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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Rogue Valley Bricks

Also some notes on Rogue Valley brickmaking families: the Guerin, Priddy, Childers and Ensele brick makers.

See the Building Notes page for information on specific buildings. Information about concrete brick and block is only included as it relates to conventional burned brick.


An Oregon Brickmason, circa 1900
An Oregon brickmason, circa 1900

    Brick have been made to some small extent, and there are two persons in the country who understand making them.
Elijah White, letter of April 1, 1843 to Thomas Hartley Crawford, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, page 20, NARA M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 607, frame 61


    Mr. Abernethy built a house in 1844 and opened his stock of goods in 1845. I assisted in making the brick. About 20 feet from the alley west [of the Cliff House?--see page 28] was Abernethy's store. It was brick entire. The shingles were fir dried out and shaved. We made the brick at the mouth of Bull Creek. Those were the first bricks made here [Oregon City]; there were some made at Salem 2 years before that. They were small kilns. The bricks were used only for chimneys. There had been one kiln built near what is now called Wheatland. It was then called the old mission. George Gay, an Englishman, had a house built 22x37 which was the first brick house built on the Pacific Coast to my knowledge. John McCaddon was the name of the man who made the brick both in Salem and for Mr. Gay, but Gay owned the house. I do not know whether those at Salem were made the first or Gay's; at all events this was the first brick house. McCaddon was the first brickmaker and the first brickmason on the coast to my knowledge. Gay was occupying the brick house mentioned in 1842 when I came here. It was enclosed and occupied in 1841.
    Abernethy opened his stock of goods in the brick house here. . . . The brick building I built fell down in the freshet of 1861-62.
Sydney W. Moss, "Pictures of Pioneer Times at Oregon City," 1878, Bancroft Library MS P-A 52, pages 32-37


    Such sights frequently fell within my observation on Sundays in the north portion of Marion County in 1845, where the first brick building erected in Oregon, the Catholic Church near Champoeg, was then being finished. (I may remark here that the first brick building used for business purposes in Oregon was erected in 1846 by  Gov. Abernethy at Oregon City.)
John Minto, "Early Days of Oregon," 1878, page 31, MS PA-50, Bancroft Library


    Bricks are used for chimneys in some parts [of Oregon], but none used here yet.
Robert C. Sykes, Table Rock City, Oregon, "Overland to Oregon," Hornellsville Tribune, Hornellsville, New York, January 29, 1852, page 2


    Two other happenings which marked 1854 as a banner year of growth in Jacksonville were the birth of the first white child, James Clugage McCully, August 27, named in honor of James Clugage, the founder of the town and the builder of the first brick building [the 1855 Brunner Building].  A combination of clay and sandstone of the desert was used as a substitute for lime in constructing the building. 

Arthur M. Geary, "Jacksonville Is Real Relic of the Pioneer Days," Medford Mail Tribune, March 26, 1911


    The location of the University of Oregon at Jacksonville [in 1855] caused much bitter comment, and probably had more to do with the relocation of the capital at Salem than any one thing. It was evidently a trade, and all the parties to it became odious. The Umpqua people were especially indignant that their beautiful and fertile valley should be passed by for the sake of a region only known as a wilderness and given up to the operations of gold-seekers. To all the state this same objection was apparent. Meantime the mining people appreciated their favors, and actually commenced burning brick for the university. Something like $2000 was expended, but as brick are a staple article in most countries probably there was nothing lost.
"Our State Capital," Morning Oregonian, Portland, September 30, 1888, page 1


    Munn and Bowen advertise in the Sentinel that they are now burning lime of a superior quality at a quarry which has recently been discovered at Sterling, in Rogue River.
Oregon Argus, Oregon City, May 2, 1857, page 2


    Jacksonville is still improving--John Anderson is building a residence on California Street, and several of our citizens are preparing to build brick houses during the present season.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 15, 1858, page 2


    NEW BRICK.--Pat. Ryan's new brick is nearly finished, ready for the reception of goods.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 13, 1859, page 2



    FELL IN.--The upper story of the brick store of Messrs. Hamilton & Co., fitted up and used for a Masonic Hall, fell in the other day. We have not been able to learn the extent of the damage, but suppose it is nominal.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 13, 1859, page 2


    IMPROVEMENTS.--J. A. Brunner & Bro.'s new brick addition to their store is progressing. When completed, it will be the largest store building in Jackson County and, we believe, the largest south of Salem. We learn that other brick buildings will be put up in town during the year.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 30, 1860, page 2


    WADE, MORGAN & CO.--This firm are now permanently located in the new brick building, formerly occupied by P. J. Ryan, ready for business. They have on hand, and are constantly receiving, a large and well-selected stock of merchandise, which they offer at fair and reasonable prices. Persons will find the proprietors clever and accommodating gentlemen.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 11, 1860, page 2


    LIMESTONE QUARRY.--Messrs. Hess and Smead of this place discovered a very valuable quarry of limestone, about a mile from town on the Applegate road, during the week. We are informed by Mr. Hess that he proposes burning both lime and brick, and reducing the price of these invaluable building materials. This will accelerate improvements in our progressive town.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 26, 1861, page 3


    IMPROVEMENTS.--The brick work on Sachs Bros. new store is finished, the front of which is very pretty. They intend occupying it next month.
    P. J. Ryan has contracted for the building of a brick store, which is to be erected on the lot between the U.S. Hotel and the Sentinel building.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 17, 1861, page 3


    RECOVERING.--Richard Brown, who fell from Sachs Brothers' new brick store a few days since, is slowly recovering.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 24, 1861, page 3



    IMPROVEMENTS.--The large stable being built by the California Stage Company is very near completion. Sachs & Brothers' brick store will be finished in a few days.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 7, 1861, page 3


    The foundations of P. J. Ryan's new brick stores on California Street, between the United States Hotel and Cluggage & Drum's stables, are progressing. . . . On the suburbs, towards the valley, is the new brick dwelling of B. F. Dowell, Esq., rapidly going up. This will be, when finished, one of the handsomest, costliest dwellings in the county. The front porch steps, column bases and caps, window sills and lintels, mantel pieces and fronts, are all to be of a very clear and excellent quality of white marble found at Williamsburg. A little beyond this house is the brick dwelling of John Bilger, in progress of erection, in front of his present snug little residence. It is being built in substantial and comfortable manner.
"Town Improvements," 
Semi-Weekly Gazette, Jacksonville, September 30, 1861, page 3


    SHERIFF'S SALE.--By virtue of a decree in Chancery to foreclose a mortgage . . . I will proceed to sell for cash to the highest bidder, on Saturday, the 27th day of December, A.D. 1862, the following described lot of ground, lying and being in the town of Jacksonville, Jackson County, Oregon; said lot fronts fifty feet on Third Street, and runs one hundred feet back on D Street; that the south line is parallel and fifty feet south of D Street; and, also, all of that tract of land situated near the town of Jacksonville, county and state aforesaid, being the east fractional half of the southeast quarter of Section No. 32, in Township 37, south range 2 west of the Willamette Meridian, containing 59 68/100 acres, including the brick yard, etc., together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging. Sale on the premises between the hours of 10 o'clock a.m. and 4 o'clock p.m of said day.
W. H. S. HYDE, Sheriff.           
    Nov. 26, 1862.
Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, December 3, 1862, page 4


    REMOVED AND CONSOLIDATED.--Mr. Henry Judge and Mr. Zimmerman, harness makers and saddlers, have formed a copartnership, consolidated their business, and moved their stocks into the new store in Ryan's new brick building, recently fitted up expressly for them.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, November 14, 1863, page 2


    IMPROVEMENTS.--The town of Jacksonville presents quite a lively appearance this summer; all the carpenters and painters are busy at work with hammers, saws and paint brushes. Many of the old buildings are being repaired and painted up, and many new ones will soon be visible. The demand for lumber is so great that all the sawmills are overfull with orders. One brick kiln has already been burned, and another one is on the way. Two lime kilns will be burned this summer. P. J. Ryan is making preparations to build a brick residence on Third Street, between B. F. Dowell's law office and the Express Saloon; B. F. Dowell will commence building an addition to his residence soon. . . .

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, June 23, 1866, page 2


    BRICK.--Mr. Fehely has just burned a kiln of good, sound brick, which will be ready for delivery on Tuesday next.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, August 17, 1867, page 2


    We will now say something for the chief town of Southern Oregon. . . . We have five physicians; five lawyers; three notaries public; one conveyancer and court commissioner, and all the officials of the county. In addition to the above, we have a soap manufactory; a stone yard; a brick yard and a broom manufactory.
"Jacksonville,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 16, 1867, page 2


    IN RUINS.--The old building standing on the corner of Oregon and Main streets, known as the Maury & Davis brick, is falling down. The bricks on the northwest corner have all become loose, and many of them have fallen.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, March 21, 1868, page 3

Newberg, Oregon Pressed Brick Co.
Newberg, Oregon Pressed Brick Co.

    Patrick Fehely's [brick] yard was at the end of Third Street where our brick house is.
Charles Thomas Fehely, on the 1868 Fehely house at 750 South Third Street, Jacksonville. Uncredited clipping, SOHS "Bricks" vertical file.


    NEW BRICK.--Mr. P. Fehely burned a brick kiln this week and now has any amount of this fine building material.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, May 23, 1868, page 2


    NEW SIDEWALKS.--Mr. John Neuber has laid down this week, in front of his store, a new brick sidewalk. D. Linn has also laid down a new brick sidewalk in front of H. Breitbarth's store.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, June 13, 1868, page 3



    NEW SIDEWALK.--Messrs. Fisher Bro. have laid down a brick sidewalk in front of their store.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, July 25, 1868, page 2



    BRICK.--Mr. P. Fehely yesterday finished burning a kiln of 250,000 brick. He burned a small kiln of 125,000 earlier this season.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, August 8, 1868, page 3


    ROBBERY.--A hole was cut through the brick wall of the old Caro store, last night, about the time of the fire, and G. Karewski robbed of about $300. No trace of the robber.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 8, 1870, page 3


    On the night of Wednesday last an attempt was made to enter Sachs Bros.' store. The brick wall was broken in three places at the rear of the store, and an attempt was also made at an entry from the rear of Bilger's store.

"State News: Jackson County," Weekly Oregon Statesman, Salem, January 18, 1871, page 3


    That he had a quantity of bricks for sale was the substance of an advertisement signed by Patrick Fehely, proprietor of the brick yard, from which the material came for practically all the business houses standing in Jacksonville today.
"Hot Weather Irritated Jacksonville Newspaper," Jackson County News, May 21, 1926, page 7, referring to the August 12, 1871 issue of the Democratic Times


    BRICK.--The undersigned has just finished burning a large brick kiln at his brick yard in Jacksonville, and is ready to furnish brick to all those in need of this article.
PATRICK FEHELY.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1871, page 3


    NEW BLOCK.--John Orth is preparing to build a new brick block on Oregon Street. It will be, when completed, nearly 60 feet front and running back 60 feet, and two stories high. It will join other brick buildings, and will make one of the finest blocks in the town. Mr. Orth has pride in doing something for the town. Who will be the next to put up a block?

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 13, 1872, page 3


    P. Fehely has commenced operations for the building of a kiln of 100,000 brick. He intends completing it in the course of a month or two, when rebuilding the burnt district will proceed in good earnest.

"Local Brevities,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1874, page 3


    REBUILDING.--Geo. Schumpf is cleaning off his lot on the burnt district, preparatory to putting up a brick building.
    David Linn's brick is receiving the doors and windows, and will be ready for occupation in a short time. A. Fisher's brick is also approaching completion.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 3, 1874, page 3


     BRICK-MAKING.--P. Fehely has a contract with the government for the manufacturing of several thousand brick at Fort Klamath. Mr. Fehely left for that place this week, accompanied by a number of employees, and will commence work immediately. A thorough renovation and rebuilding of the post is promised this summer.
    FIRST INSTALLMENT.--John A. Boyer this week received the first installment of goods for his new store. He intends reopening shortly in Linn's brick building, which is receiving its finishing touches, and when completed will be one of the finest business places in town.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1874, page 3


    PROGRESSING.--Work on Miller and Schumpf's brick building is being pushed rapidly ahead. The cellar is now being walled in and a well dug. The latter is being dug through solid bedrock and the work is necessarily slow. It will take some months to finish the building.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1874, page 3


    BRICK-BUILDING COMMENCED.--The foundation of John Miller and Geo. Schumpf's buildings having been finished, the sills were laid and the bricklaying commenced this week. Brady and Hibbard have the bricklaying contract and David Linn the contract for executing the woodwork.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1874, page 3


    AN IMPORTANT ENTERPRISE.--We learn that it is almost certain that the Masonic fraternity, in connection with Veit Schutz, will build a two-story brick, to occupy the ground embraced between Schumpf's new structure and that of Wintjen & Helms. The proposed building cannot but be of great importance to Jacksonville, and we trust its erection will be finally concluded upon.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1874, page 3


    NEW FLUES.--In compliance with the town ordinance requiring flues to be built, in place of running the stovepipe through the roof, we notice several brick flues being built on various dwellings. This is a timely preventive to the great danger liable to result from defective flues, and a step that cannot but be of great benefit to the safety of the town.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1874, page 3


    ABOUT FINISHED.--Patrick Fehely has about finished his contract for making brick for the proposed improvements at the Fort, and with his employees will return to town in a few days.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1874, page 3


    RENOVATIONS.--Pat. Ryan is making preparations to repair his brick building, which was burned out in April 1873, and has started already. We learn that he contemplates making it a two-story, and that it will be used as a hotel. He is having a well dug in the rear of the building. This will be a decided improvement in the appearance of that portion of town.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1874, page 3


    BRICK KILN.--P. Fehely is making preparations for making another kiln of 100,000 brick, the other one having been exhausted.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1874, page 3


    P. J. Ryan has a large number of men engaged on his proposed two-story brick, and is pushing matters rapidly forward.
"Local Brevities,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1874, page 3


    The brick work on the buildings of John Miller and Geo. Schumpf has been completed, and they are now rapidly approaching completion. Although the work has been executed slowly, it certainly was done in a neat, substantial manner.

"Local Brevities,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1874, page 3


    P. J. Ryan is building another story on his already two-story brick, which will be of wood.

"Local Brevities,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1874, page 3


    It rests on two horizontal supports, is about fifteen inches square, ten or twelve feet high, of a pale red color, was put up for the Sentinel office by George Holt and is called a brick flue. City dads take notice and fire wardens git out.
    Pat. J. Ryan has got his three-story brick hotel building under roof, and carpenters are busy on the inside. It will be as fine a building of the kind as there is in any town of this size in the state. It is suggested that it be christened the "Accidental."

"Brief Mention," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 21, 1874, page 4



    It will require 200,000 brick to put up the Masonic building. They are ready and the foundation is being built.
"Brief Mention," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 12, 1874, page 3


    "Did you know that the old town hall built [in Jacksonville] in the middle '70s was made of gold bricks?" continued Colonel [Robert A.] Miller. "You don't believe me? Well, it's true that the bricks used were shot through with gold."
    "Here's how it happened. The bricks were made in Rich Gulch in the town's corporate limits. One day a miner panned out some dirt where the bricks were made, and it proved rich in gold. So that's why the old miners of the town wanted to run the bricks of the old town hall through a quartz mill."

Eunice Davis, "Gold Still Here Says Col. Miller," Medford Daily News, July 9, 1927, page 1


    BURNING BRICK.--Patrick Fehely has justed completed burning a kiln of 200,000 brick west of town.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 3, 1875, page 3



    The cinnabar company on Applegate, Jackson County, are now burning a large quantity of brick to use for their furnaces preparatory to commencing operations on an extensive scale the coming summer.
"Oregon," Morning Oregonian, February 13, 1876, page 4


BRICK KILN--Mr. Scott has burned a large kiln of brick about one mile north of town. The brick is to be used in the construction of J. M. McCall's new brick store, next summer. There are, however, a few thousand for sale at the kiln.
Ashland Tidings, December 2, 1876, page 3

Newberg, Oregon Pressed Brick Co.
Newberg Pressed Brick Co. (detail)


    HOLT'S HOTEL.--George Holt is still at work laying the foundation of his new hotel, which is to be a fine large two-story brick building. In a couple of months Mr. Holt intends to commence work on his brickyard and will burn 200,000 brick, to be used in the construction of this building. When completed this will be the finest hotel in Southern Oregon, and a neat credit to this place.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 4, 1877, page 3


    Teams are now engaged hauling brick for J. M. McCall's new building. As soon as the weather settles masons will be put to work on the walls.
"Local Intelligence," Ashland Tidings, April 14, 1877, page 3


    Holt has moved the building that was occupied by Abell & Welsh to the corner of C and Third streets. This will allow him to continue work on the foundation of his new hotel.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 18, 1877, page 3


    G. W. Holt is working on his new brick hotel building.

"Random Jottings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 26, 1877, page 3



    George W. Holt fired his kiln of 220,000 bricks this week. They will be used to complete his hotel building now in course of construction.
"Random Jottings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 4, 1878


    We remark that Holt has commenced putting up the scaffolding at his brick hotel building. It looks like a speedy resumption of brick laying.
    Mr. George Schumpf contemplates build a second story on his brick on California Street during the summer. This speaks well for our little city.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 26, 1879, page 3


    Messrs. Thatcher & Worden will soon commence the erection of a brick store at Linkville.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 26, 1879, page 3



    Geo. Schumpf has decided to build another story on his brick this summer. Jacksonville is improving.
    Holt is running the walls of his brick hotel up rapidly. He expects to have the lower story ready for the 4th of July ball.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 2, 1879, page 3



    George W. Holt expects to have the lower floor of his brick building finished by the Fourth of July, in which event a grand ball will be given.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1879


    Rev. J. H. Skidmore has taken the contract for doing the mechanical work on Abraham's new brick at Roseburg, for $8,000.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 30, 1879, page 3


    Work on the new brick of Thatcher & Worden of Linkville is progressing fast, the foundation being nearly completed.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 21, 1879, page 3



    Messrs. Jacobs and Guerin, accompanied by a brickmaker and another mechanic, arrived from Roseburg last Saturday. As soon as a dry day is discovered they will begin to work upon the brick to be used in Ashland this season. If the weather permit, 400,000 will be made.
Ashland Tidings, May 30, 1879, page 3


    A force of carpenters commenced work on Holt's brick on Monday, and the building will now be pushed ahead rapidly.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 18, 1879, page 3


    HOLT'S BRICK--The second story of this fine building is beginning to loom up, and we are informed by Mr. Holt that he expects to have it roofed in during August. The capacity of this hotel we think will be ample. It will contain twenty-two sleeping apartments besides office, ladies' parlor, dining room and store rooms. The partitions on the lower floor are all brick, and the building when finished will contain not less than three hundred thousand. The spacious dining room on the lower floor is eighteen by sixty feet, and each bedroom is provided with a fireplace. The large hall on the second story is thirty-five by seventy-five, and intended for parties, concerts or public exhibitions, we believe is the largest between here and Salem, and will have room to seat five hundred people. Madame Holt is entitled to credit for projecting a building that will be the finest in Jacksonville, and we hope nothing will occur to retard its progress.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 9, 1879, page 3


    G. W. Holt has engaged the services of Mr. Scott of Ashland, an excellent bricklayer, who, in conjunction with himself, will hurry the new U.S. Hotel toward completion.

"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1879, page 3


    The Odd Fellows of Ashland have decided on building a new hall at that place.
    Holt's new brick hotel will soon be ready to receive the roof. The massive walls are nearly completed.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 23, 1879, page 3


    NEW BUILDING FOR ASHLAND.--Ashland Lodge No. 45, I.O.O.F., has decided to build a brick building in conjunction with Messrs. Fountain & Farlow, Inlow and Helman, these gentlemen erecting the lower story and the lodge the upper. It will be a large and substantial structure, with 61 feet front and 60 feet depth, and will be built on the ground in the burnt district owned by the parties above named. Ashland is therefore assured another edifice that will be a credit to her, something she is to be congratulated upon. Thus do coming events illustrate that her loss by that disastrous conflagration will be her gain in the end.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1879, page 3


    Geo. W. Holt is making preparations to burn another large kiln of brick.
    Jacobs, Fox & Guerin are progressing finely with their work on the new Masonic building at Ashland and expect to complete the foundation this week. They set fire to their brick kiln Saturday.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1879, page 3


    The brick work for Holt's new hotel building was finished last week, with the exception of the fire walls. Operations will now be suspended until another kiln of brick can be burned. We learn that Mr. Holt now has an idea of building another story on top of this--making it a three-story building in front and two in the rear.

"Sorts," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 27, 1879, page 3

Brick Yard, Oregon State Penitentiary, Salem
Bricks curing at the Oregon State Penitentiary, Salem, circa 1910

    George W. Holt is making another kiln of bricks with which to finish his building. Operations have been temporarily suspended on the structure until the bricks are completed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1879


    Kahler Bros. propose next season to erect a brick building on the site where their drug store now stands. Its construction will add materially to the appearance of the main business part of town.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 3, 1879, page 3



    ANOTHER NEW BRICK.--We learn that Mrs. M. W. Hargadine proposes to build a 30x26-foot front addition to the store occupied by Butler & Rockfellow at Ashland, this fall. If she does so three new bricks will have been added to the town this season.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 10, 1879, page 3



    G. W. Holt has just burned a brick kiln containing 100,000 bricks. This will be enough to complete his new hotel, and he will have some to spare.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 17, 1879, page 3


    The brick work of the new Masonic building has been completed, and the structure is in the hands of the carpenters. . . . Work on the new Odd Fellow's building will be at once commenced, the foundation having already been laid.

"Ashland Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 24, 1879, page 3



    The bricks used in the building of the hotel were made by George Holt from clay taken from Jackson Creek, north of Jacksonville.
Toni Tweedy, "The United States Hotel," English Composition, February 25, 1960. SOHS "Bricks" vertical file.


    Work at the brickyard of Jacob, Fox & Guerin has been suspended since the rain began. They have about 100,000 brick already molded, and when as many more are ready for burning the business will probably be finished for this year.
"Local Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 17, 1879, page 3


    The site for the steam grist mill, shortly to be erected in Jacksonville, has been located on the flat near Holman Gulch, a short distance south of Fehely's old brick yard. T. T. McKenzie will at once move the available machinery from his mill near Central Point and construct a steam mill of ample capacity.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 7, 1880, page 3



    The brick work on the Odd Fellows' building, Ashland, has been finished, notwithstanding the snowy state of the season, and will be topped off with a fireproof gravel roof.

"Ashland Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 14, 1880, page 3


    BUILDING DAMAGED IN ASHLAND.--We learn that the Odd Fellows' brick building recently erected in Ashland has been very seriously damaged by the storm. The foundation in front has settled so that the walls of the second story in front are bulged forward several inches, and there are several long vertical cracks in the wall, running from the stone foundation up. The wall was thought so insecure that on Thursday last workmen were engaged in strengthening the foundations, but many think anything but the rebuilding of the whole front wall a waste of money. We heard long since that the bricklayers protested against the foundation as flimsy and unsafe, but their judgment was disregarded. We are at a loss to know why this important item has been omitted by our usually enterprising cotemporary, the Tidings.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 14, 1880, page 3


    THE ASHLAND BUILDING.--We learn from T. O. Andrews of Ashland that the damage done to the building erected jointly by the Odd Fellows and several merchants of that place, by the settling of the foundation, is very serious. Mr. Andrews says that when the trench for the foundation was dug, water to the depth of eighteen inches was struck; the trench was then filled with gravel and the foundation rock laid on the gravel, and it seems that neither the stone mason nor brick layers are to blame. Those whose judgment is worth having think that no tinkering process will be sufficient to restore public confidence in the safety of the building. The damage is a matter of serious regret, as the building would have been an ornament to Ashland, and from the fact that the Tidings is still silent we apprehend that "somebody blundered" and is afraid the matter will be made public.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 21, 1880, page 3



    The masons think the wall of the new brick in Ashland will be easily fixed. We hear it is the intention to procure jack-screws and by taking out a column in front it will be all right.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 28, 1880, page 3


    The purchase of the old Mensor brick for a town hall was confirmed by the board, and an order for $450 drawn on the Treasurer to pay for same.

"Board of Trustees," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 28, 1880, page 3



    Work has been commenced on the Hargadine brick building at Ashland.
    The work of taking down the front wall of the Odd Fellows' brick building at Ashland is nearly completed.
    We hear that Charley Klum intends putting up a brick in Ashland. Charley himself is a "brick" and keeps the cheapest harness and saddlery in Jackson County.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 10, 1880, page 3


    John Orth will commence the construction of a two-story brick residence on the site of his present home as soon as the weather settles.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 14, 1880, page 3


    The Hargadine brick in Ashland is nearly finished.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 28, 1880, page 3



    Will Fehely is putting up a brick kiln of 150,000 brick at Kerbyville.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 9, 1880, page 3


    The old frame building standing between the post office and the New State Saloon on California Street now occupied by the Union Bakery will soon be taken down in order to make room for a new brick store to be erected for Jas. S. Howard. John Wolters will temporarily discontinue the baking business until he can secure another location. He will perhaps reestablish himself in Ashland.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 28, 1880, page 3


Notice to Contractors.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that bids will be received by the undersigned Building Committee appointed by the Board of Trustees of the town of Jacksonville, Or., until the 20th of August, 1880, for the purpose of erecting a town hall and calaboose in the town of Jacksonville; the bid to be for taking down the walls of the old brick structure on the corner of Miner [sic] and Oregon streets and erecting thereon and completing said town hall and calaboose, according to plan and specifications now on exhibition at N. Langell's place of business. It is understood that the committee reserves the right to reject any and all bids that may not be acceptable.
                N. LANGELL,       )
                CHRIS ULRICH,   )  Building Com.
    Aug. 4

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 4, 1880, page 2

Denny Renton Clay Co., Portland, circa 1910
Denny Renton Clay Co., Portland, circa 1910

BRICK FOR SALE
by
Heaton Fox
Ashland Oregon
Is now prepared to furnish customers with first-class brick in large or small quantities.
    Good oak and pine firewood for sale upon reasonable terms.
Ashland Tidings, August 13, 1880, page 3                                                            H. Fox


    A bake oven has just been completed in [the] rear of Holt's new hotel building to be used in connection with Mr. Kreutzer's proposed bakery, to be started up shortly in the east end of Holt's new brick block.
    Wm. E. Spangler came down from Ashland on Monday, having on his wagons 4000 brick for Kahler Brothers' new building. They are from the kiln of Heaton Fox, Ashland, who has the contract of furnishing 30,000.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 18, 1880, page 3


    Kahler's brick will soon be finished.
    Patrick Fehely, of Josephine County, a former resident of Jacksonville, is here on a short visit. He reports times flourishing in his locality.
    Madame Holt has furnished several rooms in her new hotel building for the reception of President Hayes and party when they pass through Jacksonville.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 25, 1880, page 3


    Work on Kahler Bros. new brick store is progressing, and the structure is gradually assuming proportions.
    The contract for building the new town hall and calaboose was let on Monday last to David Linn at $1,995. The contract calls for [a] one story brick building, 23 by 36, with calaboose and truck house in rear, and includes paint and finish, the contractor to furnish everything, except the brick, which are on the ground.

"The New 'Boom'," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 25, 1880, page 3


    The walls of the new city hall are beginning to loom up. Geo. W. Holt is doing the brick work, and David Linn superintends the balance.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 27, 1880, page 3



    On the same block [on California Street] with Mr. [Coleman] we find the fine new brick drug store, lately erected by C. W. Kahler at a cost, we are informed, of $2,000. We must admire Mr. Kahler for the pains he has taken in making the drug store such a nice building. It is now occupied by Kahler & Bro., who will dispense to the public all articles in their line, at low rates.
    On the adjoining block as we walk eastwardly, we see our new grand hotel and hall, owned by Geo. and Jane Holt, and we hear will be occupied by the Madame in person when we believe all the delicacies of the season will be dispensed to her guests in the latest style and at fair prices. In noticing the hotel and hall, it would hardly be right to pass it by without giving a short sketch of the manner in which it was built, Geo. Holt, owner and builder, starting from the bedrock as we call it. Quarrying the stone for the foundation, making the brick, burning the lime, cutting the stone for sills, doors, windows, etc., and then laying each of these in their proper places, finally plastering the building throughout. We think, from information furnished, the hotel when completed will cost $12,000, and we believe the equal of Mr. Holt for industry and perseverance is not in the state of Oregon. Were we blessed with more like him we would have a different town and valley.
    . . . we return along Oregon Street until we come to our new town hall, now in course of erection; when completed it will make a neat and very creditable appearance. It is of brick, one story in height, having a frontage of 25 feet on Main Street and running back on Oregon street 75 feet, with an "L" in the rear, the building nearly covering the plot of ground owned by the town, and is divided as follows: Truck room in the rear; adjoining is the calaboose of two cells, solidly constructed. We would rather not be confined therein--that is for any length of time. The front portion will be used by the Trustees for their meetings. The Recorder also having his office there. When finished not including the lot, will cost $2,500, builder David Linn. Should the finances of the town justify it, at an early date the Trustees will add an additional story for public purposes.
"Jacksonville Improvements for One Year," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 24, 1880, page 1


    The brick work on the new city hall is completed, and work on the roof is progressing. It is thought that the building would be enclosed sometime during this week.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 1, 1880, page 3

Denny Renton Clay Co., Portland, circa 1910
Denny Renton Clay Co., Portland, circa 1910

    Jerry Nunan has purchased the brick house and lot, known as the Fehely property, of J. T. Glenn, paying $600 therefor.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 29, 1881, page 3



    Madame Holt has her new brick hotel all furnished in fine style, and her table is supplied with everything the market affords. Look out for her new ad. next week and patronize the U.S. Hotel when you want first-class accommodations.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 26, 1881, page 3



    Patrick Fehely has commenced digging clay for a large kiln of brick, probably 100,000, and will begin molding as soon as the weather is settled.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 5, 1881, page 3


    P. Fehely and Samuel Egger will soon burn a large kiln of brick for use here.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 16, 1881, page 3


    Henry Judge will next week move his saddler shop to the building formerly occupied by Mat. Dillon as a saloon. On account of the fire ordinance he will be forced to build a new brick addition in the rear to make sufficient room, and in due course of time he will build a substantial brick in front.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 23, 1881, page 3



    Samuel Egger and P. Fehely have commenced work on their brick kiln.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 7, 1881, page 3

Heaton Fox Brickyard, June 24, 1881 Ashland Tidings
Heaton Fox, June 24, 1881 Ashland Tidings

    A NEW RESIDENCE.--John Orth on Wednesday moved his old dwelling house to the rear of his lot, and has everything in readiness for commencing to build a new brick residence on the premises of the old. The dimensions of the structure will be 36 by 60 feet, two stories high, with rock cellar underneath, and the whole to be set off by a handsome porch. Mr. O. is one of our most substantial citizens, and he generally "makes everything go" what her undertakes.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 4, 1881, page 3



    Egger & Fehely's brick kiln is in readiness to be fired. 200,000 is their number.
    Geo. Holt, who has finished laying a nice stone pavement in front of Donegan's, is this week engaged laying a sidewalk of the same material in front of Solomon's store. It is well that the uneven brick pavement in front of the post office has been removed and a nice broad stone slab pavement put in its stead.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 25, 1881, page 3


    S. H. Egger has just finished burning a kiln of 215,000 brick which are the best ever made in this county. They are offered for sale in any quantity desired.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 2, 1881, page 3


BRICK FOR SALE
    The undersigned has just finished burning a kiln of 215,000 brick and is now prepared to fill all orders for this building material. These bricks have been manufactured after the most improved methods and are warranted to be superior in every respect. Orders promptly filled at the most reasonable rates.
S. H. EGGER.    
    Jacksonville, July 2, 1881
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 2, 1881 through September 3, 1881


    Saml. Egger has excellent brick for sale.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 9, 1881, page 3


    Orth's brick residence is looming up.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 16, 1881, page 3



    Samuel H. Egger is making another kiln of 300,000 brick.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 6, 1881, page 3


    There is an artificial bed of lime in the "desert" between Stuart's Creek and Rogue River, which was used by B. T. Davis in 1855 in building a chimney in this town before any limestone was discovered in this county.

"Artificial Stone Cement and Irrigation," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 20, 1881, page 2



    Orth's fine brick residence is rapidly assuming proportions. The brick work is progressing quite rapidly, and in a short time the building will be ready for occupancy.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 20, 1881, page 3


    Samuel H. Egger will soon burn another kiln of 300,000 brick. He has over 125,000 already made.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 3, 1881, page 3


    John Orth wants a settlement with all those owing him. He also has about 25,000 brick for which he will take any kind of grain.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 10, 1881, page 3



FOR SALE.
I HAVE 25,000 first-class bricks for sale, which I will also trade at $10 per thousand for grain at the following rates: Wheat, 75 cents per bushel; barley, 60 cts; and oats at 50 cents.                                                   JOHN ORTH.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 1, 1881, page 1



    G. W. Holt is building a large brick addition to the U.S. Hotel.
    John Orth's new brick residence will soon be ready for occupancy.
    S. Eggers' brick kiln was fired several days ago, and he will soon be ready to supply the market.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 15, 1881, page 3


    Saml. H. Egger has just finished burning another lot of excellent brick, which he offers for sale at the lowest prices.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 5, 1881, page 3


    FINE RESIDENCE.--We visited John Orth's new brick residence this week and found it one of the most commodious and convenient houses we have ever seen. There are four rooms downstairs and five in the second story, all large, well proportioned and well lighted. Johnny says he cares nothing for expenses now and is building a house in which he expects to live and die.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 12, 1881, page 3


    Some fine work in the way of plastering, by George W. Holt, and painting by Reed & Savage, is now being done on John Orth's new brick residence, and when finished Johnny will have one of the finest homes in Southern Oregon.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 20, 1882, page 3



    Samuel Egger has lots of brick for sale and will burn another kiln soon.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 2, 1882, page 3


    NEW COURTHOUSE--During the session of the county court this week we had the pleasure of viewing the design for the courthouse as submitted by the architect, G. E. Payne, of Ashland. The structure is to be brick, two stories high, 62 feet in length and 90 feet wide and is to cost $30,000. It is to be located in the courthouse square on the site where the old building now stands, and work will be commenced on the foundation immediately after the contracts are let next Saturday. The courtroom will be 68x40 feet and will be located in the second story of the building. The lower story will be used as offices by our county officials, the Clerk and Sheriff taking the two front rooms. Next Saturday's bids will only be for excavation and construction of the foundation and the sale and the removal of the old building, and contracts for the remainder of the building will be let at the November term. The drawing shows that it will make a fine appearance.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 9, 1882, page 3


    Jacksonville has twenty-three brick buildings at the present time.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 16, 1882, page 3



    Samuel H. Egger has entered into a contract with the county commissioners whereby the former is to furnish 150,000 brick for the new courthouse.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 23, 1882, page 3


    Samuel H. Egger is molding brick for the new courthouse.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 7, 1882, page 3



    S. H. Egger with a force of men is now making brick for the new courthouse, having taken a contract for a portion of the amount required.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 21, 1882, page 3


    S. H. Egger has just finished burning a kiln of 40,000 brick to be used as a starter for the new courthouse. He will commence work on the balance required early next spring and promises to have them read as soon as required.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 18, 1882, page 3


    CORRECTION.--Our informant was in error last week in stating that L. S. P. Marsh, the contractor for the building of the new courthouse, had sublet his entire contract. He gave Mr. Byers of Portland the brick contract, but all the other work will be done under Mr. Marsh's supervision. The latter expects to become a resident of this place for the time being so as to superintend the work.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 3, 1883, page 3


    Messrs. Jacobs & Russell now have five stone masons employed in dressing rock for the foundation of the new courthouse. Mr. Byers, the contractor for the brick work, is expected here soon to make preparations for the beginning of his work.

"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 3, 1883, page 3


    Byers & Guerin, contractors for the brick work on the new courthouse, arrived from Portland this week accompanied by two other mechanics. They are now making arrangements for the burning of brick, and as soon as the foundation is finished, the work of putting up the walls will be commenced.

"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 14, 1883, page 3


    Mr. Vaughn of Ashland has been awarded the contract for furnishing the brick for the new courthouse, and on Wednesday removed to this place with his family. He has leased J. A. Cardwell's brickyard.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1883, page 3


    CONTRACT LET.--The contract for furnishing the brick for the courthouse building was this week awarded to Mr. Vaughn of Ashland. The contract price, delivered, is $8.12½ per thousand. Work has already been commenced, and the contractor promises to have them ready as soon as required.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 21, 1883, page 3



    Messrs. Vaughn & Carr will commence making brick for the courthouse next Monday. Their kiln is on the Cardwell place, and they have a contract for 400,000.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 28, 1883, page 3



    Work has been commenced at the brick kiln on Cardwell's farm.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 5, 1883, page 3



    The weather has not been propitious for brickmaking, and Messrs. Vaughn and Carr are not getting along with their contract as well as hoped for. Should the weather be pleasant, they will soon have a large number of brick for the courthouse.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1883, page 3


    The brick contractors for the new court house are to have 200,000 brick on the ground by June 18th, and the exercises of laying the cornerstone are to take place on the 23rd, Mr. Payne tells us.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 1, 1883, page 3


    The brick contractors have just completed burning a kiln of 180,000 brick for the courthouse.

    Everything is now in readiness for the bricklayers on the new courthouse building, and they will commence work as soon as there are sufficient brick on hand. Cornerstone exercises will be held on the 23d inst.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 9, 1883, page 3


    Brick layers will commence work on the courthouse next Monday.

"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 16, 1883, page 3


    Some lively brick laying is now being done on the new courthouse--four fast bricklayers now being employed on the work--besides the necessary assistants.

"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 23, 1883, page 3


    The [courthouse] structure has thus far been carried forward by the use of 950 perch of rough and hammer-dressed stone, 592 feet of dressed sandstone, 40,000 brick; 500,000 brick will be required, and the usual amount of lime, sand and cement to complete the job.

"The Courthouse," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 30, 1883, page 3



    Byers & Guerin fired their second kiln of brick this week.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 7, 1883, page 3


    The brick work for the first story of the new courthouse will be finished this week, and Mr. Marsh, the contractor, promises to have the whole building completed and ready for occupancy by the first of September. Excellent work is being done and when completed will be a credit to the county.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 14, 1883, page 3


    The brick work on the courthouse will be finished by Mr. Byers on Monday. Mr. Marsh will then commence putting on the roof, expecting to complete it in about three weeks.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 18, 1883, page 3



    The brick in the new courthouse are so well made and they are laid in so workmanlike a manner that paint cannot add any beauty to the appearance of the building.
"A Suggestion," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 25, 1883, page 2


    The brick work on the courthouse was completed on Wednesday, and the contractors for that work, Messrs. Byers & Guerin, have certainly done a most creditable job. The building will be under cover and ready for inside work in about three weeks.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 25, 1883, page 3



    The first story of Mr. Whetstone's new brick residence has been put up by George Holt and will be finished in a short time.
    The Odd Fellows contemplate making numerous improvements to their brick, the building of a new brick addition and the repairing of the steps leading to their hall being among the number.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 29, 1883, page 3


    The public may form an estimate of the magnitude of this work when we state that it contains over 400,000 brick; over 70,000 feet of framing and rough lumber, 80,000 feet of sash, door, finishing and cornice, the roof requiring 50,000 shingles. . . . Messrs. Byers & Guerin, subcontractors for the brick work and plastering, have done their part in a very creditable manner apparently trying to see how well, rather than how quickly, it could be done, and they deserve credit for the handsome way in which it has been accomplished so far. It is expected that all the plastering will be done within two weeks, and the finishing of each room will be a question of a very short time.

"Our New Courthouse," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 13, 1883, page 2


    My recollection is that the cornerstone was laid in September, 1883. At that time I was working for my board at the brewery in Jacksonville, and I stopped a great many times while they were laying the bricks in the courthouse, and there was a man by the name of [James] T. Guerin, who was a very rapid bricklayer. he didn't belong to any bricklayer's union and therefore was not limited to the number of bricks he could lay, but he laid all the bricks he could during the day. And thus was this courthouse constructed.
"Southern Oregon Historical Society," address of Gus Newbury, August 5, 1950 at the dedication of the Jacksonville Museum, Oregon Historical Society, September 1950, pages 223-227


    It is stated that Mr. Byers and other persons are about interesting themselves in the erection of a large brick building in Medford. We don't know how true it is.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 28, 1883, page 3


    A considerable amount of brick is being hauled to Medford for Byers & Co.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 4, 1884, page 3


    A large brick building 50x60 feet is to be erected at Medford this winter.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 4, 1884, page 3


    Fine brick buildings will soon take the place of the frame structures burned down [in the New Year's fire], when the looks of the town will be considerably improved. The walls of the post office building were not injured much [when it was gutted] and will be repaired by Max Muller as soon as he can get the bricks.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 5, 1884, page 3



    Byers & Jacobs will build a brick block 50x60 and another brick store 20x40. Large piles of brick are already on the ground, having been hauled from Jacksonville. The buildings will be made but one story high at first. Thos. McAndrew promises to burn a large kiln of brick and also put up one or more brick buildings during the coming season.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1884, page 4


    Enough brick have been secured to rebuild the post office building, and the work will soon be commenced. No definite arrangements have yet been made in regard to the other places in the burnt district, mostly on account of the scarcity of building material, and partly on account of negotiations pending for the transfer of some of the real estate.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 26, 1884, page 3



    Within a few days work on the smaller brick building of Byers & Jacobs will be commenced. It will be used as an express office. The larger building, 50x60, will be two stories high. 
"At Medford," Ashland Tidings, February 1, 1884, page 3


    It is often said half in earnest, half in jest, that some of the old brick buildings made from the clay taken from Rich Gulch have more gold fused into the bricks than was ever inside the buildings.

Robert A. Miller, "Golden Nuggets," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 2, 1884, page 2



    NEW BRICKS.--Negotiations have been pending for some time past between the Red Men lodge of this place and C. W. Savage for the purchase of the latter's land in the burnt district, and matters were brought to a close yesterday by the sale of the property for $1,500. The dimensions of the lot are 25x100 feet, but as it is to be two stories high the Red Men will also build over Howard's lot, making it all one building. The post office building will also be repaired and a new brick put on Ryan's lot adjoining, making that block a solid brick.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 2, 1884, page 3


    Max Muller is having the rubbish cleaned out of his brick preparatory to having the building repaired.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 9, 1884, page 3



    Byers & Co. will commence the building of their brick buildings at Medford as soon as the cold snap is at an end.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 15, 1884, page 3


    Messrs. Byers and Jacobs will soon commence putting up a brick store building at Medford.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 16, 1884, page 3


    Work on the post office building has been commenced by Geo. W. Holt. The brick to be used comes from Grants Pass.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 23, 1884, page 3



    Byers & Co. have commenced work on their fine brick buildings and expect to have them ready for occupancy in the course of a few months. They propose to make the structure opposite the depot a two-story one.
"Medford Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 29, 1884, page 2


    Work on the foundations of the two brick buildings of Byers & Jacobs at Medford is now in progress. Messrs. Byers and Steadman are doing the work.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, February 29, 1884, page 3


    Work on Byers and Jacobs' new brick building was commenced this week and [is] progressing finely. Two bricks, one fronting the depot and the other adjoining it on the side street, are to be erected and the plans show that they will be large and roomy structures.
"Medford Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884, page 3


    The floor of the post office building has been lowered several feet, and G. W. Holt and assistants are getting along well in repairing the brick work.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884, page 3


    Work on the post office building continues right along, and it will not be long before it is ready for occupancy. Holt is doing the brick work, Hockenjos the carpenter work and K. Kubli the tin work.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 15, 1884, page 3



    One of Byers & Co.'s brick buildings at Medford is nearing completion, while the foundation is being laid for the other.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1884, page 3


    Mr. Byers has begun laying brick for the second brick building of Byers & Jacobs at Medford. It will be two stories high. The walls of the smaller building are up ready for the joist.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1884, page 3


    The old frame buildings now occupied by S. P. Jones and Jack Marshall will soon be torn down and a substantial brick placed there instead by the owner of the property--Mrs. Jane McCully.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 29, 1884, page 3



    Mr. Byers, the bricklayer and stone mason, came up from Medford last Monday. He has the new brick buildings of Byers & Jacobs at that place enclosed, and they will soon be entirely finished.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, April 18, 1884, page 3


    Geo. W. Holt will commence making brick in Fehely's yard next week.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 26, 1884, page 3



    Priddy & Son are starting a brick yard in the vicinity of Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1884, page 3



    There is some talk of another brick block being built at Medford by parties of that place.
    The Red Men have commenced cleaning off their lot on the corner of California and 3d streets preparatory to commencing work on their new brick building on that corner.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 10, 1884, page 3


    Byers & Co. have leased a large body of ground near Medford and are about getting ready to manufacture brick on a large scale.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1884, page 3


    Byers & Guerin are making arrangements to burn a kiln of brick at H. Fox's brick yard, for the bank and other buildings to be erected in Ashland.
Ashland Tidings, May 16, 1884, page 3


    The new brick buildings at Medford, owned by Byers and Jacobs, are fine structures and will make beautiful stores. Baruch Fisher has rented the one on the side street [the Medynski Building, on Main] and will open a general merchandise store there. The others are being negotiated for by outside parties, and as they are connected the owners are making an effort to rent them to one party as one large store.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 17, 1884, page 3


    Baruch Fisher will open a store in one of Byers & Jacobs' brick buildings at Medford.
    Byers & Guerin will manufacture brick both at Ashland and Medford, and expect to fully supply the demand in the whole valley.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 23, 1884, page 3


    Holt & Hardin have finished making a kiln of 125,000 brick, and it is now being burned. In a few days this firm will have a large number of good bricks for sale.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1884, page 3


    Messrs. Holt & Hardin are now burning a kiln of 125,00 brick.
    The corner room in Byers & Jacobs' new brick at Medford has been rented by W. G. Kenney and H. H. Wolters, who will open a saloon at that place.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 7, 1884, page 3


    GOT THE CONTRACT.--L. S. P. Marsh was the successful bidder for the construction of the new courthouse at Crescent City, agreeing to complete the building according to specifications for $12,000. The building is to be of frame and the foundation of rock and brick. Messrs. Byers & Guerin have taken a subcontract for the stone and brick work and will commence at once. Mr. Marsh started for Crescent City last Thursday to arrange other preliminaries and subcontract some of the other work to be done.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 14, 1884, page 3



    The stormy weather interferes greatly with Mr. Guerin's brick making operations at the yard near Ashland, and is thus delaying the construction of the bank building.
Ashland Tidings, June 27, 1884, page 3


    A fine lot of brick are now offered for sale by G. W. Holt.
    A fine new store building has just been finished for Henry Judge at Ashland on the vacant lot between the Odd Fellows and McCall bricks. He moved his saddler shop into the new building this week.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 28, 1884, page 3



    The brick will be ready for work to begin on the bank building in about a week.
    Byers & Guerin will probably burn a kiln of brick at Fort Klamath for use in the new buildings to be constructed there.
Ashland Tidings, July 4, 1884, page 3


    L. S. P. Marsh, who received the contract for building the Crescent City court house, left here this week with a good force of carpenters and the structure will be commenced immediately after their arrival. J. C. Whipp and W. H. Byers will also go down to do the stone and brick work.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 12, 1884, page 3


FALL IN BRICK!
THE UNDERSIGNED HAS JUST FINISHED burning a Kiln of 100,000 superior brick, which will be sold at
Very Reasonable Rates,
In quantities to suit. Satisfaction guaranteed.
    Call at the place, four miles northeast of Jacksonville.              GEO. PRIDDY.
Medford Precinct, July 15, 1884.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1884 et seq., page 2


    New residences are proposed by several of our farmers. We learn that M. Bellinger, C. W. Broback, G. W. Fordyce and J. N. Woody each contemplate building substantial dwelling houses in the near future.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1884, page 3


    Work on the new Red Men's hall will be commenced in a few days by Geo. W. Holt, who has secured the contract for the brick work.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 19, 1884, page 3



    WILL BUILD.--The piece of land in the burnt district on California Street, commonly known as the Howard lot, was bought by K. Kubli this week for $850, and the new owner will build a fine brick store building on the ground at once. There was considerable strife among several to get possession of this property, and at one time it looked as if the matter would have to be settled in the courts.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 26, 1884, page 3


    Byers & Guerin will probably have two or three brick store buildings to put up in Crescent City, besides doing the work upon the foundation of the new courthouse here, and will burn 300,000 brick for the purpose. Mr. Guerin will go down there as soon as he completes the brick work and plastering of the Ashland bank building.--Tidings.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 26, 1884, page 3



   Mr. Byers informs us that a block of three or four brick stores will probably be built at Medford this summer.
   Byers & Guerin have at Medford the best brick yard in the county, and will burn this season 400,000 or 500,000 brick, one large kiln having already been burned. Their yard is right on the railroad, and they are prepared to fill orders for shipment, either north or south, on short notice.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 1, 1884, page 3



    C. W. Broback's new dwelling house at Medford is now in course of erection. It will be a fine building.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 8, 1884, page 3


    The Ryan lot in the burnt district is being cleared off preparatory to the erection of a fine two-story brick building.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 9, 1884, page 3



    C. W. Broback's handsome residence near Medford is nearing completion. A. Childers and sons, three first-class mechanics recently from Portland, did the brickwork.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1884, page 3


    The brick work of the bank building was finished last week, and the sand of the fire roof has been put in place this week.
    Messrs. Byers and Guerin went to Medford to attend to business there until the bank building here was ready for plastering. The carpenters were ready for them yesterday.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 15, 1884, page 3


    At the Red Men's corner things have assumed a businesslike appearance. Trenches for the foundation are being dug and the brick and rock are also being hauled. P. J. Ryan has also made a start and will soon have a new brick on the site where his building burned.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 16, 1884, page 3


    C. W. Broback's brick house is rapidly approaching completion. It is one of the few brick dwelling houses of the county, and will be finished in good style and add greatly to the appearance of the town. It is situated about halfway between the depot and his former residence.
"Medford Notes," Ashland Tidings, September 5, 1884, page 3


    Brick layers are wanted at Roseburg, and good wages will be paid.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 13, 1884, page 3



    Byers & Guerin of Medford have shipped 20,000 excellent brick to Fort Klamath.
    Work has been resumed on the new buildings in town. As soon as Holt & Hardin's kiln of brick is finished the Red Men's edifice will be rushed to completion.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1884, page 3


    Work on the Red Men and Kubli bricks has been somewhat retarded on account of the scarcity of bricks, but Hardin and Holt's kiln will soon be burned, and then work will be continued without interruption.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 20, 1884, page 3


    C. W. Broback has moved into his new brick house at Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 26, 1884, page 3


    Hardin & Holt are about burning another large kiln of brick. The wet weather has interfered with their work a great deal.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 22, 1884, page 3


    Mr. Guerin informs us that he is making preparations to keep on hand in Ashland a complete assortment of brick, lime, laths, plaster and all other material used in brick work and plastering.
Ashland Tidings, October 3, 1884, page 3


    Brick are now being hauled from the new kiln.
    Work on the new Red Men building will now go on without further delay as plenty material is on hand. The fine new brick adjoining, owned by K. Kubli, will also be finished soon. Pat Ryan is digging a cellar and will get his brick up as soon as possible.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 4, 1884, page 3


    In another week with good weather the walls of the Red Men and Kubli bricks will be up, and the carpenters and plasterers will then have charge. Mr. Kubli is putting a second story on his building to conform with the other, and when finished this promises to be the finest building in town.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 1, 1884, page 3


    The brick work on the Red Men and Kubli buildings is nearly all finished, and the carpenters have commenced work, with J. T. Roloson in charge.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 15, 1884, page 3



    Pat Ryan has secured the walls on both sides of his new brick, and it will not take long to complete the building.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 22, 1884, page 3



ENTERPRISING.--Getting short of brick for his new building this week, Pat Ryan offered several street gamins a cent apiece for each brick they would bring him, at the same time telling the boys to pick up any and all brick they could find around town. After prospecting around a little the youths struck a bonanza in the shape of a big brick pile in the back yard of one of Mr. Ryan's other houses. The work of delivering commenced at once, the boys receiving pay as each load was delivered, when finally Pat smelled a mouse and investigation showed that he had been buying his own brick. The contract was canceled at once.--Sentinel.
Ashland Tidings,
November 28, 1884, page 3


    The Red Men and Kubli bricks are now under cover, and the carpenters are laying the floors. The building presents a fine appearance and is an ornament to the town.
    P. J. Ryan's new brick building is now assuming proportions. The brick work on the second story is nearly finished, and he is now thinking of putting another story on top of that.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 6, 1884, page 3


    Goods have already been placed in the upper story of K. Kubli's new brick, that part of the building being finished. Mr. Kubli will move his entire stock to the new building in about a month from now and extends an invitation to everybody to call and see him when he gets into his new quarters. Prices to suit the times.

"Local Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 20, 1884, page 3


    Bilger & Maegly are now putting on the tin roof over Ryan's new brick.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 3, 1885, page 3


    Mr. Williams of Medford will build a brick building [i.e., the Hamlin Block] instead of the frame one he began there and it will be same size as frame--50x90.
    Schmidtling & Son are now whittling down the rock for the new stone sidewalk to be laid in front of the new brick and propose making it a fine job.
    P. J. Ryan is having a cellar dug under the sidewalk in front of his new brick which he says the renter can use as a wood house or storeroom. The idea is a new one, and if it works all right, all of our merchants can get more room by following suit. We hope they won't, however.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 17, 1885, page 3


For Sale.
    Superior brick in quantities to suit. For further particulars inquire of J. S. Howard, postmaster, or the undersigned.
BYERS & GUERIN, Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1885, page 3


    G. W. Williams of Medford will not erect his large building until spring, and may use brick instead of lumber.
    Jas. Priddy, of Medford precinct, who has been quite sick, has sufficiently recovered to pay Jacksonville a visit.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1885, page 3


    There are thirty brick stores and dwellings in Jacksonville--more than most people would think we had.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 24, 1885, page 3


    The plastering of Kubli's brick was finished by Messrs. Guerin and Huggins this week, and the shelving is ready to be put in place. Both Kubli and Merritt expect to move into their new places of business in a couple of weeks.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 31, 1885, page 3


    Roberts & Neil have let the contract for building a brick store in Medford. Mr. Childers has the job. J. T. Guerin has ordered a neat dwelling house built, and will probably keep "bachelor's hall" there.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 13, 1885, page 3



    Rumor says that Jas. T. Guerin will soon have a neat dwelling house built at Medford.
    Mr. Childers has taken a contract to build a brick store at Medford for Roberts & O'Neil.
    Byers & Jacobs have rented their small brick building at Medford to a gentleman from the Willamette Valley, who proposes opening a book and music store there.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1885, page 3


    Mensor Bros. expect to build a brick store at Medford soon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1885, page 3


    FINE WORK.--The new Red Men hall was turned over to the lodge today, and their furniture will be moved from the old place of meeting at once. This will make one of the finest lodge halls in the state when finished, and great credit is due the architect and mechanics engaged in the construction of the building. Geo. W. Holt was the contractor for the stone and brick work, J. T. Roloson for the wood work, A. J. Wilcox the plastering and Carter Brothers the painting. All did their work exceedingly well and deserve due credit. Carter Bros. did some fine work in the painting line in the hall, and the plastering by Mr. Wilcox cannot be excelled anywhere. The Red Men are to be congratulated on their enterprise, and they now have the finest-appearing building in town.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 28, 1885, page 3


    The new Ryan brick is nearing completion and will make a fine-looking building when finished. G. W. Holt and A. J. Wilcox are doing the plastering now.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 14, 1885, page 3


    Roberts & O'Neil have commenced breaking ground for their new brick building at Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1885, page 3


    Work on Roberts & O'Neil's brick building at Medford is progressing rapidly. They will put a large stock of goods into it when it is completed.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1885, page 3


    G. W. Williams, the enterprising Medford architect and builder, has let the contract for doing the brickwork on his proposed two-story building at that place to Childers & Son, and will do the carpentering himself.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1885, page 3


    G. W. Holt will go to Cole's soda springs next week to do the plastering in the fine hotel recently built there.
    The foundations for two new brick buildings in Medford has been started. George W. Williams is building one and Roberts & O'Neil the other. Mr. Williams will arrange the upper story of his building so that it can be used for lodge purposes, with the two rooms in front for offices.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 9, 1885, page 3


    There is some talk of organizing a joint stock company to build a brick hotel at Medford this season.
    Holt & Hardin have some intentions of putting up a large kiln of bricks on F. Galloway's place near Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1885, page 3


    Messrs. Holt, Hardin and Wilcox returned from Linkville the other day not finding enough encouragement there for burning a kiln of brick.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 16, 1885, page 3


    Childers & Sons are about firing a large kiln of superior brick at Medford and will next week be ready to accommodate any calls for that article at very low rates. Read this advertisement elsewhere.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1885, page 3


Brick for Sale!
    The undersigned takes pleasure in informing the public that, having completed a large Kiln of Brick, they are prepared to furnish a superior article at the most reasonable rates. Orders for any quantity will receive prompt attention.
    For further particulars call on or address
CHILDERS & SONS,
Medford, Or.
Medford, May 15, 1885.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1885 et seq., page 3


    Take a look at the store room over K. Kubli's new brick, and if you need farming machinery of the best make you will find it there.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 6, 1885, page 3


    A number of brick buildings are in contemplation at Medford. Geo. W. Williams and J. S. Howard each intend to put up handsome two-story structures, while Roberts & O'Neil will erect a one-story brick. Childers & Son have been awarded the contracts.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1885, page 3


    Mr. Vaughn, formerly of this place, is preparing to burn a kiln of brick at Medford.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 12, 1885, page 3



    Three new brick buildings will soon be put up at Medford by Geo. W. Williams, J. S. Howard and Roberts & O'Neil. Childers and son have taken the contract to do the work.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 13, 1885, page 3


    Just below Gold Hill station is a lime kiln, where very fine lime is burnt from the marble and lime rock that abound in this region.
"Jackson County," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1885, page 2


    Our old friend Howard of Medford is building a two-story brick store, and says he will have a grand parlor in the upper story for his lady customers, and will have a brass band to play on the plaza in front every evening. Howard is a lady's man and will spare no pains to please his lady customers, but we promised not to tell this, as it is intended as a grand surprise, and that is why we haven't said anything about it.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 20, 1885, page 3


    We are informed that Fred Barneburg, Granville Naylor, Jas. Hamlin and others have formed a joint stock company to build a brick hotel at Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 26, 1885, page 3


    I. Phipps has completed a large and commodious barn, and the contract has been let to Childers & Sons for the construction of a large three-story brick hotel of Messrs. Barneburg, Naylor and Hamlin. The brick work has been begun on the three large brick stores that are being erected by Messrs. Howard, O'Neil and Williamson; everything lively and people happy.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 27, 1885, page 3


    Childers & Sons have received the contract for building the proposed brick hotel at Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 3, 1885, page 3


    The contract for the new Medford hotel was let to Childers & Son for $4369, this being the lowest bid. Mr. Byers' bid was $4845. The hotel is to be built on Front Street on Naylor & Hamlin's lots, and is to be 100 feet in depth and two stories high. The stockholders are Hamlin, Naylor, Barneburg and Galloway. The object is to begin work at once.--[Monitor.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 3, 1885, page 3    Unbuilt--see July 31, 1885, below.


    INSURANCE CHANGES.--Mr. Niles, who is assistant manager for the Pacific Insurance Union--comprising nearly all the first-class insurance companies in the coast--was here this week and made a survey of our town to regulate insurance in the future. He makes the following statement of the company's ideas in the premises:
    "There will be no material change in rates, although some risks will be rated lower and some higher than at present. The insurance companies are not anxious for high rates, but desire a reasonable [illegible] from fires. All building will be rated on their merits, and he believes the fairness of the rates made will be generally conceded by our property owners. The design of the company is to do business hereafter, in Oregon, on business principles. They have paid out large sums in Jacksonville, and will pay more in the way of honest losses, if they come. They are in earnest in using every possible effort to repress incendiarism and if, as seems likely, there are "fire bugs" in our midst, they will be sharply dealt with if detected. During the past six months two incendiaries have been sent to the penitentiary from Portland through efforts of the companies. Any improvements made by our citizens in the way of reducing the fire hazard by replacing stove pipes with brick chimneys, taking out cloth lining, putting safety doors and shutters on exposed openings of brick buildings, clearing away the tumble-down sheds and generally improving their buildings and surroundings, will be promptly met by a reduction of rate. Agents are not allowed to make any rebate of commission, and if any return of commission is solicited and allowed policies will be canceled. The new rates will be ready for insurance in about two weeks.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 4, 1885, page 3


    Childers & Son of Medford are shipping a large amount of their superior brick to Grants Pass. They are putting up another kiln.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 10, 1885, page 3


    The walls of the new brick buildings at Medford are about up to the floor of the second story.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1885, page 3


    Dr. W. F. Kremer is building a new brick building at Grants Pass to be used as a drug store.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 18, 1885, page 3


    A. L. Johnson, the land agent, has purchased Roberts & O'Neil's unfinished brick building at Medford, and proposes establishing a private bank in it when completed.
    Work is progressing on Williams' and Howard's brick buildings at Medford. They will be occupied in the main by merchants doing business on the street along which the railroad track runs.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1885, page 3


    The report that Messrs. Barneburg, Naylor, Hamlin and others would build a brick hotel at Medford is unfounded. At least they have given up any such intention if they ever had any.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1885, page 3


    D. W. Hardin goes to Grants Pass next week to put up and burn a kiln of brick.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 8, 1885, page 3



    Byers & Co. intend to put another story on their brick building at Medford, which will probably be used as a hotel.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1885, page 3


    The front of Caton & Garrett's saloon has been improved with a new brick sidewalk, the work of Wm. Huggins.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 15, 1885, page 3



    Byers & Co. intend to commence operations on the second story of their brick building at Medford at once.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1885, page 3


    The new brick stores at Medford are approaching completion and will soon be ready for occupants. Byers & Co. will also raise their building one story higher and make a hotel out of it.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 5, 1885, page 3


    A. L. Johnson of Medford has put a vault in his new business quarters.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1885, page 3


    Wm. Ulrich of Medford informs us that work on the second story of Byers & Co.'s brick building is progressing rapidly.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1885, page 3


Serious Accidents.
    J. McCullough, who was working on the new two-story brick building at Medford, fell from a scaffolding on the upper story, one day last week, breaking one of his shoulders and it is supposed two of his ribs are also broken, besides receiving other injuries. At last accounts, he was getting along as well as could be expected.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1885, page 3


    Holt & Hardin have burned a kiln of 120,000 brick at Grants Pass, and several brick buildings will be erected at that place before long.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 25, 1885, page 3


    A. L. Johnson, land agent at Medford, is having a fireproof vault put in his new brick building there and his office when finished promises to be one of the finest in the State.
    Medford will soon have a new brick hotel. A second story is being built on Byers' brick and the building will also be considerably enlarged. Kenney and Wolters' saloon will be moved to the room adjoining where they now are and their old stand on the corner changed to an office for the hotel. From the plans shown us we think it ought to make a commodious and well-arranged building for the purposes for which it is destined.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 26, 1885, page 3


    Williams' new brick buildings at Medford will soon be ready for occupancy and will present a fine appearance when finished.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 3, 1885, page 3


    Byers & Jacobs have purchased H. Kinney's property in Medford, adjoining their brick buildings.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1885, page 3


    The brick work of the Byers & Jacobs hotel at Medford is about completed, and the building presents a fine appearance.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 9, 1885, page 3



    Byers & Jacobs' brick building at Medford is nearing completion and presents a fine appearance.
    Angle & Plymale talk of putting up a one-story brick at Medford, as a precaution against fire. Insurance rates are quite high in that place.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1885, page 3


    The brickwork on the new buildings at Medford has been finished, but it may be some time yet before they will be occupied.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1885, page 3


    Work has commenced on Angle & Plymale's brick store at Medford.
    Wm. Oliver, formerly of this place, is burning a kiln of brick near Medford.
    A. L. Johnson has moved into his new brick building in Medford, which will be neatly fitted up for a bank.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1885, page 3


    W. K. Reeves, who had been at work upon the fine brick building of Caro Bros. at Roseburg, returned home last week.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 30, 1885, page 3


    D. W. Hardin of Grants Pass has just burnt a fine kiln of brick and is now building flues, etc., for which he has contracts to last him several months.
    The new brick drug store of Dr. W. F. Kremer's at Grants Pass is one of the finest in this end of the state and would be a credit to a much larger place. The Dr. also enjoys a large practice and seems to be thriving generally.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 7, 1885, page 3


    G. W. Williams' fine brick building at Medford will soon be ready for occupancy.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885, page 3


    A. Childers & Son have finished their third brick kiln for this season. They make the finest brick in the country and find ready sale for them.
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 13, 1885, page 3



    A new brick building will soon be erected at Medford by Geo. S. Walton on the lot formerly owned by M. Mensor of this place.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 14, 1885, page 3


    Work is progressing on Angle & Plymale's brick building at Medford.
    Childers & Son of Medford have just completed another kiln of excellent brick.
    'Squire Walton has let the contract for putting up a brick building on his lot in Medford, and work has already been commenced.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 20, 1885, page 3


    Byers & Guerin, the well-known contractors, are engaged in the construction of 'Squire Walton's brick building at Medford.
    The brick buildings of G. W. Williams and Byers & Jacobs at Medford are now being plastered and will soon be ready for occupancy.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 27, 1885, page 3


    Angle & Plymale at Medford do the boss business in the general merchandise line at that place. They will soon move to their new brick when they will also increase their already large stock.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 26, 1885, page 3


    Messrs. Holt and Hardin have all the work they can do in the brick laying line.

"Grants Pass Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 9, 1886, page 3


    C. W. Withrow intends to manufacture brick at the Fox brickyard, and wants an  experienced man to take charge of the work. See notice.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 15, 1886, page 3



Brickmaker Wanted.
    The undersigned, who recently bought the brickyard property of H. Fox near Ashland, wants an expert brickmaker who will take charge of the manufacture of brick; facilities, clay and wood to be furnished him. Apply at once, Ashland post office.
    Jan. 15, 1886.                                                            C. W. WITHROW.
Ashland Tidings, January 15, 1886, page 3


    Four carloads of lime were shipped to Portland from Burrage and Pomeroy's quarry near Rock Point this week, and we understand that they have orders for much more. They can furnish it in any quantity required, and this will add an important and profitable industry to that portion of our county.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 16, 1886, page 3


    The shelving is being put in J. S. Howard's new brick, and he intends moving by the first of next month.
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 22, 1886, page 3


    'Squire Walton's neat, new brick building is about completed and will soon be occupied.
    Williams' fine brick building is almost completed and will soon be ready for occupancy.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1886, page 3


    The plasterers are now at work in Angle & Plymale's new brick, and it will soon be ready for the "shebang."
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 5, 1886, page 3


    The limestone from Rock Point, Jackson County, is said to produce a better quality of lime than the San Juan, but costs more to burn it, under the present high charges of freight from Rock Point to the Circkamas [sic--Clackamas?].
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 23, 1886, page 3


    W. K. Reeves talks of leasing the brick yard property of C. W. Withrow and going into the manufacture of brick on a large scale.
    C. W. Withrow is building a substantial new barn on the brickyard property near Ashland, which he bought of H. Fox, and will also put up a comfortable brick dwelling sometime during the coming season.
Ashland Tidings, February 26, 1886, page 3


    Byers & Guerin, of Medford, are at work in Ashland this week.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 12, 1886, page 3


    Childers & Son will begin work on another large brick kiln in a few days. They find ready sale for all they can manufacture.
    Another two-story brick building will be commenced in a short time. The lower rooms to be used by Kenney & Wolters and the upper part will be for rent.
  
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 12, 1886, page 3


    A chronic alarmist circulated the report this week that the well-known firm of Angle & Plymale of Medford had failed; the report proves to be entirely without foundation and the firm will shortly transfer their large stock of merchandise to their new brick store which is nearing completion.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 20, 1886, page 3


New Building.
    C. W. Ayers has received the contract for Avery Johnson's new brick store building to be put up on the lot adjoining McCall's brick block. The contract for the masonry and brick work has been given to Messrs. Byers & Guerin, who will commence work on the building at once. The building will be 38x60, one story, and will contain two fine store rooms.
Ashland Tidings, March 26, 1886, page 3


    The contract for the brick building to be erected by Messrs. Billings and Butler opposite the Pioneer Store has not been given as yet.
    The wooden building next to McCall's block has been torn down to give place to the new brick block that is to be erected there soon.
    Messrs Byers & Guerin are at work plastering F. Roper's new house in the southern part of town. They will have work that will keep them in Ashland for some time.
"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, March 12, 1886, page 3


    Two new brick blocks will be erected in Ashland this spring. One of them will be put up by Messrs. Billings and Butler.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 3, 1886, page 3


    The bricks for the new buildings of A. Johnson have been shipped up from Medford. The foundation wall is now being laid.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 9, 1886, page 3


    Messrs. Butler, Thompson and Billings have let the contract for the building of the foundation for their brick block on the corner of Main and Oak streets, Ashland, to W. K. Reeves, who will begin work at once.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 24, 1886, page 3


    Mr. Byers is making good time on Johnson's brick building. With the assistance of only one other bricklayer, he has already laid the walls about to the ceiling joists.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 30, 1886, page 3


Two More Brick Stores.
    Mr. A. Johnson has let to Byers & Guerin and C. W. Ayers the contract for the building and finishing of two more brick stores of the same size and style as those now under construction, and will be built on the lot adjacent to these. The blacksmith and wagon shop are being moved from this lot. The front building, nearly new, has been bought by Thompson & Stephenson, and will be moved by Wm. Patterson to their lot just south of the Ashland livery stable. Mr. Johnson is making a valuable addition to the business part of town in his brick blocks.
Ashland Tidings, May 7, 1886, page 3


    The foundation wall is about ready for the brick walls of Johnson's second brick building. The plasterers are at work now upon the two stores first built.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 14, 1886, page 3


    A. L. Willey has the contract to build the brick block on the corner of Main and Oak Street for Messrs. Butler, Thompson and Billings.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 21, 1886, page 3


    Byers & Guerin will have their work upon the new stores in Johnson's block finished within a short time now. The joists of the second floor were laid yesterday.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 21, 1886, page 3


    Byers & Guerin are plastering the last two stores in Johnson's block, and will soon have them finished and ready for occupancy.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 11, 1886, page 3


    A brickyard is to be established at Central Point by Priddy & Sons.
    Byers & Guerin beat the building record in town by putting up a brick house in one day--a large addition for a workshop at the back of the store occupied by Willard & Eubanks.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 18, 1886, page 3


    Brick from Medford and lumber from Grants Pass will make the new block on the corner of Main and Oak streets. It is too bad that there is no timber or clay near Ashland.
    Byers & Guerin have completed the plastering of the handsome new dwelling houses for Mr. Roper and Mrs. Houck, and have given the walls a handsome finish.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 25, 1886, page 3


    The ceiling joists of the new corner brick block have been put in place, and the iron front will soon be in position.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 2, 1886, page 3


    W. K. Reeves, the contractor, who drew the front design and brick cornice of Butler & Billings' new brick block, is now engaged in finishing it up, and when completed it promises to be the most handsome piece of ornamental brick work in Southern Oregon. Mr. Reeves is a superior artist in this line, having put up some of the finest buildings in California and Southern Oregon.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 16, 1886, page 3


    Don't forget the place, Johnson's New Brick next door to H. Judge's harness and saddle store. Clayton & Gore.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 23, 1886, page 3


    NEW BRICK--C. W. Kahler has let a contract to Byers & Guerin of Medford for the construction of a brick building on the site where his office stood. The old building has already been torn down and bricklaying will commence about Monday. Wes says he has not yet lost confidence in Jacksonville and his actions prove it.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, August 7, 1886, page 3



    Geo. H. Williams of Medford has traded off his brick block at that place to James Hamlin for 190 acres of land in Eden precinct. Mr. Williams will make a fine farm of this place.
    The brick work on C. W. Kahler's new brick building is nearly finished, and it will be ready for occupancy in a couple of weeks more.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 21, 1886, page 3


    C. W. Kahler will move into his new brick law office next week. It presents a nice appearance and will no doubt prove a desirable loafing place for our local scientific sharps.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 4, 1886, page 3


    Medford is soon to have a brick church edifice. Messrs. A. Childers and son have contracted with the proper authorities to furnish 60,000 bricks for the building. The building will be for the use of the Baptist Church of this place.--Monitor.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 24, 1886, page 3


    [Madame Holt] had been married numerous times before she was wedded to a brick maker and layer named Holt. She married him as a matter of convenience. He was an industrious old Englishman, and the Madame had an ambition to build a brick hotel in another part of town. He could make bricks, lay them in a wall and chop the wood to burn them, hence he was qualified as an important factor in the Madame's hotel enterprise.

"Madame Holt," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 2, 1886, page 1


    Medford is soon to have a brick church edifice. Messrs. A. Childers & Son have contracted with the proper authorities to furnish 60,000 bricks for the building. The building will be for the use of the Baptist Church of this place.
"Jackson County," Oregonian, Portland, October 7, 1886, page 8


    This place now has three halls, J. S. Howard's hall (the upper story of his brick building), being the latest candidate for public favor.
"Medford Squibs,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886, page 3


Medford's Improvements.
    A correspondent says: I send you herewith a partial list of the improvements made in Medford during the past year. It is as nearly accurate as I could make it, but is, of course, subject to correction. After footing the column and examining the total, you will have to admit that you were in error in stating last week that Central Point, next to Ashland, has expended more in improvements during the year than any other town in the valley: A. L. Johnson's brick office and dwelling, $2,000; Williams' block, two-story brick building, $6,000; J. S. Howard, 2-story brick store, $3,000; Angle & Plymale, fireproof brick store, $4,000; G. S. Walton, brick building, $2,500; Byers & Jacobs, brick hotel imp't., $2,000; Mrs. L. Foster, millinery and dwelling, $1,000; H. E. Baker, farmers warehouse, $1,200; S. H. Lyon, store, $800; O. Holtan, tailor shop and dwelling, $1,000; Thos. Harris, imp't. on dwelling, $300; McGee & Zimmerman, public hall, $1,200; J. B. Riddle, poultry yards, $800; A. L. Johnson, barn, $500; ------ Clark, dwelling, $1,800; C. K. Fronk, dwelling, $900; A. P. Talent, $1,000; John W. Short, $1,800; N. H. West, dwelling repair; $200; W. G. Zimmerman, ditto, $50; R. T. Young, dwelling [omission]; Wm. Edwards, dwelling, $1,000; E. J. Pool, blacksmith shop, $150. Total $34,800.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 14, 1887, page 3


    Messrs. Byers and Guerin, the well-known brick masons, intend going to eastern Oregon to follow their business.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 8, 1887, page 2


    Childers & Son are finishing the brick foundation for the Baptist Church. The contract for doing the carpenter work will soon be let.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 29, 1887, page 2


    The brick foundation of the Baptist Church at this place is about completed and Webb & Zimmerman, who have the contract for doing the carpenter work, will soon commence operations.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1887, page 2


    The carpenters are placing the rafters on the handsome brick church erected by the Baptist people of this little city. The church will be ready for occupancy sometime in September, and it will be an ornament to the place.
"Medford Items," Oregonian, Portland, July 16, 1887, page 6


    Geo. Holt, the well-known brickmason, is at Montague, having just returned from lower California. He has purchased the new brickyard near that place, where good clay has been found within four feet of the surface and water at 40 feet.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1887, page 3


    Messrs. Scott & Jennings have purchased the business of Geo. W. Riddle in Grants Pass. They will immediately erect a fine brick building in which they will carry on the mercantile trade. Success to you, boys.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 15, 1887, page 3


    George Priddy has his new brick house well under way. He expects to have it enclosed before next winter.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 20, 1887, page 3


    The Tidings says arrangements have been made to establish a brick and tile manufactory at Ashland. Preparations will be begun soon and operations will be commenced early in the spring.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 22, 1887, page 3


    It is reported that a bank will soon be opened in the brick building formerly occupied by A. L. Johnson.
"Medford Squibs,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1887, page 2


    Adkins & Webb have let the contract for erecting a two-story brick building to S. Childers on the site of their present business place.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1887, page 3


    Childers & Son are now engaged in manufacturing a large kiln of superior brick.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1887, page 2


    George Priddy has his new brick house well under way. He expects to have it enclosed before next winter.
"Local News,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 20, 1887, page 3


    Work has been commenced on Adkins & Webb's new brick building.
"Medford Squibs,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1887, page 2


    Childers' big brick kiln will soon be ready to burn.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1887, page 2


    Messrs. Close, lately of Canada, and experienced tile-makers, who have located in Eden precinct, are engaged in manufacturing tiles, which will be used by our prominent orchardists in underdraining their soil.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1887, page 2


    Frank Galloway has sold his farm and other real estate and will engage in business in Walton's brick. He is a reliable and worthy gentleman, and we wish him success.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1887, page 3


    Childers & Son have fired their large kiln of brick. They have also been awarded the contract for building the foundation of D. T. Lawton's residence and lately completed that of Geo. L. Webb's dwelling house.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 25, 1887, page 3


    Jas. T. Guerin, the scientific brickmason, who has been in Washington Territory for several months past, has returned. He will remove to California in the near future with his family and probably locate.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1887, page 3


    'Squire Walton has sold his brick store building to Mr. Griffin, a newcomer, who will go into business here in the near future.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1887, page 2


A New Enterprise for Ashland.
    Henry Close and sons, practical brick makers, who came to this county recently, have made arrangements to establish a brick and tile manufactory at this place, on land belonging to Messrs. Atkinson, Carter Bros. and Leeds south of town. They have brick and tile making machinery of large capacity, and, after thorough test, have pronounced the clay there just what they want. The brick they make are far superior to anything ever used in this country, having a finish almost equal to the Baltimore pressed brick, and when they come into use in frontings for buildings, our business blocks will begin to present a finer appearance than it has been possible to give them heretofore. Mr. Close has four sons--two of whom are married--and they will all work at the business. They will begin to make preparations soon, and will commence operations early in the spring.
Ashland Tidings, December 9, 1887, page 3



    Mr. Butler, who intends opening a bank here, has rented Mrs. Stanley's brick building, and went to San Francisco last week to make the necessary arrangements.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3


    Work on Adkins & Webb's big brick building will soon be commenced.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1888, page 2


    Messrs. Close & Sons are putting up the necessary buildings for their
brick yard south of town.
Ashland Tidings, February 17, 1888


    Childers & Son have commenced hauling stone for the foundation of their new brick building on Seventh Street.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 2, 1888, page 2


    Mrs. Talent, daughter of H. Close, had a very narrow escape from being killed at her father's brickyard, Phoenix, last week. While standing near the machine her dress caught in the cog wheels and drew her down on to the machine. Her clothing wound around the cog wheels so tightly that it stopped the engine. Had it not stopped as it did, in another minute she would have been killed. As it was, she escaped with some very bad bruises.--Tidings.

"State & Coast," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 8, 1888, page 1


    Work is progressing on Ashland's new brick hotel building.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 8, 1888, page 3

Childers ad, March 13, 1888 Southern Oregon Transcript
Childers ad, March 13, 1888 Southern Oregon Transcript


    P. J. Ryan has neatly fitted up his four-story brick hotel to rent, and a wide-awake business man with the necessary experience and a small capital would find it an investment that would undoubtedly prove profitable.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 15, 1888, page 3


    Work on the foundation of Childers' brick building was begun last week, and it will be pushed to completion.
"Notes from Medford," Oregonian, Portland, March 27, 1888, page 3


    Childers & Son have commenced operations on the fine brick building they propose putting up on Seventh Street, adjoining S. Rosenthal's place of business.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1888, page 2

Mail Tribune, June 29, 1979
I have not yet determined whose residence this was.

    John Morey, a brother-in-law of J. W. Short, who arrived from the East recently, has purchased the brick residence in the western end of town and the four acres connected therewith, paying $1,000 for the property.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1888, page 2


    Childers & Son's fine brick building is assuming proportions.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1888, page 3


    Spence Childers is building a two-story brick on the corner of Main and C streets. The ground floor is for store rooms, the second floor is for offices. It will be a fine structure and an ornament to the city.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, May 18, 1888, page 3



    Close & Sons have gone into the brick business at Ashland and are manufacturing a superior quality of building material. They have sent for a new molding machine and will then be able to furnish as fine brick as can be obtained in the state.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1888, page 3


    Prof. Vawter of Eugene City and Mr. Bentley, lately from the eastern states, have rented Mrs. Stanley's brick building and will soon open a bank there.
"Medford Squibs,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1888, page 3


    Childers & Son have just completed a large kiln of superior brick.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 19, 1888, page 3


    Work on the brick building was begun again last Tuesday and will be rapidly pushed until completed. Childers & Son have just finished burning a kiln of 300,000 brick to be used in buildings to be put up this season.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, July 20, 1888, page 3



    The following city improvements are under way: Childers' brick store building, Webb's brick store, Judge Walton's residence, Dr. Minnis' cottage, Dickison's large hotel and the water ditch together with a large number of other valuable frame stores and residences.
"Medford Notes," Oregonian, Portland, July 24, 1888, page 6



    Childers' brick building is nearing completion. They will soon commence the erection of others.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1888, page 3


    Ashland is enjoying a healthy, rapid growth that bids fair to continue. A leading citizen of that place estimates that there are at this time nearly 300 carpenters and bricklayers at work in the city.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 9, 1888, page 3


    The stone foundation for Adkins & Webb's new brick building is now being cut.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 9, 1888, page 3


    Adkins & Webb have moved their stock of hardware into Childers' new brick building, and the carpenters are already at work moving the old building out of the way preparatory to the erection of their new three-story brick store.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, August 10, 1888, page 3



    The work of erecting the roundhouse at Ashland commenced this week, a large force of men being at work digging trenches for the foundation. The plans show a ten-stall roundhouse with 160 feet front, 240 feet back and 75 feet on the sides, the walls to be 20 feet high and the roof of corrugated iron. It will require 600,000 bricks and 600 yards of sand.--[Record.
Democratic Times,
August 16, 1888, page 3


    The old building formerly used by Adkins & Webb has been moved away, and the excavation already commenced for the walls of the new three-story brick.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, August 17, 1888, page 3



    G. W. Holt and Mr. Gregg have received the contract for doing the brickwork of the new roundhouse at Ashland.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 23, 1888, page 3


    Childers & Son's brick building is receiving the finishing touches. It has already been spoken for.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 23, 1888, page 3


    Adkins & Webb are occupying Childers' new brick, and will be there until their new building is completed.
    Adkins & Webb's frame building has been removed, and work on their new three-story brick has been commenced.
    Dr. C. Minnis, an excellent physician, has located in this place and opened an office in Childers' new brick building. He comes highly recommended, and will doubtless be well received.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888, page 3


C. MINNIS, M. D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D    S U R G E O N
Medford, Oregon.
----
    Office in Childers' brick block, Main Street. Residence on North Front Street.
    Calls promptly attended to, day or night.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888 et seq., page 3


    The foundation of Adkins & Webb's new building is about finished, and brick work will begin in a few days.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, September 7, 1888, page 3


    The foundation for Adkins & Webb's new three-story brick is completed, and the brick masons are at work. It will be a handsome structure and a credit to Medford--the first three-story business house in the city.
    Adkins & Webb have moved into the lower story of the Childers brick, the upper story of which will be fitted up for offices.
    A handsome veneered brick residence, being built for W. H. Barr in the western part of the city, is nearing completion.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, September 14, 1888, page 3


    Childers & Son have commenced the brickwork of Adkins & Webb's new building.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, September 20, 1888, page 3


    Brick-laying on Adkins & Webb's building has been commenced, and the work will be pushed as fast as possible.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, September 21, 1888, page 3


    W. H. Barr is building a neat brick residence near this place.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1888, page 3


    Priddy & Son have sold their brick residence here to Mr. Flippen, lately from California, for $1200. They will soon commence the construction of two more brick buildings.
"Central Point Pointers,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 11, 1888, page 3


    The new brick residence of W. H. Barr is approaching completion.
    The finishing touches are this week being put upon the second story of the Adkins & Webb building.
    Childers' new brick building is completed and several persons have located their offices in the upper story thereof.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 25, 1888, page 3


    The brick work on Adkins & Webb's building has progressed as far as the third story.
    Childers & Son have the contract for building Jones & Horn's brick store and hotel at Hornbrook, Cal., which is a fine, large structure. The outside work will soon be completed.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 8, 1888, page 3


    Childers & Son, having finished the construction of Horn & Jones' large brick building at Hornbrook, Cal., have brought their bricklaying force here and put them to work on Adkins & Webb's three-story structure. They have been quite successful as contractors, doing most of the best work in southern Oregon for the past few years.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1888, page 3


    Miss Russ' millinery store will soon be removed from its present quarters in Walton's brick building, to make room for another hardware store [most likely D. A. Huling's].
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 6, 1888, page 2


    The second story of the new brick is ready for the joists.
"Medford Items,"
Ashland Tidings, December 7, 1888, page 3


    Angle & Plymale will soon build another brick building.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 27, 1888, page 2


    Adkins & Webb's fine three-story brick building is nearing completion.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1889, page 3


Drain Tiling.
    Close & Sons have shipped a carload of drain tiling to H. B. Miller of Grants Pass this week from their yard near town, and J. H. Stewart and others of this county have been using a considerable quantity this winter in draining fruit lands. Close & Sons will manufacture a large amount during the coming season, and will find a heavy demand, both in this neighborhood and other parts of the valley.
Ashland Tidings, January 11, 1889, page 3


    The brick work of Adkins & Webb's new building has been completed.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1889, page 3


    Adkins & Webb's fine three-story brick is nearly completed.
    F. M. Poe and others will soon commence an extensive kiln of brick.
    Work has commenced on the foundation of Angle & Plymale's new brick store.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1889, page 3


    It is announced that Wm. Slinger, H. E. Baker, W. H. Barr,  B. W. Powell and J. W. Short have formed a partnership for the purpose of conducting a packing business at this place; also that they have purchased some real estate of J. B. Riddle and will erect a brick building on it soon.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Adkins' fine brick building will soon be ready for occupancy. We learn that H. H. Wolters of the Monarch Saloon will occupy Childers' building as soon as Adkins & Webb vacate it.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1889, page 3


    F. M. Poe & Co. started their brick machine in earnest last Monday. They are turning out about 12,000 first-class bricks per day.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, March 15, 1889, page 3



    Angle and Plymale's new brick building is looming up.
    Messrs. Oliver, Poe and Branhier have commenced the manufacture of pressed brick here.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


    Poe & Brantner are now proprietors of the new brick yard.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1889, page 2


    Preparations are being made for the erection of several brick store buildings. Medford is fully up with the procession.
    J. G. Grossman, the well-known wheelwright, has let the contract for putting up a brick building on his lots in the eastern portion of town.
    Vawter & Whitman have started a loan agency at this place, and elsewhere announce that they have a large sum of money to loan on long time and at low rates.
    Angle & Plymale's two-story brick building is looming up nicely already. J. A. Whiteside has bought their frame building and removed it to the western portion of town.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1889, page 3


    Poe & Co have their second kiln of brick nearly ready to burn. The first kiln turned out first-class brick, which are all sold already.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, May 24, 1889, page 2



    J. G. Grossman is preparing to build a brick business house on his lots on Main Street.
    Messrs. Adkins and Webb are pushing things on their new two-story brick building on 7th Street, which will be 50x75 feet in size.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1889, page 3


    Poe & Co. and Childers & Son each finished burning a large kiln of brick last week. The demand for brick is so great that they will erect another kiln at once.
"Medford Items,"
Ashland Tidings, June 28, 1889, page 2


    Mr. Wallace, a recent arrival, has purchased the brickyard of Poe & Brantner near town, and will continue the manufacture of a superior quality of brick.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 3


    J. G. Grossman, the well-known wheelwright, is occupying his fine brick building on Seventh Street.
    Geo. W. Isaacs' fine two-story brick residence is nearing completion. It is one of the nicest in town.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889, page 3


    Work has commenced on the fine brick structures Dr. Adkins and I. A. Webb propose building.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1889, page 1


    The brick work on the opera house has reached the top of the third story, and the carpenters are now engaged framing the crosses for the roof.
    The foundation of the Webb & Adkins new building is nearly completed, and the brick work will begin Monday.

"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, August 2, 1889, page 3


    J. H. Stewart has had 4000 feet more of tiling hauled to his fruit farm from Close Bros.' brick yard near Ashland.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1889, page 3


    J. O. Johnson and S. Childers, Sr., now own the brick building in this place formerly owned by A. Childers & Son.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1889, page 2


    The somewhat remarkable fact was developed during the preparation of the material for the new jail floor that the cost of transporting and handling a barrel of Portland cement over the O.&C. from Oregon's metropolis is nearly double the primary cost of the article there. The barrel of cement is transported from Liverpool by water carriage, at least 25,000 miles, and laid down at a figure that warrants the Portland jobbers in retailing it at $3.50 per barrel; and yet the cost laid down here is put at $8.50 or $5.00 per barrel for handling and carriage over the railroad, including wharfage and local freight.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1889, page 3


LIME.
    First-class lime at reasonable rates. Put up in barrels, in any quantity. Apply at John D. Chappell's, Gold Hill.
Medford Mail,
September 7, 1889, page 2


BRICK!
C. H. Wallace & Sons,
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
    Having purchased the Poe & Brantner brick yard, in the west part of Medford, are prepared to furnish any amount of brick and do all manner of work in
BRICK STONE and PLASTERING.
    Our charges are reasonable. By honest and fair dealing and prompt attention to business, we hope to merit a portion of the patronage of our fellow citizens.
Place of Business: BRICKYARD
Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 2


    J. H. Hoffman has been at Medford roofing with tin the big brick buildings being put up there.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1889, page 3


    A. J. Fredenburg will soon build a comfortable brick residence west of the railroad. [243 South Holly--northeast corner Tenth and Holly--block 52, lot 12]
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1889, page 3


    The brick work and plastering contracts for the Ganiard opera house block are both let to Ashland men--H. J. Clark obtaining the former and S. Pedgrift the latter. The building will require about 300,000 bricks and 4000 yards of plastering, and it is well known that the work will be well done if undertaken by these mechanics. Mr. Clark expects to begin laying brick about Nov. 1st.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 27, 1889, page 3


    Julius Goldsmith, the popular grocer, has rented the lower story of Childers' brick building, and is now displaying a fine, large assortment of groceries and provisions of all kinds, glassware, crockery, etc. He keeps only the best goods and sells at prices that defy competition. When in Medford don't fail to give him a call as he will please you.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 3


    Staver & Walker have rented the ground floor of Angle & Plymale's large new brick building and will stock it with an immense assortment of agricultural implements, vehicles, etc., making this their headquarters for southern Oregon.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1889, page 3


    A. J. Merritt has moved to Medford from further down the valley and may inaugurate the business of manufacturing pressed brick here.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1889, page 2


    The Plymale & Angle handsome brick block is almost completed. The opera house will be initiated with a grand ball soon.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1889, page 3


    It may be set down as certain that more brick buildings will be put up next season in the business part of Ashland than in any year to date. The latest brick building proposed is that of S. F. Morine, who contemplates erecting a two-story brick upon the lot next to the bank, on which his blacksmith shop now stands. A new street from the mill corner across Wagner's meadow to Granite Street is another improvement proposed for that part of town.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 22, 1889, page 3



    The neat brick dwelling which A. Childers, Sr., is building on his ranch east of town is rapidly assuming proportions.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1889, page 3


    When the fire reached the brick walls of I. A. Webb's new building, which stood next to the street, it was easily checked and controlled. 
"Blaze at Medford," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1889, page 2


    C. H. Wallace, the contractor, last week returned to Medford, after completing a fine two-story brick at Junction City, in the Willamette Valley. Mr. W. built the first brick edifices in Eugene, Cottage Grove, Creswell and Junction.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1889, page 3


    It is predicted that brick buildings will replace the wooden structures in the burnt district next spring, which will make our town more solid than ever.
    W. G. Cooper last week made application to the town council for leave to erect a temporary wooden building on the site of his burned business house, until such time as he can build a brick structure. Mr. Cooper is a live, energetic citizen, who cannot be kept down by adversity.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1889, page 3


    Close & Sons have sold out their brickyard at Ashland to Chas. H. Veghte, who is conducting it at present. Otha West remains in charge.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1890, page 3


    Close Bros., who with their father compose the noted brickyard band, will soon leave Ashland for Seattle, to engage in business.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1890, page 3


    Dr. Adkins will put up a brick building on his lot east of Webb's furniture store.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1890, page 3


    F. W. Hutchison:--"It's fifteen years ago last February since I first came to Medford. I didn't permanently locate then, just stayed a few months and went away to return later. At that time there were only three brick buildings in the town. I came near buying one of them, but thought it looked too shaky. I had just come from the East, where you must build solid and then anchor the structure down. That building is standing yet and looks as good as it did fifteen years ago."
"Street Echoes," Medford Mail, October 6, 1905, page 1


    C. H. Veghte is making preparations to begin the manufacture of brick and tile at the Ashland brick and tile works, as soon as the weather will permit. He will have to procure a new engine before manufacture begins. Tiling will be made a specialty.
Ashland Tidings, March 7, 1890, page 3



    H. J. Clark has completed the brick work on O. Ganiard's three-story brick opera house, and the carpenters are busy at work. This is an elegant building and an ornament to the town. It is expected that it will be finished by the 1st of May.
"Notes from Jackson County,"
Oregonian, Portland, April 2, 1890, page 9


    Hon. J. H. Stewart, the orchardist, has completed the laying of two miles of tiling, and is now free from the annoying excess of moisture which prevented early plowing in his fields in former years.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1890, page 2



    Work upon the foundation of Morine's new brick building is well under way. The building will be 25 feet front by 65 feet deep and is upon the extreme southern end of Morine's lot.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 4, 1890, page 3



    Among the brick buildings contemplated in Medford during the coming season are a 25x76-foot two-story business house on the corner of Seventh and B streets, to be erected by W. G. Cooper, work on which has already begun; a two-story business house which Thos. McAndrews will build on the north side of Seventh Street; also two store buildings to be erected by Dr. Adkins and Mrs. Dennison respectively on the south side of the same street.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1890, page 2


    The roof of the Ganiard opera house block is said to be supported by the longest single span of any building in the state, but the building is so substantially built as to be perfectly safe. It is one of the finest structures in Ashland.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1890, page 3


    P. W. Olwell has contracted for the immediate erection of a temporary frame dwelling house on his property near town, to accommodate his family until he can build the brick residence which he has in contemplation. He is compelled to build a temporary home for his family in consequence of having sold his residence at Phoenix. The work will be rapidly pushed forward to completion.

"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1890, page 3


    The work of roofing in the Ganiard block at Ashland is progressing this week.
    Morine's brick blacksmith shop in Ashland is about completed, and he will take possession this week.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890, page 3


    P. W. Olwell has already placed his order for 50,000 brick, to be used next fall in the construction of a fine residence on his ranch near town. The building at present in course of construction will be used as a tenant and farm laborer's cottage after the brick residence is built.

"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1890, page 2



    H. J. Clark, the brick mason, who had contracts on a number of brick buildings in Ashland the past two years, is now a resident of Olympia.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, May 9, 1890, page 3


    Webb's block on Seventh Street boasts of a new brick sidewalk along its entire length.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1890, page 2


    Childers & Son burned 250,000 fine brick at their kiln last week.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1890, page 2



    The many Salinas friends of Spencer Childers and family will read with regret the following item, which we find in the Medford, Or. Mail of June 26th: the death of Mrs. Agnes J. Emblen, beloved wife of Charles Emblen, died yesterday of consumption after an illness of 6 months. The bereaved husband has been married scarcely longer than that time. She was the daughter of Spencer Childers. The funeral took place today at 2 o'clock in the Jacksonville Cemetery.
The Salinas Weekly Index, July 3, 1890


    W. R. Patterson, G. W. Gilbertson, Chas. Haynes, J. W. Hatcher and Mr. Jones of Ashland, who have been engaged on the opera block, left last week for Montague to work on the new $5000 brick school house, says the Record.
   
Mrs. B. F. Dowell of East Portland has closed a contract for three neat cottages, to be erected in East Portland during the summer. Mrs. A. Bilger also contemplates building a number of neat cottages for rent in the same locality. Jas. T. Guerin will do the brick and plaster work.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1890, page 3


    Thos. McAndrews' new brick building is rapidly assuming proportions, and will be ready for occupancy before many weeks.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1890, page 3


    T. J. Kenney has removed the goods he purchased of W. G. Cooper of Medford to Jacksonville, and will soon open a large first-class stock of saddles, harness, etc., in Solomon's brick building.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1890, page 3


    W. G. Cooper is putting up a one-story brick structure on the site of his former frame building.
    Wallace & Sons of this place have taken the contract for the brickwork on the new national bank building at Grants Pass.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1890, page 3


    Chas. H. Veghte of Ashland has a large quantity of first-class tiling for sale at the Ashland brickyard, at reasonable rates. Those needing any should not fail to give him a call. Read his advertisement elsewhere.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890, page 3


    Carpenters are at work on the roof of McAndrews' new brick building, which will soon be ready for occupancy. It will be a handsome structure.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890, page 3


    John D. Chappel & Co. are manufacturing an excellent quality of lime near Gold Hill, for which they find a ready demand.
    Wimer & Allison are disposing of a large quantity of their superior lime to builders along the railroad, shipping as far north as Roseburg.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1890, page 3


    S. Childers has returned from his ranch on Dry Creek and is employed on W. G. Cooper's brick building, which will be one of the handsomest in town when it is completed.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1890, page 3


    The new brick building of Mr. Brandenburg is beginning to show up.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1890, page 3


    Cooper's brick building is almost ready for occupancy. It is now being plastered.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1890, page 2


    The Red Men have disposed of their fine brick building in Jacksonville to a company composed of B. A. Autenreith of Yreka, C. W. Kahler, E. Barbe, Chas. Nickell and John Orth.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1891, page 3


    Mr. Wallace, who has conducted the brick yard at Medford for some time past, has returned to the ministerial field, having accepted a call to preach to the Presbyterian Church at Cottage Grove, to which place he returned last week.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1891, page 2


TILE FOR SALE!
 The undersigned has now for sale at the brickyards near Ashland,
Tiling of All Kinds,
FROM 2½ INCH TO 6 INCH
C. H. VEGHTE.           
Ashland Tidings, February 27, 1891, page 2


    It is rumored that Chas. F. Wall will erect a fine brick block on his lots adjoining the Noland saloon property at this place, during the coming season.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1891, page 2


    A. Childers, the pioneer brickmason, who went to Whatcom, Wash., on a visit some time since, was taken sick. He will return as soon as he recovers. His son Arnold is also there, and his family have been sick more or less of the time.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1891, page 2


    A large $20,000 brick hotel will be erected here this summer, it is said.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1891, page 2


    G. W. Priddy, the Central Point brick manufacturer, called at the Times office one day last week.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1891, page 3


    F. Hubbard's sons have rented Cooper's brick building on 7th Street and will stock it with agricultural implements and machinery of all kinds.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 2


    A. J. Fredenburg will beautify his property on the west side with a nice brick residence during the next few months.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1891, page 2


    Spencer Childers has the contract for doing the brick work and plastering about the new schoolhouse building at Medford, and it will be well done.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1891, page 3


    Jacoby Brothers of Gold Hill are receiving unsolicited letters of recommendation from various localities as to the excellent quality of their lime. Experts pronounce it superior to any now on the coast. The company are now employing fifteen men.--[Mail.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1891, page 1


    The contract for building the new city hall at Ashland was last week let to C. H. Veghte, whose bid was $5,000, he to take the city bonds at par. Mayor Grainger appointed councilmen Farlow, Ganiard and Evans a building committee to oversee the work.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 2, 1891, page 3


    Burrage & Pomeroy have rebuilt their tramway near Rock Point and will resume the shipment of large quantities of lime in the near future.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1891, page 2


    Wm. Sansome and wife are the latest acquisitions to Ashland society. The former will ply his calling of a mason in the granite city.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 15, 1892, page 3


    G. W. Priddy has leased the brick yard, of which L. L. Angle had charge. Mr. Priddy intends to put a force of men to work turning out brick preparatory to the prospective extensive spring building boom.
"Local News," Medford Mail, January 28, 1892, page 3


    G. W. Priddy is making preparations for a building boom in the springtime, gentle Annie, having leased the Angle brickyard, and will soon have a force of men at work in that line.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 2


    J. J. and G. W. Priddy were over from Central Point Saturday in the interests of the new brick yard they are about to establish here.
Medford Mail, March 10, 1892, page 3


    George Priddy of Central Point, the well-known brickmaker, made us a call on Tuesday.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1892, page 3


    A. J. Fredenburg's two-story brick residence is going ahead slowly on account of wet weather.
"Local News," Medford Mail, April 7, 1892, page 3


    The wife of Jas. Priddy died suddenly last Sunday morning. She had arisen in her usual good health and was stricken with apoplexy a few hours afterward, from which she soon died. Mrs. Priddy had been a resident of Jackson County for many years and was highly esteemed by all who knew her.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 15, 1892, page 2


    Geo. Priddy, the expert brickmason, is doing some fancy work at Dr. Robinson's new residence.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 15, 1892, page 3


    Mr. Ely is having a one-story 25x26 brick built just off 7th Street on C, which will be occupied by a butcher shop we understand as soon as completed.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, May 13, 1892, page 3


    Geo. W. Priddy has moved his family to Medford from Central Point. He started up his brick yard this week and will soon have a kiln under way.
Southern Oregon Mail, May 20, 1892, page 3


    Mr. Ely is engaged in erecting a brick building, 25x26 feet in size, near the corner of C and 7th street.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1892, page 2


    G. W. Priddy has removed here from Central Point and is engaged in manufacturing brick. He is a first-class mechanic and knows how to make an article that will give the best of satisfaction.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1892, page 2


    Sam Phillips' brick house in the southern portion of town is nearing completion. It will be one of the most substantial dwellings in this section.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1892, page 3


    G. W. Priddy & Co. have just finished burning a kiln of 140,000 brick at their brick yard near this city.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, June 24, 1892, page 3


A $2,000 Damage Suit.
    S. Childers, through his attorney, S. S. Pentz, has filed a complaint in the circuit court against M. P. Phipps for $2,000 damages. Mr. Childers claims that in an altercation in which Mr. Phipps was the aggressor, he was so roughly handled by the defendant as to cause him great bodily pain, and the injury may result in a permanent sickness, thereby unfitting him for manual labor of any kind. Mr. Childers was a very sick man at the time and refused to put up his "props," but Mr. Phipps, who is a large and powerful man, with muscles like Peter Jackson and who strikes like a mule kicking, advanced on his man and pummeled him severely until stopped by a looker-on. The case will be tried at the September term and will, no doubt, be a racy and interesting proceeding.
Southern Oregon Mail, June 24, 1892, page 3


    Robert Hardman of Gold Hill has located a claim on the marble ledge which has been utilized to supply a lime kiln in that section for some time past, and as the stone takes a fine polish he is confident it will prove sufficiently valuable to warrant its being generally used for indoor and monumental purposes.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1892, page 3


    Work was commenced on the M. P. Phipps brick on C Street this week. A. Childers & Son are doing the work.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, July 1, 1892, page 3


    Priddy & Son have just completed the burning of 140,000 superior brick at their kiln at this place.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1892, page 2


    Ladies, call at New York Cheap Cash Store on the 4th of July and get a fan free of charge. Note the address, Cooper brick.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, July 8, 1892, page 3


    Childers & Son last week began work on the new brick building of M. P. Phipps on C Street.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1892, page 2

Medford Brick Yard 1892-7-8SOMail
Southern Oregon Mail, July 8, 1892

    Note G. W. Priddy's brickyard adv. on the first page, and give him a call when you want brick.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, July 15, 1892, page 3


    G. W. Priddy and wife have the sympathy of their many friends in the sad loss they sustained by the death of their infant daughter one day recently.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1892, page 2


    Geo. W. Priddy of the Medford brickyards has a large quantity of fine brick on hand, which he is selling at the most reasonable figures. Anybody needing any of this building material should give him a call.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3


    Those needing brick should not fail to call on G. W. Priddy, who recently finished burning a fine, large kiln of them. George is also a first-class mason and never fails to give satisfaction.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3


    A. J. Fredenburg's fine brick residence is nearing completion.
    Brophy & Mathes, the new butcher firm of Medford, expect to be ready for business about the first of next week. The shop will be temporarily located in the building where the city meat market used to be, but will be moved to the brick on C Street back of Slover's Drug Store as soon as it is ready for occupancy. Watch for their adv. next week.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, July 29, 1892, page 3


    The fine brick residence of A. J. Fredenburg, at Medford, is almost completed.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, August 4, 1892, page 1


    Some miscreants broke into the lime kiln company's house and stole a large amount of provisions last week. Certain parties are suspected, but no arrests have been made yet.

"Willow Springs Whittlings," Southern Oregon Mail, August 19, 1892, page 2


    Geo. Priddy has been repairing Angle & Plymale's brick sidewalk.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, August 26, 1892, page 3


    The wood and brickwork of the bank has been repainted in bright colors and looks nobby.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, September 9, 1892, page 3


    T. P. Judson, of Grants Pass, burned a kiln of 425,000 brick last week, probably the largest amount ever burned in the county before at one time.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, September 22, 1892, page 1


    Mr. Childers has taken charge of the J. O. Johnson ranch and has his family here.

"Table Rockets," Southern Oregon Mail, September 30, 1892, page 3


    G. W. Priddy and S. H. Lyon are doing the work of preparing a place for the Racket Store.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, October 28, 1892, page 3

Medford Brick Yards, October 28, 1892 Democratic Times
Democratic Times, October 28, 1892

    Jeweler E. L. Brown has vacated the Standly [sic] brick on C Street and is now occupying the Wood harness shop building.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, November 4, 1892, page 3


    Spencer Childers, Jr., has the contract to erect a handsome residence for W. B. Roberts in the southern part of Medford.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1892, page 2


    C. H. Veghte has been at Medford this week supervising the laying of 3800 feet of tiling for the distillery, to give it a supply of water from the ditch. The distillery will begin its winter run soon.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 9, 1892, page 3


    It is said that the Childers-Phipps damage case, which was tried this week, will be appealed, as neither party is pleased with the verdict of the jury.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1892, page 3


    C. H. Veghte of Ashland has been at Medford during the past week, engaged in laying about three-quarters of a mile of tiling for the distillery company, to enable them to get a better supply of water for condensing purposes.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville,
December 16, 1892, page 2


    S. Childers has been engaged during the last week in completing an addition to Pritchard's jewelry store.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1893, page 3


Will Rebuild the Front.
    The front of the Ganiard opera house has shown for some time cracks and changes in the brick work from the settling of the foundations, or some other cause or causes, and Mr. Ganiard has concluded to put in a new front, with solid stone piers from the ground up to the second floor. Mr. Christian, of Jacksonville, has the job, and will begin quarrying the rock at once. Ashland people generally will be glad to note this purpose upon the part of Mr. Ganiard.
Ashland Tidings,
January 6, 1893, page 3


    Among the 7th Street improvements is the new brick addition being built by Mr. D. T. Pritchard to his jewelry store. The Messrs. Childers are supplying the material and doing the bricklaying.  
"Weekly Round-Up," Southern Oregon Mail, January 20, 1893, page 3


    The new brick addition which D. T. Pritchard is building to his jewelry store on Seventh Street is rapidly assuming proportions.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1893, page 3


    Messrs. Nicholson Bros. have moved their stock of implements from C Street to the Barnum brick building on Seventh Street. The building to which they have moved has recently been fitted up expressly for their use.
"Weekly Round-Up," Southern Oregon Mail, February 3, 1893, page 3


    The construction of the Medford Business College is now assured. The ground has been secured and work will be commenced on it as soon as the material can be got onto the ground. The building is to be a frame 40x60, two stories high and set on a brick foundation four feet high. This is an institution long needed in southern Oregon and will be an acquisition to our school facilities.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1893, page 3


Needed in Southern Oregon.
From the Jacksonville Times.
    The construction of the Medford Business College is now assured. The ground has been secured and work will be commenced on it as soon as the material can be got onto the ground. The building is to be a frame 40x60, two stories high and set on a brick foundation four feet high. This is an institution long needed in Southern Oregon and will be an acquisition to our school facilities.
Medford Mail, February 24, 1893, page 3


    For some months past Mr. R. H. Halley has had under contemplation the erection of a new brick block, but not until now has the project developed sufficiently to warrant his giving out the fact as an item of news. He informs a Mail reporter that as soon as sufficient brick can be procured he will commence the structure. The location of the building will be on the present site of this gentleman's wooden structure on [the west side of] C Street between Seventh and Eighth streets. The new block will be 60x46 7/8 feet in size and two story [sic] high. The first floor will be divided into two store rooms, one of which will be occupied by Mr. Halley, and the other for rent. The second story will be fitted up for living purposes or offices. The structure will be built with all the modern styles of architecture and will be an ornament to that part of the city. It is quite probable work will be commenced next month.
Medford Mail, March 17, 1893, page 2


    R. H. Halley will replace his present wooden building on C Street, between 7th and 8th streets, with a brick block during the coming season, to be of the dimensions of 60x46 feet and two stories in height. The lower story will be divided into two store rooms, upper story devoted to residence flats and offices.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 24, 1893, page 2


    G. W. Priddy has been given the contract for furnishing the brick for the new Halley Block, on C Street.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, March 31, 1893, page 3


    T. Dungly and Wm. Jacoby brothers have again started their lime kiln in full blast and are now employing a large force of men in these quarries.

"Galls Creek Items," Medford Mail, April 7, 1893, page 1


    G. W. Priddy will furnish the brick for the new Halley block on C Street.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 21, 1893, page 3


    Ed. Pottenger leaves the brick house on the corner of B and Ninth and has moved to Mr. Gore's place on  C Street.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, April 28, 1893, page 3


    L. E. Bender has opened a tobacco and confectionery store in the brick building on C Street, and is prepared to serve up all the delicacies that can possibly be had in this line. His candies are fresh, his cigars fragrant and his tobaccos tender to the tastes of those addicted that way. Read his ad. [His ad on page 2 locates his business on "C Street, Opposite Mail Office."]
    R. H. Halley has purchased, of Mrs. [Brentano], the vacant lot fronting on Eighth Street, near the gun shop, and when he gets in shape to commence work on his new brick block he will move one of his wooden buildings onto his recent purchase.
    The death of the little two-year-old son of Geo. Childers occurred at Sams Valley last Friday. Funeral services were held Sunday.
    The foundation for the Medford Business College was laid on Wednesday of this week.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, May 12, 1893, page 3


    J. D. Chappell is again working his marble quarry near Rock Point, and will soon supply the Grants Pass market with a superior quality of lime.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 12, 1893, page 3


    R. H. Halley has bought the vacant lot on Eighth Street near the gun shop and will move one of the buildings from the property, on which he contemplates erecting his new brick block, on this lot when he gets ready for building operations.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 19, 1893, page 3


    G. W. Priddy is now engaged in making brick for the new Halley Block. Mr. Priddy will also do the brick work on this building. Messrs. Shawver & Nicholson will do the wood work.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, May 26, 1893, page 5


    C. H. Veghte of Ashland has disposed of a carload of tiling of a first-class quality to Wm. Bybee and Chris Ulrich. The latter keeps it for sale at his planing mill.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 26, 1893, page 3


    Rocks are now being hauled for the foundation to the R. H. Halley new brick block on C Street.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, June 2, 1893, page 3


    G. W. Priddy has commenced active operations at his brick yard and expects to have a kiln of 200,000 brick ready to burn by July 1st.
Medford Mail, June 9, 1893, page 3


    The A. J. Fredenburgs' brick residence is being finished by E. W. Starr, an expert workman.
    County Recorder W. M. Holmes was down from Jacksonville Saturday to meet Mrs. Jas. T. Guerin and children who will spend a few weeks visiting relatives and friends in the valley.
    On account of not being properly ventilated the floor in the Dr. Adkins brick building occupied by the Henry Smith store has become rotted and will have to be replaced with a new one which will be done before Cranfill & Hutchison open up their new stock of goods.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, June 16, 1893, page 3


    G. W. Priddy is preparing to burn a kiln of 200,000 brick. He always gives satisfaction.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1893, page 2


    Geo. Priddy of Medford, the brick mason, was at Jacksonville the forepart of the week, and built a chimney while here.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1893, page 3


    G. W. Priddy is nearly ready to fire a kiln of brick. He now has 155,000 in the kiln and when he reaches an even 200,000 he will begin firing.

    Wm. Ulrich, manager of the Southern Oregon Pork Packing Company, tells us that his company will soon commence the erection of a 30x50-foot brick building, to be used as a refrigerator and general receptacle for meats.
    R. H. Halley has commenced tearing away the old buildings and making ready generally for his new brick. The brick for this structure are now being made, the stone for the foundation are being delivered as is also lumber for the wood work. By the middle of July it is expected work on the building proper will begin.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, June 23, 1893, page 3


    John Chappel's lime kiln has been engaged in furnishing lime for the new buildings going up at Grants Pass.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1893, page 3


    The Southern Oregon Pork Packing Co. intends putting up a brick building in town and engaging in the wholesale and retail butcher business on a large scale.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1893, page 3


    Little Nora, the six-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Biden, met with a sad accident Wednesday which resulted in her death the following day. She, in company with some other children, was playing at "burning brick" in the yard when her clothes caught fire and burned her so badly as to result as above stated. It is a sad affliction and the parents are nearly heartbroken. They have the deepest sympathy extended them by The Mail and their many friends.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, June 30, 1893, page 3


    R. H. Faulkner, a brick contractor of Grants Pass, was in Medford Monday looking over the city with a view to getting his finger in the mortar that will soon cement the walls of Medford's proposed brick structures. The gentleman reports Grants Pass as fast building up with good, substantial brick buildings, and he further stated: "I hear Medford is going to take on shape becoming to a great city now pretty soon."
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, June 30, 1893, page 3


    G. W. Priddy is about ready to light the fires under a kiln of 200,000 fine brick.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 30, 1893, page 2


SPENCER CHILDERS
    Adjoining the above property on the east is the very comfortable home of Mr. Spencer Childers. The gentleman owns three lots and has the same well-planted to fruit and berries, while in the front yard are growing flowers in great quantities and varieties. Mr. C. returned last February from two years' stay in California. He owns a ten-acre tract of very rich and valuable land just across Bear Creek, also thirty acres three-fourths of a mile east of Medford. He was formerly from Clarksburg, Virginia.
Medford Mail, July 14, 1893 et seq., page 1


    R. H. Halley has commenced work on the foundation for his new brick.
    Dr. Adkins is improving his Seventh Street property by putting down a new brick sidewalk.
    Lumber for the new Baptist Church parsonage has been ordered, and as soon as brick can be procured work on the foundation will begin. Contractor Lyon will do the mechanical work.

"All the Local News," Medford Mail, July 14, 1893, page 3


    Wednesday night of last week southern Oregon was treated to a steady downpour of warm rain. Some hay was damaged, but the loss will be nothing compared to the impetus given late grain, corn and gardens. The biggest loss heard of was to Robert Faulkner's brickyard in Grants Pass. Mr. F. had 35,000 newly molded bricks lying in the yard ready for the kiln, but the steady rain washed them level to the ground. The total fall during the storm amounted to 1.17 inches in Josephine County.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 14, 1893, page 3


    R. H. Halley has wisely decided to lengthen out his new brick fifteen feet--making it seventy-five instead of sixty as was first talked.
    In establishing the grade level of South C Street it is found that Mr. Halley, in order to be on a level with the grade, will be compelled to lay the foundation for his new brick block about a foot below the sidewalk as it now stands.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, July 21, 1893, page 3


    Work has been commenced on Halley's brick building.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 21, 1893, page 3


    G. L. Webb has leased the north half of the Halley brick block--ground floor, and about October first the Racket will move to its new abode. The building will be much larger than where he now is and a much better display can be made.
    Shawver & Nicholson have commenced operations on Halley's new brick. Ditto G. W. Priddy. There will be a building up there in a few weeks that will be a credit to C Street--and The Mail will have rooms on the ground floor--go 'way trouble.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, July 28, 1893, page 3


    John Orth, who had his eye burned by lime last week, is convalescent.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 4, 1893, page 3


    The Halley brick block, on C Street, will be ready for occupancy in a few weeks. The brick work is expected to be finished next week.
"And They Do Build," Medford Mail, August 11, 1893, page 3


    G. L. Davis has opened an office in the Stanley brick building on C Street. His business is that of buying poultry and eggs.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, August 18, 1893, page 3


    The Halley brick block is ready for the roof.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, August 25, 1893, page 3


    Spence Childers is preparing to burn a kiln of brick for use another spring in erecting a two-story brick block on C Street, just south of the Mail office. There will be some several brick blocks in this man's town if those that are now promised are built.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, September 1, 1893, page 3


    Roberts & O'Neil have purchased from Mr. Childers the lot and building just south of the Mail office, and next spring these gentlemen contemplate the erection of a two-story brick building.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, September 15, 1893, page 3


Notice of Dissolution.
    Notice is hereby given that the co-partnership heretofore existing between Arnold Childers and Spencer Childers, Jr., doing business under the firm name of A. Childers & Son, is this day dissolved by mutual consent. All accounts contracted after this date are to be paid by A. Childers, by whom the business of brick making will be continued as before.
    Dated Sept. 1, 1893.
ARNOLD CHILDERS,
SPENCER CHILDERS, Jr.
Medford Mail, September 22, 1893, page 2


    The new stone walk is being extended north on C Street. There is also a new brick walk being put in on Seventh Street, in front of Dr. Adkins' vacant lots.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, September 29, 1893, page 3


    The large new residence of Mr. Shideler's is nearly completed, and a fine structure it is. 'Tis well 'tis so, otherwise it would not harmonize with its neighbors. Mr. Barr's brick on the corner is a fine building as is also Mr. Maule's a little further south. On the opposite side of the street is Messrs. Whitman, Fawcett and Hill; all have large and very pretty residences and beautiful grounds. Mr. Shideler is to be congratulated in his choice of a location, and the neighbors ought to feel pretty good over his coming.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, October 20, 1893, page 3


    [Attorney G. W.] White owns the property occupied by jeweler Pritchard, and a brick addition is being built to this building in which the new firm will have their office.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, October 27, 1893, page 3


    Moved--The Racket Store, to Halley's new brick.
    G. L. Webb has moved his Racket Store to the Halley block. Good building, good stock and a good man operating the business.
    Ed Wilkinson is tearing down and building greater. This time it is his smokehouse that is being enlarged, to about twice its original size.
    Spencer Childers, Sr. has sold, through the agency of Pentz & White, thirty acres of his farm to J. W. Richardson, recently from Tacoma, for $2,700. The land is situated just across Bear Creek and opposite the Lindley property. Mr. Richardson is a mason by trade and has been at work about Medford for the past two or three months. He is a good, straight fellow and a first-class workman. We understand he will at once commence the construction of a dwelling house on this land and move his family thereto.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, November 3, 1893, page 3


    The Mail will move to its new quarters in the Halley brick block tomorrow.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, November 10, 1893, page 3


    South C Street is a long ways from being backward with her improvements. A new brick sidewalk has been put down in front of the Halley brick block, and teams and men are at work grading the street between Sixth and Seventh. The grade is to be cut down twenty-two inches in front of J. R. Wilson's blacksmith shop and about four inches in front of the Halley block. The sidewalk is also to be put down to correspond with the street grade. This will improve the appearance of the street and will give a good, even grade from Seventh Street south.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, November 17, 1893, page 3


    There has been a considerable moving about of household effects this week. Eli Hogan has rented the second story of Mr. Payne's residence, corner A and Seventh; Attorney Fitch has moved to the Davis brick residence, corner of A and Ninth; Dr. Kirchgessner to the corner of C and Ninth and Rev. Stephens has moved to the beautiful new Baptist parsonage.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, December 1, 1893, page 5


MEDFORD BRICK YARDS
    There are few industries of so much importance as that of making brick in a prosperous city. Mr. G. W. Priddy, proprietor of the above yards, has shipped from his yard all the brick used in the building of the principal business blocks in Medford. He now has on hand 140,000 brick, which are of first quality. Large and small orders are promptly filled. He also does all kinds of brick work and satisfaction guaranteed. Mr. Priddy has been engaged in this business for several years, and during his long and busy career has sustained an excellent reputation for sterling integrity and honorable dealing.
Medford Mail, December 1, 1893, page 1


    Mrs. Wm. M. Holmes, who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. James Guerin of Portland, for the past few weeks, has returned home.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 15, 1894, page 3


    There is little probability of the burned buildings being replaced again, for some few months at least. As the lots are inside the fire limit, nothing but brick buildings can be built.
"Saturday's Fire," Medford Mail, March 9, 1894, page 2


    L. M. Lyon--"I have secured the contract for doing all the wood work on the McAndrews new brick building. Mr. Childers will furnish the brick and will do all mason work. Understand work will commence upon the building now very soon."
"Echoes from the Street," Medford Mail, April 6, 1894, page 2



Two New Brick Buildings.
    T. McAndrews and W. S. Barnum are figuring on soon beginning work on their new brick buildings on Seventh Street. These buildings are to be put up someplace on the north side between A and B streets, but who owns which lot and what lots they are going to build on is more than we can satisfactorily arrive at.
Medford Mail, March 30, 1894, page 3


Going to Live in the City.
    Spence Childers, Jr. has purchased the Legate residence property on North C Street from B. S. Webb and will soon move in from his Table Rock ranch. The price paid was $1000. His sons will remain on the farm and care for the stock. Mr. Childers is a mason by trade and moves to the city to be in closer proximity with his work.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, April 6, 1894, page 3


    Mayor Haskins:--"It is quite probable my new brick store building will be commenced at once. I have let the contract for the brick work to Mr. Childers, and Messrs. Shawver & Nicholson will have charge of the wood work. There will be only the two end walls to put up, as the adjoining ones will be my side walls--and in which I have a part ownership. The building will be two stories high--the second story to be fitted for office purposes. The building ought to be in readiness for occupancy inside of three months."

    J. R. Wilson:--"You heard I was going to build? Well, yes, that is right. Don't know just when I will get at it, but it is going up just the same. It will be [illegible]x75 feet in size and two stories high. [illegible] first-class. I am working three men in my blacksmith shop and could work more if I had room. I am going to do all wood work myself and am now starting in on a fine buggy for Dr. Kirchgessner. The buggy will be piano box, all woodwork the best of hickory, and the ironing will be first-class throughout--if anyone should ask you, she will be a dandy from the ground up."
"Echoes from the Street," Medford Mail, April 20, 1894, page 2


    Mesdames Maggie Anguine and Anna Coleen, of Santa Rosa, Calif. are visiting in Medford, the guests of their brother, Spencer Childers, and family.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, April 27, 1894, page 2


    The brick yard of G. W. Priddy is running at full blast these times. The gentleman already has 60,000 brick in the kiln ready for burning and is still at work molding more.
    The brick blocks of Barnum and McAndrews have been commenced, and the brick work is being pushed ahead at a rapid rate.
    M. P. Phipps is preparing to erect a brick residence on his property near Medford--across the street from Mr. Edwards' place.
    D. Brooks, the tinner, is engaged in putting the roof on Mayor Haskins' new brick.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, May 18, 1894, page 3


    Frank Guerin, grandson of Geo. Brown of Eagle Point, is paying that gentleman a visit, having arrived last week from Portland in care of the railroad conductors.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 21, 1894, page 3


    Work on the Barnum and McAndrews bricks is being pushed rapidly.
    The brickyard of G. W. Priddy is running in full blast, and he has nearly 60,000 brick on hand.
    The many friends of Mrs. G. W. Priddy will be glad to learn that she is recovering rapidly from the effects of the surgical operation which she submitted to a short time ago.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 24, 1894, page 2


    Lee Vincent is now living in the house formerly occupied by Spencer Childers, situated on upper end of Table Rock Ranch.

"Table Rock Items," Medford Mail, May 25, 1894, page 4


    Work on the Barnum and McAndrews brick buildings is at a standstill for a few weeks owing to lack of brick. It was only figured that these buildings would go one story high, but now the owners have decided to go up two stories and also put the second story on the building now occupied by Redfield Bros.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, June 8, 1894, page 3


    Mrs. Chas. Murray and child arrived from Portland last week, and Charlie and family are now housekeeping in the Davis brick residence, corner of A and Ninth streets.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, June 15, 1894, page 3


    Spencer Childers, Jr., commenced work Tuesday morning on his new brick yard, which is located on the seven acres of land he recently purchased in the Mingus addition. S. E. Tellier, recently from Lane County, is the gentleman who will have charge of the molding department. It is Mr. Childers' intention to put up and burn 300,000 brick this fall. While The Mail, of course, don't know just where Mr. Childers expects to use this large amount of brick we venture the guess that he has some sort of an idea that they will be put into brick blocks next spring.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, August 31, 1894, page 3

Veghte 1894-12-13p4Tidings
December 13, 1894 Ashland Tidings

Medford Brick Yard, 12-28-1894 Medford Mail
Medford Mail, December 28, 1894

Medford Items.
    That Medford will have a real live boom this year that will make the hair stand on end there is hardly any doubt. Among the buildings, besides Hotel Nash, will be a brick block by S. Rosenthal, the pioneer merchant; a two-story brick by W. B. Roberts with a possible third story by the K. of P. for a hall. W. H. Parker and Capt. Nash each contemplate the erection of elegant and costly residences.
Valley Record, Ashland, Oregon, February 7, 1895, page 3



    Spence Childers is making ready to manufacture brick in quantities great in number. This week he received a Kells & Son brick machine, which has a capacity of 20,000 brick per day. The machine arrived Tuesday and was taken at once to the brick yard, east of Medford, where in about ten days' time it will begin grinding. The machine is so constructed that very little water is required in its use, in consequence of which the customary drying process is done away with, the brick only requiring about two days' airing while stacked up in "hacks" before they are ready for the kiln. Mr. Childers will operate the machine with steam power, he having rented Mr. Cock's engine for that purpose. Twelve men will be employed. A kiln of 20,000 will at once be gotten ready for burning, after which a second one to contain from 400,000 to 500,000 will be filled and burned.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, March 29, 1895, page 5


    Spencer Childers started his new brick machine Monday.
Medford Mail, April 12, 1895, page 1


    G. W. Priddy will do the mason work on D. B. Soliss' farm residence; A. P. Green will do the painting and Klippel & Marcuson will furnish the lumber.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, May 24, 1895, page 5



    Spencer Childers has just finished burning another kiln of 80,000 brick. The two brick yards are this season having about all the business they can conveniently handle, which is a good thing for two deserving gentlemen--and every brick used in the construction of any building in the city--is a good thing for the city.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, June 21, 1895, page 5


    G. W. Priddy has recently burned another kiln of 120 thousand of brick, which, as he states, are a prime article. He is also filling up his lime kiln for another burn, the first kiln not having been burned sufficient to make it quite the article required. The lime, however, was all right.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, July 12, 1895, page 5


    G. W. Priddy's brick yard is just a little livelier than any place in this locality. He has eight men molding brick to the amount of 300,000 which will be burned just as soon as the kilns can be filled. Aside from these he has about 100,000 on hand--and these are being hauled to the school grounds for immediate use in the new school building. Between three and four hundred thousand will be required in this job alone.
    The Childers brick kiln is a scene of much business right about now. Eight men are employed. One kiln of 240,000 brick is being taken down and delivered to various parts of the city, and another kiln is being put up in which there will be 400,000 brick. It is but natural that these things be as they are when we consider the amount of building that is being done inside our city limits.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, June 21, 1895, page 5


    Nearly every day we hear someone telling of the "crying need" for more buildings in which to open business on Main or Seventh Street. The "need" will be "crying" just as loud as now until suitable brick store buildings are built on North and South C Street. Property owners on this street are losing sight of their best interests by not inviting greater value to their property by putting up larger and more substantial buildings.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, August 23, 1895, page 5



    No time has there been since the coming to the city of the present publishers of the Mail but that there has been a steady, sure building growth. The buildings have not been put up with a hurrah and a jump but just fast enough to meet the demand of trade. These structures have been largely of brick, and on them has been fixed a surface of permanence that fosters not retrogression. At the present time there is a little unusual flurry of building, and it is of such nature as to omen good to our fast-developing Hub City. We give below a mention of the buildings now in course of construction--and there are mechanics here sufficient in number to build them all:
    The brick work on Councilman J. R. Wilson's  blacksmith shop is finished and the carpenters are now at work laying floors and putting in windows and doors. Brooks, the tinner, is putting on the roof.

    W. F. Halley has arrangements all made for the erection of a two-story brick dwelling house, corner of Fifth and G streets. It will be 24x30 and will cost something like $1500. S. Childers will do the brick work.
    Ed. Wilkinson's new brick block, in which Ed will carve steaks to the general liking of all who come, is fast narrowing down to a finish, so far as the brick work is concerned. This will positively be the gem of all the buildings--and of which Ed is justly proud.
    
J. O. Johnson, the Table Rock rancher, has purchased a tract of land just south of Dr. B. F. Adkins' residence--50 feet wide and long enough to reach to the bank of Bear Creek. Upon this land Mr. Johnson is having laid a foundation for a five-room brick cottage. The main part of the building will be 30x35 with an ell 14x24, and a porch on two sides. The structure will cost not less than $1800. S. Childers will do the brick work. W. J. Bennet, architect.
    A new brick block which is soon to be erected will be situated between I. A. Webb's and W. H. Meeker & Co.'s stores, south side of Seventh Street, and will be built by Dr. B. F. Adkins and Mrs. Dennison, who each own a twenty-five-foot lot. The block will be 50x100 feet, two stories high and of brick. The first floor, of Mrs. Dennison's half, will be occupied by Mitchell, Lewis & Staver Company and J. W. Lawton's harness shop, each taking twelve feet of the twenty-five.
    Last week we spoke of the new brick residence to be built by S. Childers, Jr. This building will be quite unique in design, the verandas and porticoes being also of brick. It will be a two-story building with six rooms below and three above. The sitting room, parlor and dining room will be connected by folding doors and can all three be thrown into one room when required. The foundation for this building will be commenced within a few few days. The cost of the structure will be about $2000. W. J. Bennet, architect.
Washington School 1895
The "new brick school building," Washington School, 1895.
    The new brick school building, which is to cost $12,000, is one of the most prominent buildings which is entitled to mention in these columns. Work on the foundation was commenced Saturday morning. The whole work of construction in its several lines will be pushed to its quickest possible completion. The contractors are Butler, Barrett and Stewart. The subcontractors: On stone work, Frank Wait; brick work, G. W. Priddy; iron work, such as bolts, ties, etc., G. F. Merriman; painting, Ling & Boardman.
"Medford Improvements," Medford Mail, September 27, 1895, page 4


    Theo. Dunn and family, of Roseburg, arrived in Medford Sunday, and have engaged rooms in the Barnum block, where they have commenced housekeeping. Mr. Dunn is a brickmason, having worked on the Hotel Nash. He has secured employment on the new schoolhouse.

Medford Mail,
September 27, 1895, page 4



    G. W. Priddy's brick yard is just a little livelier than any place in this locality. He has eight men molding brick to the amount of 300,000 which will be burned just as soon as the kilns can be filled. Aside from these he has about 100,000 on hand--and these are being hauled to the school grounds for immediate use in the new school building. Between three and four hundred thousand will be required in this job alone.
    The Childers brick kiln is a scene of much business right about now. Eight men are employed. One kiln of 240,000 brick is being taken down and delivered to various parts of the city, and another kiln is being put up in which there will be 400,000 brick. It is but natural that these things be as they are when we consider the amount of building that is being done inside our city limits.
    Joe Hill has sidetracked his ambitions as a driver of a dray team. In fact, he has graduated in that line of work and is now laying brick on the new school building. He has been doing steady work for about two years and has behaved right cleverly--but he couldn't do anything else--it isn't in him to be crooked. Art Faris takes his place on the dray.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, September 27, 1895, page 5


    G. W. Priddy finished burning a kiln of 110,000 brick Tuesday afternoon. He has another kiln of 150,000 which will be ready to fire by next Monday.
    F. M. Poe has the center foundation wall of the Adkins-Childers block built and is now working on the front walls.
    S. Childers commenced firing a kiln of 240,000 brick last Tuesday.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, October 18, 1895, page 5


    Merchant Wm. Angle has sold to M. Purdin the residence property which he (Angle) formerly occupied, corner of B and Sixth streets, for a consideration of $1100. Mr. Purdin moved to his new home Wednesday and H. G. Shearer, who has been living in the residence for several months, has moved to the Childers residence, east of Bear Creek.
    The Adkins-Childers block is very nearly completed. The first story of the Adkins half is plastered, and floors are now being laid in both lower rooms. Water pipes and fittings have been put in for use in the upstairs rooms. That building is going to come pretty near being all right when it is completed.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, January 17, 1896, page 5


    And the new brick buildings continue to loom up in Medford. The latest acquisition to the brick block arena is a two-story structure now under construction by Messrs. Crane & Childers. It was but a few days ago that W. T. Crane, of the Oriental Livery Stables, and H. E. Childers (all the same Bert) entered into a compact to conduct the livery business together, as joint partners. The combine is working fine, first-rate, and to the entire satisfaction of all. A few days prior to the deal, however, Mr. Crane purchased from J. T. Miller two lots of North Front Street, near the city bastille, at a cost of $600, with the intention of putting up a brick stable thereon, which intention is now being carried out--only there are two intentions instead of one. On Monday of this week the new firm began work on the foundation for the new building and on or before April first it will be finished and occupied. The building will be 50x60 feet in size, twenty feet to the fire walls, and the walls to be twelve inches in thickness. This will not furnish room necessary for the business, but the boys own 40x60 feet on the back of this which will be built upon during the summer. When completed they will have a building 60x100 feet--and a good one, too. Since opening up business last July, Mr. Crane has had almost phenomenal success. His cash was limited--decidedly so--at that time, but he had lots of ambition and today he would not take $2000 for his possessions. He has given the strictest attention to business, and [with] this, coupled with good rigs and courteous treatment of all patrons, he has boosted himself into a good paying business. Mr. Childers, his partner, is one of Medford's hard-working, honest young men, and the two will make a pair hard to beat. They will have twelve rigs in the new stables--and more if the trade demands them. Spencer Childers will do the brick work on the job. The cost of the building which is now being put up will be about $3000.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, January 31, 1896, page 5



    Just as soon as the roads get a little dryer brick hauling for the new Crane & Childers livery stable will commence, and immediately thereafter the brick work.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, February 14, 1896, page 5


    W. L. Halley has purchased a corner lot just west of A. A. Davis' fine residence and will at once commence the construction of a brick dwelling thereon, the timber necessary having already been placed on the ground. The building will be 34x40 feet in size and will be two stories high. There are five rooms on the first floor and four chambers with closets on the second. The building is very conveniently arranged and is to be a good looker from the outside--as well as inside. W. J. Bennet, architect.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, May 1, 1896, page 5



    Spencer Childers has been experimenting again this spring with his brick making machine, and he has its workings down to a perfect demonstration. He recently purchased a large engine from Mr. Barnum, and by it ample power is furnished, the trouble heretofore being lack of power. As soon as the weather gets itself sort of leveled for a few nice days active operations will commence at the yard, and soon thereafter work will commence on the Hamlin brick block.
Medford Mail, May 15, 1896, page 5


    G. W. Priddy put the test to his new brick machine last Monday--and it worked to perfection. He can turn out about 3000 brick per day with it. The brick made with this machine are pressed and will be used exclusively for store fronts and chimneys.
Medford Mail, May 22, 1896, page 5


    G. W. Priddy will open his kiln of pressed brick this week. These brick are made especially for store fronts and window arches--in fact, all nice brick work. They are made of the same material as the others, but are smooth and square. The cost is a trifle more than ordinary brick, but when it is figured that only the outside tier is required in a wall, the extra cost don't count up very high.
    S. Childers is making ready for a big run of brickmaking this season. Within a very few days he will commence work on his first kiln of 150,000. These he will hurry through for immediate use. He expects to burn from four to five hundred thousand during the summer.
Medford Mail, June 26, 1896, page 5


    We are glad to announce that Arnold Childers, who has been so long and seriously ill, is improving quite rapidly.
The Monitor-Miner, Medford, July 16, 1896, page 3



    C. B. Rostel this week let to S. B. Childers the contract for erecting a two-story brick building on his lot adjoining that of Hamlin Bros. The building will be twenty-two feet front and sixty feet deep. The work of laying the stone foundation work has already been commenced, and the work of laying the brick will commence next week. This makes four brick business buildings now under construction in Medford.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, July 17, 1896, page 7


    James Priddy, one of the pioneer citizens of Southern Oregon, is dangerously ill at his home in Central Point, and is not expected to live long. His wife died last Thursday, and the shock was too much for Mr. Priddy, who was already in an enfeebled condition.
"Oregon Notes," Oregonian, Portland, July 23, 1896, page 3


    A gentleman while in Medford this week took occasion to remark that Medford was the only town south of Portland that was this year putting up any brick buildings--and the gentleman is in a position to know whereof he speaks, he being on the road and in different towns every day of the year. Another gentleman, a resident of our town, who has during the past couple of three months visited every town of any importance in the state, makes the same statement--only he includes all towns of the state. While the above is not saying a whole lot of pretty things for the state in general, it is piling up several good words for Medford--especially so because that we have six brick store buildings now in course of construction.
    Upon the return of Capt. Nash to Medford it is expected that he will commence the construction of that new brick store building, to the south of Hotel Nash.
    P. J. and W. L. Halley each have foundations built for their new brick residences, the locations being on South J Street and joining.
    Bricklaying was commenced on the Lindley building Tuesday and will be pushed as rapidly as possible until completed.
    Lumber is on the ground for the wood work in the Hamlin-Rostel brick block, on South D Street.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, July 31, 1896, page 7


    Architect I. A. Palmer is now preparing plans and specifications for a fine brick residence for Spencer Childers, to be erected in East Medford--just across the bridge. The building will be a two-story brick, with nine rooms, and an attic which will be used as a billiard hall. When completed the building will cost in the neighborhood of $4,000, and will be without a doubt the handsomest residence in Southern Oregon.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, September 11, 1896, page 7


    Messrs. Cranfill & Hutchison have leased Mr. Lindley's new brick building, and as soon as it is completed, which will be in about a month, they will move their present stock of goods thereto and will add new goods to the lines already handled and in addition to these they will put in clothing. They expect to occupy the entire 140 feet with shelving and counters; this, however, provided warehouse room can be secured across the alley from the rear of the store.
    O. Carpenter and his son, S. L., has purchased a resident lot, corner of G and Tenth streets, near Mr. Fredenburg's place, and will at once commence the construction of a 26x28 one-story brick dwelling, also an ell 16x18. The building will be put up by S. Childers and will be for rent. The lot was purchased from T. E. Pottenger. The location is a very pleasant one and no doubt they will find renting the house an easy task.
    S. Childers opened a kiln of 220,000 brick this week. He has about 40,000 more and in kiln ready for burning.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, September 25, 1896, page 7



    Contractor Childers has been awarded the contract for building painter A. P. Green's new house on his lots in East Medford, and will begin the erection of the same this week. The house will be of brick, 26x28 feet, one story high and will cost about $700. We have the word of Mr. Childers for the statement that Mr. Green is going to have one of the very prettiest little homes in Medford when it is completed--and none deserves it more than he. Mr. Childers has also been given the contract for building a 14-foot brick addition to S. W. Speas' residence in East Medford. Mr. Green has traded to Mr. Childers two of his East Medford resident lots as part payment in the new house.
    Ed. Wilkinson don't propose to be outdone in the way of brick buildings by his neighbor, G. P. Lindley, who is now completing his 25-by-145-foot two-story brick store building, and to keep in line with the procession Mr. Wilkinson has decided to continue his present two-story brick building on out to the alley, making his building 20 by 140 feet in size and all two stories high. The new part is to be used in connection with his market and for a stable. The foundation was started this week. S. Childers is doing the brick work.
    A. P. Green has been doing a little more real estate dickering. This time he has traded two of his East Side resident lots to S. Childers, in payment for which Mr. Childers is to erect a 26x28-foot one-story brick cottage for Mr. Green upon one of his two remaining lots which are in that same locality.
    Dr. McMertrey and family are housekeeping in the Halley brick residence, corner G and Fifth streets.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, October 16, 1896, page 7


    W. L. and P. J. Halley have each commenced the erection of new brick dwellings on their property, near the school house, and will push them to a rapid completion.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, October 23, 1896, page 7


    S. W. Speas has this week completed his new brick dairy cellar and divers other improvements about his very pleasant Eastside home.

"Additional City News," Medford Mail, November 6, 1896, page 6


    Wednesday marked the completion of G. P. Lindley's fine new brick, or rather the first floor, which is to be occupied by Cranfill & Hutchison, who are engaged this week in moving their large stock of goods thereto. The building is undoubtedly one of the most substantial in Southern Oregon, both inside and out. The main store room is just an even hundred feet in length, with a forty-foot store room in the rear and is furnished with fine counters and shelving. The fixtures throughout are natural wood--sugar pine--which have been made to glisten like glass by the artistic touch of the brush wielded by painter J. W. Ling. The windows are of fine French plate glass, furnished by Boyden & Nicholson, hardware dealers. The workmanship, from the laying of the first brick to the last blow of the hammer, is as nearly perfect as one generally sees. The second floor is partitioned off for office rooms, and these are commodious and well lighted as is all the rest of the building. It cost, complete, about $6000.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, November 13, 1896, page 7



    With the glimmer of springtime, not far distant, is noticeable the accustomed each year improvements. Not the least of these is a new cut stone sidewalk which Dr. B. F. Adkins and merchant I. A. Webb are making ready to put down on Seventh Street. The stone, which are being gotten out by F. W. Wait, are now being placed on the scene of action. The pieces are about two feet square and from four to six inches thick and are to be laid in cement. They are very nicely cut and cannot fail to be the requisites of a good, substantial, "wear-resisting" walk. The walk will be placed in front of the building formerly occupied by Cranfill & Hutchison, I. A. Webb's furniture store and the Racket store. The enterprise exhibited is truly commendable, more particularly as it places on the retired list about seventy-five feet of brick walks--which walks have very few friends among pedestrians. The brick walks are all right when new, but they soon become worn and are very uneven and not a pleasant thing to walk upon.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, February 5, 1897, page 7


    No sooner does our good friend, Capt. Nash, close one contract for the improvement of the ever-increasing popular hostelry, Hotel Nash, than does he commence preparations for another. Just now he has architect Palmer at work drafting plans for a new brick buildings which he will erect on his vacant lot adjoining the Nash, during the summer months. This will probably be the beginning of the building for Medford during the coming summer and fall, which will probably be followed by others in rapid succession. Truly Medford is rapidly forging to the front ranks of the leading commercial cities in Oregon--and we have plenty mechanics to do all the work.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, February 19, 1897, page 7


Medford Mail, May 7, 1897
Medford Mail, May 7, 1897

    Spencer Childers has sold his brick yard together with five acres of land to E. C. Stickel, from Lakeport, Calif., who is a son-in-law of assessor Grieve. Mr. Stickel will commence the manufacture of brick just as soon as the kiln which Mr. Childers has is burned and out of the way. The gentleman is highly recommended as a first-class workman and a good, square business man. The Mail hopes his venture will prove as profitable as he now anticipates.

"A Grist of Local Haps and Mishaps," Medford Mail, May 7, 1897, page 2


    Mrs. Al. Helms nee Priddy, formerly of this county, died at Redding, Calif. last Sunday evening, May 30th, aged 32 years, 5 months, of consumption, after a lingering illness. The remains were brought from Redding Monday evening, accompanied by the husband, and the funeral was held Tuesday, interment at Central Point cemetery. The deceased leaves three young children.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 3, 1897, page 3



    Wm. Russell, our brick man, is preparing to start work on a large kiln of brick the first of the week.
Gold Hill News, July 2, 1897, page 3


    S. Childers has become a resident of Klamath County, and is located near Olene.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1898, page 3


    Capt. Nash is contemplating the erection of a brick building adjoining his hotel. The lower story will be modeled into a store room, while the upper will be divided into rooms and used in connection with the hotel.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1898, page 3


    S. Childers, wife and children left last week for Chico, Calif. to seek a location.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1898, page 3


    G. W. Priddy, the brick manufacturer and mason, is putting up a mighty pretty dwelling house out near C. J. Howard's place. The building is of brick, 26x26 feet in size, one story high, with an ell 12x16 feet, also of brick. The place, which is very pleasantly located, will be for rent when completed. Mr. Priddy expects to move back to the brick yard about the first of May.
    Work on the new city jail is progressing finely. Mr. Priddy has finished the brick work, and contractor Crouch is now at work putting in the inside cribbing. The outer walls are of brick, roof of corrugated iron, and the floor of cement. It will be 14x22 feet in size and will have two apartments. The city has passed an ordinance compelling prisoners to work out fines on the streets when the payment of such fines are refused in money. The new jail will be a place to house prisoners in a more humane manner, and working them on the street will be a means of paying for their board.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 22, 1898, page 7  


    E. C. Stickel, the brickmaker and mason, is making ready to manufacture and burn a kiln of twenty-five or thirty thousand tile. He already has orders for a considerable number, and he hopes to be able to sell the entire lot.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 20, 1898, page 7  



MAKING BRICKS WITH OIL
Found To Be Cheaper and Better Than Any Other Fuel.
    An experiment of considerable interest to brick manufacturers and dealers has been tried in a brickyard in New York state, fuel oil being used instead of wood or coal oil to burn a kiln of bricks. Fuel oil is the product left after crude petroleum has been refined. It has been used for some time as fuel for engines and furnaces, but its adaptability for the more delicate operation of burning pottery or bricks is a recent discovery. The success of the experiment, says the Pittsburgh Dispatch, is likely to reduce the cost of brick making in a considerable degree. Forced draught is an important factor in the system, and by it the heat from the burner can be directed at a uniform temperature toward any part of the arch of the kiln. The oil runs in pipes around the base of the kiln and feeds directly from the burner in the arch in the interior. The forced draught "feeds in" with the oil, and by the turning of a valve the heat can be regulated at any point within the arch.
    It is claimed that the use of oil is much cheaper than that of either coal or wood for brick burning. The cost of burning 1,000 bricks with wood at five dollars a cord is 80 cents; the cost where coal is used is 50 cents; with oil the cost is 38 cents. In burning bricks with wood 12 men are required every 24 hours; if oil is used two men can do the work. The new method is quicker, completing the burning of the kiln in six days, instead of seven or eight, as formerly, and the bricks are better, because with the forced air draught the temperature of the kiln is entirely under control.
Eastern Oregon Observer, La Grande, June 9, 1898, page 2


    Last Friday a bargain was closed between Hon. J. J. Howser, of the Meadows, and Mrs. Mary M. Childers, of Medford, by which the latter becomes possessed of the 160-acre homestead recently advertised for sale in this paper, and the former gets in return a fine piece of residential property just east of Bear Creek, in Medford. Mr. Howser will move his family to Medford, while Mrs. Childers will occupy the homestead property in the Meadows. She secured the place for her son, Spencer Childers, who wishes to go on the farm for a time.
Medford Monitor-Miner, June 16, 1898, page 3


    Gold Hill's lodge of Odd Fellows is making arrangements to build a fine hall, probably of brick.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1898, page 3


    Two good-sized store buildings will be erected near the railroad depot in Ashland this season. E. F. Loomis will erect one and C. E. Nininger the other, and they will be brick. A number of other substantial improvements will be made at once in that part of the granite city.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 30, 1898, page 3


   
Geo. V. Stickel, the well-known brick manufacturer and mason, was in Jacksonville not long since. He secured contracts to do work in his line there.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 14, 1898, page 3


    J. H. Pomeroy, well known in this county through his connection with the lime quarry near Rock Point, is now in charge of the iron works at Oswego, Clackamas County, where 75 men are employed.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 14, 1898, page 3


    Perham and Short have been awarded the contract for building the I.O.O.F. building at Gold Hill, and have commenced the foundations. The structure will be two stories high, the lower to be used as a store-room and the other for lodge purposes.
    Work is progressing rapidly on the handsome brick buildings being constructed by E. F. Loomis and C. E. Nininger in the railroad addition to Ashland, near the site of the late fire. Geo. W. Priddy of Medford, the well-known mechanic, is doing the brickwork.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 21, 1898, page 3


   
E. C. Stickel, the expert mason, is at Gray's mill on upper Rogue River, doing a lot of brick work.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 11, 1898, page 3


    The parties who will put up the two-story edifice at Gold Hill this season are building a kiln of brick. They expect to have the structure enclosed before wet weather begins.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1898, page 3


    Joe Beeman will soon commence the construction of a fine store building at Gold Hill, adjoining that occupied by Reames Bros. & Co. Wm. Russell will furnish the brick.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 18, 1898, page 3


    G. W. Priddy, who is doing the brickwork on the Loomis and Nininger buildings at Ashland, has got done with one of the structures. He is doing a first-class job.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 25, 1898, page 3



    Gold Hill is considerably divided over the question of building a town hall. Those who oppose the proposition say that a water system is of paramount importance. Brick for the hall has already been ordered, however.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1898, page 3


    Mrs. G. W. Priddy accompanied her husband to Ashland Monday morning for a week's stay. Mr. Priddy is engaged in building a couple of brick blocks at that place. He hopes to be through, or nearly so, with his work this week.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, September 9, 1898, page 6


    Fred. Barneburg and Robt. Taylor, who own the old Alhambra building at Ashland, near Pelton & Neil's butcher shop, have let the contract for the construction of a brick edifice on its site to C. H. Veghte. It will be one of the handsomest structures in that city.
    The foundation of the I.O.O.F. building at Gold Hill is being laid, and the brickwork will commence Monday. E. G. Perham has charge of operations. Geo. V. Stickel of Medford burnt the brick, which is of an excellent quality.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1898, page 3


    Work has been commenced on Gold Hill's first brick building, which will be a handsome and commodious structure. The I.O.O.F. and C. H. Dalrymple are having it constructed.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 22, 1898, page 3


    D. W. Andrus has leased the Gale lime kiln and quarry on Kanes Creek, and in company with Oscar Carpenter commenced work last Tuesday in getting out rock and putting up a kiln. They expect to have a kiln of lime ready to open the latter part of next week. The lime from that quarry is always all right, and these gentlemen understand how to handle it.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 30, 1898, page 7



    Work on the brick building which the Odd Fellows and C. H. Dalrymple are constructing at Gold Hill is progressing nicely. The first story will be completed by the end of next week.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 6, 1898, page 3


    Fred Barneburg was at Ashland last Friday on business connected with the new brick he and Robt. Tayler are building in that city to rent.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 7, 1898, page 6


    Andrus & Carpenter have finished burning a kiln of lime on Kanes Creek, and they will at once commence the construction of a 16x16 lime house on the Barnum property, near the Bear Creek bridge. The house will have a capacity of 1200 bushels of lime, and this they expect to fill this fall.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, October 14, 1898, page 7


    Hon. J. H. Stewart has purchased the brick building occupied by Ferguson, the grocer, on 7th Street, as also the vacant lot adjoining. He will have constructed, for the use of the proposed banking institution, a handsome edifice, as also another story above it.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1898, page 3



    The material for the new bank building is being put on the ground. Hon. J. H. Stewart is superintending operations.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1898, page 2


    The brickwork on the building being built at Gold Hill by the I.O.O.F. and C. H. Dalrymple is completed, and the roof was finished before rain commenced falling.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 17, 1898, page 3


    The handsome brick structure that Fred Barneburg and Robt. Taylor are having built at Ashland is about completed, and will be occupied in a few days by A. F. Eddy, proprietor of "The Fair."

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1898, page 3


    Childers Bros., three in number, who have been making brick for the Agnews (Calif.) insane asylum, returned last week.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1898, page 3



    Childers Bros. have commenced the construction of a kiln of 300,000 brick, which will be used to finish the J. O. Johnson building.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1899, page 3


    Work has been commenced on the new bank building. The brickwork is being done by Geo. Priddy, an expert workman.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 23, 1899, page 3


    Wm. Russell and J. M. Taylor of Gold Hill, the brick manufacturers, were with us yesterday.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1899, page 3


   
D. T. Lawton has purchased a couple of lots on the corner of B and Sixth streets, for a consideration of $300, and will erect a brick building thereon, to be used by Mitchell, Lewis, Staver & Co., as a retail farm implement and carriage establishment.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1899, page 3


    W. S. Barnum is building a good-sized addition to his brick building on South A Street. It is being erected in order to give room for a new cider mill which Mr. Barnum will put in shortly, and which will turn out ten or fifteen barrels of cider a day. It will also be used for storing purposes. The dimensions of the addition are 20x30 feet.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 28, 1899, page 7


    Fred. Patterson of Roseburg, the well-known contractor (who enlarged Hotel Nash), has gone to Drain to begin work on a brick building for W. A. Perkins, and will probably put up one for Judge Lyons also.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1899, page 2


    Spence Childers has his brick yard in operation again, with about seven hands employed. They are getting the kiln ready and have a good many brick molded and ready to burn. The yard presents a very businesslike appearance.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 19, 1899, page 7



    For months past there has been under course of construction one of the best, if not the best brick structure in our blooming little city--in this is situated the Medford Bank--for this purpose the building was constructed. Its first floor was arranged in every detail in such manner as best suited to banking business. The interior of this structure is a model of neatness and grandeur throughout, while the exterior is as well lacking in none of these. It is a structure the city has every reason to be proud of from the foundation to the uppermost point. It is a structure so solidly built that centuries of time and use cannot wear away. The building is 25x86 feet in size and two stories high. It is built of brick with sand rock at both top and bottom of each of the several pillars and at door and window sides and corners. The two large front windows are of the best French plate glass. Its every bearing is as solid as rock, lime, cement and the best of wood can make.

Excerpt, "A New Banking House," Medford Mail, June 23, 1899, page 6


    The husband of the late Jackson County pioneer, Mrs. J. M. McCully, built the second brick building that was put up in Jacksonville; the Bruner brick, across from the Odd Fellows brick, being the first.
Ashland Tidings, June 26, 1899, page 3


    Stickel Bros., the expert masons, are building the reservoir for the Gold Hill waterworks, which will be 100x32x6 feet in dimensions. A good job is assured.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1899, page 1



    Spencer Childers has taken a contract to put up two brick store buildings at Grants Pass. One is 50x100 feet in size and is for R. L. Coe, and the other is 18x90 and is for engineer McCarthy. Both are one story high.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 15, 1899, page 7


    Geo. V. Stickel, the expert brick mason, has returned from Yreka, Calif., where he has been doing considerable work. He has the contract for building the reservoir of the Gold Hill waterworks.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1899, page 3


    A. Lemke was at Medford this week, to buy brick for the fine building he will put up at once on the site of his old business place.

"Josephine County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 5, 1899, page 3


    G. W. Priddy of Medford, the well-known brickmason, is in Jacksonville, building the foundation to T. J. Kenney's residence.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 12, 1899, page 3


THE GOLDEN STREETS OF JACKSONVILLE.
To the Editor of The Times:
    The Mining and Scientific Press says: "The brick used in building the city of Deadwood, South Dakota, are mostly made from the clay obtained from the neighboring gulches, which is often gold-bearing. There is not a brick or pound of mortar in these buildings which does not contain gold. Hundreds of thousands of bricks had been burned at this yard before the fact of the gold value was known."
    I send you a little brick made from clay found in one of Jacksonville's gulches, showing that here, too, the houses might be built of gold bricks. Somebody may figure that, if each brick contained one cent, then--&c., &c. The gold in this brick is exceedingly fine. Your best microscope will fail to show the finest.
    Where does this gold come from? Is it the dust ground from the large gold, or the natural product of the rocks in this region?
    Gold in some quantity may be found everywhere in and around Jacksonville. The greater part of it is probably in so fine a state of division that ordinary processes fail to save it.
    In the streets here I often find the fine gold-bearing rocks. I send you a piece I picked up in front of your residence. Look it over carefully, and you will see the same fine grains of gold that are in the brick.
J. VOYLE.               
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 26, 1899, page 2


    Geo. W. Priddy, the expert brickmason, has been doing considerable work in his line at the county seat.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 16, 1899, page 2


    Mrs. O. Ganiard is soon to begin the erection of a brick on her property on Fourth Street, on the lots occupied by the livery stable which was burned about a year since.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 29, 1900, page 3


Another New Brick Block.
    The Ashland Meat Company is in negotiations with C. E. Nininger for the erection of a new brick building on his lot situated on Fourth Avenue, which they hope to occupy as soon as it is constructed. In the meantime the company is looking for a temporary location on the railroad addition to the city. Despite the large number of buildings of all kinds that have been erected in Ashland during the past year, there is still a scarcity of stores and dwellings of all kinds, and there promises to be a continuation of the building improvements that have been taking place in Ashland.
Ashland Tidings,
February 15, 1900, page 3



    G. W. Priddy is going to run his brick yard to its fullest capacity this season, and within a few days he will commence the manufacture of brick for the new Halley block, which he has the contract to put up, and for which is now putting in the foundation.
    S. Childers has secured a steam engine, and just as soon as this moist spell we are now experiencing has cleared away he will commence making pressed brick. He proposes making 600,000 during the coming season. The first kiln he will burn will contain 160,000, which will be for immediate use.
    D. T. Lawton is tearing away the fence and old buildings from his lots on North B Street, and just as soon as S. Childers completes the extension to the Adkins block, work will commence on this new building, Mr. Childers having been awarded the contract for putting it up. The building is to be a fine one, and no mistake. It will be 50x75 feet in size, one story high, with an elevated and artistically ornamented front. The building will front on B Street and extend back along the alley between Sixth and Seventh streets. On the front there will be six large windows and three doors, 7x10 feet in size, and on the alley side there will be three windows and one large door. When completed it will be used by the Mitchell, Lewis & Staver Co.'s farm implement dealers, and for which company Mr. Lawton is local agent for Southern Oregon. For convenience this building will be an ideal one and as an improvement to that part of the city it will be a monument to Mr. Lawton's worth as a public-spirited and progressive citizen. The old photograph gallery standing on the ground and being used by F. W. Wait as a marble shop will probably be removed to the west side of the track--onto some property which Mr. Lawton owns there.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, February 23, 1900, page 7


    D. T. Lawton will shortly commence the erection of a large brick block on B Street. Contractor Childers will do the work.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1900, page 2


    Capt. J. T. C. Nash has contracted with G. W. Priddy to put up the talked-of annex to Hotel Nash. Work on the building will be commenced about the first or sooner if Mr. Priddy can get the brick burned. The building will be 25x100 feet in size, which will give Mr. Nash a brick block 100x100 feet in size and all two stories high. The second story of the new brick will be used by the hotel while the first story will be for store purposes.
    A. D. Helms will this week let the contract for building a 25x60-foot brick saloon building on his lot, south of Hotel Nash. The building will be one story high and will probably be built by G. W. Priddy. Now if B. P. Theiss will get in and put up a brick on his lot and Capt. Nash builds his new hotel annex, South D Street will have nearly a block of solid brick buildings.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, March 2, 1900, page 7


    G. W. Priddy will shortly commence the manufacture of brick for the new Halley block, which he has the contract for constructing.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 5, 1900, page 3


    The Beach brick block on Main Street is now finished throughout, and the stores and rooms in it are being occupied by the new tenants.
"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, March 5, 1900, page 3


    The contract for Ashland's fine new $15,000 brick school building, to be built during the year, will be opened on the 15th inst. There promises to be some lively bidding to secure this large contract.
    Material is being hauled upon the ground for the new brick business building contracted by C. E. Nininger adjoining his brick business block corner of Fourth and Spring streets.
    One of the most conspicuous and attractive business blocks in Ashland is the new Beach brick just completing, corner Main and Water streets. Its construction represents an outlay of about $6500.

"Over $50,000 of Improvements,"
Ashland Tidings, March 8, 1900, page 3


    D. W. Andrus went out to his lime kiln on Coleman Creek yesterday morning and commenced preparing for the burning of lime. He claims that in ten days' time he will have 400 bushels of lime ready for market. This Coleman Creek product is an excellent article and will, we believe, find ready sale.

"Additional Local," 
Medford Mail, March 16, 1900, page 2


    Medford has 714 children of school age--361 boys and 353 girls.

"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, March 19, 1900, page 3

Ashland East School, circa 1905
Ashland East School, circa 1905

THE NEW EAST SCHOOL.
    The board of directors of Ashland School District (No. 5) last Thursday evening opened the bids for the construction of the new east school, to be built upon the grounds secured for it in McCall addition. The contract was let to H. Snook, of Salem, for $13,300, the work to be completed on the first day of the coming September, with a $10 a day forfeit after that date. The only other bidder was W. O. Heckart, of Corvallis, who offered to construct the building for $14,495.
    The plans for the new building provide for a substantial modern structure which will be a credit to the city in every way. It will be 78x84 feet in size, two stories, and eight rooms and basement. The basement will be of cut stone, with 15- and 12-inch brick walls on top of that. The heating will be by two furnaces, and the contract for the necessary apparatus was let separately some time ago for $1,800.

Ashland Tidings,
March 19, 1900, page 3



    Isaac Householder, of Gold Hill precinct, who is burning lime on Kanes Creek, tells us that there are two large quarries of lime rock on the creek of first quality which will not be exhausted for many generations. When other quarries along the line of road become worked out, as a number of them have been already, this immense bed may become an article of commerce from Jackson County of no small consequence.
"Mines, Miners and Mining of Southern Oregon," Medford Mail, March 30, 1900, page 1


    Childers Bros. have their kiln of 100,000 brick nearly ready for burning. G. W. Priddy also has about 60,000 ready for burning. When these kilns are opened there will be renewed activity in building, as several parties are waiting for brick.

"City Happenings,"
Medford Mail, April 6, 1900, page 7


    The foundation for the new east school building is being built of blue sandstone from a quarry opened up on the Jackson place, near the Eagle Mills.
"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, April 5, 1900, page 3


    G. W. Priddy has 60,000 brick ready for burning, which will be used on the brick buildings to be built in Medford during the year.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 12, 1900, page 2


    Wm. Russell, the brickyard man, has formed a partnership with Kellogg & Darling for the manufacture of brick, and they will soon begin operations for a large output during the summer.

"Gold Hill Items," Medford Mail, April 13, 1900, page 3


    Thos. McAndrews will soon commence the construction of his new brick block, on East Seventh Street. The wooden buildings now occupied by Hardin's barber shop and Davis' store room will be moved away, and the new brick will take their place. The building will be 25x80 feet in size and one story high--possibly two stories high--Mr. McAndrews has not fully decided this point as yet. Childers Bros. will put the building up.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 20, 1900, page 7


    Thos. McAndrews will commence tearing away the Hardin barber shop building and the Davis warehouse the first of the week and immediately following a brick structure will be put up.

"Additional Local," Medford Mail, April 27, 1900, page 3


    O'Neil Bros., owners of the Lebanon paper mills, were in Medford last week looking over several lime kilns with a presumed view of purchasing.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, April 27, 1900, page 6


    Childers Bros. commenced burning their large kiln of brick Monday morning. They expect to have brick for use by the middle of next week. G. W. Priddy has also put fire in his kiln.
"Additional Local Items," Medford Mail, May 4, 1900, page 6


    Both the G. W. Priddy and Childers Bros. brick kilns were opened Monday, and the work of hauling the brick to their respective places of use about the city begun. Work was commenced Tuesday on the D. T. Lawton and R. H. Halley blocks.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 18, 1900, page 7


    Childers Bros., at Medford, Ore., have their kiln of 100,000 brick nearly ready for burning. G. W. Priddy also has about 60,000 ready for burning. When these kilns are opened there will be renewed activity in building, as several parties are waiting for brick.
"Pacific Coast News," Brick and Clay Record, May 1900, page 214


    The foundations are being laid this week for the Hotel Nash annex and A. M. Helms' saloon building. The Nash annex will be 25x100 feet in size and one story high. The Helms building 25x60, one story high, both of brick. G. W. Priddy is doing the mason work.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 25, 1900, page 7



    Childers Bros. shipped a carload of brick to Montague, Calif. this week.

"City Happenings,"
Medford Mail, June 1, 1900, page 7


    Spencer Childers left Monday for Lakeview, Oregon, where he goes with the expectation of doing a bit of contracting on the rebuilding of that town, which was but recently almost entirely destroyed by fire.
    E. J. Armstrong struck the trail Monday for Lakeview. Mr. Armstrong is a brick mason--and a good one--and he will do contracting in his line. There is said to be a great amount of work in Lakeview at present--as a result of the recent fire.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, June 8, 1900, page 6


    R. H. Halley is at work on the second story of his new brick block. The front piers for the first story were put in with brick and stone, and are very pretty--and substantial. The first floor of this building will be the new home of The Mail. The second story will be for sleeping rooms for the Halley house. W. L. Halley is superintending the carpenter work on the job, and G. W. Priddy is doing the brick work.
Medford Mail, June 8, 1900, page 7


BUILDING BOOM AT MEDFORD.
Many New Structures Intended for Business Purposes.
    MEDFORD, June 7.--The demand for business locations here has greatly stimulated building. Seven brick buildings are under contract, and others are contemplated. R. H. Halley is pushing to completion a two-story brick, 50x50 feet, the lower part to be used by the Medford Mail; the upper part to be used by Mr. Halley in connection with his boarding house. J. R. Wilson is engaged on a brick structure, 46x50 feet. D. T. Lawton has under construction a fine building 50x75 feet, to be used for a carriage and implement house. Captain Nash and A. M. Helms are building separate store rooms, 25x100 feet. T. McAndrews will build a store room 25x125 feet. There is not a desirable house to rent in the city, and many newcomers are purchasing village and farm property.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, June 8, 1900, page 3



    Spencer Childers returned from Lakeview Sunday. He contracted for the manufacturing and laying in walls of 200,000 brick with Dr. Daly while in Lakeview, and at once commenced work on preparing a yard near that place, and in three days' time he was ready to do business. Guy and 'Gene remained there and will look after the business.

Medford Mail, June 29, 1900, page 3


    Ed. Armstrong and C. H. Wallace, the bricklayers, have gone to Lakeview to work on the buildings being constructed there.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 28, 1900, page 3