
1 large camp kettle 6.00
1 tin can 4.00
1 tin churn 8.00
2 frying pans 4.00
1 coffee mill 3.00
1 tin water bucket 3.00
2 coffee pots 5.00
1 stew pan 3.00
1 brass kettle (2 gallons) 6.00
1 water bucket 2.00
1 washboard 2.00
1 set teacups & saucers 4.00
1 set plates 4.00
6 tin plates 3.00
4 tin cups 2.00
6 milk pans (tin) 6.00
8 japan canisters 2.00
1 set knives & forks 3.00
2 butcher knives 2.00
1 carving knife & fork 3.00
1 set teaspoons 3.00
1 table spoon 1.50
1 large dish pan 2.50
1 table 6.00
2 mattresses 6.00
1 linen tablecloth 5.00
1 pr. buckskin pants 8.00
1 pr. jeans pants 4.00
1 pr. shoes (men's) 2.50
1 tent 6.00
2 stone jugs (2 gals.) 4.00
1 gal. canteen 1.50
2 quilts 20.00
4 blankets 20.00
2 pillows 10.00
25# flour 5.00
5# coffee 1.65
1# tea 1.50
5# bacon 2.50
3# soap 1.50
1 [illegible] silk shawl 30.00
1 Bay State shawl 20.00
1 blk. alpaca dress 14.00
1   "    crepe      " 5.00
3 calico dresses 15.00
1 silk apron 5.00
2 gold breastpins 10.00
1 silver butter knife 2.50
4 night dresses 4.00
6     "     caps 4.00
6 towels 6.00
1 mosquito bar 4.00
7 shirts 7.00
4 lace collars 4.00
6 yds. bonnet ribbon 3.00
4   "     velvet       " 4.00
8   "     curtain calico 2.00
8   "     pillow slips 2.00
38½ yds. calico 11.50
1 blk. silk hdkf. 2.50
4 ladies' shirts 6.00
4 pr. ladies' hose 3.00
1 yd. crash linen 1.00
8 spools cot. thread 2.00
2 calico aprons 1.00
2 ladies' calico socks 3.00
1 pr. ladies' drawers 3.00
1 white shirt 5.00
1 worsted sock 3.50
1 bonnet 5.00
1 worsted dress 10.00
2 calico        " 6.00
4 aprons 2.00
2 pr. ladies' hose 1.50
2 white shirts 4.00
1 Bible 3.00
1 blk. silk veil 6.00
3 child's chemise 3.00
1      "      worsted sock 2.00
4 school books 4.00
2 child's night dress 2.00
2 prs. ladies' shoes 5.00
10 yds. sheeting 2.50
5     "     fine flannel 5.00
4     "     cotton   " 2.00
5     "     linen diaper 5.00
1 patent leather trunk 1.500
5# sugar 1.55
2 glass gilded boxes 2.00
20 bus. potatoes 100.00
100 squashes 12.00
100 melons 5.00
30 bus. corn 300.00
50# tomatoes 4.00
50# turnips 1.50
25# beets 2.00
25# carrots 2.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Albert B. Jennison of said county being duly sworn says--That the articles of property contained in the foregoing list were his property at the time destroyed, that they were destroyed sometime between the 7th day of August and the 5th day of September 1853, being burnt and taken by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians during the war of 1853--That he has never secured any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States, nor from anyone.
Albert B. Jennison
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William J. Newton of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on the 7th or 8th day of August 1853 I know that the dwelling house of Albert B. Jennison was burnt to the best of my knowledge and belief by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. This tribe had a rancheria near the house and I saw them nearby and their track all about the ruins of the house, the next morning after the house was burnt.
    At the time the house was burnt, I think that it contained pretty much all his household effects and from the appearance of things after the fire I should think they were all destroyed with the house. Mr. Jennison's house was well supplied with household goods and furniture for this country. I am satisfied he saved nothing from the fire. The description of the house contained in Mr. Jennison's bill is correct as near as I can judge--I helped put it up. I would think the house was worth at the time it was burnt at least $250.
    Mr. Jennison had a large stack of hay burnt at the same time, I would think 30 tons. I know he had scythes and snaths, one cupboard worth $20, axes, in use, a hand saw, a camp kettle, large, a tin can, milk can 3 gallons, a tin churn, 2 frying pans, one coffee mill, a tin water bucket, coffee pots, a stew pan, a brass kettle, a water bucket, washboard, set [of] tea cups and saucers, one set plates, tin plates, tin cups, milk pans, tin, japan canisters worth 2 bits apiece, knives & forks, carving knife, teaspoons, table spoons, a large tin dish pan, one plain pine table, 6 or seven dollars, 2 mattresses straw & tick, about $4 apiece, one linen tablecloth, one tent worth 10 or 12 dollars, 2 stone jugs worth a couple of dollars apiece, a one gallon canteen. They had two beds in there with bed clothing, and other articles of wearing apparel both male and female for three persons. I don't know how much or what particular articles. I know they had provisions for family use, but not how much. I have seen a breastpin there but don't know the value. I have seen school books there, don't know how many. Mr. Jennison had a large sized patent leather trunk, some small fancy boxes belonging to Mr. Jennison's daughter, don't know what they were worth. Jennison had a field of potatoes about half acre which was destroyed then. I think the Indians dug the most of them from the appearance of the field. Indians dig potatoes different from other folks, dig with a stick. I think the Indians must have taken 20 bushels. There were also squashes in the same field which were destroyed--also melons--had a patch of corn which was also destroyed ½ acre or more. Jennison had also a good garden with various other kinds of vegetables in it all [of] which were destroyed during the war, mostly by the Indians.
    I was a near neighbor of Mr. Jennison and was frequently in and about his house before it was burnt. I have no interest in this claim.
W. J. Newton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Thomas P. Bartlett of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War about the 8th of August 1853, I know that Albert B. Jennison had a dwelling house situated in said county with its contents, articles of household furniture, clothing, provisions &c. destroyed by fire. I resided in the family of Mr. Jennison just before his house was burned, have read the list of articles filed by him, constituting his claim in this case, and know Mr. Jennison had those articles in his house as mentioned and that they were destroyed by fire with the house. I helped cut the stack of hay mentioned, and would think there was better than 25 tons in the whole. May have been more. There were left in the trunk which was burnt in the house one silk shawl, a good, new shawl, a large woolen shawl, one black alpaca dress, new, one alpaca crepe. There was calico dresses there also. I know these articles were then there as the trunk was opened when we left the house, and we were to take these articles with us but could not pack them, so they were left. The house was a log house I should think as large as 16/20 ft. on the ground, had a floor, fireplace & chimney, also a porch in front. I should judge it would have been worth $200 at the time it was burnt. I have no doubt the house was burnt by the Rogue River Indians from the fact that these hostile Indians were seen in that neighborhood at that time burning other houses & destroying property.
Thomas P. Bartlett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
            W. W. Fowler of said county being duly sworn says--
    Just previous to the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I sold to Albert B. Jennison a bill of dry goods in a month about $100 or $125, including sheeting, flannel, dress patterns &c., which Mr. Jennison took home a short time before his house was burnt by the Indians. I was at that time a merchant in Jacksonville ("Town of"), have no interest in this claim.
W. W. Fowler
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.

No. 7--Claim of William J. Newton        "Award" $1600.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William J. Newton of said county being duly sworn says--That during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 9th August 1853, I was the owner of the following property to wit:
    One log house one story high 16/18 feet on the ground, with a floor, fireplace and chimney--which I valued at $200 also about seven tons and a half of hay in a stack enclosed with a fence made of poles, which was destroyed by fire, burnt by the Rogue River Indians as nearly certain, as I saw Indians firing two other houses next neighbors to mine, and I saw tracks of Indians about the ruins the next morning after it was burnt. About the same time I lost 16 head of cattle viz. 6 cows, 6 calves, 2 oxen, 1 year old steer. The cattle were a full average lot of cattle. They were drove away by the Indians. None of said property has been reclaimed by me nor have I received payment therefor from the United States, nor from anyone. I also lost a saddle horse by the same means and at the same time valued at $100.
W. J. Newton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William J. Newton of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 10th day of August of said year, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe took and drove away a bay American horse, belonging to me, worth at the time one hundred dollars, at the time said horse was at Shetler's Ranch near the Siskiyou Mountain. I have never recovered said animal, nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
W. J. Newton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 31st day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John E. Ross of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I was col. commanding the Oregon volunteers and was requested by William J. Newton to detail a number of men to escort him in hunting a band of cattle which he said he had ranging on Evans Creek, on what is now called the Indian Reserve. I went that day and saw cattle signs but saw no cattle--detailed some 20 men to help Mr. Newton find them. I heard John Durbin say that he had sold cattle only them to Mr. Newton. The volunteers did not find the cattle, but saw fresh signs of them. I believe from the appearance of things then that Indians were in that neighborhood and had driven off said cattle. I have no interest in this claim. We were then on a march up Evans Creek and came upon the Indians the second day afterwards.
John E. Ross
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 10th day January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    W. G. T'Vault of said county being duly sworn says--I know that in the summer of 1853 William J. Newton of said county bought of John Durbin a band of said cattle, about one hundred head, at the commencement of the Rogue River War of 1853. Said band of cattle was on Evans Creek on lands since assigned to said Rogue River Tribe as a reservation by the Treaty of 10th September 1853. During the time of hostilities I know that a large portion of that band was missing, and it was the general talk and impression in the neighborhood that they were driven away by the Indians. After the war a part of these driven away were found on the Reserve--an Indian told me that they had killed five of the Durbin cattle. I have good reason to believe from statements of those hunting for the cattle at the time that fifteen were finally lost, and not recovered after the war.
W. G. T'Vault
Sworn to & subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 10th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    A. B. Jennison of said county being duly sworn says--I lived a neighbor to Wm. J. Newton in said county at the time of the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. I know he had a log house about 16/18 feet on the ground with a floor, chimney & fireplace worth I would think about $200. This house was burnt about the 9th day of August 1853, and I have every reason to believe it was burnt by the Rogue River Indians in the neighborhood the same night [they were] setting other houses on fire. Mr. Newton also had a stack of hay there which was burnt at the same time--I would think the stack contained six or seven tons of hay. The stack had a corral fence about it.worth $20 at least. I have seen Mr. Newton's stock; they were an average lot of stock.
Albert B. Jennison
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Thomas D. Jewett of said county being duly sworn says--I know that in the summer of 1853 William J. Newton bought a band of cattle of John Durbin; at the time of the war, said band of cattle was running on the north side of Rogue River on Evans Creek--what is now the Indian Reserve. I know that the man having charge of the band got the band up about the close of the war and counted them; they said that there was fifteen head missing and not to be found. I believe from my knowledge of the band of cattle, and the circumstances of the war, that said fifteen head of cattle were driven away and destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians.
    I cannot say that all the missing cattle belonged to Mr. Newton--as a man by the name of Dodge had some cattle in the band. I never heard Dodge say that he lost any cattle.
Thomas D. Jewett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
State of California              )
County of Siskiyou             )   Before D. Grosse justice of the peace
Township of Cottonwood   )  for Cottonwood Township--
    Personally appeared before me Jacob Shetler who being duly sworn deposes and says--That on or about the 9th day [of] August 1853 a bay horse belonging to Wm. Newton of Rogue River Valley in the Territory of Oregon was taken according to my belief by Indians belonging to [the] Rogue River Tribe or their allies during the late war. The aforesaid horse was taken at the same time that a horse [that] belonged to Cram, Rogers & Co. of the city of Yreka was taken, which latter horse carried a trail rope; and both horses were seen together the evening previous to their being taken. By means of the trail rope I was enabled to track the horses for about two miles above my house, in this state and county aforesaid and at the place where the trail was lost. I saw the tracks of Indians; the tracks were numerous, plainly showing that the Indians had come from the mountains. I value the aforesaid horse of Mr. William Newton at one hundred dollars.
Jacob Shetler
Subscribed and sworn to before me, Cottonwood Jany. 27th 1855.
D. Grosse
Justice of the Peace
for Cottonwood Township
No. 7 William J. Newton's        "Award"    No. 7  1600.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William J. Newton, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of sixteen hundred dollars.
$1600.00
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
January 31st 1855

No. 8 Claim of William Thompson & Henry C. Rowland
"Award"  $1029.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William Thompson & Henry C. Rowland  of said county being duly sworn says--During the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on the 8th or 9th of September 1853 we were joint owners of a log house on Applegate Creek in said county--the house was 18/24 feet on the ground furnished with a fireplace and chimney, worth not far from $300 at that time. Said house was burnt near the date last aforesaid with its contents to wit--
    2 ten feet pine dining tables worth one worth $15 the other 6 or $8, 3 ten gallon kegs pickles, 6 stools worth $6, two long benches worth $3 apiece, 2 soaking pans worth $10, two kegs of vinegar, 6 gallons. Said house and articles of furniture were destroyed by fire, and as these applicants believe were burnt by the Applegate Indians--a band of the Rogue River Tribe. Certain of the Applegate Indians have since stated to applicants that they burnt the said house with its contents. We have not received payment for said property from the United States nor from anyone--nor reclaimed any of the same.
    We also had a field of potatoes growing near the house, about 2½ acres which were destroyed about the same time of the burning of the house, by the same Indians as we believe--
    When we first returned to the premises after the making of the Treaty of 10th Sept. 1853, we found Indians diggin' potatoes in this field--and from tracks of Indians in the field and from the appearance of the ground dug we believe the Indians destroyed the potatoes. We think there must have been seven hundred and twenty-seven hills of potatoes destroyed; we counted them at the time, and think this is the number. This would amount to about one hundred and four bushels, estimated according to the yield of them left in the field after the war.
Wm. Thompson
H. C. Rowland
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 21st day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    George Hayes of said county being duly sworn says--Just previous to the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I had been living with Mr. William Thompson and Henry C. Rowland at their house on Applegate Creek. The house was a log house about 18/24 or 26 feet on the ground, one story high with a fireplace and chimney in it. I should think the house was worth at that time in the neighborhood of $250. The last time I was there, I saw three kegs [of] pickles, 10 gallons in each I should judge--2 long pine dining tables, two long bench stools--2 soaking pans, can't say what they were worth. I know that Messrs. Thompson and Rowland had a field of potatoes growing near the house about 2½ acres I would judge--that as much as a hundred bushels had been destroyed of the potatoes, if they yielded as largely as I should think they would yield. The house with the contents was destroyed by fire about the 8 or 9th of September 1853. Several of the Applegate Indians told me after the war that they burnt the house and destroyed the crops.
    The Applegate band belongs to the Upper Rogue River Tribe. I have no doubt, from the appearance of the field, that the Indians destroyed potatoes. I have no interest in this claim.
George Hayes
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 21st day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
No. 8 William Thompson & Henry C. Rowland, "Award" $1029.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William Thompson and Henry C. Rowland, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one thousand and twenty-nine dollars.
$1029.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Feby. 6th 1855

No. 9--Claim of John W. Patrick & the estate of Jno. R. Hardin $1313.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John W. Patrick of said county being duly sworn says--In the last of February 1853, I entered on and took possession of a certain land claim situated in Rogue River, being the same now claimed by the widow of John R. Hardin, deceased, and commenced improving the same--built a house and made other improvements thereon. I continued to reside upon and cultivate said land claim continuously from thence up to the first day of March 1854. John R. Hardin and wife came to reside with me sometime the last of June or first of July A.D. 1853 under an agreement of joint occupancy of the premises, were in equal partnership in all our business. The house and improvements were of the character described by Amanda E. Hardin in her statement filed in the matter on this claim, also the furniture therein contained, all which were destroyed by the Rogue River Indians during the war therein stated. On or about the 1st of March 1854 aforesaid, I sold out to Mrs. Amanda E. Hardin my joint possession and left her the sole occupant and claimant of the land on which said improvements were situated immediately after the war, and before I sold my interest to Mrs. Hardin I built another house on said claim near where the first house stood inside of the enclosed improvements originally made by me and released to Mrs. Hardin after the death of John R. Hardin.
    I claim one half interest in all property destroyed by said Indians during the war except the settee mentioned, which was the property of John R. Hardin.
    The ox yokes mentioned in Mrs. Hardin's statements neither belonged to me nor to Mr. Hardin. They were left there by one Carson of Umpqua Valley.
    I have never reclaimed any of said property destroyed nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
J. W. Patrick
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. T
United States of America
    In a/c with Mrs. Amanda E. Hardin, widow of J. R. Hardin, for dwelling house with three rooms, one room 18 by 20 feet lined with unbleached sheeting, sawn lumber floor, 2 doors, one fireplace and chimney, one room for kitchen 12/16 feet, one door, slab floor, chimney and fireplace, one other room 14 by 16 feet sawn lumber floor, one door the roof [of] said building boards nailed on. Value $1000.00
Also sawn lumber and paling, value 100.00
Also one settee 5.00
Also two tables and chairs           each $10 20.00
Also two ox yokes $5 each 10.00
Also about 200 chickens      200.00
$1335.00
Amanda E. Hardin being duly sworn--Says that she is the widow of Jno. R. Hardin, deceased, that said Hardin was killed by the Rogue River Indians or their allies during the Rogue River War between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853, and that the said Hardin and one Jno. W. Patrick were joint owners and occupying the premises above described with the exception of the settee which was the property of Jno. R. Hardin, and that the Rogue River Indians or their allies destroyed said property by fire and otherwise during the Rogue River War and between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of Sept. 1853 and that she believes the property to be the value above stated and that she claims one equal half of the value thereof in her right of dower, the house and goods being the homestead and goods of the said Jno. R. Hardin, deceased, and further this affiant has not received pay for the same from the United States or from anyone.
Amanda E. Hardin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Amanda E. Hardin of said county being duly sworn says--I am the widow of the late Jno. E. Hardin, deceased--during actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 on the 11th day of August 1853, he was shot by the Rogue River Indians near Dardanelles in said county, and died of his wounds on the 13th day of the same month. At the time of the commencement of said war, I and my late husband were residing in the house mentioned in the claim filed for damages to be awarded Jno. W. Patrick also resided there and was part owner of the house; it was understood that the north half was Mr. Hardin's land claim which included the house. Mr. Patrick took the other half. Mr. Patrick made the first actual improvement; Mr. Hardin furnished the means. Mr. Patrick has since sold his half, and I still claim and occupy the said north half mentioned, which never was claimed by Mr. Patrick.
Amanda E. Hardin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    The United States of America. To all persons to whom these presents shall come, greeting.
    Know ye, that whereas John R. Hardin, late of the county of Jackson, died intestate as it is said, having at the time of his death property in this Territory which may be lost, destroyed or diminished in value if speedy care be not taken of the same. To the end, therefore, that said property may be collected, preserved and disposed of according to law I do hereby appoint John W. McCully administrator of all and singular the goods and chattels, rights and credits which were of the said John R. Hardin at the time of his death with full power and authority to secure and dispose of said property according to law, and collect all moneys due said deceased and in general to do and perform all other acts and things which are or hereafter may be required of him by law.
    In testimony whereof I Thomas McF. Patton, judge of the probate court in and for the county of Jackson aforesaid, have hereunto signed my name and affixed the seal of said court at [my] office this 17th day of October A.D. 1853.
T. McF. Patton, Judge of Probate
( T. McF. Patton )
( Probate Judge )
( Jackson County )
    I hereby certify that the foregoing letter of administration is a true copy of the original letter of administration granted by the probate court of Jackson County to John McCully on the estate of John R. Hardin, dec.
A. P. Stearns
This the 23rd Jany. 1855.       Probate Judge
United States
    To Jno. W. McCully, administrator, estate of Jno. R. Hardin, decd.        Dr.
to one house, described as follows, built of hewn logs 30/20 feet one story high, roof nailed on, and also fencing around the house destroyed by the Indians in Rogue River Valley.
Valued at 1000.00
Value of fencing        60.00
$1060.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John W. McCully of said county being duly sworn says--John R. Hardin, late of said county, was shot by the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853--he was shot on the 6th [or] 8th of August 1853. I have been duly appointed and qualified to act as his administrator. At the time Hardin was shot he owned a house in Rogue River Valley, which was burnt about the time of his death by the Rogue River Indians. The house was a log house, some 20/30 feet on the ground with some additions. There was a fence about the house. Said Hardin left a widow, Amanda E. Hardin, who now claims the land on which said house stood. As administrator of said estate I have not received payment for said property destroyed from the United States or from anyone.
J. W. McCully
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 8th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John W. McCully, being duly sworn, say I am the administrator of the estate of John R. Hardin, late deceased, duly appointed by the probate court of said county. I have been duly qualified as such administrator and have proceeded to administer on said estate and all the aspects thereof as far as the same have come to my knowledge. According to law, I have filed a claim in favor of said estate for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians during the war of 1853. The claim I filed embraces only the house, also for a fence partly finished which was destroyed by the Indians. I do not know of said deceased ever having any other house in said county except the one mentioned, situated on public lands between Jacksonville and Rogue River on the military road, about 7½ miles from Jacksonville. I know that John R. Hardin and wife lived in said house at the time Indian difficulties commenced in 1853. The amount of dower turned over to the widow is not recollected by me, but a receipt was taken therefor & filed in the office of the Probate Court.
J. W. McCully
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 10 day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand & seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Nathan B. Lane of said county being duly sworn says--On the first of September 1852 I came to Rogue River Valley. I stopped with John W. Patrick two or three days; he was then living alone on his claim in said county, in a house which he had built. I took up a claim nearby and have lived a neighbor to Mr. Patrick ever since until he left said claim. John R. Hardin came to Patrick as a boarder as I understood it from him, on the 1st of November 1852. Hardin and Patrick has a settlement, as I learned from them both, by which Patrick gave a mortgage of certain cattle and improvements to John R. Hardin, in satisfaction of a balance found due Hardin. Hardin never made it his continual residence at Patrick's until prior [to] 1853, when he moved and took his wife there. I never saw Hardin and his wife doing anything there, while living there, but seemed to live as boarders. Mr. and Mrs. Patrick made all the improvements, and done all the work and resided there continuously from the time I first came to the valley up to the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. During said war I went with Mr. Patrick to his house on the claim on the 9th of August 1853 and assisted him to remove his articles of provisions &c. Mr. Patrick's family was the last to leave the premises during the war; they were compelled to leave for safety as several had been killed in the valley before they left. Immediately after the war Mr. Patrick returned to said claim and built another house in place of the one he had first erected which had been burnt by the Indians. I know that Mr. Patrick sold to Mr. Hardin half of the crop growing on said claim in the summer of 1853 in satisfaction of said mortgage and that Hardin was to have half of the claim if he paid for it, but I never learned that he ever paid anything to Mr. Patrick. I talked with Hardin a few days before his death; he said he was owner of half the crop in satisfaction of the mortgage, and was to have half the claim when he paid for it. The claim mentioned is the same which is now in the possession of Amanda E. Hardin and claimed by her.
    Mr. Patrick about the 1st of March 1854 sold his possession and improvements in said claim to said Amanda E. Hardin. I have no interest in this claim.
Nathan B. Lane
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Jacob Gall of said county being duly sworn says--I am the father of Amanda E. Hardin, widow of John R. Hardin, deceased. My daughter was married to said John R. Hardin on the 26th day of June 1853. I was present and witnessed the marriage ceremony. They lived together as husband and wife and occupied the premises stated in the claim here filed for destruction of property by Indians at the time of the commencement of the Rogue River War of 1853. I was acquainted with the premises and believe the description given in the account of said building to be correct, and its value a just one. I know the articles set forth as being destroyed in said house were there at the time it was burnt, and were destroyed with the rest, and believe them to have been of the value stated in said account. I heard John W. Patrick say that he and Mr. Hardin were to divide the land claim occupied by them equally between them and I know that afterwards Patrick laid claim to the east half and sold it. He has never to my knowledge laid claim to the part occupied as the homestead of Mr. Hardin.
    John R. Hardin and Amanda E. Hardin resided on and continuously cultivated said premises containing the house destroyed from [the] 27th day of June 1853 to the commencement of the war about the 1st of August 1853, and Mr. Hardin has since continued to claim and occupy said premises to the present time.
Jacob Gall
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Benjamin T. Davis of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, in or about the 11th day of August 1853, I was passing near the house lately occupied by John R. Hardin and John W. Patrick on Rogue River in said county and saw said house in flames. I have no doubt that the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe set the house on fire, as our party was fired upon by Indians in that vicinity twice at that time. Two or three days afterwards I was at the place where the house had been burnt and saw feathers laying about as though chickens had been killed; there were ten or twelve chickens then still remaining alive and from appearances I believe said chickens were destroyed by said Indians.
Benj. T. Davis
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    W. B. Horn being duly sworn says--I lived a neighbor to John R. Hardin who was killed in the Rogue River War of 1853, was acquainted with the dimensions of his house, fencing &c. I know that at the commencement of the war he had a log house about 20/30 feet with an addition of a frame building about 15/10, finished inside with a lining of common sheeting--a plank floor, one fireplace & chimney--house was divided into three rooms, a bar counter & shelves. I would judge the value of them at the time was as about $1000. There was also a fence partly completed about the house worth $30. The house and fence described were burnt by Indians on the evening of the 11th day of August 1853. I am willing to swear according to the best of my knowledge and belief the house was burnt by Indians, and I believe by the Rogue River Tribe.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Wm. B. Horn
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 8 day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Jabes Kincaid of said county being duly sworn says--I was acquainted with the house occupied by John R. Hardin at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. The house as near as I recollect was as described by Mr. Horn, who has testified in this claim matter--also the fence was about as he stated. The house and fence was destroyed by fire about the 11th day of August 1853, and as I verily believe from the circumstances of the war, that they were burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. I have no interest in this claim.
Jabes H. Kincaid
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 8th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
No. 9 John W. Patrick & the estate of John R. Hardin, decd.  Award $1315.00
    This may certify that the Board of Commissioners, appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John W. Patrick and the estate of John R. Hardin, decd., claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one thousand three hundred and fifteen dollars.
$1315.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

No. 10--Claim of Pleasant W. Stowe   "Award" No. 10 $450.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Pleasant W. Stowe of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I had a field of potatoes about 8 acres, also a garden--2½ acres of watermelons--one fourth of an acre of carrots and parsnips. Most of said field of potatoes and said garden were destroyed during the war. I know that the Indians destroyed more than five hundred bushels of my potatoes--as many as 600 watermelons worth then $600 at that time. I think they must have then taken and destroyed as many as 40 bushels of carrots & parsnips.
    I frequently saw the Indians during the war in my field & garden takin' and destroying my vegetables--did not dare to interrupt them. I had as much as I could do to guard my house. I have never received payment for said vegetables destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.

Pleasant W. Stowe
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William A. Wilkinson of said county being duly sworn says--During most of the time during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I resided in the house of Pleasant W. Stowe of said county. I know that he had a garden containing vegetables of various kinds among which was melons, potatoes, cabbages, carrots, beets & parsnips. I know that he lost during the war some vegetables of different kinds, I don't know what or how many, I should not think that there was near 600 melons stolen while I was there. I saw the volunteers there one day stealing melons. I do not know that the Indians took any vegetables, but suppose they took some while I was there. I would not think as many as 50 bushels of potatoes were taken from Mr. Stowe's garden by Indians. I have no interest in this claim.
William A. Wilkinson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 23rd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Silas J. Day of said county being duly sworn says--I resided at the house of Pleasant W. Stowe on Butte Creek in said county at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 and continued to reside there until after the Treaty of the 10th of September 1853 was ratified. I know that Mr. Stowe had a large garden containing various kinds of vegetables, potatoes, onions, cabbages, melons, squashes &c., a quantity of said potatoes not exceeding 10 bushels were taken by Indians during the war as we supposed. We saw their tracks about them. No cabbages were taken except 2 that we found, which they did not eat. About 40 melons were plugged, don't know how many were taken away. I should not think more than 50 were destroyed and taken away in all. [illegible] three or four carrots & parsnips were taken when the potatoes were taken, not more. Melons were selling for 50 cents to $2.00 each at the time. I assisted Mr. Stowe to pick all the ripe melons about the commencement of the war and sold them at Jacksonville. I have no interest in this claim.
Silas J. Day
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5th day of February A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    James Lewis of said county being duly sworn says--I lived with Pleasant W. Stowe on his land claim in said county about one week or ten days during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. He had a garden with a large quantity of vegetables, containing about 3½ acres of potatoes, about 2 acres of watermelons, a lot of beets, carrots & parsnips, all in the same ground. Altogether the garden covered about 6 acres. While I lived there I observed fresh Indian sign in the garden. They would come in the night, take what they wanted and destroy what they pleased and then leave. I would judge that Indians took as much as 200 or 250 [omission] while I was there, and I was there soon after the war and found many more destroyed, as much as 450 or 500 bushels in all. I think that over 200 melons were also destroyed. Carrots, parsnips & beets were destroyed as much as a quarter of an acre, all [of] which were destroyed by Indians. Volunteers also came and took vegetables, which I have not estimated in my statements of property destroyed by Indians.
          his
James X Lewis
         mark
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Edward W. Day of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I resided at the house of Pleasant W. Stowe, was there assisting him to guard his premises. I know that he had carrots, beets, cabbages &c. Mr. Stowe did not lose many of his vegetables by the Indians; he sold three or four loads of melons in Jacksonville, sold some to others. Volunteers stole most of the melons which were [omission]. I think Indians did not take more than 30 melons in all, and we were not certain they took them. Indians took a few of his potatoes, not more than a row 60 to 70 ft. long, did not carry many away, but built a fire in the bushes nearby and roasted them which they did get not more than 5 or 6 bushels in all. We never missed but two parsnips & one beet from the garden during the war. There were also taken 6 or 7 heads of cabbages. I do not believe the whole damage done to Mr. Stowe's garden by Indians during said war would amount to $100. I have no interest in this claim.
Edward W. Day
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Tobias L. Linkwiler of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Pleasant W. Stowe had on his farm in said county a field of potatoes between five and eight acres I should judge also a garden containing about 2 acres of watermelons maybe more, also carrots and parsnips, can't say how many--never noticed them much. I know that he had a large quantity of these vegetables destroyed during the war, and I am satisfied they were destroyed by the Rogue River Indians. There may have been five hundred bushels of the potatoes and as many as 600 watermelons destroyed during the war. The watermelons were then worth one dollar each.
    I have no interest in this claim.

Tobias L. Linkwiler
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Isaac Skeeters of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I was living at the house of Pleasant W. Stowe of said county until the close of said war.
    Mr. Stowe had a garden of some 8 or 10 acres of different kinds of vegetables--5 acres of potatoes--an acre of cabbage--an acre of watermelons, some onions, carrots and beets. During the war there were from three to five hundred bushels of potatoes destroyed. I would think about 500 watermelons, 50 cabbage heads--and some beets and carrots. I think that Indians did most of the destruction of said vegetables from the sign about the garden. I have seen Indians in said garden during the war. They usually came in the night. I never knew volunteers to come there but once. I have no interest in this claim.
Isaac Skeeters
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 31st day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 10 Pleasant W. Stowe's "Award"   No. 10 $450.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Pleasant W. Stowe, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and fifty dollars.

$450.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 5th, 1855


No. 11--Claim of Jeremiah Yarnell   "Award" No. 11 $100.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Jeremiah Yarnell being duly sworn says--That during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I was a resident of Illinois Valley in said county, and owner of one ox which as I verily believe was stolen and skilled by the Illinois Tribe of Indians which at the time were allies of the Rogue River Tribe on or about the 10th day of August 1853. Said ox was worth one hundred and twenty-five dollars. I have never reclaimed said ox or received pay therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Jeremiah Yarnell
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Geo. Sam Rice
Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    G. W. Stoen [sic] being duly sworn says--That during actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 he was a resident of Jackson County O.T. and I know that sometime in the month of August 1853 Jeremiah Yarnell was the owner of a band of cattle which were kept in Illinois Valley--I was one of the men who had charge of them--and that the cattle were missing and were tracked into Rogue River Valley in the vicinity of the mouth of Applegate Creek, where they were all found excepting one ox, which as I verily believe was killed by the Indians of said valley.
    Said ox have never been seen or heard from since, by any white man, to my knowledge. Said ox was worth one hundred dollars.
G. W. Stran [sic]
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Geo. Sam Rice
Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    I, S. H. Taylor, U.S. District Clerk, and for said county and Territory, do hereby certify that Geo S. Rice, the person who administered and certified the oath to the within affidavit, was at the date and still is an acting justice of the peace in the precinct of Sailor Diggin's in said county and Territory, that as such officer he is certified and by laws of this Territory to administer and certify oaths &c.
    That I am well acquainted with his signature and recognize the within as then signed to be the proper and true signature of the said Geo. S. Rice, justice of the peace, as aforesaid. Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal this 11th day of Feb. A.D. 1855.
S. H. Taylor
(  seal  )                          Clerk D.C. "J.C."
No. 11 Jeremiah Yarnell's "Award"    No. 11 $100.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Jeremiah Yarnell, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred dollars.

$100.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 5th, 1855

No. 12--Claim of William S. King  "Award" No. 12 $250.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William S. King of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the day 28th of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt my dwelling house situated about 4 miles from Evans ferry in said county described as follows--a double log house built of round logs 35/16 feet on the ground--2 partitions, one fireplace and chimney, 2 doors, floor in two parts, valued at $250.
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States or from anyone.
William S. King
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 23rd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Samuel S. Bowden of said county being duly sworn says--I know that on or about the 28th day of August 1853, during the Rogue River Indian War, the dwelling house of William S. King of said county was destroyed by fire. Said house was of the following description to wit: about 35/16 feet on the ground, built of round logs--floor in two parts, 2 doors, fireplace & chimney worth about $200 or $250.
    I believe that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt said house as [there was] no white man in that section of the county at that time. I have no interest in this claim.
Samuel S. Bowden
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 23rd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Samuel Williams of said county being duly sworn says--I know that on or about the 28th day of August 1853, during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, the dwelling house of William S. King, situated on the road from Jacksonville to the Canyon in said county, was destroyed by fire. Said house was of the following dimensions--a log house 35/16 feet on the ground, 2 rooms and a shed between, 2 doors, one fireplace & chimney--floor in 2 parts worth about 250 dollars.
    I have no doubt that the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt said house, as all whites living in that direction had left at that time, and the Indians were burning and destroying other property all about the country. I have no interest in this claim.
Samuel Williams
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 23rd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 12 William S. King's "Award"   No. 12 $250.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William S. King, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars.

$250.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 5th, 1855

[No. 13--Cram, Rogers & Co.  "Award"  No. 13 $250.00]
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Richard Dugan of said county being duly sworn says--I am a member of the firm of Cram, Rogers & Co. doing an express business in northern California and southern Oregon. During the time of actual hostilities in the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 9th day of August 1853, said company has horses and mules running from Jacksonville in Oregon to Yreka in California. The messenger Joseph Rogers left one large American Bay horse at Shetler's ranch at the crossing of the Siskiyou Mountain. Said horse was taken and driven away by Indians belonging [to] Chief "Tipsey" a band of the Upper Rogue River. I valued said horse at the time of his loss at $250. The company have never reclaimed said horse nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
R. Dugan
Sworn to & subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 10th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Jacob Shetler of said county being duly sworn says--During the time of actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 on or about the 9th day of Aug. 1853 I know that Cram, Rogers & Co. had at Shetler's ranch of which I am proprietor situated at the crossing of the Siskiyou Mountain, one large American Bay horse worth at that time in my judgment $250 (two hundred & fifty). Said horse was stolen and taken away by Indians belonging to the Rogue River Tribe as I have good reason to believe. The horse had a trail rope on at the time. I tracked the trail rope draggin' on the ground some distance from the ranch, and saw distinct traces of Indians there at the time. There were no other Indians in the neighborhood about that time and I believe said Indians took said horse away, as the band left immediately afterwards.
Jacob Shetler
Sworn [to] & subscribed before me this 11th day of January A.D. 1855.
D. Grosse
Justice of the Peace of Cottonwood Township
State of California     )
County of Siskiyou    )
    I, Hiram G. Hines, clerk of said county, do hereby certify D. Grosse, the person who administered and certified the oath to the within affidavit was at that date & still is an acting justice of the peace of Cottonwood township of this county; as such officer he is authorized by the laws of this state to administer & certify oaths &c. that I am well acquainted with his signature. I recognize the within as these signed to be the proper & true signature of the said justice of the peace as aforesaid.
Witness my hand and the impress of the seal of the
county court of said county at the city of
(  seal  )                          Yreka the 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
H. G. Ferris
    County Clerk of Siskiyou County, Cal.
No. 13 Cram, Rogers & Co.  "Award"  No. 13 $250.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Cram, Rogers & Co., a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars.

$250.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 5th, 1855

No. 14--Claim of Mrs. Edith M. Nickel  "Award" $230.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Mrs. Edith M. Nickel of said county being duly sworn says--That during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Tribe of Indians and their allies, during the Indian war of 1853, on or about the 20th day of August 1853, she was the owner of two cows, at which time said cows as she verily believes was stolen from Illinois Valley by the Applegate Creek Indians, a branch of the Rogue River Tribe, and driven to Applegate and killed by said Indians, and that said cows were worth one hundred and twenty-five dollars each. Deponent further states that she has never reclaimed said cows or received pay therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Edith M. Nickel
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Geo. Sam Rice
Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Gabriel Smith of said county being duly sworn says--That he was a resident of Jackson County during the year of 1853 & well acquainted with Mrs. E. M. Nickel, and knows that on or about the 25th day of August 1853 she was the owner of two cows, and seven other head of cattle, and that she caused said cattle to be drove up to the yard every night during the war of 1853, and that on the evening of the day above mentioned, as near as he can recollect, the two cows above described were missing from the band, and that on the following day search was made for said cows, and on examination it was found that the whole band had been driven away by Indians about three miles towards Applegate Creek, it having rained the night before, the tracks of the Indians were plainly to be seen. At which place it appeared by the tracks that the cattle then had separated and that each of the two Indians whose tracks had been seen had taken a cow and continued to drive the same on towards Applegate Creek. We followed on their trails about five miles farther, and turned back, not considering our party strong enough to go farther into the Indian country.
    Deponent further states that to his knowledge said cows never came back or never were ever after seen by the whites and that if said cows had returned he would have had abundant means of knowing the same. I think said cows were worth one hundred and twenty-five dollars each at that time. I have no interest in this claim.
Gabriel Smith
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Geo. Sam Rice
Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    I, S. H. Taylor, clerk of U.S. District Court in and for said county and Territory, do hereby certify that Geo. S. Rice, the person who administered and certified the oath to the within affiant, was at that time and still is an acting justice of the peace in the precinct of Sailor Diggin's in said county and Territory, that as such officer he is authorized and by laws of this Territory  to administer & certify oaths &c.
    That I am well acquainted with his signature and recognize the within as then signed to be his, the proper and true signature of the said Geo. S. Rice, justice of the peace as aforesaid.
Witness my hand and seal this 1st day of February A.D. 1855.
S. H. Taylor
(  seal  )                          Clerk D.C. J.Co.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James McDonough of said county being duly sworn says--I know that during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on [or] about the 25th day of August 1853, Edith M. Nickel of said county had cows missing on Deer Creek in Illinois Valley in said county, about the date aforesaid. Indians of the Rogue River Tribes stampeded all the cattle on that range. Said cattle, some came back to the range, with the exception of two cows belonging to Mrs. Edith M. Nickel, which were drove away by said Indians. I with two others pursued said cows, tracked them into the mountains, as they were driven by said Indians, but failed to recover them after a whole day's pursuit. I never knew said cattle to leave the range. I think they were killed by said Indians. The cows were worth $100 each. I have no interest in this claim.
James McDonough
Subscribed and sworn to before me [at] Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 14 Mrs. Edith M. Nickel  "Award"  No. 14 $230.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Mrs. Edith M. Nickel, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and thirty dollars.

$230.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 5th, 1855

No. 15--Claim of John Benjamin  "Award"  No. 15 $316.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Benjamin of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 9th day of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe took and killed an ox belonging to me which was a fine beef animal and would [weigh] say 750#. They also robbed my house situated in Rogue River in said county and carried away and destroyed the following articles of property to wit: 2 cast iron bake ovens worth $15, 2 frying pans $5, 2 iron camp kettles $6, 1 wooden bucket $2, 200# onions $30, 50# potatoes $5, 25# beets $2, 100 head cabbages [omission]. I have never recovered any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
John Benjamin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or.Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Geo. H. Ambrose of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 9th day of August 1853, during the Rogue River Indian War, I know that John Benjamin had an ox running in my band of cattle which was missing when Indians attacked said band and drove off several cattle. I have no doubt that Indians stole said ox, as several of said band were shot with arrows. The ox would weigh about 750#. I know that the Indians broke into Mr. Benjamin's dwelling house and took or destroyed several articles of property of household furniture &c., don't know what or of what value.
    I heard the Indians say that they went there in daylight and robbed the house. I have no interest in this claim.
Geo. H. Ambrose
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Robert Hill of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 8th or 9th of August, I know that an ox belonging to John Benjamin of said county was missing. Said ox had been running with the band of Dr. Ambrose on Rogue River, which was attacked, some wounded with arrows, and some run off and were never found, this ox of Mr. Benjamin's among the missing. I have no doubt the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe stole and destroyed said ox. Said animal was fat enough for beef and would weigh between 7 and 800#. I was at the house of Mr. Benjamin when he left at the commencement of the war. I know that he left then several articles of property to wit: 2 cast iron bake ovens, 2 frying pans, camp kettle, 1 wood bucket, a lot of onions, potatoes, cabbages &c. When I returned to said house a short time after the war closed, and found said articles gone. I have no interest in this claim.
Robert Hill
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or.Ter.
No. 15 John Benjamin's  "Award"  No. 15 $316.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Benjamin, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred and sixteen dollars.

$316.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Feby. 5th, 1855

No. 16--Claim of Daniel N. Birdseye  "Award"  No. 16 $211.50

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Daniel N. Birdseye of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, sometime between the 15th of August and the 10th day of September 1853 I lost the following property to wit: One American cow, one breeding sow, 9 months old, 1 scythe & snath, 2 log chains, 1½ inch auger, 1 spokeshave. Said cow was a first class American cow. I left her on my claim 17 miles from here down on Rogue River; when the war was over, she was not to be found anywhere. She had never been from the range while running there, and I believe she was taken away from there by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. The sow I also believe was taken by them. The other articles above mentioned were loaned to Wm. N. Ballard at the time of the war, and was burnt at the time the Indians burnt his house, within the dates aforesaid. I also had one pack saddle worth $8 and a mattress worth $8. These articles were stolen from my house during the war by the Rogue River Indians.
    I have seen the remnants of the mattress and a part of the pack saddle in their possession since the war. I have not reclaimed any of the property heretofore mentioned, nor received payment for the same from the United States nor from anyone.
D. N. Birdseye
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William N. Ballard of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 Daniel N. Birdseye had on his claim on Rogue River one first class American cow, one breeding sow 9 months old or about that; after the war I assisted him to look after said cow and sow but they could not be found. I have reason to believe the Rogue River Indians drove them off, and had also at my house, which was burnt, one scythe & snath, 2 log chains, inch & half auger, one spokeshave, which were burnt with the house as I believe by said Indians.
    I know that Mr. Birdseye also left a mattress and pack saddle at his house at commencement of the Rogue River War. After the war I saw a part of the mattress in an Indian camp, some 2½ miles from this place.
    I have no interest in this claim.
William N. Ballard
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or.Ter.
No. 16 David N. Birdseye's  "Award"  No. 16 $211.50

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to David N. Birdseye, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred & eleven dollars & fifty cents.

$211.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Feby. 5th, 1855

No. 17--Claim of Lewis Rothermel  "Award"  No. 17 $225.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Lewis Rothermel of said county being duly sworn says--At the time that Edwards was killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on the 2nd day of August 1853, said Indians shot several animals among which was an ox belonging to me. Said ox was a work ox, good beef at the time and would weigh 750#. He was shot dead with two balls.
    I have never received payment for said animal from the United States nor from anyone.
Lewis Rothermel
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Napoleon B. Evans of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 2nd day of August 1853, I know that Lewis Rothermel of said county had a large work ox, which was good beef at the time, and would weigh as much as 750#. Said ox was running with my band east of Butte Creek in said county. I drove said cattle up that day to my corral and turned said ox outside. I started out with my team, and this ox went across Butte Creek. In about an hour I heard a gun fire in that direction, in the evening of the said day I found said ox dead in the prairie about 400 yards from my house having been shot by Indians as I believe, as the place was near where Edwards was killed by Indians the same evening. I have no interest in this claim.
N. B. Evans
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day of February A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 17 Lewis Rothermel's  "Award"  No. 17 $225.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Lewis Rothermel, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and twenty-five dollars.

$225.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855

No. 18--Claim of Mary Ann Hodgins  "Award"  No. 18 $80.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Frederick Heber of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 21st day of August 1853, I know that Mary Ann Hodgins lost an ox killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians, when they attacked the party at Dunn's on the morning of the 21st August aforesaid. Said animal at the [time had] just arrived at the head of Rogue River Valley from the plains, and was worth at the time it was killed about $80. Mrs. Hodgins made some mention of losing some other property at the same time but I cannot say what. I have no interest in this claim.
Frederick Heber
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    G. W. Barnett of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 21st day of August 1853, I know that Mary Ann Hodgins lost one ox killed by the Rogue River Tribe, worth $80. I also heard her say at the same time of the attack on our party that she lost a quilt and some blankets--don't know how many--also a pocketbook $20 and a note for $30. I have no interest in this claim.
G. W. Barnett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this the 16th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 18 Mary Ann Hodgins'  "Award"  No. 18 $80.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Mary Ann Hodgins, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eighty dollars.

$80.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855

[No. 19--]Claim of G. H. C. Taylor  "Award"  $668.50
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George H. C. Taylor of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I had certain property at the house of John M. Silcott in said county to wit: ten tons of hay in a rick, 2 mowing scythes worth $16, one pack saddle and rope worth $8, one sheet iron camp kettle worth 4.50, 20# sugar, 75# flour. Said property was destroyed by fire on or about the 12th day of August 1853, and as I verily believe was burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. I have never received any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States or anyone.
G. H. C. Taylor
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
State of California     )
County of Siskiyou    )  s.s.
    John M. Silcott of said county being duly sworn says--I know that during actual hostilities in the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 12th day of August 1853 G. H. C. Taylor had at a house owned by me in the county of Jackson, Oregon Territory, a certain amount of property to wit: ten tons of hay in a rick, 2 mowing scythes worth $8 apiece, one pack saddle and rope worth 8 dollars, 1 sheet iron camp kettle worth 4.50--20# sugar, 75# flour, all of which was destroyed by fire, on the date last aforesaid, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I verily believe.
John W. Silcott
Sworn to and subscribed before me
a notary public in and for said county
the 13th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand & notarial seal
H. G. Ferris
(  seal  )                               Notary Public
No. 19 G. H. C. Taylor's  "Award"  No. 19 $668.50
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to George H. C. Taylor, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of six hundred and sixty-eight dollars and fifty cents.

$668.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855

No. 20--Claim of John Markley  "Award"  No. 20 $80.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Markley of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 14th of August 1853, I lost a horse on Applegate Creek in said county, which was stolen and taken away by the Rogue River Indians as I verily believe. All the whites in that section of the county had left; our company were the last to leave. I sent a man out to get my horse which was running in a band nearby. That day the Indians attacked the man who was out after the horses, shot down two of the horses in that neighborhood and ran off the balance, and mine among the rest. The horse was a Canadian animal and worth at the time $100. I have never recovered said animal nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
        his
John X Markley
       mark
Witness to signature A. C. Gibbs
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 10th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James Bishop of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 14th day of August 1853 I know that John Markley was the owner of a horse running on Applegate Creek in said county. In the morning of that day I saw said horse. About noon men came to our place and told us that the Indians were shooting down men and animals all through that part of the country, so we were compelled to leave. A party of men were sent out to get the horses. They returned and reported two horses killed, and the rest driven away. I have no doubt that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe took said animals. The horse of Mr. Markley was a roan half Canadian horse, worth at that time 75 or $80, might be more. I know that he was offered $100 for it a short time before lost.
    I have no interest in this claim.
James Bishop
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 20 John Markley's  "Award"  No. 20 $80.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Markley, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eighty dollars.

$80.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855

No. 21--Claim of James C. Tolman  "Award"  No. 21 $175.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James C. Tolman of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on the 3rd day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe shot a mule belonging to me. The mule was in possession of James Davis at the time who was riding it just above Griffin's ranch in said county. The mule was shot in the side with an arrow and lived but three days afterwards. The mule was a first class riding animal worth at the time $175.
    I have never received payment for said animal from the United States nor from anyone.
James C. Tolman
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 17th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James R. Davis of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 I know that James C. Tolman of said county lost a mule shot by said Indians worth about $200. It was a large fine American mule. I was riding said mule at the time it was shot some two or three miles from the town of Jacksonville in said county. Said mule was shot on the 3rd day of August 1853. I have no interest in this claim.
Jas. R. Davis
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 21st day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 21 James C. Tolman's  "Award"  No. 21 $175.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James C. Tolman, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred and seventy-five dollars.

$175.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855

No. 22--Claim of Sigmund Ettlinger  "Award"  No. 22 $130.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Sigmund Ettlinger of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War sometime early in August 1853 I had a Spanish horse killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. Said animal was running at the time at Griffin's ranch in charge of Mr. Griffin.
    The horse was a dark roan Spanish animal, about 7 years old, and worth at the time $130. I have never received said animal nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
S. Ettlinger
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Joseph Lane of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, about the first of August 1853 I know that Sigmund Ettlinger of said county had a Spanish horse running at Griffin's ranch. Said ranch was attacked by the Indians as I suppose and several animals killed. Mr. Ettlinger's horse was shot dead at that time. I saw said animal after it was killed. I have no doubt from appearances that it was done by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. Said horse was about 7 years old, of a roan color and worth as much as $130 at the time killed. I have no interest in this claim.
           his
Joseph X Lane
          mark
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 22 Sigmund Ettlinger's  "Award"  No. 22 $130.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Sigmund Ettlinger, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred and thirty dollars.

$130.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855

No. 23--Claim of Henry Helms  "Award"  No. 23 $108.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Henry Helms of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 sometime between the 2nd and 10th day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe broke open my dwelling house, situated on the east side of  Bear Creek in said county and carried away or destroyed the following articles of property to wit:
10# nails 1 camp kettle
50# flour 7 blankets                            (worth) $35.00
12# bacon 2 bed ticks 7.00
1 can powder 1# 1 pr. buckskin pants 6.00
1# lead 2 hickory shirts 3.00
1 box per. caps 1 gold pan
2 frying pans 40# corn meal
    I have never reclaimed said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
     (Dutch)
Heiny Helm
          his
Henry X Helms
         mark
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Low of said county being duly sworn says--Sometime between the 2nd and 10th day of August 1853, during the Rogue River Indian War, I know that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered and robbed the dwelling house of Henry Helms of said county, taking away or destroying the following property belonging to him to wit:
50# flour 1 can powder
12# bacon 1# lead
1 box per. caps 1 pr. buckskin pans
2 frying pans 2 hickory shirts (worn once)
1 camp kettle 1 gold pan (just bought)                    4.00
7 blankets (1 pr. new, rest good) 40# corn meal
2 bed ticks (nearly new) 10# nails
    I have no interest in this claim.
John Low
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
No. 23 Henry Helms'  "Award"  No. 23 $108.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Henry Helms, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred and eight dollars.

$108.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 1st 1855

No. 24--Claim of William M. Elliott  "Award"  No. 24 $560.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William M. Elliott of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on the 2nd day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt the ricks of hay belonging to me situated on my land claim near Griffin's ranch in said county. Said ricks contained between 8 and 10 tons of hay. They were entirely destroyed by fire. I have no doubt the Indians burnt said hay, as several whites were killed by them at that time in the vicinity and other property destroyed in the same manner.
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.
William M. Elliott
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public,  O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Marcena McCombs of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that William M. Elliott of said county had two ricks of hay on his land claim near Griffin's ranch in said county containing about 10 tons I should think. Said ricks of hay were burnt by Indians of the Rogue River Tribe on the night of the 2nd of August. I judge the Indians burnt the hay, as I saw the tracks of them about when the hay was burnt.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Marcena McCombs
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 24 William M. Elliott's  "Award"  No. 24 $540.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William M. Elliott, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred and eight dollars.

$540.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855

No. 25--Claim of Silas & Edward Day  "Award"  No. 25 $421.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Silas Day and Edward Day being duly sworn say--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 11th day of August 1853, we had at our claim on Butte Creek in said county the following articles of property: One leather trunk, a large new trunk worth $20, 2 razors, one hone, 1 razor strop, together with $10, 1 medical diploma in a tin case worth fifty dollars, an assortment of medicines worth $50, 1 Webster's unabridged English dictionary worth $12, Neill's Compendium of Medicine worth $12, Wilson's Anatomy worth $8, a violin instructor worth $1, 3 pairs broadcloth pants--new--worth $30, 2 messaline vests worth $15, 2 black cloth vests worth $8, 1 black satin vest $5, 2 black broadcloth coats worth $60, 6 linen shirts some worn worth $18, one brown cloth Mexican shirt worth $5, one silver alarm watch $30, 3 black silk cravats new worth $2, 2 lawn cravats worth $1, 1 panama hat worth $8, 2 cloth breeches worth $2, one hair brush coarse and fine comb worth $2, 2 toothbrushes worth $1, 2 pair yarn stockings worth $4, 2 pair black kid gloves worth $4, one pair colored silk gloves worth $1, 2 white silk and one white cambric pocket handkerchiefs worth $5--1 brown line coat worth $4--2 chopping axes--1 hand saw--1 drawing knife, 1 coffee mill--2 files--2 grinders $1, one dollar's worth lead, 1 camp kettle--4 tin plates--4 knives & forks--4 iron spoons--4 tin cups--1 bottle India [ink], stationery &c. worth $1, 2 papers shoe tacks, 1 pr. India rubber boots $8, 1 India rubber money belt worth $2, one buckskin money belt $1, 1 bridle $8--1 lot garden seed $2--1 iron square--1 jack plane--1 pair iron compasses--all of said articles were destroyed or taken away by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as we verily believe, on the date last before mentioned. We have seen several of said articles of clothing in possession of said Indians since the war. We have seen fragments of the trunk mentioned as destroyed, and said Indians have since sold said axes, dictionary and other of said articles to whites and said Indians have acknowledged since the war that they took and destroyed said property. We have never reclaimed said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.

Silas Day
Edward Day
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public,  O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William A. Wilkinson of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 15th day of August 1853 I visited the claim of Messrs. Silas & Edward Day in said county, found the house open with nothing in [it] of value. Saw where things had been burnt and dug up by the Indians. I am certain it was not the work of the whites, as no white man dared to go in that direction at that time. Indians sold some articles which they took from this house to a man by the name of Resson. I know that just before the commencement of the war the Messrs. Day moved onto the claim and took ten mule loads of goods there. I know they took flour then. I suppose they had various articles of goods--clothing, bedding, provisions &c.--for housekeeping. I know that they took nothing away with them at the time they left in the war but a double-barreled shotgun and a pistol.
    I have no interest in this claim.
William A. Wilkinson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for  O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James J. Fryer of said county being duly sworn says--After the close of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I saw in the possession of said Indians certain articles of property said to belong to Messrs. Silas & Edward Day, to wit: One large Webster's dictionary--some carpenter's tools--hand saw, drawing knife &c., some cooking utensils &c. Said Indians said they broke open the Days' trunk, took the things and destroyed some and took away others. I have no interest in this claim.
James J. Fryer
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 25 Silas & Edward Day's  "Award"  No. 25 $421.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Silas and Edward Day, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and twenty-one dollars.

$421.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7, 1855

No. 26--Claim of James Triplett  "Award"  No. 26 $500.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James H. Triplett of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 1st day of September 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered my garden, situated on the north side of Rogue River in said county, and destroyed and carried away a large quantity of potatoes, as many as a hundred and fifty bushels. I am sure I saw said Indians diggin' my potatoes and carrying them away. I had two acres of potatoes which were nearly all destroyed. Soldiers took many, but from the appearance of the field I think Indians took as many as 150 bushels. I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.

James H. Triplett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Robert B. Metcalfe of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 James H. Triplett had a garden on his claim on the north side of Rogue River in said county, containing about 8 acres of potatoes, onions, melons, corn, pumpkins &c. Tyee Jim's band of Rogue River Indians camped nearby, and I saw squaws going to and returning from said garden bringing vegetables. I also saw at their camp a large quantity of potatoes which I suppose they had got from Triplett's garden. Said garden was all destroyed during said war & I have no doubt the said Indians did most of the destruction of said vegetables. I have no interest in this claim.
R. B. Metcalfe
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th Feby. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Thomas Thompson of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 James H. Triplett of said county had on his land claim situated on the north side of Rogue River about two acres of potatoes, which would produce at least 200 bushels. I was at the place about the close of the war, and found that Mr. Triplett's garden was entirely destroyed. I believe the Indians took most of the potatoes but never saw any Indians diggin' therein, but I saw Indians going in the garden. I have no interest in this claim.
Thomas Thompson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 21st day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 26 James H. Triplett's  "Award"  No. 26 $500.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James H. Triplett, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of five hundred dollars.

$500.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855

No. 27--Claim of Nathan B. Lane  "Award"  No. 27 $669.50
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Nathan B. Lane of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on or about the 8th day of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe broke into my house situated near Willow Springs in said county and took and destroyed the following articles of property in and about the house--to wit:
1 rifle, shot pouch, powder horn & saddle valued at $30.00
1 Colt's revolver navy size 40.00
3 cans of powder @1.50    4.50
9# lead 50¢ 4.50
125# flour 25¢ 30.00
1 woolen coverlet 25.00
1 calico quilt 15.00
1 woolen  " 20.00
4 blankets $4      16.00
3 sheets $2½   7.50
3 dozen shirts    "     90.00
1 fine coat 25.00
1 close body coat 20.00
1 Kentucky cloth coat 10.00
1 orn. coat 15.00
9 prs. pants $5      45.00
10 prs. socks & 2 prs. mittens 12.00
12 pillow cases $1       12.00
12 towels $1       12.00
2 table spreads $5         10.00
5 large silver spoons $3       15.00
2 razors $2½   5.00
8# tobacco $1       8.00
A quantity of sugar, dried apples & peaches 6.00
          "            household ware 25.00
30# butter $1       30.00
50 chickens $2       100.00
1 dog killed by Indians 25.00
2 chopping axes $6       12.00
    I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Nathan B. Lane
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John W. Patrick of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853, on or about the 10th day of August 1853 I was at the dwelling house of Nathan B. Lane of said county and found the house had been broke open and robbed. Saw Indian signs all about there, the pillows and beds were cut to pieces--no blankets nor clothing was left in the house--a very few articles of crockery utensils were left there. He had a splendid rifle then worth some $30 taken by the Indians. They told me afterwards they got said rifle with other things when they robbed the house. Said they killed his dog--and could have killed him but did not want to. Mr. Lane had a lot of fine linen towels, bed clothing and articles of silverware all [of] which were taken away by Indians. The dog killed was a fine dog; I once offered a horse for it. I think said dog would have sold for $50 at the time shot. I have no interest in this claim.
J. W. Patrick
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Anderson of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 8th day of August 1853 I was at the place of Nathan B. Lane in said county, found that the Indians had been there and ransacked the house, looked about there, found a skillet in the bushes--nearby also a paper of saleratus, some salt, coffee &c. I saw Indian tracks there. I have no doubt the Indians broke into the house of Mr. Lane and did much damage but don't know to what extent.
John Anderson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James Danson of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 8th day of August 1853 I was at the house of Nathan B. Lane near Willow Springs in said county. We had gone there to tell Mr. Lane to leave the house lest he might be killed by the Indians, when I was standing by the door a rifle shot from the bushes opposite killed Mr. Lane's dog standing by my side. I saw no Indians but have no doubt the shot was from Indians. We had been at the place an hour before but the house was locked up. When we returned found Mr. Lane there, his house had been broken open and all the articles in it of value thrown about. Can't say what were gone or destroyed. The Indians had been there I have no doubt, and done the mischief--I saw their tracks.
James Danson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand & seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 27 Nathan B. Lane's  "Award"  *  No. 27 $669.50

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Nathan B. Lane, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of six hundred and sixty-nine & 50/100 dollars.

$669.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855            [penciled: *including one dog $25!!!
]

No. 28--Claim of John Agy  "Award"  No. 28 $85.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Agy of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue [River] Indian War of 1853, on or about the 7th day of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe either killed or drove away a large cayuse horse No. 1 belonging to me worth $100. Said horse was running on the right hand fork of Applegate Creek at the time he was lost. There were several other animals taken from that region the same time by said Indians, some shot and some drove away.
    I have never reclaimed said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.

John Agy
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 26 day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Marion McCormick of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 7th day of August 1853, I and one Jerome Dyer were prospecting on Applegate Creek in said county. We had in our possession a cayuse horse belonging to John Agy which was feeding on the range early in the morning with other animals. While we were eating breakfast, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe attacked the animals and drove them into the mountains, this one among the rest. I never saw said horse afterwards. I have since seen the skeleton of a horse in that neighborhood, which I was led to believe from certain marks near the remains of said horse said horse was a No. 1 cayuse horse 7 or 8 years old. I have no interest in this claim.
Marion McCormick
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 26th Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 28 John Agy's  "Award"  No. 28 $85.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Agy, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eighty-five dollars.

$85.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855 

No. 29--Claim of James Bruce  "Award"  No. 29 $475.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James Bruce of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on the night of the 5th day of August 1853, I lost three mules and one horse from the place where they were running at that time on upper Rogue River in said county. I saw two of the mules dead, shot with arrows and a ball, another of the mules I found so badly wounded that it died soon afterwards. It was shot in the side with an arrow. The horse missing at the same time I did not find but have learned that it was discovered by Geo. W. Collins so badly wounded that it could not get up, so it died I suppose. I have never seed it since. I have no doubt that said animals were killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians--one of the band has since told me so. Two of the mules were worth $150 each, the other about $100. The horse was worth $75. I have never received payment for said animals from the United States nor from anyone.

Thomas Bruce
Sworn to & subscribed to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George W. Collins of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 1st day of August 1853 I know that James Bruce of said county had three mules and one horse killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. Said animals were running on the prairie near Jacksonville when dead [sic]. I saw them when dead. They were shot with arrows. I should judge two of the mules to be worth $15 each--and the other $100 at that time and the horse worth about $75. I did not see the Indians shoot said animals but have no doubt from the manner in which they were shot that the Indians did it.
    I have no interest in this claim.
George W. Collins
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of August [sic] A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 29 James Bruce's  "Award"  No. 29 $475.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James Bruce, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and seventy-five dollars.

$475.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7 1855 

No. 30--Claim of James J. Fryer  "Award"  No. 30 $544.50
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James J. Fryer of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I owned and occupied a dwelling house on Butte Creek in said county described as follows: built of round logs 16/18 feet, floored, a stone fireplace & chimney, nailed roof, one door, porch 8/10 feet, nailed roof and railing, valued at $250. Said house was burnt by the Rogue River Indians on or about the 20th day of August 1853. I also had destroyed in said house or taken away by said Indians at that time the following articles of property to wit:
30# coffee
30# sugar, crushed
200# flour
4# tea
4# soap
1 tea kettle, large, cast
1 oven & lid cast iron
10 tin plates
1 set tea cups & saucers
1 coffee pot (tin)
1 tea pot
6 tin cups
1 set knives & forks
1 scythe & snath (new)
2 gold pans (large)
1 camp kettle
1 pine table worth 8.00
1 chair 4.00
3 empty kegs 3.00
1 tin bucket (large) 3.00
5 gallons pickles
3      "       whiskey
1 sash plane
1 smoothing plane
1 augers (1 & 2 inch)
1 hand saw
1 hand axe (Collins)
1 hatchet
1 two inch mortising chisel
10# nails
2 bed ticks ($3 each) 6.00
4 pillows, feathers $5 20.00
3 sheets 150¢ 4.50
1 coverlet 8.00
2 shirts $2 4.00
1 settee 5.00
curtains for 2 beds, calico 5.00
1 brass kettle (5 gallons) 10.00
    I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
James J. Fryer
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George W. Ludlow of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I knew that James J. Fryer of said county owned and occupied a dwelling house on Butte Creek in said county, described as follows--built of round logs 16/18 feet, nailed roof, 1 door, porch 18/8 feet with railing worth about $250. Said house was burnt by the Indians on or about the 20th day of August 1853. Mr. Fryer also lost at the time either destroyed or taken away by Indians a large amount of household provisions and furniture, which I could not now specify. I believe from circumstances of the war that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe took or destroyed them all, as none were left after the fire.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Geo. W. Ludlow
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Theodoric Cameron of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 James J. Fryer of said county owned and occupied a dwelling house on Butte Creek in said county described as follows to wit: built of round logs 16/18 feet, one door, nailed roof, floored, porch 8/18 feet. Said house contained a large quantity of furniture and supplies, tools &c., which Mr. Fryer had laid in for the support and use of a family which he had agreed to keep a year. I have read his statement of articles lost in the war and believe it to be true. Said house and contents were destroyed by fire on or about the 20th day [of] August 1853, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I believe--I think the house was worth at the time at least $250. I have no interest in this claim.
Theodoric Cameron
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
No. 30 James J. Fryer's  "Award"  No. 30 $544.50

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James J. Fryer, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of five hundred and forty-four dollars and fifty cents.

$544.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7 1855 

No. 31--Claim of W. G. T'Vault  "Award"  No. 31 $270.00
United States of America
        In a/c with W. G. T'Vault
For one ox taken by the Rogue River Indians or their allies during the Rogue River War between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853, in the county of Jackson, Oregon Territory. Said ox was destroyed by the Indians aforesaid at the time aforesaid and would weigh about nine hundred pounds, that I have not reclaimed said ox or the value thereof or any part from the United States or anyone, that I believe beef was worth at the time said ox was taken about from twenty-five to thirty cents per pound and I further believe that the said Indians killed said ox and ate him during hostilities with said Indians.
W. G. T'Vault
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 20th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Benjamin of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I know that W. G. T'Vault of said county owned a steer which was running on Rogue River in a band which I was assisting to guard at the time about the 9th day of August 1853. Indians of the Rogue River Tribe attacked said band, killed some and drove off some. Mr. T'Vault's steer was among the missing and was never found. I believe it was killed by said Indians. Said steer would weigh about 900# at the time when lost.
    I have no interest in this claim.
John Benjamin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George H. Ambrose of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 9th day of August 1853 during the Rogue River Indian War, at the time when said Indians attacked my band of cattle, I know that one of W. G. T'Vault's oxen running at the time with my band was missing. I have no doubt said Indians drove off said ox. Said animal would weigh about 900# I should judge.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Geo. H. Ambrose
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
No. 31 W. G. T'Vault's  "Award"  No. 31 $270.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to W. G. T'Vault, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and seventy dollars.

$270.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8th 1855 

No. 32--Claim of Hall & Burpee  "Award"  No. 32 $628.50

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Samuel Hall of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 11th day of August 1853 I was joint owner with Joseph S. Burpee of a house situated near Willow Springs in said county, described as follows: a log house 18/24 ft. on the ground, one story & a half high, one fireplace & chimney, a good floor below, and partly closed above, one door, a chicken house at one end valued at $400. We also had in the house 3 tables worth $5 each, one cupboard worth $5, 2 blankets $7, 3 woolen shirts 250¢ each, 1 pair shoes $3, 1 tent for packing, some worn, $10, three kegs empty $5, 2 pack saddles new with full riggin' worth $12 each, 3 tin pans, 2 cut glass decanters worth $4 each , 140# butter worth one dollar per pound, one leather covered trunk worth $4, all which was destroyed by fire, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on the date last aforesaid.
    I have never received any of said articles of property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Saml. Hall
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Anderson of said county being duly sworn says--I know that the Rogue River Tribe of Indians burnt the dwelling house of Messrs. Samuel Hall & Joseph S. Burpee on the evening of the 11th day of August 1853. I saw the tracks about the premises the next morning, and found in the ruins of the house the next morning pieces of burnt pack saddles, portion of chicken house and fragments of other articles which had been burnt in the house. I should think the house was worth at the time burnt $400 at the least. I have no interest in this claim.
John Anderson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Nathan B. Lane of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 11th day of Aug. 1853, I know that Samuel Hall and Joseph S. Burpee owned and occupied a certain house near Willow Springs in said county described as follows: a log house 18 by 24 feet on the ground--story & half high, well floored, one fireplace and chimney, one door, worth I should think $400 at that time. I knew they had a tent there, 2 decanters, bedding, tin pans--a trunk worth about $4, also noticed there 2 new pack saddles, well rigged, worth $12 each. They had two kegs of butter, as much as 140#--I was there just before and told them how to preserve it--tables 2 or more, they also had a cupboard worth $5. Said house and contents was burnt by the Rogue River Indians on the evening of the 11th of August 1853 about 9 o'clock. I saw the Indians about the house and heard the splitting of boards to kindle the fire, heard the talk and knew it was Indian tongue.
Nathan B. Lane
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
No. 32 Samuel Hall & Joseph Burpee  "Award"  No. 32 $628.50

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Samuel Hall and Joseph Burpee, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of six hundred and twenty-eight dollars and fifty cents.

$628.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8th 1855 

No. 33--John Penniger               Award No. 33    $263

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Penniger of said county being duly sworn says--During the time of the Rogue River War of 1853 I was living at the house of William J. Newton of said county. Mr. Newton's house was destroyed by fire by the Rogue River Indians on or about the 11th day of August 1853. I had certain articles of property in and about the house and [which] were destroyed with it, to wit:
    One jeans coat worth $8, one overcoat $8, 6 shirts, factory domestic, $9, 4 lady's drawers $16, 30 yds. domestic $7.50, one pine table $10, 8 gallons vinegar $32, 2 chopping axes one $5 other 2 50/100, one pair lady's shoes $3.00, one tin bucket $1.50, 2 tin pans $2 both, 3 linen bed ticks $15, 2 bed quilts $10, one blanket $5, one vial vermifuge $1, 1 vial spts. turpentine $1, 1 vial wormseed oil $1, set knives and forks $2.50, 1 set iron spoons $1.00, 1 wash tub $9. I had 80 chickens also destroyed by the Indians at the same time. Indians of said tribe have since told me that they destroyed said property.
    I have never reclaimed any of said goods nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
John Penniger
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William J. Newton of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 and before I had resided at my home in said county. My house was burnt by the Rogue River Indians on or about the 11th of August 1853 and Mr. Penniger had all or nearly all of his clothing, bedding and household goods destroyed with the house. I and two or three other men were at the house the night before it was burnt, and I know that all the articles (as near as I can recollect) mentioned in Penniger's claim to have been there, were there then. I recollect he had a coffee pot then also worth $2.50. He also had glass tumblers there, as many as 4. I recollect his chickens were then there and some 30 of them killed lying in a pile together. Afterwards when the house was burnt all but one were missing. I have no doubt the Indians destroyed those chickens as they did the other things.
    I have no interest in this claim.
W. J. Newton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Rowland Hall of said county being duly sworn says that--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on or about the 11th day of August 1853 I know that the dwelling house of W. J. Newton was destroyed by fire, being burnt by the Rogue River Indians. I had been living at Mr. Newton's some two months and a half previous to the war. I know that John Penniger and family were also living there at the commencement of said war and that he had a large number of chickens there, as many as 80 I think, 2 linen bed ticks, 2 chopping axes, one tin bucket, 30 yds. of domestic, also bottles containing spirits of turpentine and other medicines, a quantity of clothing and bedding, one pine table worth $10, I should suppose, a quantity of vinegar--as much as 8 gallons, 1 set knives and forks, 1 wash tub common size, all [of] which were left at the house and I suppose burnt with the house. I have seen fragments of many of said articles in the ruins of the house since the fire.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Rowland Hall
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15 Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
John Penniger Award (No. 33) $263.

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on their claims during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Penniger, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and sixty-three dollars.

$263.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Febry. 8, 1855 

No. 34--John E. Ross               $4176.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John E. Ross of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 on or about the 7 or 8 day of August 1853 I lost 18 head of beef cattle. 16 [of] said cattle were there ranging in the prairie near Stuart Creek in said county in a band which the Rogue River Indians stampeded; the next day we found said cattle and found two shot dead, others wounded, and many others missing, among which were 16 belonging to me, which as an average lot were worth as I sold cattle at that time $232 each.
    They were better than ordinary beef cattle. The Indians also took two other beef cattle about the same time running near T'Vault's on Rogue River which were very large cattle and worth full as much as the other 16. I have no doubt that the Rogue River Indians took said cattle as they were driving off cattle at that time all through the valley, and Chief Jim said his people drove off said cattle. I have never reclaimed any of said animals nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
John E. Ross
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William J. Newton of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, sometime during the month of August of said year I know that John E. Ross had a band of beef cattle running on the prairie near Stuart's Creek in said county. I passed across the plain where I knew the cattle had been running and seeing very few cattle about there I inquired where they were. Mr. Brown, the man who had been herding the cattle, told me that the Indians had stampeded the band and that several of the cattle [were shot] with arrows the night before. Mr. Brown was hunting the cattle for several days and coming near my house he found one of the cattle shot dead with arrows by the Indians. I went and saw the animal and was satisfied it was one of Ross' cattle. I have no interest in the claim.
W. J. Newton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 17 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John W. Hillman of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 early in the month of August of said year I was requested by George Ross to assist him in hunting a band of cattle belonging to Col. John E. Ross which had been driven away by the Rogue River Indians. He said 18 or 20 cattle were missing. I went out with him, found no cattle, but heard of two being seen on the road down on Rogue River which answered the description of two belonging to Col. Ross' band.
    Returned without getting any of the cattle. I have never heard that any of said band were ever recovered except the two head found on Rogue River; the man who described the two cattle found by the road said they were two large beef cattle.
    I have no interest in this claim.
John W. Hillman
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James L. Loudon of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 sometime between the 6th & 8th day of August 1853 I knew that John E. Ross had a band of cattle running on the prairie near Stuart's Creek in said county. I was helping herd the cattle about that time. I saw one of the band shot on the range and some 20 head were missing when we got the cattle together again, one of which I knew he recovered afterwards. If he got others I do not know it. The cattle lost were large sized beef cattle. I would judge that they would weigh 790 lbs.at that time and beef was selling at 30 cents. I have no interest in the claim.
J. L. Loudon
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    W. G. T'Vault of said county being duly sworn says
    In the summer of 1853 I sold to Col. John E. Ross two oxen which would weigh from 1350 to 1400 lbs. each. Col. Ross never took said animals from my house in said county.
    After the commencement of Indian hostilities with the Rogue River Tribe sometime between the 20 and 24 of August 1853, while in company with Gen. Lane's command in search of the Indian trail in the mountains, we came across the heads of said oxen which had been slaughtered by the Indians. I knew the heads of said oxen by the horns which I recollected well, having belonged to me for some time prior. I have no interest in the claim.
W. G. T'Vault
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 20th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George Ross of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on or about the 7 or 8 day of August A.D. 1853 I was assisting to herd a band of cattle belonging to John E. Ross which were running on the prairie near Stuart's Creek in said county when they were all driven from the range except one shot with arrows. I saw Indians of the Rogue River Tribe in that neighborhood at that time and believe said cattle were driven away by said Indians. They were stampeded in the night time and the next day I went in pursuit of them. Did not get them. There were two of them found two or three days afterward and 18 head were finally missing which I do not know of Mr. Ross ever recovering.
    I think they were killed and eaten by said Indians.
    The cattle lost were very large beef cattle, the best in the valley at that time. I cannot say what the value of them was exactly.
    I have no interest in the claim.
George Ross
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
John E. Ross' Award (No. 34) $4176.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John E. Ross, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four thousand one hundred and seventy-six dollars.

$4176.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Febry. 8, 1855

No. 35--John S. Miller              No. 35 $477.

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John S. Miller of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indians on the 3rd day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe shot an ox belonging to me which would weigh 850 lbs. Said ox was killed on my claim on the east side of Bear Creek [sic] in said county. I also lost about that time 95 chickens worth a dollar apiece; also some 400 melons. I cannot say who destroyed the chickens or the melons, as they were taken in my absence.
    I have reason to believe that Indians took and destroyed many of said melons as they were seen in the garden during the war. I have not reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
J. S. Miller
Sworn and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 25 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John E. Ross of said county being duly sworn said--On the 3rd day of August 1853 during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War when I was returning from an inquest held over the body of Edwards, who was shot by Indians at the commencement of the war, I saw John S. Miller examining an ox of his which had been shot in the head as we supposed by the Rogue River Indians. He was chopping the ball out of his head. Said ox was a large animal something over 800 lbs. I should judge. I have no doubt said animal was killed by the Indians.
    I have no interest in this claim.
John E. Ross
Sworn & subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Marcena McCombs of said county being duly sworn says--I know at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 that John S. Miller of said county had on his land claim in said county a garden containing a large number of watermelons--400 or 500. Also a lot of chickens near 100 I should suppose. I know that when they drove up the cattle of Mr. Miller after Indians had been in this neighborhood about 7 or 8 August 1853 one ox was missing. I heard the boys say that said ox was lying dead on the other side of the creek, had been killed by Indians. Don't know how much said ox was worth. I have no interest in the claim.
Marcena McCombs
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
        John S. Miller's Award (No. 35) $477.
No. 35
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John S. Miller, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and seventy-seven dollars.
$477.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners

No. 38--Davidson & Erwin              (Award No. 36)  $920.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    Gideon B. Davidson and Robert L. Erwin of said county being duly sworn say--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 10th day of August 1853 we had a log house situated on Applegate Creek in said county 18 by 30 feet on the ground, nailed roof, two doors, one partition through the middle, 1 fireplace and chimney, worth about two hundred dollars.
    We also had a rick of hay about 12 tons. Said house and hay were burnt on or about the date last mentioned, by the Applegate Indians, a band of the Upper Rogue Rivers, as we believe. Said Indians have since the war stated to us that they burned said property. We have never received payment from the United States nor from anyone for said property destroyed.
Gideon B. Davidson
Robert L. Erwin
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 13 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John P. Baker of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War I lived a neighbor to Messrs. Gideon B. Davidson and Robert L. Erwin of said county on Applegate Creek. I know that they owned and occupied a log house about 18 by 30 feet on the ground, story & half high, two rooms, 1 chimney and fireplace, nailed roof, worth at least $200 at that time. They also had a rick of hay. I should judge as much as 12 tons. Said house and hay were burned by the Indians on or about the 10th  or 11th August 1853. I saw the house in flames at the time. There were no white men in that neighborhood at that time. I have no interest in this claim.
John P. Baker
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 13 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award
No. 36
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Gideon B. Davidson and Robert L. Erwin, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of nine hundred and twenty dollars.
$920.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Burrell B. Griffin              (No. 37)  $1277.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    Burrell B. Griffin of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853, on or about the 5th day of August 1853, I was the owner of a log house situated in said county described as follows: 18 by 18 feet on the ground, hewed down on the inside and outside, a fireplace and chimney built of rock halfway up--2 doors & shutters, a floor, with an addition on the gable end of 10 by 18 feet frame and weatherboarded and floored--also a porch the full length of both, framed & floored, the roofs were nailed. Valued at $450. In the house were three bedsteads worth $4 each, one large worth $6 a small table worth $3. Said house and contents were burned about the date last mentioned by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I verily believe. I also left about 100 chickens big and little, which were destroyed during the war by the Indians as I believe, as arrows were found under the chicken roost.
    I had also one large American mare and 1 Indian horse lost during the war. The mare was killed by the Indians. I found her near where the house was burnt with an arrow stuck in her side. I pulled the arrow out myself and the mare died of the wounds about three hours afterwards. I found one of the Indian horses dead on the ground with several other dead horses belonging to the miners. The American mare was a first class animal worth $400, at least--a blooded animal.
    I also had in the field near the house 30 dozen sheaves [of] oats, [and] a stack of hay containing 1½ tons. I also had 6 pack saddles with rigging hanging on a pole near the house worth $6 apiece.
    Said oats and hay were destroyed at the time the house was burnt, and said pack saddles were cut to pieces & destroyed by the Indians as I believe--it looked like their work. I have never reclaimed any of said property, nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Burrell B. Griffin
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William M. Elliott of said county, being duly sworn, says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that the Rogue River Indians burnt the house of Burrell B. Griffin situated in said county, described as follows, as nearly as I can recollect, to wit: 18 by 18 feet on the ground, made of hewed logs containing a fireplace and chimney made of rock halfway up, 2 doors, the house was floored throughout, with an addition on the gable end 10 by 18 feet, framed and weatherboarded, a porch the full length of both framed & floored, the roofs were nailed. I would estimate the value of said house at that time at $450. I was at the place on the day afterwards and have no doubt from the appearances that said house was burnt by the Indians. I know also that Mr. Griffin lost during the war an American mare worth $400. She was a first class animal--and an Indian horse worth $100. I should judge said mare was killed near Griffin's ranch. The Indian horse was missing and I have never heard of him since. I have no doubt the mare was shot by the Indians and the Indian horse stolen by them.
    I live a neighbor to Mr. Griffin and know all the circumstances of this claim.
W. M. Elliott
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 20th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James R. Davis of said county being duly sworn says--On the 3rd day of August 1853 during the Rogue River Indian War Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered my dwelling house in said county, took away and destroyed several articles of property belonging to me--and a rifle gun belonging to Burrell B. Griffin of said county worth at the time about $40.
    I have no interest in the claim.
James R. Davis
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Marcena McCombs of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 3 day of August 1853 during actual hostilities of the Rogue River War I know that Indians of said tribe burnt the dwelling house of Burrell B. Griffin, of the description given and worth about $450 in my judgment. I know that he left in the house bedsteads, tables &c. which were destroyed with the house.
    He left a lot of chickens at his house--don't know how many [of] which were killed by the Indians as I judge from appearances. The Indians also killed a fine American mare worth between 400 & $500. I did not see the Indian kill her, but she was shot with an arrow and I heard the Indians hallooing at the time she was killed. There was an Indian horse missing at the same time--have no doubt Indians took him--he was worth $100 or $125.
    Mr. Griffin also had destroyed by the fire about 1½ tons hay [and] as many as 20 doz. [omission] oats. Indians also tore to pieces several pack saddles belonging to Mr. Griffin--can't say how many. I have no interest in this claim.
Marcena McCombs
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 37) $1277
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Burrell B. Griffin, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one thousand two hundred and seventy-seven dollars.
$1277.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Marcena McCombs                $1020.00
No. 38

Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    Marcena McCombs of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on the evening of the 2nd day of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt 2 ricks of hay belonging to me on the land claim of Wm. M. Elliott in said county. There were about 16 tons in said ricks, all which was destroyed, also 250 rails--
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone. Said Indians also shot an Indian mare belonging to me, crippling him for life. Said mare was worth $100 before shot, but is not now worth anything for business. I think she was damaged $100.
Marcena McCombs
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William M. Elliott of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on the evening of the 2nd day of August 1853 I know that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt two ricks of hay belonging to Marcena McCombs which was on my land claim in said county. Said ricks contained at least 16 tons if not more. I also know that McCombs had a mare shot in the shoulder with a large rifle ball so that she is crippled and is worthless for use. I think the Indians shot the mare. She was worth before he was shot $100 at least.
    I have no interest in this claim.
William M. Elliott
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Merritt Bellinger of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853--on the evening of the 2nd day of August 1853 I know that two ricks of hay belonging to Marcena McCombs of said county were destroyed by fire being burnt by the Rogue River Indians as I believe. Said Indians had been committing similar depredations on the same day in that neighborhood.
    Said ricks contained some 15 or 16 tons of hay I should judge. Mr. McCombs also had a mare shot in the shoulder supposed to be shot by Indians. The mare was crippled by the shot & I think she was injured the value of her. Said animal was worth one hundred dollars before [being] injured.
    I have no interest in this claim for damages.
Merritt Bellinger
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 38) $1020.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Marcena McCombs, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one thousand and twenty dollars.
$1020.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of William N. Ballard                $468.50
No. 39

Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    William N. Ballard of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I had on my claim on Rogue River one log house about 16 by 18 on the ground--round logs with a floor--fireplace and chimney doors and shutters, worth $200. One stack of hay--3 tons. Corral fence about worth $25. One 2 inch auger, one inch auger, one chopping axe, one broad axe, one hand saw, one drawing knife, one frying pan, one camp kettle, one pack saddle and rope worth $12, one steel fork for hay $5, one padlock $3, one tin bucket, one plane $5, one pick, one shovel, one coffee pot--
    All of said articles and property were destroyed by fire during said war between the 15th day of August and the 10th day of September 1853, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I verily believe.
    I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor anyone.
Wm. N. Ballard
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of Jany. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David N. Birdseye of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 Wm. M .Ballard had on his claim on Rogue River one log house about 16 by 18 feet on the ground with a fireplace and chimney, door & shutter worth about $200. A stack of hay with a fence about it--3 or 4 tons--a corral fence 8 rails high. I have heard the list of articles in Mr. Ballard's claim read over and recollect that he had these articles in and about his house at the time he left it during the war.
    This house and contents were burnt with the hay by the Indians as I have reason to believe sometime between the 15 day of August and 10 day of September 1853.
    I have no interest in this claim.
D. N. Birdseye
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    W. G. T'Vault of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 at the time when said Indians burnt the house of William N. Ballard in said county, I know that the broad axe mentioned in said Ballard's claim for property destroyed was one which I let him have.
    I paid $24 for it in the spring of 1852 at Oregon City and packed it to Rogue River which was worth $5.00 more. I consider that said axe when destroyed was worth $30. It was an extraordinary shop carpenter's axe.
W. G. T'Vault
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 39) $468.50
No. 39
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William N. Ballard, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and sixty-eight dollars and fifty cents.
$468.50
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners

Claim of Freeman Smith Jr.                $382.25
No. 40

Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    Freeman Smith Jr. of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, during the month of August 1853, I had the following property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians--to wit: One brindle ox killed on Rogue River and eaten by said Indians worth $100, one ox shot by said Indians with several arrows so that he was crippled and unfit for beef, damage $100, one red ox shot with three arrows rendered unfit for service three months, damage $25.
    One roan ox shot with three arrows and severely wounded, rendered unfit for service for three months, damage $25, one roan ox shot with two arrows, damage $25.
    The following articles of property were taken away to wit:
2 No. 1 Collins axes 10.00
1     "           "       hatchet 3.00
1 large cowbell & strap 11.00
3 large frying pans 10.00
6 tin plates 4.50
6 tin cups 4.00
1 set knives & forks 4.00
2 coffee boilers 7.00
1 coffee mill 3.00
1 iron bound patent pail 3.00
1 large mill file 3.50
1 mill square file .75
1 oilstone for plane bits 5.00
1 pine table 10.00
4 dressed deer skins 14.00
10 undressed  do.  do. 10.00
10 gallons vinegar 40.00
2 iron bound kegs 4.00
1 oilcloth suit 15.00
2 pr. satinette pants 10.00
1  "   cassimere  do. 10.00
6 shirts 18.00
1 cloth overcoat 16.00
3 large tin pans 10.00
1 set table spoons 3.00
2 shovels 5.00
50# flour 10.00
1 camp kettle 3.50
    I have never reclaimed any of said articles except by purchasing them from said Indians after the war. Nor have I received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Freeman Smith Jr.
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James J. Fryer of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I owned & occupied a dwelling house on Butte Creek in said co. which was burnt by the Indians in the month of August 1853 during the war. When said house was burned it contained a large lot of household goods, clothing, mechanic's tools &c. belonging to Freeman Smith Jr. which were either taken away or destroyed with the house by said Indians. I have read the statement of articles lost by Mr. Smith and believe the same to be true. I know that Mr. Smith lost one ox about that time and believe the same to have been killed by Indians. I know that two or three oxen [were] wounded by arrows--no doubt the work of Indians. I have no interest in the claim.
James J. Fryer
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George W. Ludlow of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities in the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Freeman Smith Jr. of said county had on Butte Creek a large number of articles of household goods and furniture, also carpenter's tools, clothing &c., all [of] which were taken away or destroyed during the month of August of said year by Indians of the Rogue River Tribe.
    I have heard the statement of articles lost read and know the same to be true. I know that the Indians killed and ate one of his oxen worth at the time $100 and that they crippled three others by shooting them with arrows so that they were rendered unfit for service for three months or more--one of which was almost worthless being now when I last saw him unfit for beef or work. He was probably shot with poisoned arrows so that he now has his large sores upon him. The ox was worth $100 when shot. The damage done to the other two mentioned I would estimate at $25. The articles mentioned as taken away or destroyed were in the dwelling house of James Fryer which was burnt by the Rogue River Indians.
George W. Ludlow
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 40) $382.25
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Freeman Smith Jr., a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred and eighty-two dollars and twenty-five cents.
$382.25
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs

Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Nicholas Klopfenstein                $227.50
No. 41

Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    Nicholas Klopfenstein of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 the Rogue River Indians entered my garden situated in said county and destroyed and carried away a large quantity of garden vegetables, to wit: one acre of corn about 30 bushels, 2 acres of potatoes half destroyed about 30 bushels, many pumpkins, cabbages, turnips, &c.
    Also ½ acre of onions all destroyed-- as many as 10 bushels. I think the Indians took and destroyed said vegetables because I saw their tracks in the field afterwards.
    I also had a dozen chickens taken by the Indians as I suppose--white men might have taken a part of said property.
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.
Nicholas Klopfenstein
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John W. Johnson of said county being duly sworn says--I lived a neighbor to Nicholas Klopfenstein during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853.
    I know that his garden was destroyed by Indians as I believe. It contained potatoes, cabbages, turnips and other vegetables. I should judge that as many as 40 bushels of potatoes were destroyed, 50 cabbage heads, some 60 or 70 pumpkins, a lot of onions, some 15 or 16 bushels--about an acre of corn, and ¼ acre of turnips, all destroyed. Also a dozen of chickens.
    I think Indians had a hand in destroying the garden as I saw their tracks--there were also white men's tracks--the volunteers might have taken some of said vegetables and chickens.
    I have no interest in the claim.
              his
John W. X Johnson
             mark
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day of February 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 41) $227.50
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Nicholas Klopfenstein, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and twenty-seven dollars and fifty cents.

$227.50
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8 1855

Claim of Daniel F. Fisher $173.50
No. 42
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
Daniel F. Fisher of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 on or about the 4th day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe broke open my house situated on Bear Creek in said county and took and destroyed the following articles of property--to wit:
    2 chopping axes, 5 frying pans, 3 tin plates, 1 inch & half auger, 1 half inch auger, 1 inch & half chisel, 1 pair buckskin pants worth $15, 1 cloth pair pants $7, 1 cloth overshirt worth $8, 1 Oregon saddle tree worth $20, 1 pair saddle bags worth $10, 5 camp kettles, 6 knives & forks & tin plates, 6 tin cups, 6 spoons--britannia, padlock $1.50, 1 weeding hoe $4, 1 hand saw, 1 woolen bed cover $10, 1 branding iron $5, 1 coffee mill, 1 dressed buckskin, 1 dressed otter skin, 1 pair (new) men's shoes, 10 lbs. beans, 2# soap, 4# lead, 1 tent worth $10, 8 canvas pack covers, good, 4 yds. sailcloth in each--and two wooden water buckets--
    I have never recovered any of said articles nor received payment therefor from the United States or anyone.
Daniel F. Fisher
Subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 18 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Hultz [sic] of said county being duly sworn says--I was at the house of Daniel F. Fisher on Bear Creek in said county on the day of the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. He had in his house at that time cooking utensils, bedding, tools and articles of furniture such as a bachelor would have in his house--I cannot specify the articles. Mr. Fisher left his house with said articles in it--the same day when I left. I returned to the house a few days afterwards and found the house broken open and said articles were all taken away. I suppose they were taken by the Rogue River Indians as I had a small pocketbook among the articles and afterwards got it from these Indians. I have no interest in this claim.
John Hulse [sic]
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William M. Hughes of said county being duly sworn says--I knew that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 Daniel F. Fisher had at his house on Bear Creek in said county chopping axes, cooking utensils, augers, clothing, bedding, pack covers &c. I can't say what he left there--exactly. I know that during the war the house had been broken open and things taken out and taken away.
    I have heard Indians of the Rogue River Tribe say since that they fired into said house to shoot those in it then went in and robbed it. I believe from the circumstances those said Indians took and destroyed Mr. Fisher's goods. I have no interest in the claim.
Wm. M. Hughes
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of January A.D. [1855].
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 42) $173.50
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Daniel F. Fisher, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred seventy-three dollars and fifty cents.

$173.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Thomas D. Jewett $317.25
No. 43
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Thomas D. Jewett of said county being first duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 28 day of August 1853--I had a log house situated on my claim on Rogue River in said county described as follows: 16 by 18 feet on the ground, one story high, round logs, one door, valued at $125. In said house I had one bedstead, corded, worth $10, one axe, 1 pr. macheers worth $10.00, 1 pack saddle & rigging $9, 1 pine table worth $5, 4 benches $4--3 tin plates--2 tin cups, 3# cream of tartar 75¢ per #, 13# Oregon bacon, 1 hand axe worth $1.50. Said house with its contents was destroyed by fire on or about the date last mentioned, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I verily believe. I saw the house in flames and saw said Indians in the immediate vicinity the same night. I have never reclaimed any of said articles or property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Thomas D. Jewett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Waldo Jewett of said county being duly sworn says--At the time of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 20 day of August 1853 Thomas D. Jewett of said county had on his claim on Rogue River one log house one story high 16 by 18 feet, round logs--one door, nailed roof, worth in my judgment at least $150, one corded bedstead worth $8, 1 pair macheers worth $12, 1 chopping axe, 1 pack saddle & rigging--good, 1 pine table worth $5.00, 4 benches worth $8.00, 1 tin plates--and tin cups don't know how many, 3# cream of tartar worth 75 cts. per #, a piece [of] dried bacon--one lot clapboards about 3000--a splendid lot worth $40 per thousand. All said property was burnt on or about the date aforesaid by a band of the Rogue River Indians. I saw the house in flames and the Indians nearby at the time. I have no interest in this claim.
Waldo Jewett
Sworn and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of January 1853 [sic].
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 43) $317.25
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Thomas D. Jewett, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred and seventeen dollars and twenty-five cents.

$317.25

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Sylvester Pease $300.
[No. 44]
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Sylvester Pease of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 I had a land claim situated on Antelope Creek a tributary of Upper Rogue River in said county on which I had a field containing about 3 acres under cultivation containing potatoes, corn and garden vegetables generally; at the close of said war I returned to said farm which had been abandoned during hostility and found my potatoes all destroyed, I think as many as 40 or 50 bushels, also corn about 12 bushels and melons about 1000 destroyed--also tomatoes 20 or 25 bushels. I believe the Rogue River Indians destroyed said crop, from the Indian signs in the field, and from their acknowledgments after the war. They said their "papooses" destroyed my garden.
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.
Sylvester Pease
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William Thompson of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I knew that Sylvester Pease had on his claim on Antelope Creek in said county a garden containing potatoes, corn, melons and other vegetables which were destroyed during the war. He lost I should judge between 40 and 50 bushels of potatoes. He had an acre and a half of corn which I should think was half destroyed and he gathered 12 or 13 bushels from it after the war. He had about ½ an acre of melons which were about one half destroyed also. I could not estimate the number. I should judge he lost between 20 & 25 bushels destroyed. I know that the Indians were all about the premises in the time of the war, and no whites lived there at the time. I believe the Rogue River Indians destroyed the property.
    I have no interest in the claim.
William Thompson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16 Jany. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Ty.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Engleman [sic] of said county being duly sworn says--Near the close of hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853--
    I was at the land claim of Sylvester Pease situated on Antelope Creek in said county. There I observed that he had had a garden of considerable extent a little the rise of three acres I think, which had been mostly destroyed. I was there twice during the war and saw Indians in said garden. The garden seemed to have contained vegetables of all kinds grown in the valley at that time, and from appearances I should judge that it had been destroyed by Indians--there were any quantity of Indian signs all about--I would say that as many as thirty bushels of potatoes had been destroyed, a lot of cabbages, between 800 & 1000 melons--between 12 & 15 bushels of corn & 15 bushels of tomatoes--
    I have no interest in this claim.
John Engelman [sic]
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public
Award (No. 44) $300.
No. 44
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Sylvester Pease, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred dollars.
$300.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Febry. 8 1855

Claim of Wm. H. McGreer, Charles Drury and Ithamer Runnels (No. 45)
$450.

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William H. McGreer of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 8th day of September 1853 Indians of the Applegate Band belonging to the Upper Rogue Rivers burnt the dwelling house situated on Applegate Creek in said county belonging to William N. McGreer, Charles Drury and Ithamer Runnels who were joint owners of the premises. Said house was built in two parts described as follows: One a log house 16 by 18 feet, the other built of boards 18 feet square with counter and shelves--three doors, nailed roof, one fireplace and chimney, no floors, valued at $500.
    I have no doubt said Indians destroyed said house, as they had been known to destroy property of that kind during the war all through Rogue River Valley, and there were no whites in the vicinity of said premises at the time it was destroyed. Said parties have not received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.
Wm. H. McGreer
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 26th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Agy of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 8th day of September 1853 I know that Indians of the Applegate Band belonging to the Upper Rogue Rivers burnt the dwelling house belonging to William H. McGreer, Charles Drury and Ithamer Runnels as joint owners. The premises consisted of a log house and a frame house. The log house was about 16 by 18 feet and the frame about 18 feet square to the best of my knowledge.
    The frame house had a nailed roof--don't recollect whether the log house had or not, 1 chimney and fireplace, 3 doors, a counter and shelves in the frame house. I should judge the value of the premises to have been $450. Am satisfied that they could not have been built for less than that.
    I have no interest in the claim.
John Agy
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 26 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David N. Yarnell of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 in or about the middle of August of that year I know that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt the dwelling house of Charles Drury situated on Applegate Creek in said county described as follows: a log house 12 by 16 and a frame addition about 16 feet square, 1 fireplace and chimney, 2 doors, nailed roof, a bar and shelves, all worth about $250. I don't know whether there were any articles of furniture or goods burnt with said house or not. I have no interest in this claim.
David N. Yarnell
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 45) $450.
No. 45
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William H. McGreer, Charles Drury and Ithamer Runnels, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and fifty dollars.
$450.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

No. 46    Claim of David Haggart     Award $90.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David F. Fisher of said county being duly sworn says--I know at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 that David Haggart of said county had a cayuse Indian horse running on my land claim on Bear Creek in said county, which was taken away during hostilities by the Rogue River Indians as I have no doubt and has never been found. I have learned that said animal was afterwards seen in the camp of said Indians and have no doubt they took said horse away.
    I have no interest in this claim.
    The horse was worth at the time about $100.
Daniel F. Fisher
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 46) $90.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to David Haggart, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of ninety dollars.
$90.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Febry. 8, 1855

Claim of James Mooney     (No. 47)    Award $500.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Samuel Mooney of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 10th day of August 1853 I lost three mules and three horses which were taken by the Applegate Indians, a band of the Upper Rogue River Tribe. Two of said animals were subsequently given up by said Indians after the close of the war. The other four were never recovered. Said Indians have since stated that they killed and ate them. 2 of the lost animals were Spanish mules worth $150 each, one American mule worth $150, and one horse worth $150 each.
    I have never recovered payment for said animals from the United States nor from anyone.
S. Mooney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Osborne of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on or about the 10th day of August 1853 I know that Samuel Mooney lost 3 mules & one horse taken by the Applegate Indians, a band of the Upper Rogue River Tribe. I was engaged three days in hunting said animals.
    We took a trail of the Indians who stole the animals and followed them to the headquarters of Old "Jo," the chief of the Rogue River Tribe.
    He told me that the Indians had got said animals with two others which he would return, but that the four mentioned had been killed. I think that the mules at that time were worth $150 each, the horse was a Canadian animal worth $100 at least. I have no interest in this claim.
John Osborne
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 47) $500.
No. 47
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James Mooney, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of five hundred dollars.
$500.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of John Gheen     (No. 48)    Award $840.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Curtis Davenport of said county being duly sworn says--I resided at the house of John Gheen situated on Applegate Creek in said county some three months just preceding the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. I left them on or about the 12th of August 1853 and came to Jacksonville when I heard a day or two afterwards that Gheen's house was burned by the Indians. When I left said house there was in it a bar and shelves--a dining table of pine worth $8, 1 bar table worth $4, 3 or 4 benches, 1 rocking chair worth $5. When I left there was also a stove, cooking utensils, a fine lot of dishes &c. He kept a boarding house. Whether any of them were removed I don't know. Gheen had also a stack of hay containing at least 4 tons which I understood was burnt with the house. I would estimate the value of said house at about $500. It was a log house 20 by 16 feet with a kitchen, sleeping apartment, canvased--a good bar and shelves.
    I have no interest in said claim.
Curtis Davenport
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 29th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John O'Brien of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 12 day of August I know that the dwelling house of John Gheen of said county was destroyed by fire. Said house was built of logs and worth about $300 as wages were at that time. I think there were a considerable number of articles of household goods and furniture in said house and destroyed with it--can't specify what. I also know that Mr. Gheen had a stack of hay burnt--can't say how much it contained when burnt.
    I believe from what I know of the circumstances of said Rogue River War that Indians of that tribe destroyed that property. I have no interest in this claim.
John O'Brien
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 29th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Thomas Gill of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 12th day of August 1853 I know that the dwelling house of John Gheen situated on the north side of Applegate Creek in said county was burnt by Indians of the Rogue River Tribe as I suppose, as at the same time said house was burnt there were three others burnt in that neighborhood and no whites were in the vicinity.
    Said house was about 20 by 16 feet, built of round logs, 2 doors, nailed roof, 1 fireplace & chimney; also another house near, about 13 by 12 feet built of logs, 2 doors, one fireplace and chimney, a bar and shelves, valued at $300. In said house was a quantity of crockery, cooking utensils, 2 kegs of beef pickled, 10 gallons each, tables--pine, benches--2 or 3, bedsteads & chairs. Also a stack of hay containing about 2 tons of hay--all of which were destroyed with the house by fire. I have no interest in this claim.
             his
Thomas X Gill
           mark
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 29th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David N. Yarnell of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the middle of August of said year I know that the dwelling house of John Gheen situated on Applegate Creek in said county was burnt by the Rogue River Indians. Said (house) was worth as much as $300 at the time burnt. There were in the house and destroyed with it 2 barrels pickled beef, 1 large dining table, 1 small table, counter & shelves, 1 sofa, several benches & stools, 7 or 8 hammock bedsteads worth $2 each. He also had a stack of hay burnt at the same time. I should judge from appearances of the stack that there were 12 tons.
    Said Indians also set fire to a pile of charcoal and destroyed it all--about 400 bushels--said coals were worth 25 cts. per bushel.
    I have no interest in said claim.
David N. Yarnell
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 48) $840.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Gheen, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eight hundred and forty dollars.
$840.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8 1855

Claim of Theodoric Cameron     (No. 49)    Award $30.50
No. 49
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Theodoric Cameron of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 20th day of August of said year Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered and robbed my dwelling house situated on Butte Creek in said county. They took or destroyed the following articles of property, to wit:
1 sack flour, 50 lbs.
1 coffee pot, tin
1 frying pan
1 Collins axe
1 tin pan
1 small camp kettle
    I have never reclaimed any of said articles nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Theodoric Cameron
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James J. Fryer of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that said Indians entered and robbed the dwelling house of Theodoric Cameron situated on Butte Creek in said county.
    They took or destroyed one sack flour 50 lbs.--a coffee pot, frying pan--1 Collins axe--1 tin pan and a small camp kettle. I know Mr. Cameron had said articles stolen, as I lived with him at the time.
    I have no interest in this claim.
James J. Fryer
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George W. Ludlow of said county being duly sworn says--
    During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Theodoric Cameron had at his house on Butte Creek in said county the following articles of property, to wit:
1 sack flour
1 coffee pot, tin
1 frying pan
1 Collins axe
1 tin pan
1 small camp kettle
    Said articles were stolen and taken away by said Indians as I believe on or about the 20th day of August 1853.
    I have no interest in this claim.
George W. Ludlow
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 49) $30.50
No. 49
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Theodoric Cameron, a claimant for property destroyed a