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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Notes on George H. Chick

George Horatio Chick was born April 24, 1834 in Monroe, Waldo County, Maine, and died October 11, 1912 in Oakland, California. At some time he apparently married a woman named Josephine. On October 23, 1867 in Boise, Idaho--apparently without bothering to divorce Josephine--he married Florence Nightingale Hyde (November 19, 1848 Rosendale, Wisconsin - May 5, 1924 Douglas, Arizona), the daughter of David Hyde and Mary Sheldon.
 
In 1900 (see below) Florence described herself as a "widow" when transferring property to her son--who made no secret of his relationship to his father, at the time openly living with a new wife on the other side of San Francisco Bay.
 
Chick's 1912 Oakland death certificate lists him as a retired miner, and the cause of death as lobar pneumonia and chronic interstitial nephritis. It gives his wife's name as Josephine, giving her address as 3060 Union Street in Oakland. It's unknown if the two Josephines are the same person.*
   

Perhaps oddest of all, in 1914--two years after Chick's death--Florence filed for divorce.


    Little is known about George Chick, a miner and sometime real-estate agent who was usually absent when the census takers came around (and in Seattle, where the family lived throughout Guy’s childhood and adolescence, they came around annually). In addition to peregrinating from one mining job to another, George apparently lived in California with another woman, the mother of three children who took his name.
    Florence, who clearly did not relish the situation, brought up her three California-born sons—Guy [1868–1930], Ralph (1872–1928), and Maurice (1878–1934)—in the Seattle household of her parents, David and Mary Hyde. Her marriage to George ended in 1887, and shortly thereafter she took her sons to California, presumably to have them educated.
"Guy Hyde Chick: The Man Behind the House," Daniella Thompson, Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association


Census date: July 12, 1860
Name: Amos Chick
Residence: Rose Bar Township, Yreka County, California
Occupation: Miner
Birth location: Maine
Household members:
Amos Chick, 55
Elisabeth Chick, 40, female, born in Maine
George H. Chick, 24, male, born in Maine
James A. Chick, 17, male, born in Maine
Elisha Arey Chick, 25, male, born in Maine
United States Census


   
TESTIMONY COMMISSIONS.--Orders for commissions to issue to take testimony in Nevada Territory, in the cases of A. H. Rhodes et al. vs. Louis McLane et al. and George Chick et al. vs. same, have been granted by the Fourth District Court.
San Francisco Bulletin, November 4, 1862, page 4


    George Chick has on hand a good assortment of parlor stoves. Those in need of anything in his line will do well to call soon.
Idaho Statesman, Boise, December 5, 1865, page 2


George H. Chick ad, September 18, 1866 Idaho Statesman    Opposition has awakened George Chick up to a business feeling and he endeavors to lay before the public [in his advertisement] his large and well-selected stock of stoves, hardware and every other article to be found in a first-class wholesale and retail tin store. Knowing that it would require almost a volume to spread out such an assorted collection George has just merely enumerated a few of the most important items. To find out al that he really has in his establishment, you must call and examine. "His policy" (conciliatory) is quick sale and small profits--cash on delivery. See his "relief bill," duly approved and signed, in another column.

Idaho Statesman,
Boise, February 6, 1866, page 2


    George H. Chick made his appearance last Saturday among the old friends in Boise City. He spent the winter and spring in California.
"From the Statesman Files of 69 Years Ago" (1866), Idaho Statesman, Boise, June 30, 1935, page 14



   
COUNTERFEITERS OF GOLD DUST IN IDAHO.--The Idaho Statesman of November 20th contains the annexed account of the arrest of counterfeiters of gold dust. Captain Thomas G. Murphy, who is referred to, will probably be remembered as a resident of Sacramento for a while and afterwards of Virginia:
    "The public are already aware of the arrest last week at Idaho City of Thomas G. Murphy upon a charge of passing counterfeit gold dust. We learn that he has since been discharged, though whether upon recognizance to appear or upon failure to sustain any charge against him, we have not learned. It has been believed, in fact pretty well known for some time to the officers of the law, that a considerable gang of counterfeiters were operating in our midst. The arrest of Murphy gave a new clue to the prosecution of further inquiries. About four weeks ago George H. Chick was called upon at his tin shop to make a sheet iron furnace, which so much resembled a concern for melting gold, and from other suspicious circumstances, he was led to believe that it was designed to be used for counterfeiting dust. Chick acquainted Sheriff Duval of the facts, and a sharp lookout has been kept for the gentlemen ever since.
Excerpt, Sacramento Daily Union, November 30, 1866, page 2


    HYDRAULIC PIPE.--Observed George Chick making iron pipe yesterday for use in a hydraulic mining claim near Idaho City. It is made of wrought iron riveted together and joined like stove pipe. This piece of work is one thousand feet in length, four inches in diameter, and capable of sustaining a pressure of one hundred and fifty feet. Mr. Chick is an old and experienced hand in the art of fixing up hydraulic works for miners, and can do a job that will work without mistake. Those in need of such work will make a note of it.
Idaho Statesman, Boise, February 7, 1867, page 2


    Trains and passengers are rolling out every day for the new mines at Lemhi. George H. Chick, loaded with tinner's supplies, etc., left for Leesburg, where he is starting a branch.
"From the Statesman Files of 69 Years Ago" (1867), Idaho Statesman, Boise, May 31, 1936, page 14


    PERSONAL.--Mr. Chas. Miller, of the firm of Bloch, Miller & Co. at the Dalles, has been stopping in town a few days, and leaves this morning for Owyhee. His firm are about to establish a branch of their business in this city, and for that purpose Mr. Miller has bought the new brick of George H. Chick, now building next to Blossom's corner. It is his intention to fill up with a new stock as soon as the building is completed.

Idaho Statesman,
Boise, July 4, 1867, page 2

George H. Chick ad, May 12, 1866 Owyhee Avalanche, Silver City, Idaho
Owyhee Avalanche, Silver City, Idaho,
May 12, 1866


    There are additional signs of prosperity in new and substantial improvements along Main Street. . . . G. H. Chick is going to put up a new store adjoining Rossi & Robie's.

Idaho Statesman,
Boise, July 25, 1867, page 2



    Messrs. Twichell & Moody, who succeed Geo. H. Chick in the tin and hardware business, take possession today under the contract of sale. We do not like to see George retire from business, but don't know of anyone we would rather see succeed him than Messrs. Twichell & Moody.
Idaho Statesman, Boise, August 20, 1867, page 3


    Twichell & Moody, Successors to George H. Chick, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Tin & Sheet Iron Ware Stoves and Shelf Hardware . . .
Advertisement, Idaho Statesman, Boise, November 9, 1867, page 4

Sacramento Daily Union, June 12 through July 10, 1868
Sacramento Daily Union, June 12 through July 10, 1868



Daily Alta California, San Francisco, June 13-20, 1868
Daily Alta California, San Francisco, June 13-20, 1868



George H. Chick ad, June 16, 1868 San Francisco Bulletin
San Francisco Bulletin, June 16, 1868



Daily Alta California, San Francisco, June 26, 1868
Daily Alta California, San Francisco, June 26, 1868



U.S.
District Court.—Hoffman, J.
   
In the matter of George H. Chick.—The said Chick appears in this Court by Winans & Hyer, his attorneys, and prays for ten days time in which to present and file his answer to the petition herein, which was thereupon granted.
"Law Intelligence," Daily Alta California. San Francisco, November 18, 1868, page 2


U.S.
District Court—Hoffman, J.
   
In the matter of Geo. H. Chick, in involuntary bankruptcy, case referred to Asher B. Bates to take testimony.
"Law Intelligence," Daily Alta California, San Francisco, December 22, 1868, page 2


    INSOLVENTS.--The old year swept out of existence not a few of the enterprising business firms of the state, and ruined pecuniarily also many industrious and worthy citizens who, through rascality, inefficiency and inability of others, or the vicissitudes in trade, were compelled to succumb and pass in checks to the benefits of creditors. To the long lists heretofore published in the Alta, we append the following: . . . George H. Chick.
Daily Alta California, San Francisco, January 3, 1869, page 1


BORN.
    In Oakland, April 5th, the wife of George H. Chick, of a son.
Sacramento Daily Union, April 13, 1872, page 5



    CARLIN, May 17th.--Following is a list of the passengers passing Carlin today, to arrive in San Francisco May 21st:
    . . . George H. Chick, Oakland, Cal. . . .
"Overland Travel," Daily Alta California, San Francisco, May 21, 1872, page 1


    INCORPORATIONS.--There were filed in the office of the Secretary of State, yesterday, articles of incorporation . . . of the Fort Yuma Quartz Mining Company, to operate in Agra District, El Dorado County. Capital, $5,000,000, in shares of $100 each. Directors--C. H. Gorrill, George H. Chick, James E. Blethen, Curtis P. Williams and George R. Vernon. The principal place of business will be in San Francisco. . . .
Sacramento Daily Union, June 12, 1875, page 5


    At the annual meeting of the Brooks Gold and Silver Mining Company, held on the 15th inst., the following named were elected Directors for the ensuing year: Thos. Brooks, Superintendent; T. C. Coxhead (President), George H. Chick (Vice-President), H. H. Bigelow, C. Field. I. T. Millikan was appointed Secretary and Treasurer.
"Brevities," Daily Alta California, San Francisco, June 16, 1875, page 1


    Listed as a trustee of the Home Security Building and Loan Association of Alameda County, Oakland, California., incorporated July 21, 1875.
Oakland Daily Transcript,
September 30, 1875, page 3; Oakland Tribune, November 5, 1875, page 1


    The Brooks [mine] have elected C. Field (President), C. B. Comstock, J. C. Yale, George H. Chick, and H. H. Bigelow Trustees for the ensuing year.—Eureka Sentinel
"Mining Stocks and Mining," Daily Alta California. San Francisco, December 12, 1875, page 2

Daily Alta California, San Francisco, September 1, 1876, page 3
Daily Alta California, San Francisco, September 1, 1876, page 3

BORN.
    San Rafael, March 20--Wife of George H. Chick, a son.
Sacramento Daily Union, April 1, 1878, page 3


Census date: June 14, 1880
Name: George Chick
Residence: Hornitas, Mariposa County, California
Occupation: Miner
Birth location: Maine
Married
Household members:
George H. Chick (boarder), 40, male, parents both born in Maine
United States Census


Census date: 1883
Name: G. F. Chick
Residence: Seattle, King County, Washington
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Occupation: Agent
Birth location: Maine
Household members:
G. F. Chick, 40
F. Chick, female, 33, housewife, born in Wisconsin
G. Chick, 14, male, born in California
R. Chick, 11, male, born in California
M. Chick, 5, male, born in California
Washington State and Territorial Census


Territory of Washington vs. George H. Chick et al.
Territory of Washington,       )
               vs.                              )
G. H. Chick                             )
William Kinney                      )
Samuel Evans                          )
John Doe (John McCoy)       )
Richard Roe (G. L. Upton)    )
    Patrick Mathews makes complaint to T. H. Cann, Justice aforesaid and accuses the above named defendants by this complaint and information of the crime of forcible entry committed as follows:
    For that the said defendants at the County of King in the Territory of Washington, on the 14th day of February, 1883, did then and there violently enter upon and take possession, with menaces and with force and arms, and without the authority of law, a certain close and lands then and there being in possession of E. M. Smithers and C. H. Sutton, which said lands are described as follows, to wit: The west half (½) of Section thirty-four (34), Township twenty-two (22) North of Range seven (7) east in King County, Wash. Terr.
    Patrick Mathews, being duly sworn an oath, saith: that the matter and things set forth and contained in the above and foregoing complaint and information are true as he verily believes.
[signed]       Patrick Mathews
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 14th day of February A.D. 1883 at Seattle in King County, Washington Territory.
T. H. Cann
Justice of the Peace for Seattle Dist., King Cnty. W.T.
The property in question was just east of Kent, Washington. The defendants were arrested by Sheriff J. H. McGraw on February 17th, each paying $300 bail on the 19th, naming David N. Hyde and Isaac Waddell as sureties. On April 23 the grand jury found the complaint to be a true bill, examining witnesses James Williams, James McGuire and Mathews. By that time a Shelly Hyde had been added to the defendants. Prosecuting Attorney C. M. Bradshaw moved dismissal of the case, which the presiding judge granted, pointing out "that the entry made upon said lands (which entry is the act charged as a crime) was not made with force, or violence, or menaces, but was made in the absence of all persons claiming prior possession and without objection by those persons, and was made upon an unoccupied, unfenced and unimproved portion of the unsurveyed lands of the United States, under and by virtue of a claim of right under the universal land laws of the United States. . . ."


In the District Court, holding term at Seattle in King County, Washington Territory
E. M. Smithers and C. H. Sutton, plaintiffs
                            vs.
The Northern Pacific Railroad Company, a corporation duly organized,
The Oregon Improvement Company, a corporation duly organized,
The Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad Company, a corporation duly organized,
James McNaught, J. H. Howard, J. T. Jones, George H. Chick, William Kenney, Samuel Evans, John McCoy, and George Upton, Joseph F. McNaught, E. P. Ferry and J. N. Mitchell, Jr., and Oregon and Transcontinental Railroad Company, defendants
Complaint
To the Honorable Roger T. Greene, Chief Justice of Washington Territory and Judge of the above entitled Court. The plaintiffs allege and complain to your honor
I
That the defendants, The Northern Pacific Railroad Company, The Oregon Improvement Company and The Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad Company, and The Oregon and Transcontinental Railroad Company are corporations duly organized and authorized to transact business in Washington Territory.
II
That the plaintiffs, E. M. Smithers and C. H. Sutton have been for more than six (6) months last past and are now in actual and lawful possession and occupancy of the following described premises, to wit: The West half (½) of section thirty-four (34) Township twenty-two (22) North of Range seven East of Willamette Meridian in King County, Washington Territory.
III
That said premises are unsurveyed lands and contain valuable deposits of coal and tracts of timber and were entered upon, preempted and prospected under the laws of the United States by plaintiffs in good faith, with the intention of preempting and purchasing the same from the United States Government. That plaintiffs have within the past six months expended large sums of money, to wit: $12000.00 dollars and upwards, in prospecting and developing the coal veins upon said premises and in making other valuable improvements thereon, and plaintiffs are now continuing such developments and improvements; and plaintiffs are qualified to enter and preempt and purchase said premises under the laws of the United States.
IV
That heretofore to wit, on or about the 14th day of February 1883, the defendants, by force and arms and against the wish, will or consent of plaintiffs or either of them, entered into and upon said premises; and said defendants threaten and are now attempting by force and arms, and against the wish, will or consent of plaintiffs or either of them, to hold possession of and oust plaintiffs from said premises.
V
That said defendants are committing serious waste upon said premises, cutting down trees, digging coal and otherwise injuring the property.
VI
That plaintiffs are informed, believe and so charge that defendants threaten and intend by force and arms to take complete possession of and hold said premises, and to drive plaintiffs therefrom by force. That defendants threaten and intend to commit further waste on said premises by cutting therefrom and destroying valuable timber and digging coal thereon, to the irreparable damage of plaintiffs.
VII
That plaintiffs are now in possession and occupancy of houses erected by themselves on said premises and defendants threaten and intend, as plaintiffs verily believe, to drive plaintiffs therefrom by force and arms and take possession of plaintiffs' said houses.
VIII
That there is danger of defendants immediately carrying out these threats by taking absolute possession of said premises by force, driving plaintiffs therefrom by force, erecting buildings thereon, cutting and destroying timber thereon and digging coal thereon to the irreparable loss and damage of plaintiffs, unless restrained by the order of this honorable Court.
    That this action if an injunction is granted will prevent a multiplicity of suits as to said lands.
    Wherefore plaintiffs pray that the defendants and each of them their agents, attorneys and employees be restrained, enjoined and prohibited from in any manner interfering with plaintiffs' possession of said premises, or from building thereon, or destroying any trees or timber thereon or digging any coal thereon, also from dispossessing or attempting to dispossess said plaintiffs or either of them their agents and employees from taking or attempting to take or keep possession of said premises or any part thereof or from entering upon the same or any part thereof.
    That a restraining order issue to prevent defendants so doing until an application for a temporary injunction can be made and notice thereof given.
    That at the final hearing hereof such order and injunction be made perpetual, that plaintiffs recover their costs and have such other and further relief in the premises as may be in accordance with equity.
J. R. Lewis and Burke & Rasin,
Attorneys for Plaintiffs.
On February 17, 1883 Smithers and Sutton filed their formal plea with the District Court, submitting a $500 bond which named F. H. Whitworth and David T. Denny as sureties. The restraining order was granted, Sheriff McGraw serving the defendants individually between the February 17 and March 2 (Chick being one of those served on the 17th). George H. Chick, through his attorneys (and co-defendants) McNaught, Ferry, McNaught and Mitchell, filed a demurrer on March 14th; McCoy and Upton also filed. There's no evidence the order was rescinded.


Territory of Washington vs. George H. Chick et al.
Territory of Washington,       )
               vs.                              )
G. H. Chick                             )
William Kinney                      )
Samuel Evans                          )
John Doe (John McCoy)       )
Richard Roe (G. L. Upton)    )
    Patrick Mathews makes complaint to T. H. Cann, Justice aforesaid and accuses the above named defendants by this complaint and information of the crime of forcible entry committed as follows:
    For that the said defendants at the County of King in the Territory of Washington, on the 14th day of February, 1883, did then and there violently enter upon and take possession, with menaces and with force and arms, and without the authority of law, a certain close and lands then and there being in possession of F. H. Whitworth and L. J. Coleman, which said lands are described as follows, to wit: The east half (½) of Section thirty-four (34), Township twenty-two (22) North of Range seven (7) east in King County, Wash. Terr.
    Patrick Mathews, being duly sworn an oath, saith: that the matter and things set forth and contained in the above and foregoing complaint and information are true as he verily believes.
[signed]       Patrick Mathews
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 14th day of February A.D. 1883 at Seattle in King County, Washington Territory.
T. H. Cann
Justice of the Peace for Seattle Dist., King Cnty. W.T.
The same charge and complainant as the last, but for an adjacent property with different owners.This charge also went before the grand jury and was found a true bill, the same witnesses having been examined. Prosecuting Attorney Bradshaw's motion for dismissal was again granted, this time due to an affidavit from the aggrieved parties "acknowledging satisfaction for such alleged injury," the defendants also paying court costs.


In the District Court, holding term at Seattle in King County, Washington Territory
L. J. Coleman and F. H. Whitworth, plaintiffs
                            vs.
The Northern Pacific Railroad Company, a corporation duly organized,
The Oregon Improvement Company, a corporation duly organized,
The Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad Company, a corporation duly organized,
James McNaught, J. H. Howard, J. F. Jones, Geo. H. Chick, William Kenney, Samuel Evans, John McCoy, and Geo. Upton, Joseph F. McNaught, E. P. Ferry, J. H. Mitchell, Jr., and Oregon and Transcontinental Railroad Company, defendants
Complaint
To the Honorable Roger T. Green, Chief Justice of Washington Territory and Judge of the above entitled Court. The plaintiffs allege and complain to your honor
    1. That the defendants, The Oregon Improvement Company, The Northern Pacific Railroad Company and The Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad Company, and the Oregon and Improvement Company are corporations duly organized and authorized to transact business in Washington Territory.
    2. That the plaintiffs have been for more than six (6) months last past and are now in actual and lawful possession and occupancy of the following described premises, to wit: The East half (½) of Section thirty-four (34) Township twenty-two (22) North of Range seven (7) East of the Willamette Meridian in King County, Washington Territory.
    3. The said premises are unsurveyed lands and contain valuable deposits of coal and tracts of timber and were entered upon and prospected and preempted under the laws of the United States by plaintiffs in good faith with the intention of preempting and purchasing the same from the United States Government. That plaintiffs have expended large sums of money, to wit: $12000.00 dollars and upwards, in prospecting and developing the coal veins upon said premises and in making other valuable improvements thereon, and plaintiffs are now continuing such developments and improvements; and plaintiffs are qualified to enter, preempt and purchase said premises under the laws of the United States.
    4. That heretofore to wit, on or about the 14th day of February 1883, the defendants, by force and arms and against the wish, will or consent of plaintiffs or either of them, entered into and upon said premises; and said defendants threaten and are now attempting by force and arms, and against the wish, will or consent of plaintiffs or either of them, to hold possession of and oust plaintiffs from said premises.
    5. That said defendants are committing serious waste upon said premises, cutting down trees, digging coal and otherwise injuring the property.
    6. That plaintiffs are informed, believe and so charge that defendants threaten and intend by force and arms to take complete possession of and hold said premises, and to drive plaintiffs therefrom by force. That defendants threaten and intend to commit further waste on said premises by cutting therefrom and destroying valuable timber and digging coal thereon, to the irreparable damage of plaintiffs.
    7. That plaintiffs are now in possession and occupancy of houses erected by themselves on said premises and defendants threaten and intend, as plaintiffs verily believe, to drive plaintiffs therefrom by force and arms and take possession of plaintiffs' said houses.
    8. That there is danger of defendants immediately carrying out these threats by taking absolute possession of said premises by force, driving plaintiffs therefrom by force, erecting buildings thereon, cutting and destroying timber thereon and digging coal thereon to the irreparable loss and damage of plaintiffs, unless restrained by the order of this honorable Court.
    That this action if an injunction is granted will prevent a multiplicity of suits as to said lands.
    Wherefore plaintiffs pray that the defendants and each of them their agents, attorneys and employees be restrained, enjoined and prohibited from in any manner interfering with plaintiffs' possession of said premises, or from building thereon, or destroying any trees or timber thereon or digging any coal thereon, also from dispossessing or attempting to dispossess said plaintiffs or either of them their agents and employees from taking or attempting to take or keep possession of said premises or any part thereof or from entering upon the same or any part thereof.
    That a restraining order [be] issued to prevent defendants so doing until an application for a temporary injunction can be made and notice thereof given.
    That at the final hearing hereof such order and injunction be made perpetual, that plaintiffs recover their costs and have such other and further relief in the premises as may be in accordance with equity.
J. R. Lewis and Burke & Rasin,
Attorneys for Plaintiffs.
This complaint was cribbed from that of Smithers and Sutton; the penman even forgot to change the names in one place. On February 17, 1883 Coleman and Whitworth filed this formal plea with the District Court, submitting a $500 bond which named E. M. Smithers and David T. Denny as sureties. The restraining order was granted, Sheriff McGraw serving the defendants simultaneously with the previous order. George H. Chick, through his attorneys (and co-defendants) McNaught, Ferry, McNaught and Mitchell, filed a demurrer on March 14th; McCoy and Upton also filed. There's no evidence the order was rescinded.


Andrew Merchant, et al. vs. R. C. Humeston, et al.
Andrew Merchant, George W. Merton, J. D. Parks, Martin D. Ballard and Edward F. Sox, co-partners doing business as Ballard & Sox vs. R. C. Humeston, Henry L. Yesler and John S. Anderson, doing business in Seattle as Yesler Mill Co.; J. Schram and A. Korn, doing business as J. Schram & Co.; George H. Chick and Frank Nathan, doing business as Nathan & Co.; George Stetson and J. J. Post, doing business as Stetson & Post; G. W. Holmes, Olef Onson, Wesley H. Knee, Seattle Lumber and Commercial Company. Suit was to recoup unpaid wages in construction of seven dwelling houses in Seattle.
To the Hon. Roger S. Greene Judge of said District Court
    George H. Chick and Frank Nathan defendants sued herein as Nathan & Co. answering the complaint of the plaintiffs herein respectfully show and allege as follows viz:
I.
That at all times hereinafter mentioned the said George H. Chick and Frank Nathan were, ever since have been and now are co-partners doing business as shingle manufacturers and traders in the city of Seattle in said county and territory under the firm name and style of Nathan & Co.
II.
That said defendant R. C. Humeston was indebted to said George H. Chick and Frank Nathan as said co-partners in the sum of $283 75/100 upon an account for 113,500 shingles by said Nathan & Co. furnished and delivered to said R. C. Humeston at his special instance and request at said Seattle, between the 7 and 24th days (inclusive) of May A.D. 1883 at the agreed price of two & 50/100 dollars for thousand of said shingles.
III.
That no part of said sum of $283 75/100 has ever been paid to said Nathan & Co. nor to said Chick or Nathan except the sum of $140.00 and that there now remains due said Nathan & Company upon said account the sum of one hundred and forty-three dollars and 75/100 dollars.
IV.
That of the shingles for which the above named sum of $143 75/100 remains due, ten thousand were furnished for and actually used in the construction of each of those five certain buildings two of which are situated on lot 5, two on lot 6 and the other partly on lot 5 and partly on lot 6 in Block 39 according to Maynard's Plat or addition to said city of Seattle and situated near Seattle in said King County--all of said houses fronting on 8th Street between Lone and Wheeler streets according to said Maynard's Plat.
V.
That it being these defendants' intention to avail themselves of the benefit of Chapter 138 of the Code of Washington Territory and perfect a lien upon the premises aforesaid as a security for the payment of the claim of these defendants to the extent of $125 00/100 due as aforesaid and to claim and hold such lien not only upon the said buildings but also upon the land whereon the same have been constructed, together with a convenient space about the same or so much as might be required for the convenient use and occupation thereof or upon such interest as said defendant Humeston who caused the said buildings to be constructed had therein at the times said shingles were furnished and used in the construction of said buildings as aforesaid, these defendants did file on the 20th day of July A.D. 1883 and within sixty days from the furnishing [of] said shingles for said houses, with the auditor of said King County where said premises were wholly situated the claim of these defendants which said claim and the verification thereof, duly made by said George H. Chick, are hereby made apart of this answer, copies of which are hereto attached marked Exhibits "A" & "B" and for a full and complete description of said claim reference is hereby made thereto, and that thereafter, to wit: on the said 20th day of July A.D. 1883 the said claim was duly recorded in vol. 5 of Liens page 174 Records of King County, Washington Territory.
VI.
That said claim was duly filed and recorded within sixty days from the time said shingles were delivered as aforesaid and that said buildings at the time said shingles were furnished as aforesaid and at the time said buildings were constructed and said shingles were used thereon were the property of said R. C. Humeston together with a leasehold interest in said lots 5 & 6 in said Block 39 according to said Maynard's Plat, and said lease hold interest of said Humeston is and was based upon a lease of said lots to said Humeston from one W. C. Squires dated [omission].
The case record is nearly three-quarters of an inch thick and amongst the many demurrers, refilings and motions to strike, I can't make out what was the final disposition. The case was appealed to the territory Supreme Court, though, which on July 13, 1885 affirmed the lower court's decision.


George B. Adair vs. George H. Chick
Territory of Washington,   )
Third Judicial District,       )    ss.

County of King,                  )
In the District Court holding terms at Seattle.
Geo. B. Adair, Plaintiff,
    vs.
Geo. H. Chick, Defendant.
    The plaintiff in the above entitled action, for cause of action against the defendant above named, alleges as follows:
    1. That on the 6th day of October, 1883, the defendant, Geo. H. Chick, for a valuable consideration, made, executed and delivered to plaintiff his promissory note, whereby the said defendant, for a valuable consideration, as aforesaid, promised to pay to the order of G. B. Adair the sum of one hundred and twenty-six and 25/100 dollars, with interest thereon at the rate of one percent, per month from date until paid; said note being due and payable ten days after the date thereof.
    2. That no payments of principal or interest due on said promissory note have been made, except the sum of $26.25.
    3. That plaintiff is now the owner and holder of said promissory note.
    Whereupon plaintiff prays for judgment against said defendant for the sum of one hundred dollars, with interest thereon from the 6th day of October, 1883, until paid, and for costs and plaintiff's disbursements herein.
(signed) C. H. Hanford
               Attorney for Plaintiff
Chick's debt remained unpaid as of November 30, 1885, when a summons for the unpaid balance and court costs was filed with the county clerk. A copy of the original promissory note was also filed, with an unattributed newspaper clipping attached to it, reading: "Mr. George H. Chick, who has been on a business trip to California, returned last evening, having secured an appointment to a position of great responsibility."


    George H. Chick, one of the gentlemen who recently bonded the extensive mining and timber property of the Pacific Hydraulic Mining Co., in Josephine County, was in town last week, and is greatly pleased with Ashland. W. C. Tindall, a correspondent of an eastern journal, accompanied him out from Portland.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 4, 1884, page 3


    There is a large amount of tailings at some of our gold quartz mills hitherto of no value whatever. The new reduction works in this city it appears can work these over again to a large profit. Every dollar thus saved is so much more wealth for the state.
"Brief Mention," Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 18, 1884, page 3


A BIG SHOWING--Salmon Mills Versus Stamps--Out of 700 lbs. of quartz tailings from five stamp mills, which was worked at Chick's Reduction Works, using Salmon's Pulverizer and Chick's Patent Riffle, a saving of $10.25 per ton is given, showing a loss to the companies of ten tons per day, of $103.50, which is more than one-half what they are realizing on first working, as they claim it pays them but $20 per ton, or $200 per day. Results are stubborn facts. Works located at the corner of Main and Front sts. Office 102 First St., Portland, Or.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 23, 1884, page 2


LOTS 50x100 FEET
-- AT --
YAQUINA BAY,
$25 EACH,
INSTALLMENTS OF $5 PER MONTH.
GEORGE H. CHICK & CO.,
No. 102 First Street.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 23-August 12, 1884


    Lively times at Yaquina Bay. The lots which Chick & Co., the real estate agents, No. 102 First, are selling at $125 each on easy installments of $25 per month are nearly all sold. They are sure to command a handsome premium when no more can be got. Don't neglect to secure a lot whilst you have the chance, or you will when too late surely regret it. Parties arriving from the country will be located as well as if they had called personally at their office.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 25, 1884, page 3


    The officers of the Equal Rights Association of King County in the fall of 1884 were Mrs. C. M. Anderson, president; Mrs. E. Mooers, vice president; Mrs. W. D. Wood, secretary; Mrs. Amos Brown, corresponding secretary; Mrs. M. J. Pontius, treasurer; Mrs. George H. Chick, Mrs. Irving Ballard, Mrs. H. E. Taylor, Mrs. M. E. Kenworthy, Mrs. Alfred Snyder, executive committee.
History of Seattle from the Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Clarence Bagley, 1916


Gold and Silver Ores.
CHICK'S REDUCTION WORKS,
-- OF --
TEN TON CAPACITY,
Is now ready to make positive
WORKING TESTS ON GOLD & SILVER
Ores at San Francisco Prices.
----------
CHAS. A. WING,
LATE OF ARIZONA,
A FIRST-CLASS ASSAYER & MILLMAN,
Will have charge of location of works, corner
of Main and Front streets.

Office at GEO. H. CHICK & CO's.,
102 First St., Portland, Or.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 24 through August 13, 1884.  There's no evidence that the reduction works ever went into full production--or was even built.


   
MINING DEVELOPMENTS.--Geo. H. Chick, of Portland, who was over at Henley this week, informs us that a corporation is to be formed soon to develop a new phase of mining business in Southern Oregon and Northern California, viz: the working of quartz ledges which have gold in them but which could not be profitably worked heretofore because of the impossibility of saving the gold. Mr. Chick has a new process of working the sulphurets which he is sanguine will enable the company to mine with profit in many places where the quartz has failed to pay. The scheme of the company is not fully perfected, but the above is an outline of its object. Its name is to be the Southern Oregon Development Company, and its incorporation is to be so effected as to allow it to operate in California near the Oregon line.
Ashland Tidings, August 15, 1884, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick, the Portland real estate man, and Capt. Taylor have been over at Henley within the past week, making arrangements for a new mining enterprise.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 15, 1884, page 3


    The Southern Oregon Development Company now has 500 tons of low-grade ore ready to ship from Jackson County to East Portland as soon as the reduction works in that city are in operation.
"Brief Mention," Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 15, 1884, page 3


NEWSPAPERS AND PUBLICATIONS.
OREGON REAL ESTATE ADVERTISER (Monthly)—George H. Chick & Co., publishers. 102 1st.
Portland City Directory, 1885. Portland, Oregon: R. L. Polk & Co., 1885.


YAQUINA BAY!
$35  $50     LOTS!     $75  $100
----
Every man, woman, boy and girl can own a lot on Yaquina Bay,
the Terminus of the Oregon Pacific Railroad,
and one of the future Great Cities
and Commercial Centres of the Northwest.

$35, $50, $75 or $100 per Lot,
For Cash or Installments,
No Interest.
MONTHLY: $5, $10, $20, $50.
WEEKLY: $2, $3, $5, $10.
Perfect Titles.           Size 50x100 Feet.
----
GEO. H. CHICK & CO.,
Real Estate and Mining Brokers,
102 First Street, Portland, Ogn.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 1, 1885 et seq., page 4


AN EXPLANATION
Portland, Or., Jan. 23.
To the Editor of The Oregonian
   
The report of the trial in Justice Davis' court, published in the issue of last Wednesday, regarding George H. Chick & Co. in connection with J. Grafe, did the firm great injustice. At no time was Mr. Grafe refused either the money or the deed. He expressed himself perfectly satisfied to wait the return of Mr. Richards, when his money was to have been paid or the deed delivered to him. Mr. Grafe, instead of waiting, as he had promised, began suit against the firm before the return of Mr. Richards, who is new here, and the deed which I now show you is signed, sealed, and ready for delivery to Mr. Grafe or his authorized agent.
GEO H. CHICK & CO.
per Geo. H. Chick
Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 30, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick, the Portland real estate man, and Capt. E. J. Bates, both of whom are interested in a mining enterprise near Henley, passed through town this week, on their way from San Francisco to Portland.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, March 20, 1885, page 3



    The firm of George H. Chick & Co., real estate and mining brokers, is this day dissolved by mutual consent, Mr. Chick taking charge of mining business, and Mr. Richards of the real estate business. All parties owing the firm will pay their bills on presentation by George H. Chick, and all parties having bills against the firm will present them to Mr. Chick for payment.
GEO. H. CHICK  
Portland, Or., March 18, 1885                                                                     D. A. RICHARDS
Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 20, 1885, page 2


    D. A. Richards and Carl Werngren have entered into partnership in the real estate business. Mr. Richards is of the firm of George H. Chick & Co. and Mr. Werngren has purchased the interest of George H. Chick. The new firm ask a continuance of past favors from the patrons of the old firm, and will promptly and reliably transact all matters entrusted to their care. Give them a call at No. 6 Washington Street, Portland, Or.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 20, 1885, page 2


Census date: Apr 1885
Name: Geo H Chick
Residence: Seattle Ward 2, Washington
Birth location: Maine
Marital status: Married
Occupation: Real Estate
Household members:
Geo. H. Chick, 36
F. M. Chick, age 35, housewife, born in Maine
Guy H. Chick, 16, male, born in California
R. A. Chick, 12, male, born in California
M. Chick, 6, male, born in California
Washington State and Territorial Census


    George H. Chick, a Portland real estate agent representing a large amount of capital, was here this week negotiating for the purchase of the Schumpf quartz ledge near Willow Springs, and terms have been agreed upon whereby the former agrees to put up a ten-stamp mill at once to crush the ore now on the dump. The purchasing parties say the regular run of rock assays $22 per ton and they look for big returns.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 4, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick, of Portland, a quartz expert, has been in town on business. He speaks quite favorably of the Schumpf and other ledges.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick, who is operating the Jacobs quartz mill, near Henley, under his new process of extracting the gold from stubborn ores, reports the mill running successfully and yielding satisfactory results. He was in town a day or two this week, and informs us that he intends to have one of the mills put up at Jacksonville within 60 days, on land offered for the purpose by J. A. Cardwell.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 5, 1885, page 3


    By addressing Geo. H. Chick at Henley, Cal., you can arrange for the crushing of any amount of quartz, thereby giving it a practical test--more than an assay usually amounts to.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 6, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick, who is operating one of his quartz mills near Henley, Cal., reports that he is meeting with considerable success in reducing refractory ores. He talks of putting up one of them in Jacksonville.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1885, page 3


    Mr. G. H. Chick visited our town again on yesterday accompanied by Mr. Thomas Ewing of San Francisco, who is a capitalist and is the owner of two large mines in Arizona that are paying $40,000 net per month. He seems to be very favorably impressed with the mines in the vicinity of Jacksonville and will return here again in a short time to engage in mining. Mr. Chick will put up a mill here to work the Enterprise Company's rock and to prospect the quartz of this vicinity.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 27, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick received his amalgamating pan and fixtures last week for the Morse & Jacobs quartz mill at Henley, Cal., which will soon be shipped to the mill for testing ore on hand.
    A number of citizens of Jacksonville and vicinity are about investing in a quartz mill, such as are in common use in Shasta County, Cal., and which have a capacity of crushing five tons of quartz per day. Nothing at this time would be of greater importance and benefit than such a mill and we hope that no time will be lost in securing it. It would give those who have quartz ledges a cheap method of determining what is in them, something which is highly needed.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 10, 1885, page 3


    [In Portland] reduction works were talked of, but the projectors don't see a certainty of doubling their money the first year and so hold back.
"No Employment for Labor," Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 15, 1885, page 2


    . . . I desire to ask what has become of the building of the proposed reduction works that was being talked of here last winter. There is certainly no one thing that could be done that would do so much to develop the mining interests of Oregon as this, and would unquestionably be a good-paying investment for those putting their their money into it. I sincerely hope that this most important project has not been abandoned.
E. W. ALLEN
Excerpt, "Mineral Specimens Wanted," letter to the editor, Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 25, 1885, page 3

    Geo. H. Chick is milling a large quantity of rebellious ores with his new process in Scott Valley, Cal.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1885, page 3


    There is now a project for getting a quartz mill costing about $6,000 for which George H. Chick is agent. The offer is a liberal one.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 22, 1885, page 3


    SEATTLE, W.T., Aug. 24--All the county officers were nominated excepting Wm. H. Hughes as assessor and Mrs. Florence Chick as school superintendent. The remaining county and precinct officers were nominated, the convention taking the utmost care that all the officers should be solid for [in favor of] forfeiture.
Excerpt, "Declared for Forfeiture," Morning Oregonian, Portland, August 24, 1885, page 1


    Geo. H. Chick offers to put a first-class quartz mill in this section very cheap.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1885, page 3


    It is reasonably certain that a quartz mill will be in operation in this vicinity before the end of the year. Such an enterprise would not only be remunerative, but of incalculable benefit to our county.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1885, page 3


GOLD & SILVER ORES
WORKED.
$5 Per Cent, of Fire Assay.
AT
MORSE & JACOB'S MILL
25 Miles from Ashland.
HAVING LEASED the above named mill and at great expense put in my
SUCCESSFUL PROCESS
FOR WORKING
Rebellious Ores and Sulphurets
    I will be prepared on or after May 20th, 1885, to work any ore in Southern Oregon, 85 per cent, of fire assay.
    Parties having Gold and Silver Mines developed, so as to show in sight, the value of my process, can have work put on the same with my process, and the pay for such works taken from the mine, PROVIDING the parties will ship five or more tons of the average ore from such mine to my works in Henley, and have it worked by my process, which I agree to work 85 per cent, or make no charge for working same.
Talk is Cheap, but Results
Tell the Story.
                            GEO. H. CHICK, Agent.
Henley, Siskiyou County, Cal.                  
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 19, 1885, et seq., page 3


    Geo. H. Chick and his engineer are in the valley and submitted a scheme to the citizens of Medford to put up a quartz mill, which is now in Siskiyou County, at that place [sic], providing they would furnish him the necessary land and also purchase the five-eighths interest in said mill owned in California. A public meeting was held Tuesday evening to consider the matter, and Mr. C. informs us that his proposition was accepted. The mill will be brought over at once.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1885, page 3


    The Enterprise Mining Co. of this place this week sent a quantity of rock from their mine to Henley, Cal., where George H. Chick will give it a mill test. The owners of this time still have faith in its paying qualities, and the present mode of procedure will show what there is in the rock.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 10, 1885, page 3


    The project of putting up a quartz mill at Medford has been abandoned, and Mr. Chick proposes putting it up in this vicinity, if he can get enough inducements. A mill would be of vast benefit to Jacksonville in more ways than one.
    What this section needs more than anything else is a first-class quartz mill to work the ores of the ledges already discovered, many of which will pay well. Everything possible should be done to get one, for there is no calculating the benefit it will be. There is no doubt but what we have good quartz in Jackson and Josephine counties, but we must prove it before we can expect any amount of foreign capital to be invested here.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick now proposes to put a quartz mill at Medford, it is reported.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 16, 1885, page 3


    It seems as if the people of Medford have accepted Geo. H. Chick's proposition to bring his quartz mill to this county, and a committee has gone to Siskiyou to inspect the situation and probably bring the machinery over.
    Somebody seems to be throwing cold water on the different projects which have been conceived to bring a quartz mill to Jacksonville. We are very sorry to see this, as there is no calculating the benefit such an enterprise would be.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick is preparing to put up a quartz-crushing machine in Medford, the object being to attract thither for test the quartz from various ledges in the county now being prospected. The site chosen for the mill is near the railroad track a short distance south of the depot. A number of citizens of Medford "put up" for the enterprise.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 30, 1885, page 3


Sulphurets and Sulphuret Sharps.
    A correspondent of the Tuolumne Independent says: The great unknown quantity in gold quartz mines is the value of the sulphurets, and the number of companies who have been ruined by them is very large. They are often fair to look upon, but as often prove deceptive--
"Like Dead Sea fruits that tempt the eye,
But turn to ashes on the lips."
    They are of many kinds and colors. Some are docile, some are rebellious. The sulphurets found in gold quartz mines are chemical compounds of sulphur with iron, lead, zinc, copper, arsenic and antimony. The common pyrites, or sulphurets, are composed of iron and sulphur. Galena is composed of lead and sulphur. Zinc blende, or blackjack, is zinc and sulphur, with a little iron and lead, generally. The brassy-looking pyrites, which are technically called chalcopyrite, are composed of iron, copper and sulphur; and, other kinds of sulphurets are composed of one or more of the metals mentioned above and sulphur.
    When much lead, zinc, arsenic and antimony are present, the sulphurets are called base or refractory, and are very troublesome, requiring roasting as a preliminary step and the use of chemicals in the subsequent grinding processes. The gold which occurs in sulphurets is held there mechanically, and is not chemically combined, like the other elements, and is held just the same as the gold in the quartz, with the exception that the sulphuret gold is smaller and lighter. It can be set free from the pyritic matter containing it either by dissolving the pyrites with acids, or, in the chlorination process, by chlorine gas, which dissolves the gold, or by roasting or burning them, thus driving off all the sulphur, arsenic, antimony or zinc that may be present, and brightening the gold and leaving it in good condition to amalgamate in pans or arrastras; or, lastly, by grinding the sulphurets raw, in pans or arrastras, with quicksilver. Which one of these processes any mine needs has to be determined by the value per ton of the sulphurets, and by the docility of their rebelliousness.
    Some mines produce sulphurets which yield their gold when worked raw, by a grinding process; others hold the gold closer and require chemicals, or else roasting. The problem is how to get the most profit out of them; for, while the chemical processes yield a better percentage of the assay value per ton, they are so expensive that they will not pay as much profit as the cheaper processes, which do not yield as high a percentage of the assay value, and the tendency of the times is now toward the cheaper, or grinding process. In cases where they are base, a preliminary roasting is necessary.
    Pyrites, or sulphurets, are spotted, just as quartz is. Some are rich, some are poor, in the same ore, and no one can tell rich from poor; and anyone who pretends to do so either deceives himself or is a humbug. "A man may smile and smile, and yet be a villain"; and so can the bright shining sulphurets be of no value, or the dark, gloomy ores be rich. The only way to test them is by fire assay, or by roasting them and panning out; and here is where many people are deceived, for they are inclined to think their sulphurets all alike, and if one chute or chimney of ore contains rich sulphurets all their other chutes are likewise rich, which may or may not be the case, and it can be laid down as a rule, the sulphurets want as careful prospecting as the quartz before any correct value can be found.
    About as uncertain as the sulphurets themselves, and often as stubborn and rebellious, is the sulphuret sharp--the man who has a process or processes to get more gold out of sulphurets than is in them. He is a man with a hobby, and often with a crank, as well, and is always finding some wonderful process which turns out to be found, proved, tried everything but true or useful. Processes which look well on paper, or work well on a small scale, fail when tried commercially or practically. They are sound in theory, but ruinous when used practically. Every few years a new sharp finds the true process, and the mining world goes wild over the man who has found the great secret, but somehow or other he fizzles out, and we all go back to first principles, until another new sulphuret meteor flashes across our horizon, and then we all are agog with renewed excitement until he flashes out of sight again.
    Simplicity and cheap handling of sulphurets is what we are tending to, and the simple processes, which do not yield as high a percentage of the sulphurets, yield a better net profit to the miners than the costlier processes, which have a larger percentage of gold. The sooner the whole matter is robbed of the air of mystery that surrounds it the better. To hear one of these deeply, darkly mysterious sulphuret men talk reminds one of the days of alchemy, and carries us back down the centuries to the age of superstition--to the time of magic elixirs of life, and the philosopher's stone, and the humbuggery of the ancient magicians. Let us look at mining in the full daylight of modern science and practical business, and have no more humbug mystery, worthy only the dark ages and the childhood of mining. Let us return to the blanket sluice for a concentrator, and work the blanket tailings in a pan or arrastra, raw, if they are docile, or roast them, as a preliminary, if they are base, and be content with the result; for by striving to get the last cent out of the sulphurets we lose rather than gain. The great army of concentrator and sulphuret sharps, who have afflicted this coast, have caused the loss of millions of dollars with their newfangled plans and experiments, and want to be sent to pot to await the coming of their brothers--the mischievous, gay, deceiving patent quartz mill men--who are now reaping the harvest of the mining greenhorns, which the concentrator and sulphuret men used to look on as theirs. Ruin follows in the wake of all these mining humbugs, and almost every quartz mill, from San Diego to Alaska, shows some of the marks of these new processes and machines which generally get more gold out of the miner's pocket than out of the sulphurets--S.F. Mining and Scientific Press.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 7, 1885, page 2.  The Sentinel apparently chose to reprint this article as a warning about Chick.


    Geo. H. Chick writes to Jas. A. Wilson of this place that he has arrived at Medford from Siskiyou County, Cal., with the quartz mill he disposed of to the citizens of that place, and that it will be in operation in a few days.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885, page 3


    The Chick quartz mill at Medford is ready for business.

    Walsh & Bragdon will send some of the quartz from their Wagner Creek mines to Medford for trial

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 13, 1885, page 3


    The Medford Reduction Works are now in running order and are testing ore from different mines.
    Considerable prospecting is still being done in different portions of Jackson and Josephine counties. When the quartz mills at Jacksonville and Medford are in operations, there will be much more inducement to prospect for quartz.
    Our citizens are subscribing liberally toward the $2,000 bonus that is required to induce Brown & Co. to bring a quartz mill here. In case that sum is raised, first-class machinery of the most improved kind, and valued at $8,000, will be put up at this place or in the immediate vicinity. It is to be hoped that we will not allow another golden opportunity to slip by.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 20, 1885, page 3


    The quartz mill began operations yesterday. Quite a large amount of ore has already been shipped for crushing.
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 20, 1885, page 3


    The Chick quartz mill at Medford is about ready to commence crushing rock.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 21, 1885, page 3


Good Mining Report.
    Messrs. Walsh & Bragdon recently sent to the Medford quartz mill a quantity of rock from which they have received returns as follows: The tailings from the old quartz mill operated a number of years ago yielded at the rate of about $170 to the ton; rock from the "Eva C." ledge went $97 to the ton, and a lot of inferior rock from the outcroppings of the large ledge, the "Pilgrim," went $62 to the ton. The "Pilgrim" is an unusually large lead (7 ft.) and promises exceedingly well. They are now at work upon it and have gone in some ten or fifteen feet, where they are taking out rock which shows much more gold than did the croppings of which a report is given above. The proprietors believe it will go not less than $100 to the ton, perhaps more. They have sent a ton to Medford, to be run through the mill, and will have the returns in a short time. Their water-power arrastra will be ready for operation soon, if the weather does not interfere with work upon it.
Ashland Tidings, November 27, 1885, page 3


    The Medford reduction works are in operation.
"Southern Oregon Mines," Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 3, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick of the Medford Reduction Works was in town Saturday. He informs us that he made assays of ore from the Wagner Creek and other quartz mines, which resulted quite favorably.
    Since it has become a settled fact that a fine quartz mill will be put up in this place, a great deal more prospecting is being done. Work has been commenced on a number of ledges which have been lying dormant for many years.
    Attention is called to the advertisement of the Medford Reduction Works, which are now prepared to test all kinds of ores and make assays promptly; also to reduce any quantity of them and save a considerable percentage of the valuable minerals they contain. Mr. Chick, the superintendent, guarantees satisfaction.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 4, 1885, page 3


M E D F O R D
REDUCTION WORKS!
    ARE NOW SUCCESSFULLY
Running on various kinds of Gold and Silver ores from Jackson and Josephine counties.
    Anyone wanting Practical Working Tests made of
GOLD AND SILVER ORES
Can have the same successfully treated at the
MEDFORD REDUCTION WORKS
At Less Than
San Francisco Prices!
ASSAYING, $2.50.
GEO. H. CHICK.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 4, 1885 et seq., page 3


    The quartz mill is now running on full time.
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 4, 1885, page 3


    The new quartz mill at Medford is now in working order and has commenced crushing rock. Geo. H. Chick is in charge.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 5, 1885, page 3


    The capacity of the Medford quartz reduction works is to be increased to ten tons per day.

    A large quantity of quartz rock from the Walsh & Bragdon mines on Wagner Creek was shipped to the Medford reduction works this week.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 18, 1885, page 3


O.&C. Officials Visit Medford.
From the Monitor.
    A special train bearing Receiver Koehler, Superintendent Brandt and Vice-President W. W. Bretherton arrived in Medford Tuesday morning for the purpose of visiting the Medford Reduction Works, under the management of Mr. George H. Chick. The object of the visit was to learn the capacity of the mill and to offer encouragement to the stockholders and miners in the way of switches at different points on the road, and reduced freight rates on the ore.
    Mr. Chick has practically demonstrated to the stockholders that he can reduce rebellious ores and extract the precious metals, if any, from them. Sufficient paying ore to run a ten-stamp mill is ready. Let us have the stamps. We hope the citizens of Medford who have means will not allow this opportunity to slip by. It is an industry of all others that needs encouragement and support, at least until it is placed upon a paying basis.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 20, 1885, page 7


    Ten tons of ore from the Wagner Creek quartz mines were shipped to Medford yesterday for reduction.
    Money has been raised to purchase stamps for the Medford Reduction Works, and it is expected to have a capacity of ten tons every 24 hours.
    Fourteen hundred pounds of ore from the Wagner Creek quartz mines were tested at the Medford Reduction Works last week and a gold brick worth over $60 was the result, we are informed. Considerable excitement exists in that section in consequence.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 27, 1885, page 3


    Prospecting is being actively prosecuted in the Wagner Creek district, and it is claimed that a ledge has been traced from the Walsh & Bragdon mines for a number of miles toward the backbone of the Siskiyous. The flattering returns from the rock shipped by Walsh & Bragdon to the Medford Reduction Works started a number of Medford people out to secure locations, and a large number of claims have been made.
    Walsh & Bragdon have shipped twenty-six tons of tailings from the old stamp mill to Medford. Operations upon the prospect shaft of their Pilgrim mine also continue, under the direction of Mr. Parsons.
    The new machinery which will increase the capacity of the Medford Reduction Works to ten tons per day was shipped from San Francisco on the 26th ult., and is expected to arrive at Medford next week.
    In the Blackwell district in Willow Springs precinct, seven or eight claims have been "located" within a short time by the Medford men. A switch is to be laid by the railroad company at the most convenient point, and rock will be shipped to Medford in considerable quantities from mines in which work is already under way. McAndrews & Slagle are taking out 100 tons for this purpose, and Ragsdale & Co. are also preparing to ship a large quantity.
"Mining News," Ashland Tidings, January 1, 1886, page 3


Chick Geo H, assayer
Medford Reduction Works Co, Geo H Chick, H E Baker, L Seeley, C S Jenkins proprs
McKenney's Pacific Coast Directory 1886-1887, page 1023


    Medford has turned out "locators" enough to plaster mining claims all over the Wagner Creek hills.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 2, 1886, page 3


    Prospecting is being actively prosecuted in the Wagner Creek district, and it is claimed that a ledge has been traced from the Walsh & Bragdon mines for a number of miles toward the backbone of the Siskiyous. The flattering returns from the rock shipped by Walsh & Bragdon to the Medford reduction works started a number of Medford people out to secure locations, and a large number of claims have been made.
    Walsh & Bragdon have shipped twenty-six tons of tailings from the old stamp mill to Medford. Operations upon the prospect shaft of their Pilgrim mine also continue, under the direction of Mr. Parsons.
    The new machinery, which will increase the capacity of the Medford reduction works to ten tons per day, was shipped from San Francisco on the 26th ult., and is expected to arrive at Medford next week.
    In the Blackwell district in Willow Springs precinct, seven or eight claims have been "located" within a short time by the Medford men. A switch is to be laid by the railroad company at the most convenient point, and rock will be shipped to Medford in considerable quantities from mines in which work is already under way. McAndrews & Slagle are taking out 100 tons for this purpose, and Ragsdale & Co. are also preparing to ship a large quantity.
    M. E. Beatty, a "mining expert" recently from Colorado, and G. W. Howard, of Medford, have located a claim on an extension of the ledge upon which the Cunninghams and Barkdull have recently made such a strike in the Gold Hill district.

"Mining News," Ashland Tidings, January 2, 1886, page 3


FRI. 8.         Weather, Slight frost
    Teams hauling Hay to Mill and lumber away, also hauling quartz to Talent to ship to Medford to be reduced to bullion and thence to coin, but I have not seen any of the Coin as yet.
Diary of Welborn Beeson, January 8, 1886


    There are about four tons daily of gold quartz being delivered at Talent station for shipment to the Medford Reduction Works.

"Talent Items," Ashland Tidings, January 8, 1886, page 3


    The Medford quartz mill is to be enlarged.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 9, 1886, page 3


    The Medford Reduction Works started their stamps Friday. These works can treat ten tons per day, and have had an offer to contract one year's work ahead from one mine, but refuse to contract, as it would go against the development of other mines.
Excerpt, "Southern Oregon Mines,"
Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 14, 1886, page 5


    Tom Reynolds informs us that he brought up in Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express car on yesterday's train the concentrator for the Medford quartz mill. It was a healthy express package, weighing over 1800 lbs.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 15, 1886, page 3


    The improved machinery for the quartz mill at this place arrived on last week's freight and work was resumed the first of this week.
    There is a great excitement here over the quartz discoveries at Gold Hill. Some very rich ledges have already been found. M. E. Beatty located a ledge recently that assays over $900 to the ton. Ragsdale & Co. are engaged in opening the "consolidated mine," which promises to be a very rich ledge, and that section has begun to assume the appearance of "the days of '49."
   
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 15, 1886, page 3


    The stamps for the new reduction works at Medford have arrived and are being put in place.
"News of the Northwest," Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 17, 1886, page 8


    There are about four tons daily of gold quartz being delivered at Talent station for shipment to the Medford Reduction Works.
"Talent Items," Ashland Tidings, January 18, 1886, page 3


    The Medford reduction works started up in full blast at 12 o'clock last night, and has run smooth and nice. The superintendent informed us that they could run twelve tons of ore into bullion every twenty-four hours. This is the only works in Oregon taking the bullion from the rebellious ores.
"Southern Oregon Mines," Oregonian, Portland, January 20, 1886, page 5


    The reduction works at Medford have been started up again, after a suspension of some time to permit the putting in of five stamps, a new concentrator and other machinery. Supt. Chick assures us that the best of work will be done henceforth.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1886, page 2


    The Medford Reduction Works received ten carloads of wood from Grants Pass last week.
    The quartz mill is now running on full time and is crushing ten tons of ore per day.
Ashland Tidings, January 22, 1886, page 3


    The quartz mill is now running on full time and is crushing ten tons of ore per day.
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 22, 1886, page 3


    D. P. Thompson and other Portland capitalists are about starting reduction works at the metropolis on a large scale. Messrs. Koehler and Brandt of the O.&C.R.R., who paid this section a visit recently, seem to be satisfied that Southern Oregon will prove one of its very best customers. [Apparently Chick wasn't associated with the Portland venture.]
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1886, page 2


A TRANSIENT OPPORTUNITY.
    While Portland has been talking about it, while everybody has been suggesting what everybody else ought to do, reduction works have actually been set up and put in operation at Medford in Jackson County. Their capacity is small, it is true, but a beginning has been made and the basis created for a larger establishment. One of the advantages of this kind of enterprise is that in order to add to the capacity of works it is not necessary to throw away the original plant. All that need to be done is to add to it, and even suspension of operations while additions are being made is not necessary. It is reported that other works are to be set up at Jacksonville, and a scheme not yet fully developed is on foot to establish works on a large scale at Spokane Falls or somewhere in the Colville country. Certain capitalists of Puget Sound stand ready to set up similar works at Seattle when the Cascade division is built, provided the opportunity still remains.
    Some of these schemes may come to nothing, but it is quite certain that unless Portland takes advantage of her chance, and quite soon too, the chance will be gone. Portland is in a position just now to become the depot of the great mining region hereabout, and there ought certainly to be enterprise and spirit enough here to grasp the opportunity.
Oregonian, Portland, January 24, 1886, page 4



    The quartz mill is working well and is crushing a considerable quantity of ore.
    The last freight train brought 75 cords of wood for the reduction works here from Grants Pass, and still there is an abundance of excellent wood within a few miles of this place.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1886, page 3


    Fred Grob of this place will send a ton of quartz from his mine to Medford next week to give it a mill test. He has a large lot of rock on the dump, all of which prospects well.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 30, 1886, page 3


    The Medford quartz mill is now running on full time and is crushing ten tons of ore per day.
"Southern Oregon Mines," Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 3, 1886, page 4


    Geo. H. Chick had the misfortune to cut his wrist quite severely with a chisel one day last week. It is a painful, though not serious, wound.
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 5, 1886, page 3


    The Medford Reduction Works has been using wood shipped on the railroad from Grants Pass.
    The quartz mill belonging to Morris & Jacobs, put up by Geo. H. Chick at Vacent's [Vincent's?], near mouth of Indian Creek, Siskiyou County, has been taken down and will be moved to Humbug, to be used at some good-paying ledges lately discovered at that place.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 5, 1886, page 3


    A new engine will be added to the quartz mill in a few days, and it will then be able to crush more ore than it has heretofore.
    Geo. H. Chick had the misfortune to cut his wrist quite severely with a chisel one day last week. It is a painful, though not serious, wound.
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 5, 1886, page 3


    Thirty tons of tailings from Wagner Creek mines were worked on at the Medford mill last week and $1,200 taken.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 6, 1886, page 3


    The report in the Medford Monitor that thirty tons of the tailings from the old quartz mill on Wagner Creek had yielded $1200 at the Medford Reduction Works was entirely erroneous.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 12, 1886, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick, of the Medford quartz mill, was in town Tuesday, and displayed some very rich rock from the strike in the Gold Hill district, reported some time ago.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, February 19, 1886, page 3


NEEDS A BALANCE WHEEL.
    The Medford Monitor stated some time ago that thirty tons of tailings from the old quartz mill on Wagner Creek yielded $1200 at the reduction works. By the proprietors of the mine, the Tidings was informed that this statement was erroneous, and it said so--simply that and nothing more. The engineer of the Monitor, evidently suffering with a sore head or a disordered imagination, takes this as an insult, and in about a half-column of froth and "swash" charges the Tidings with slurring the Medford quartz mill, "belittling Medford as an enterprising center," and calling him a liar. It is surprising that, while the fit was upon him, he didn't convict the Tidings of high treason against the United States of America, and sentence it to annihilation at once. From the ridiculous he descends to contemptibility when he hints darkly that "it is rather dangerous to tell a brother editor that he lies knowingly and willfully." Possibly it might be serious in his case. If he is wrought into such a fever by simply being told that he has made an "erroneous" statement, the chances are that it would throw him into convulsions that might prove fatal. Nevertheless, should occasion require it, the Tidings will not hesitate to perform this "dangerous" duty.
    The yield of the rock in question is a matter of some public interest in this neighborhood, and the report that it was about $40 a ton naturally excited much comment. When Messrs. Walsh & Bragdon found that it did not reach one-tenth that figure, the public was entitled to know it, and the idea that the simple statement in the Tidings was intended to injure any enterprise, any place or any man is too preposterous for anyone of ordinary common sense to conceive. The facts are simply these. The manager of the reduction works tested a small quantity of the reduced ore before Mr. Walsh at the mill, and the result pointed to a yield of from $35 to $40 per ton. The Monitor man was informed of this and figured out that thirty tons would yield $1200. He stated that thirty tons had yielded that sum. The fact is, the quantity of rock was less than twenty tons, and the returns received by Walsh & Bragdon were less per ton than one-tenth what the Monitor stated. The Tidings is not disposed to be misrepresented even by the Monitor, and if that paper, or any moving spirit behind it, wishes to pursue this matter further, we have a good stock of facts in store which may be pertinently used.
Ashland Tidings, February 26, 1886, page 2


    Several tons of rock were hauled to the Medford mill this week from Applegate, but we have not yet heard the result of the test.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 27, 1886, page 3


    Chick should take the little man of the Monitor on his knee and explain to him the difference between quartz rock and tailings.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 12, 1886, page 3


    A short time ago Ragsdale & Co., who own quartz mining property in Willow Springs precinct, published a card in the Jacksonville paper stating that they had selected a sackful of average ore from one of their mines and had it tested at the Medford Reduction Works. The returns given them by Mr. Chick indicated a yield of $53.18 per ton in gold and silver. They they sent tons of rock from the same mine to the reduction works, and received from Chick only $3 per ton, from which experience they deduced and announced the opinion that either Chick had given a false report at first, or else he cannot extract gold from sulphurets, as he claims to, or he pocketed part of the proceeds of the rock. Chick last week began a damage suit for libel against Ragsdale & Co., claiming the modest little sum of $20,000 for the injury to his valuable reputation.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 2, 1886, page 3


    Geo. Chick, Sup't. of the Medford Reduction Works, brought suit today against C. C. and J. F. Ragsdale for the sum of $20,000. This is a small sum, considering the offense, even if Mr. Chick succeeds in compelling Messrs. Ragsdale to pay the full amount.--Monitor.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 3, 1886, page 3


    George Chick, superintendent of the Medford Reduction Works, has brought suit against C. C. and J. F. Ragsdale for the sum of $20,000. The suit is for damages, claimed from the latter for the publication of an article accusing the Medford Reduction Works of embezzling a portion of the gold ore brought there for reduction.
"News of the Northwest,"
Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 4, 1886, page 6


M E D F O R D
Reduction  Works
ARE NOW PREPARED TO WORK
Gold and Silver Ores
IN SOUTHERN OREGON.
--AND SOLICIT--
A Share of the Patronage.
GEO. H. CHICK, ------ SUPT.
Grants Pass Courier, April 9 through May 28, 1886, page 2


    Some quartz is being hauled to Medford from George Schumpf's mine to give it a further test.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 10, 1886, page 3


    The following proceedings have taken place in this court since the last issue of the Sentinel:
    Geo. H. Chick vs. C. C. and J. F. Ragsdale; action for damages. On trial.
Excerpt, "Circuit Court Proceedings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 15, 1886, page 2


    The reduction works at Medford are working ores from different sections of the state. These works, under the management of Geo. H. Chick, are proving very successful.
"Jackson County News," Grants Pass Courier, June 18, 1886, page 3



    J. W. Walsh has leased the Medford quartz mill and moved it to the Hope ledge on Wagner Creek, owned by himself, H. T. Bragdon and others, and will have it running upon rock from that ledge within a few days. It is understood that Mr. Walsh will buy the mill if it is found to answer his purpose.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 23, 1886, page 3


    The Chick quartz mill, which was moved over to Wagner Creek from Medford, began running Wednesday morning on rock from the Hope ledge.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 6, 1886, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick, formerly of the Medford quartz mill, is now operating in Siskiyou County.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, September 17, 1886, page 3


    G. H. Chick vs. C. C. and J. F. Ragsdale, action for damages. H. K. Hanna allowed to withdraw as attorney for plaintiff.
"Circuit Court Proceedings,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 8, 1886, page 2


    Geo. H. Chick vs. C. C. and J. F. Ragsdale; action for damages. Continued for term.
"Circuit Court Proceedings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 16, 1886, page 3


    In 1885 a Mr. Chick built a small but very complete test mill at Medford, a station on the Oregon & California Railroad, favorably located for access to the quartz claims of Jackson County. Its operations were probably not very successful. The mill was propelled by steam, and the machinery consisted of a five-stamp battery with 500-pound stamps, a concentrating device, tanks and two amalgamating pans of small capacity. Operations ceasing at the mill, the little battery has been removed to the Pilgrim Ledge, on Wagner Creek, where it is in active use.
Excerpt, "Our Mines," Morning Oregonian, Portland, November 11, 1886, page 3


Two Valuable Inventions
[Yreka Journal]
    Mr. Geo. H. Chick, of this city, has invented a silver plate for apron to battery of [a] quartz mill, with metallic chambers that cause the plate to attract gold and silver, as a magnet will attract iron. Sulphurets and iron will pass over the plate without adhering to it. The metallic chambers can be attached to old plates with same result, and cause no loss to those having them. Below this plate are a set of silver-plated riffles, with pockets for quicksilver and amalgam, which is kept in active motion by water passing through perforated pipes. Quicksilver or amalgam cannot pass the riffles no matter how great the pressure of water. This invention is also valuable for placer mining as well as quartz mining, and from an examination of both inventions as shown us by the miniature models, we are inclined to the belief that they cannot fail to prove practical. The inventions will soon be placed on the market, and no charge will be made, if they fail to perform the work claimed by the inventor.
Ashland Tidings, December 3, 1886, page 1   The article ran in the Journal's November 24 issue. I found no further mention of Chick in the Journal before or after December 3.


    George H. Chick, a mining expert, formerly a resident of this city, now of Yreka, Cala., has invented a silver plate for apron to battery of quartz mill, with metallic chambers that causes the plate to attract gold and silver as a magnet will attract iron. Sulphurets and iron will pass over the plate without adhering to it. The metallic chambers can be attached to old plates with the same result, and cause no loss to those having them. Below this plate are a set of silver-plated pocket riffles, with pockets for quicksilver and amalgam, which is kept in active motion by water passing through perforated pipes. Quicksilver or amalgam cannot pass the riffles, no matter how great the pressure of water. This invention is also valuable for placer mining as well as quartz mining. The Yreka Journal speaks highly of the new invention.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 11, 1886, page 2


    The mining property of J. W. Walsh and wife, situated on Wagner Creek, has been attached by G. H. Baker of Medford, who sold them the quartz mill formerly used by the Medford reduction works.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick is down at Redding proposing to put up one of his patent furnaces for the working of rebellious ores, the Press says. He doesn't seem to plant his works very firmly in any one locality.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 24, 1886, page 3


    The mining property of J. W. Walsh and wife, on Wagner Creek, has been attached by G. H. Baker of Medford, who sold them the quartz mill formerly used by the Medford Reduction Works.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, December 31, 1886, page 3


Two Valuable Inventions.
    Mr. George H. Chick, of this city, has invented a silver plate for apron to battery of quartz mill [sic], with metallic chambers that causes the plate to attract gold and silver,as a magnet will attract iron. Sulphurets and iron will pass over the plate without adhering to it. The metallic chambers can be attached to old plates with same result, and cause no loss to those having them. Below this plate are a set of silver-plated riffles, with pockets for quicksilver and amalgam, which is kept in active motion by water passing through perforated pipes. Quicksilver or amalgam cannot pass the riffles no matter how great the pressure of water is. This invention is also valuable for placer mining as well as quartz mining, and from an examination of both inventions as shown us by the miniature models, we are inclined to the belief that they cannot fail to prove practical. The inventions will soon be placed in the market, and no charge will be made if they fail to perform the work claimed by the inventor.--Yreka. (Cal.) Journal.
   
Mr. George H. Chick alluded to above is supposed to be the George Chick who was formerly in business in Boise, a brother-in-law of Mr. John Huntoon, and who erected the brick building in which the post office is now located. Owing to Mr. Huntoon's absence, it could not be ascertained for certain whether this was our former resident or not.
Idaho Statesman, Boise, December 2, 1886, page 3


   
Mr. Chick of Chico is here with the view of putting up one of his patent furnaces for the working of rebellious ores. One has been erected at Yreka and gives good satisfaction. It is claimed that Mr. Chick's process is equal to the Denver works. If this is so, mine owners can save a great deal of money, as thousands of tons of ore go to Denver annually from Shasta County. Mr. Chick proposes to build his works in Redding.
"Mining Notes," Republican Free Press, Redding, California, December 18, 1886, page 3



THE PORTLAND REDUCTION WORKS.
    For the purpose of inaugurating the industry of the treatment of ores in this city, a number of our wealthy men incorporated, August 17, 1886, the Portland Reduction Works, for the sampling, assaying, smelting and refining of gold, silver and lead ores. The officers are: W. S. Ladd, president; W. A. Jones, vice president; James Steel, treasurer; J. M. Arthur, secretary. The company has erected a smelter in East Portland, with a capacity of twelve hundred tons per month. New stacks will be erected as rapidly as the supply of ore procurable will justify. A refinery will be constructed during the present year. All the works are substantially constructed, and all the appointments are such as to insure the best possible results in the treatment of ores. For smelting, the company guarantees ninety percent of lead contents and ninety-five percent of silver. In order to promote the development of ore supplies, the company will make no charge for sampling and assaying lots of not less than one hundred pounds, the freight upon which has been prepaid. Smelting charges will be moderate, and returns made promptly, based upon current New York prices. Ore will be sampled and assayed in lots of from three to ten tons, at $2.50 per ton; from one to three tons, at $4.00 per ton; lots of less than one ton, $6.00. Each lot of ore is run through an automatic sampling machine, which insures an average assay of the whole.
    The problem of smelting is a complicated one, owing to the wide divergence in the character of the ores to be smelted. In ores from different ledges, the number and proportionate quantity of baser metals present vary so widely that the services of an expert chemist and metallurgist are constantly required. It was a want of appreciation of this fact, which, in the early days of quartz mining, caused so many disastrous failures, and for a long time caused quartz mining to be looked upon with disfavor. So many were these failures that the effort to develop a quartz lode was considered a gambling enterprise, where success meant riches and failure ruin. The truth of the matter is that quartz mining and reduction of ores is a question of science and not of luck. Ignorance has sunk millions of dollars in this business, and intelligent skill has taken millions more out of it. The great element of uncertainty in mining is the original prospecting of a ledge to ascertain the nature, extent and permanence of its ore. Science may be able to offer a good opinion of the value of a quartz ledge by an examination of the outcroppings; but this opinion is by no means infallible, and nothing but the actual sinking of a shaft and the running of tunnels on the ledge can definitely settle the question. Since this fact has been learned, there have been fewer failures in quartz mining, since the erection of mills to treat the ores of a particular ledge is now delayed until the exact nature and extent of those ores is ascertained. In other words, mining is now conducted on as conservative and careful business principles as any other industry.
    The process of smelting is required for the reduction of base ores, those containing an admixture of a number of the minor metals. For this reason, as the necessary facilities for such a treatment of ores can not be had in the mining districts as cheaply as in such a commercial center as Portland, the operation of smelters here, where various grades of ore, from widely separated districts, may be brought together for treatment, can be made a very profitable business. Smelting involves the fusing of the ores into a molten mass, composed of the melted metal on the one hand, and a fusible slag on the other. The former is drawn off and cast into bullion bars, while the latter is waste, and is used for filling in low lands in the vicinity of the works. The process depends upon the formation of the slag from the base material associated with the metals. When ores do not themselves possess the necessary constituents, these ingredients, such as limestone, iron, etc., must be added, as a flux, to produce the desired result. For this purpose, the company can draw upon the limestone quarries of Southern Oregon and Puget Sound, and can procure the iron ores required at Oswego, but a few miles from the works. Enormous quantities of fuel, such as coke and charcoal, are required. The former is brought from Cardiff, Wales, and from Puget Sound. Charcoal, which the company will use for the present, can be burned at many points along the lines of railway convenient for shipment to the works. In the matter of fuel of this character, a smelter here has a great advantage over one located in a region not possessing such a wealth of timber as covers our hills and mountains.
Excerpt, The West Shore, January 1887, page 63.  Chick was apparently not associated with this incarnation of the Portland Reduction Works.


The New Reduction Works.
    On Thursday last our local visited the new reduction works now being erected just below the gas works, and found Mr. Chick with some half-dozen men busy at work grading and laying a foundation for the furnace in a building erected for the purpose on the brow of the hill. On the bank of the creek will be the concentrating room, next above the pan room, next the pulp room, and above all the furnace and rock-breaker, making a perfect fall all the way down, so that there need be no handling of the ore. The machinery is expected today, and active operations will be commenced. Mr. Chick had put up a small furnace and was engaged in sampling ore for customers, among them Messrs. Copeland & Co., which came out very promising, and they expect to put up works on their mine.
Republican Free Press, Redding, California, January 8, 1887, page 3


Redding Reduction Works.
    At a meeting of the stockholders of the Redding Reduction Works held at their office last Thursday evening, the following members were elected for the present year: President, S. P. Fillman; Vice President, Dr. J. H. Miller; Treasurer, R. M. Saeltzer; Secretary, W. R. Conant. The meeting then adjourned to the call of the president. At a meeting of the directors held the same evening, Geo. H. Chick was appointed Superintendent and General Manager for the year 1887. This company has a capital stock of one million dollars divided into one thousand shares, par value ten dollars per share; all of which is paid up. The object of the company is to buy sulphurets ore, and to build plants upon all mines working under the Chick patent rights for the state of California.
    Those having mines within easy hauling distance can, after having ore assayed and valued, bring it to the main works at this place and receive their coin according to its valuation.
    Already several offers have been made to some of the stockholders for purchases at par, and considerable interest is being manifested by mining men, both at home and abroad, in the success of this great auxiliary to mining enterprises.
Republican Free Press, Redding, California, January 29, 1887, page 3


    The Chick reduction works have been satisfactorily tested. Ores from various mines have been tried by the new process with gratifying success. The company has been so much encouraged that it has commenced the erection of a new furnace of fifteen-ton capacity.
"Mining Notes," 
Republican Free Press, Redding, California, February 12, 1887, page 3


    At a meeting of the stockholders of the Redding Reduction Works held at their office last Thursday evening, the following officers were elected for the present year: President, S. P. Fillman; vice-president, J. H. Miller; treasurer, R. M. Saeltzer; secretary, W. R. Conant. At a meeting of the directors held the same evening, Geo. H. Chick was appointed superintendent and general manager for the year 1887. This company has a capital stock of one million dollars, divided in one hundred thousand shares, par value ten dollars per share, all of which is paid up. The object of the company is to buy sulphuret ore, and to build plants upon all mines working under the Chick patent rights for the State of California.--California Exchange.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 18, 1887, page 2


    Superintendent Chick of the new reduction works reports that, in consequence of the great demand to have ore worked, he has been compelled to increase the plant to double its former capacity, and for the present to restrict shipments. Another furnace is being erected, and the railroad company have promised to put in a sidetrack for the works.
"Mining Notes," Republican Free Press, Redding, California, February 19, 1887, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick, formerly of Medford, but now superintendent of the Redding Reduction Works, will shortly launch a new mining journal, which is to be devoted to the interests of northern California. There is room for such a paper if Mr. Chick makes it a reliable authority on mines. Ten thousand copies will be issued monthly for free distribution.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1887, page 2


    George H. Chick's new mining journal was issued yesterday. It is devoted entirely to our mining resources, and is a creditable sheet. The large number of 10,000 copies will advertise this county considerably.
Republican Free Press, Redding, California, March 12, 1887, page 2


    Geo. H. Chick went to San Francisco last Sunday to superintend the shipping of the new machinery required for increasing the capacity of the new reduction works, the last piece of which is now on the way. He returned on Thursday.
"Mining Notes," Republican Free Press, Redding, California, March 12, 1887, page 3


    NEW PAPER.--The Redding Mining Journal is the name of a monthly publication, the first issue of which has just appeared, and which paper is to be devoted to the mining interests of Northern California and Southern Oregon. Its owner and publisher is George H. Chick, and its editor J. W. Malone. The paper has four pages of five columns each, and the initial number presents a healthful and promising appearance.
Sacramento Daily Union, March 15, 1887, page 2



    We have received the first number of the Redding Mining Journal, issued by Geo. H. Chick, formerly of this county, which announces that it will be devoted to the mining interests of northern California and southern Oregon. It claims a circulation of 10,000 and is well filled with news.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1887, page 3


    The libel suit brought by G. H. Chick against J. F. Ragsdale for $20,000 was dismissed on Wednesday last, with costs on plaintiff.

    The suit of Chick vs. Ragsdale, instituted for damages done by the latter to the reputation of the former, has been dismissed at the plaintiff's cost. That Mr. Chick had a reputation here no one will for a moment deny, but just how that reputation could be injured by Mr. Ragsdale or anyone else we cannot conceive. Perhaps Mr. Chick desired money with which to gain a new and better one. We hope so at least.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 19, 1887, page 3


    The Redding Reduction Works have been running night and day upon ore from various mines. One lot from Litten & Bennett's mine, Igo, yielded splendid results. Ore has also been worked from Butterfield & Griffith's ledge on Olney Creek; fifty tons from the Texas and Georgia, Old Diggings; ore from Scroggins' mine, Round Mountain; and ore furnished by Jos. Gage from Salt Creek. The process seems to be the correct one for all kinds of ore, and the cheapness of working is really remarkable.
"Mining Notes," Republican Free Press, Redding, California, March 19, 1887, page 3


Case Dismissed.
    The case of Chick vs. Ragsdale was dismissed in the circuit court last week at plaintiff's cost. Mr. Ragsdale criticized Chick's management of the Medford Reduction Works in caustic but correct terms, in an article in the Times [now lost] during the forepart of 1886, and the latter--more for effect than for anything else--instituted a libel suit against them. After due meditation Chick probably came to the conclusion that there was more truth than poetry in what his accusers said, and wisely allowed his case to drop. Messrs. Ragsdale are among our best citizens and are always ready to maintain what they say.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1887, page 3


    The new furnace at the Redding Reduction Works is working like a charm, and is kept at work night and day. Between three and four o'clock Friday morning, directly after the fire at the sawmill, John Cymbell, who was on the night shift, observed several men prowling around the works in a very suspicious manner and warned them off. Are fire fiends abroad? The mill will start up next Monday, and not stop night or day unless for repairs. Everything is now fixed in good working order, and the finishing and touches are being put on today.
"Mining Notes," Republican Free Press, Redding, California, March 26, 1887, page 3


    At the Redding Reduction Works a very busy scene is presented. They are engaging in working ores from different points, and teams are hauling from the Texas and George mine in Old Diggings. The chief advantage of Mr. Chick's patent process seems to be speed and economy. The first enables him to reduce ores at a small price per ton and the latter enables him to save every particle of gold. The system seems to be perfect, and we are satisfied that these works are already a success.
"Mining Notes," Republican Free Press, Redding, California, April 2, 1887, page 3


    The Redding Reduction Works, says the Journal, are now running day and night under the management of our old friend, Geo. H. Chick, who assays ores at eastern prices, and also buys ores and sulphurets. With a branch railroad to town, and special rates charged for shipping quartz, sulphurets and tailings, it would no doubt pay well to send them to Redding. The railroad route is from 8 to 12 or 15 miles from any of our quartz ledges except those at Henley and vicinity.
"Mining Notes," Republican Free Press, Redding, California, April 9, 1887, page 3   I was unable to find any further mention of Chick or the Redding works in the Free Press.


    The first session of the Women's Christian Temperance Union of Western Washington met in the Congregational Church, June 21, 1887, and was called to order by Mrs. A. M. Weed, president of the local union. Prominent in the exercises were the following ladies of Seattle: Mrs. A. M. Weed, Mrs. Hanson, Mrs. Peterson, Mrs. Olander, Mrs. Parkhurst, Miss Bertha D. Piper, Mrs. Greene, Mrs. Chick, Mrs. Guye, Mrs. Hill and Mrs. Reeves.
History of Seattle from the Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Clarence Bagley, 1916


    Mr. Chick, of the Redding Reduction Works, is making quite an extended trip to San Francisco.
"Mining Stocks," Daily Alta California. San Francisco, July 2, 1887, page 2



A Chick Again on the Wing.
    Geo. H. Chick, who has bilked nearly everybody having anything to do with him, is making himself quite scarce around Redding, the scene of his last magnificent (?) mining scheme. He left this county mourned by many confiding creditors, which seemed to be the case everywhere. Chick knows nothing about mining and is a fraud of the first water. We warn the public against him.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1887, page 3


Florence Hyde Chick vs. George H. Chick
    In the District Court of the Third Judicial District of Washington Territory; holding terms at Seattle, in the County of King, in and for the counties of King and Kitsap.
Florence Hyde Chick, Plaintiff,
    vs.
George H. Chick, Defendant.
    To the Honorable Richard A. Jones, Judge of said Court:
        The plaintiff, Florence Hyde Chick, avers:
1.
    That the said plaintiff and defendant are husband and wife; and were married in Idaho Territory on the 23rd day of October 1867, and lived together as husband and wife from that time until the year 1882.
2.
    That during all of said time and ever since said plaintiff has fully discharged her duty in every respect as wife of said defendant.
3.
    That during said time there were born to plaintiff and defendant three children, to wit: Guy Chick, aged 18 years; Ralph Chick, aged 15 years; and Morris Chick, aged 9 years.
4.
    That for the four years last past the said defendant has failed to make suitable provision, or any provision, for the support and maintenance of the said plaintiff and the said children. That during said four years the said defendant has furnished the plaintiff no provisions, clothing or money for the support, education and maintenance of the said plaintiff and the said plaintiff's children, with the exception of $250.00 in money; and that said $250.00 so furnished was wholly insufficient to support or maintain the said plaintiff or the said children.
5.
    That the said defendant without cause wholly deserted and abandoned the said plaintiff in the year 1883; and has ever since and still continues to desert and abandon said plaintiff.
6.
    That during all of said time the said plaintiff has had the care, custody and control of the said children; and educated and supported the same.
7.
    That during all of said time the said plaintiff has been and is now a resident of King County, Washington Territory.
    Wherefore plaintiff prays for a decree dissolving the bonds of matrimony now and heretofore existing between the plaintiff and said defendant; and that said plaintiff be released from all obligations thereof. And that the said plaintiff have the care and custody of said children; and for such other and further relief, including costs, as the Court in the premises is competent to give.
Green, McNaught, Hanford and McGraw
Attorneys for the Plaintiff.
Complaint filed August 30, 1887. George H. Chick appeared at a hearing on May 2, 1888 but did not contest the complaint; Judge Jones granted the divorce two days later, assigning court costs to Chick.


   
Superintendent Chick, of the proposed National City reduction works, will put a force at work today grading the grounds, and will continue operations until the work is finished. Carl Stevens, the man who is the prime mover in the enterprise, has telegraphed from San Francisco, where he now is, that he has to have a part of the machinery manufactured, and that he will return in about ten days.

"National City," San Diego Union, August 2, 1888, page 1



    From the National City Record:  Ever since the establishment of the National City Sampling Works Superintendent George H. Chick is having a busy time of it. Consignments of ore arrive daily and the furnaces are kept going steadily.
    The richest rock handled so far came from San Bernardino county and panned out $720 to the ton. Among the other samples of worked ore, one lot from J. E. Thomas, San Diego county, gold and silver. $63 50 per ton; one lot from Mr. Jones, San Bernardino county, gold and silver, $72 90 per ton ; one lot from Mr. Ashenfelter, San Bernardino county, gold, $110 per ton, and two lots from B. Lake, Daggett, Cal., silver, $83 90, and gold, $78 50 per ton.
    The workmen engaged on the excavation for the foundation of the Reduction Works struck a narrow vein of black sand bearing gold last week. Superintendent Chick made an assay of some of it and found that it contained gold amounting to twenty-five dollars per ton. When the news spread that a gold mine had been discovered right inside the city limits, many hastened to the spot to secure claims, but after a flour sack full of sand had been gathered, the pocket proved to be exhausted and the whole find netted the discoverer only about six dollars.
Daily Alta California. San Francisco, September 24, 1888, page 2


    In answer to a question by Prof. Coffey, Mr. Kimball stated that the reduction works at National City would have a sufficient capacity to handle the ore and metal brought up from Mexico by the steamer. Mr. Chick was suggested as the most suitable person to send to the west coast of Mexico in the interest of the reduction works.
"Mexican Commerce," San Diego Union, September 30, 1888, page 1


    Superintendent Chick of the reduction works says that his sampling establishment is largely patronized by miners from San Bernardino County or from Lower California. On Saturday night he was visited at 10 o'clock by parties who desired some ore tested, and he now has more on hand than he can attend to with his present facilities. The machinery for the 20-ton establishment is expected in about two weeks, and the work on the large works is steadily progressing. Colonel Lucas, an Arizona man, largely interested in the establishment in this city, is expected to arrive here today.

"National City," San Diego Union, October 1, 1888, page 5



    Superintendent Chick of the reduction works has received word from San Francisco that the machinery for the 50-ton establishment will be shipped on the City of Puebla, which sails October 10. Mr. Chick states that the works will be in operation five days after the arrival of the machinery.
"National City," San Diego Union, October 7, 1888, page 3


RICH GOLD-BEARING DIRT.
    The sensation of the week has been the announcement that rich, gold-bearing dirt has been found on the reduction works ground. For six weeks or more Superintendent Chick has been experimenting with the sand and cement formation on the surface, and he says he has secured an average of $47 per ton. There are streaks of black sand that can easily be worked as a placer, but the best returns are from cement and sand, which is put through a crusher. Mr. Chick says that, if the indications hold out, the dike will pay for the construction of the Coronado road. It is certain that there is gold there, as hundreds of people have seen it washed and crushed out, but the Record would not commend a craze of any great immigration of miners until the value of the find has been determined. Superintendent Chick is doing his best to learn just what there is in the ground, and he will not be slow in announcing just what he discovers.--National City Record.
San Francisco Bulletin,
November 5, 1888, page 4


THE REDUCTION WORKS.
The Machinery Would Not Run on Spiritualistic Principles.
    The change of control of the National City reduction works will be of great advantage to the enterprise. Mr. Chick was unfortunate in his partnership at the outset. The person with whom he associated himself represented that he had a financial backing of $60,000, but it turned out that he had no money at all, and depended on securing it through spiritualistic agencies. The spirits failed to put up the cash, and the gentleman's alleged wealth did not materialize. The works will now be run on business principles and without regard to the money bags of the spirits.
San Diego Union,
January 8, 1889, page 5



    The National City reduction works started up again yesterday under charge of Mr. Chick. The twenty tons of gold ore spoken of in yesterday's issue did not arrive from Lower California, but the schooner carrying it is hourly expected to arrive.
"National City," San Diego Union, January 10, 1889, page 5


    When S. S. Nowlin, B. F. Beall and R. B. Taylor returned from the Inyo County mines, they brought with them a quantity of ore from a new mine that they discovered while away, in San Bernardino County. The ore was left at the Colton reduction works, and Saturday afternoon Mr. Nowlin received from the gold works a brick 4½ inches long, 2¼ inches wide and 1⅛ inches thick, and weighing 3½ pounds. The brick contains with the gold some copper and silver, but Mr. Chick of the reduction works offered them $800 for it. They are very enthusiastic over the find, and this morning S. S. Nowlin, Dr. Nichols and A. B. Cox left by train for the mine, and Elmer Smith, C. E. Watson and another gentleman left for there overland, taking a good supply of provisions.

Riverside Daily Press and Tribune, June 10, 1889, page 3



    G. H. Chick, manager of the Colton Reduction Works, brought to this city today a gold brick which weighed ten pounds and deposited [it] with their treasurer, the Riverside Banking Company. It is the result of a recent reduction of ore.
"Local News," Riverside Daily Press and Tribune, June 14, 1889, page 3


    Yesterday, S. S. Nowlin of this city was appointed manager of the Colton Reduction Works, in place of G. H. Chick, resigned. This morning he had not decided as to whether he would accept the position or not.

"Local News," Riverside Daily Press and Tribune, June 20, 1889, page 3


    The Courier says: "It is rumored that the Colton Reduction Works are about to quit business. Chick, the former superintendent and manager, has left the country, having sold a bar of so-called silver or gold to the Riverside Banking Company which had his stamp on it, valued at $800. He secured $300 on the bar, stating that he would procure the balance when he returned. He then skipped out to San Francisco or elsewhere. The bank sent the bar away and found it to be worth about $50, having been made of various kinds of metal. The mining men of this county have been on to Chick for some time and never placed any faith in the works while he was at the head of it. The company now has no manager or superintendent."

"Local News," Riverside Daily Press and Tribune, June 27, 1889, page 3


A REVOLUTION IN SMELTING.
A COMPANY WITH A CAPITAL STOCK OF $15,000,000 FORMED.
A Small Plant in This City, Operated Secretly for Two Months, Demonstrates Beyond Question the Practicability of a New Method for Smelting Ores--A Plant to Be Erected in This City at a Cost of $250,000--The Parent Organization Will Place Plants in Montana, Colorado and California.

    The company has been organized and articles of incorporation filed of one of the largest enterprises which has yet been undertaken by Kansas City capitalists. Yesterday at Topeka the Chick Short Method Smelting and Refining Company of Kansas City, Kan., with a capital stock of $15,000,000, and the Short Method Smelting Company of Kansas City, Kan., with a capital stock of $500,000, filed its articles of incorporation with the secretary of state.
    The organization of these two companies is the result of an experiment which has been in progress in this city for the past two months. It is the belief of the incorporators that a new process for smelting ores has been discovered which will work a revolution in that industry.
    Two months ago Mr. George H. Chick of San Francisco came to Kansas City at the invitation of a number of Kansas City and Leavenworth capitalists who proposed to him that if he would practically demonstrate that his process of smelting would do what was claimed for it a stock company would be formed to establish plants all over the United States. Mr. Chick claimed for his method that it would work all refractory gold and silver ores without flux at a cost of $3 a ton.
    If this could be done many of the mines which had been abandoned on account of the high duty on flux could be operated at a tremendous profit.
    Mr. Chick came to Kansas City and erected a small plant near Fifth and Bluff streets, at a cost of $2,000. This plant has been secretly operated for the past two months, and every claim of Mr. Chick has been demonstrated. Tests were made on ores from Aspen, Col., and from the Jack Rabbit mine of Arizona, by John H. Krull and Marion R. King of this city. The specimen bars of silver worked from the ore without the aid of flux were placed with the firm of Whiteside & Jarvis, and are now in the safe of that firm.
    The practicability of the method having been demonstrated beyond peradventure, steps were at once taken for the organization of a company. Nelson F. Acers of Leavenworth became interested in the scheme, and through him other Leavenworth parties were induced to take stock. The stockholders of the company are its directors and are as follows: Judge David J. Brewer, Thomas R. Starns and Nelson F. Acers of Leavenworth, George H. Chick of San Francisco, John H. Krull, William H. Whitesides and Marion R. King of Kansas City.
    One lot of ore was sent to Mr. Chick from Montana which could not be worked there and was successfully worked at the miniature plant on Fifth and Bluff streets. On Monday a sample of ore from the Lost Louisiana mine of Arkansas will be worked.
    Mr. George H. Chick was seen at the St. James last night and said: "We have organized with two companies because we will operate a local plant and the other will be general in its operation. Work on the local plant will be commenced this fall. We have decided on a location, but are unwilling to make it public now. However, it will be on the Missouri side. The plant will cost about $250,000 and have an output of from 50 to 100 tons a day. The parent company proposes to establish plants in Montana, Colorado and California. We were unwilling to give any publicity to the scheme until the method had been subjected to a practical test. I am convinced that it will be one of the grandest things for Kansas City that has ever been attempted here. It means that ores can be worked at a cost of $3 per ton instead of $20 and that the United States is absolutely independent of Mexico so far as the duty on flux is concerned."
Kansas City Times, Kansas City, Missouri, September 21, 1889, page 8


Smelting Companies.
    Two charters were filed with the secretary of state last week for smelting and refining works as follows:
    The charters are the Short Method Smelting Company of Kansas City, Kan. Capital stock, $500,000. Directors--David J. Brewer, Thomas R. Starns and Nelson F. Acers, of Leavenworth; Geo. H. Chick, of San Francisco; John H. Krull, Wm. H. Whiteside and Marvin R. King of Kansas City, Mo.
    The Chick Short Method Smelting and Refining Company, of Kansas City, Kan. Capital stock, $15,000,000, in 15,000 shares of $1,000 each. Directors--David J. Brewer, Thomas A. Starns and Nelson F. Acers, of Leavenworth; Geo. H. Chick, of San Francisco; John H. Krull, Wm. M. Whiteside and Marvin R. King, of Kansas City, Mo.
The Wyandott Herald, Kansas City, Kansas, September 26, 1889, page 3


    The charters for two new corporations were recently filed with the Secretary of State, the combined capital stock of which was placed at $15,500,000. The place of business is Kansas City, Kan., and the object is to smelt ores by a short method process recently discovered by George H. Chick, of California. The directors for each company are: David J. Brewer, Thomas R. Starns and Nelson F. Acers, of Leavenworth; George H. Chick, of San Francisco; John H. Krull, William H. Whiteside and Marvin R. King, of Kansas City, Mo.

The Kinsley Graphic, Kinsley, Kansas, October 4, 1889, page 2


    A revolution in the smelting process is promised by Mr. George S. [sic] Chick, of San Francisco, who says that he has got the biggest thing in the world of its kind. He hasn't yet revealed the secret of his process, but an experiment has worked so successfully that he has organized a company that will erect a $250,000 plant in Kansas City for the treatment of ores. Mr. Chick says that his process will work all refractory gold and silver ores without flux at a cost of three dollars per ton. If this is true we can at once discontinue the interesting discussion of the tariff on Mexican lead ores, for we can get along without them.--Las Vegas Optic.
Tombstone Epitaph, Tombstone, Arizona, October 8, 1889, page 3


FIGHTING FOR THE BOY.
The Slusser Lad Placed in the Custody of the Sheriff--
Mr. and Mrs. Slusser Have a Meeting.

    Mr. and Mrs. Slusser, of Los Angeles, who are contesting for the possession of their 13-year-old son, met at the Copeland Hotel yesterday, it being the first meeting they have had since they separated at Los Angeles several months ago. The meeting occurred in the Copeland office, and some very sharp words passed between the two. Mrs. Slusser talked plainly to her husband, told him that he had ruined himself by drinking and gambling, and she wanted nothing more to do with him; she declared that he had no money, could not even support himself, [to] say nothing of the other members of the family, and told him that the suit of clothing which he had on he had purchased with her money. She told him that the children had no love with him, that he was not a fit person to care for them, and asked him to allow her to take the boy without any further trouble and she would educate him and make of him a much better man than his father. Slusser refused to do it, however, and they finally parted.
    The boy is now in the custody of Deputy Sheriff Dumont, who is nominally guarding him at the Copeland, where the lad's mother and aunt are stopping. The mother and the boy are enabled to be together, but the deputy maintains sufficient watch to prevent his being taken from the house. The father called to see the boy but was not permitted to take him out of the sight of the officer.
    Slusser filed his answer in the supreme court yesterday morning. In this he denies that he is a drunkard and a gambler, or spends his subsistence in dissolute living. He relates that he married Joan Slusser at Iola, Kan., in August, 1874, and that they lived together until September 1, 1889, during which time the family was wholly supported by his labor; that on the last named date, being in ill health, he was persuaded by his wife and her sister, M. L. Ludington, to come to Topeka for his health and to obtain work, and that he threw up his job and came to this city, where he has been ever since. He says his wife was to wait until he got work and then he would send for her. He received several letters from her and at length his suspicion was aroused by getting one postmarked Topeka. He alleges that he investigated and ascertained that the plaintiff had for a long time prior to his leaving San Francisco been on intimate terms with one George H. Chick, who "has a wife living in Seattle, is about 50 years of age, and has a family of grown-up children," while the age of the plaintiff is about 32 years.
    The defendant alleges that the plaintiff received letters and money from Chick, who agreed with her to get [the] defendant out of the way by sending him to Topeka; that inside of a week thereafter she left for Kansas City with the eldest girl, leaving the other two children in charge of this aunt; that since her coming she has been stopping at Pleasant Hill and at the St. James in Kansas City, and having constant communication with this man Chick, and permitted him to visit her; that her sister followed her with the other two children, and went with them to Pleasant Hill. Defendant found it out and went over and took the boy, which he claims he had a perfect right to do. He says the whole trouble is that Chick, by professions of affection and regard for plaintiff, and by pecuniary assistance to her, has alienated her affections from him, and that this the court can find out by questioning the children themselves.
    The case will come up for hearing before the supreme court on November 5. In the meantime Mrs. Slusser will remain at the Copeland, and the boy in controversy will also remain there in custody of Officer Dumont.
Topeka Daily Capital, Kansas, October 23, 1889, page 4


IMMENSE SMELTER.
To Be Located in the Sixth Ward of This City Soon.
The Wealthy Chick Company Are the Projectors--The Rock Island Railway
Company Donate a Tract of Land Near Kansas Avenue,
Between Seventh and Pyle Streets--
The Site Selected.

    Institutions of mammoth proportions will make Kansas City, Kansas one of the grandest cities in the West. In a short time there will be located in this city, by the Chick Short Method Smelting and Refining Company, an immense smelter to employ 500 men the first month it is in operation.
    George H. Chick, the patentee and president of the company, was in the city yesterday, accompanied by the following officials of the Rock Island Railway: H. A. Parker, assistant president; M. A. Low, general attorney; June A. Wentz, general southwestern freight agent, and R. W. Day, assistant chief engineer. These gentlemen held a consultation with the mayor and several members of the city council and board of trade late yesterday afternoon, and it was determined to locate the smelter here if the ground could be donated. The Rock Island company realized the importance of the smelter and offered to give two and one-half acres of ground along their tracks in the south side. It will take about ten acres of land which can in all probability be secured. The business men of the city, and especially of the south side, are greatly interested in the enterprise, and the additional land can undoubtedly be procured. The ground offered by the Rock Island company lies just west of the site of the grain elevator to be built. It is near Kansas Avenue and between Seventh and Pyle streets. The location is very desirable.
    The officials of the Rock Island said yesterday that their donation was made with a purely selfish motive. That the business of a smelter of the size of the one proposed would soon pay for the ground.
    A meeting of the representatives of the company, with citizens of this city, was held at Knights of Pythias Hall in the Sixth Ward, at 2 o'clock this afternoon.
    The directors of the company are as follows: William H. Whiteside, John H. Krull and M. R. King, of Kansas City; Judge David J. Brewer, Nelson F. Acers and Thomas R. Starns, of Leavenworth, and George H. Chick, of San Francisco. The same gentlemen constitute the board of directors of the present company. Chick, the patentee, will be manager of the smelter located here.
    The Chick company filed articles of incorporation with the secretary of state September 19, last, with an immense capital stock.
    In order to secure this mammoth enterprise, it will be necessary for the citizens of Kansas City, Kansas, to donate some money to secure ground. They will undoubtedly, as they have in past, respond with alacrity for an enterprise which will more than pay.
Kansas City Gazette, November 22, 1889, page 1


ARMOURDALE'S SMELTER.
The City Expects to Have One in a Short Time--
The Chick Short Method.

    The Chick short method smelting and refining works, an immense institution with a capital stock of $200,000, and giving employment to 300 men, is about to be located in Armourdale. A tract of land has been donated and the company will locate in that city, providing $25,000 worth of stock is subscribed on the west side of the line.
    George H. Chick, patentee of the short method process and president of the company, together with John H. Krull, William Whiteside and M. R. King, other members of the company of this city, held a conference with the business men of Armourdale yesterday afternoon with reference to locating the plant in that city. The officials of the Chicago, Kansas and Nebraska railway company will donate a three-acre tract of land adjoining Seventh Street, and the smelter will be located there providing $25,000 worth of stock is subscribed on the west side of the line. Although the business men were greatly interested in the matter, they were somewhat backward in taking hold of the enterprise. A committee, consisting of Nicholas McAlpine, J. E. Gregg, A. R. Ford and W. A. Pyle, was appointed to investigate the proposition and report at the meeting of the board of trade in Kansas City, Kan., next Monday night. A committee, consisting of Harvey Allen, C. S. Griffin and J. R. Quarles, was appointed to solicit stock.
Kansas City Times, Kansas City, Missouri, November 23, 1889, page 5


    A. W. Rich of the firm of Geo. H. Chick & company of Kansas City now is here introducing their "improved riffle."
"Clifton Cullings," The Western Liberal, Lordsburg, New Mexico, December 13, 1889, page 3


G. H. CHICK
Muffle Furnace for Desulphurizing Ores.
No. 434,502.                                      Patented Aug. 19, 1890.
Patent No. 434,502
To all whom it may concern:
   Be it known that I, George Horatio Chick, of Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Muffle-Furnaces for Desulphurizing Ores, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof.
Excerpt, U.S. Patent Office. Application filed December 27, 1889


IT WILL BE BUILT.
W. C. Bryan of the Chick Short Method Smelting Company Talks.

    Representatives of the Chick Short Method Smelting Company were in the south side yesterday afternoon and talked with the business men about the location of a smelter. W. C. Bryan, one of the company's representatives, stated that the people in this city would not be asked to purchase a single share of stock to the company, and, in fact, the company had no stock for sale on this local plant.
    "It is true that the company intends to build a plant here," said Mr. Bryan, "and work will commence on its construction within sixty years. George H. Chick is in Chicago now purchasing machinery for the works and also for a plant in Old Mexico. We intended to offer some stock in the Old Mexico plant for sale to the south side capitalists but probably will not now do that. The proposition of the Rock Island Railway Company will probably be accepted. The work of construction will begin as soon as the weather will permit."
Kansas City Gazette, Kansas City, Kansas, January 22, 1890, page 1



G. H. CHICK
Ore Riffle.
No. 448,710.                                      Patented Mar. 24, 1891.
Patent no. 448,710
To all whom it may concern:
   Be it known that I, George Horatio Chick, of Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Ore-Riffles, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof.
Excerpt, U.S. Patent Office. Application filed February 8, 1890


THE CHICK SMELTER.
Mr. Chick Says the Works Will be Built in This City.

    Mr. George H. Chick, of the Chick Short Method Smelting Company, is in the city, and he announces that his company will begin work on the proposed smelter in this city within ten days, and that the works will be in operation before winter. Mr. Chick also says the machinery for the plant has been purchased.
Kansas City Gazette, Kansas City, Kansas, July 31, 1890, page 1



Gold and Silver Smelter.
    Geo. H. Chick has a miniature smelter situated just two blocks from Hotel Stilwell, where he can test any kind of gold and silver ore just as successfully as will be done at the large smelter now being built. This small plant has been put in for the purpose of testing a large lot of samples of ore sent here for a practical test by Chicago, New York and St. Louis parties, and came from different parts of the United States. One lot from New Mexico worked $275 in gold and $80 in silver per ton--total per ton $355. One lot from Montana, from Mr. Freed, of St. Louis, worked 300 ounces silver per ton. One lot from Nevada and Pacific Coast worked $60 per ton gold and $15 silver, total per ton $75. One lot from Arizona worked $50 gold and $10 silver, total per ton gold and silver $60. The richest lot of ore worked ran $410 per ton, $380 gold and $30 silver, total 4410. One of the Chicago parties agrees to furnish 50 tons per day, just as soon as the large works are ready for business. Mr. Freed, of St. Louis, says he can furnish 50 tons a day of silver ore just as soon as the works are finished. Mr. Chick has been offered more ore than the works can possibly handle at the start, and will have to enlarge the plant soon after starting up. Our reporter had a special invitation to visit the small plant and meet there a favored few of Mr. Chick's friends. They were allowed to witness the work as it progressed in the different stages. We are not at liberty to publish all we saw, but can say this, that the plant has an ore crusher, an ore grinder, retorts and two furnaces, one furnace for first treating the ore, and the other for smelting and refining. The separating of the gold from silver is done by chemicals, and Mr. Chick thoroughly understands his business, which will be demonstrated to the entire satisfaction of every business man in Pittsburg when the large plant runs, which will surely be done in the near future, and prove to be one of Pittsburg's best industries. The bullion when it comes from the works will be cashed at our banks, as each bar will have its true value stamped upon it, and after it is found that the values correspond with the United States Mint, then any bank in the country will cash the bars, as they are worth more than coins from the fact that they are free from alloy.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, January 14, 1891, page 4


    John F. Varcoe, of Kansas City, treasurer of the Short Method Silver Smelter of this city, departed last night for home after spending a week in the city the guest of George H. Chick. Mr. Varcoe will assume the management of this plant as soon as it is ready for operation. He was here for the purpose of learning the method of operating the plant and the secret work, which was a secret known only to Mr. Chick. Mr. Varcoe has been carefully instructed in the work, and is competent to take charge of the plant, which will soon start up.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, January 16, 1891, page 4


    Geo. H. Chick left this morning for Ft. Scott to spend Sunday with his family.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, January 17, 1891, page 4



    George H. Chick went to Girard this morning to purchase brick to be used in the construction of the furnaces in the silver smelter. The furnaces will be built as soon as the material arrives. Mr. Chick will return tonight.

Pittsburg Headlight,
 Pittsburg, Kansas, February 11, 1891, page 4



In Successful Operation.
    D. O. Johnson, of the firm of Johnson & Seeley, returned home last evening from Denver, Colorado, where he has been for the past three months, superintending the construction of the Pittsburg Short Method Smelting and Refining Company's new concentrating plant, which was completed and started up last Tuesday, and is now in successful operation. Mr. Johnson says the plant is a nice one and is a great advertisement for Pittsburg. Mr. George H. Chick will superintend the new plant, and all concentrates will be shipped to the smelter at this place.
Pittsburg Headlight,
 Pittsburg, Kansas, March 2, 1891, page 1


    Geo. H. Chick informs us that the silver smelter will put in a dynamo and make their own electricity to light their works. They are working early and late, their men have to fire to keep them warm while working.

Pittsburg Headlight,
 Pittsburg, Kansas, March 9, 1891, page 3


    George H. Chick received a letter from T. Molynent, of London, Eng., inquiring about the short method silver smelter process, stating that they want one put in South Wales.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, March 28, 1891, page 4


Silver Smelter Visitors.
    James T. Richie, vice president of the Pittsburg Silver Smelter, extended an invitation to a number of our prominent citizens to visit the smelter yesterday afternoon, and a large number, in fact all who possibly could, responded to the invitation and visited the plant. They were escorted by Geo. H. Chick and James T. Richie through the works and all expressed great surprise at seeing his works spread over about six acres of ground and the immensity of the structure. The contractors are pushing the work as fast as possible, but they have a great amount of work to do yet. The chief engineer is now putting in the engine and boilers, and the former is one of the finest ever brought to this city. The twelve furnaces are now complete, and Mr. Chick is having the water pipes laid from the plant to the lake where they will get their supply of water. The ditch is about four feet deep, and in digging they struck coal. Mr. Chick says that Pittsburg was the greatest coal town he ever saw, as it is impossible to dig a hole without striking coal. It is well worth the time and streetcar fare to any of our citizens who have [not] visited the smelters to take a ride out and view the works, then they could understand why the works are not completed and would be much surprised to see the amount of machinery and inside work, that is unlike any other smelting works ever built, and has taken a great amount of labor and time to construct. A Headlight reporter inquired of Mr. Ritchie when they contemplated the completion of the works, and were informed they would complete it as soon as the work could possibly be done, which he thought would be about May 10 or 15. The managers are pushing the work, and although it is very heavy and complicated, they are progressing nicely.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, April 22, 1891, page 6



    W. S. Wing, of Omaha, Neb., auditor of passenger accounts of the Union Pacific Railroad, came in this morning and spent the day in our city the guest of George H. Chick. He visited the silver smelter, of which he is treasurer and secretary. He was highly pleased with the progress of the work on their smelter and outlook for the city, in which he has great faith. He will leave for Omaha, and return to our city again in the near future.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, April 29, 1891, page 4


    Geo.H. Chick, patentee of the Pittsburg Short Method Smelting & Refining process, will start west Saturday, June 20th, to purchase ore for their smelter. He will visit the mines in Colorado, Arizona, Montana and California.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, June 11, 1891, page 2



G. H. CHICK
Steam Silver-Plated Plate for Amalgamating Gold, Silver, or Copper.
No. 460,946.                                      Patented Oct. 13, 1891.
Patent No. 460,946
To all whom it may concern:
   Be it known that I, George Horatio Chick, of Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Steam Silver-Plated Plate for Amalgamating Gold, Silver, or Copper, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof.
Excerpt, U.S. Patent Office. Application filed June 22, 1891


Preparing to Fire Up.
    Geo. H. Chick, of the Pittsburg Silver and Gold Smelter, returned home this morning from Mexico, Colorado and Arizona, where he has been for the past month purchasing ore for their smelter. He was joined at this place by C. F. Newton and W. S. Wing, president and treasurer of the smelter, who will spend a few days in the city looking after the interests of their smelter. Mr. Chick purchased 2,000 tons of ore while absent, and brought some fine specimens home with him. He states that one man in Mexico has 1,000 tons lying on the dump that he offers at a very low price, which indicates they will not be troubled in getting ore for their smelter. Part of their ore will arrive in a few days, and as soon as it arrives their smelter will be put in operation. This will be a great day for Pittsburg when the silver and gold bullion is turned out, with Pittsburg, Kan., stamped on each bar. The smoky city of Kansas will then be represented in the money markets, and among eastern capitalists.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, July 27, 1891, page 4


    Colonel Nelson F. Acers of Kansas City is spending a few days in our city, the guest of Geo. H. Chick of the Pittsburg Silver Smelter. Colonel Acers is a stockholder in the United States Company of the Chick Short Method Smelting and Refining Company, and is here to view the smelting at this place.
"Pittsburg," The Topeka Daily Capital, Topeka, Kansas, August 16, 1891, page 10


    Geo. H. Chick returned home last evening from Kansas City accompanied by W.H. Varcho, who will take charge of the Pittsburg Silver Smelter as soon as it is in successful operation, when Mr. Varcho will have full management and control of the plant, and will move his family to this city.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, September 2, 1891, page 4


    Geo. H. Chick, of the silver smelter, went to Kansas City this morning to spend Sunday with his family who live at that place.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, September 26, 1891, page 4



New Short Method Smelting Works.
    Pittsburg, Kan., October 9.--The new Chick short method silver and gold smelting and refining works started up here Wednesday.
    For fifty years mining people have been seeking some process whereby the millions of tons of ores known as base ores, that contain a reasonable assay of the precious metals and at the same time would not pay for the working, could be handled at a profit.
    Some of the most experienced experts the world has produced have spent their lives and expended fortunes for themselves and their friends, experimenting in the hope of devising a method by which these refractory ores could be handled at a profit. Mr. George H. Chick is the first gentleman to solve the mystery, and he was not able to reach the coveted goal without devoting twenty-five of the best years of his life to study and scientific experimenting. The starting up of the new silver smelter here Wednesday, and the turning out of bullion from the same grades of ores which are today thrown away as useless in hundreds of places in all mining sections, demonstrates beyond all doubt the practicability of Mr. Chick's secret.
    Seven bricks of gold and silver bullion were produced the first day which weighed even thirty pounds, or 480 ounces. While the value of this cleanup cannot be determined until after the assay is made, the best judgment of experts agrees that the total will reach in the neighborhood of $4,000.
The Topeka Daily Capital, October 10, 1891, page 8


ITS ANNUAL MEETING
    At the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Chick Short Method Smelting and Refining Company held at the company's office in Kansas City, Kan., yesterday an unusually large number of shares were represented. The successful production of bullion from refractory gold and silver ore by the new smelter recently put in operation at Pittsburg, Kan., was much talked of. The following gentlemen were elected directors for the ensuing year: George H. Chick, P. W. Kline, M. R. King, J. F. Varcoe, James T. Ritchie, C. F. Newton and W. S. Wing, who organized by electing George H. Chick president, James T. Ritchie vice president, M. R. King secretary, and P. W. Kline treasurer.
Kansas City Times, October 13, 1891, page 8


    Geo. H. Chick, of the Pittsburg Silver Smelters, left last evening for Kansas City, to spend a few days with his family and attend to some business matters.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, October 16, 1891, page 4



    Geo. H. Chick, of the Pittsburg Silver Smelter, returned home last evening from Kansas City, where he has been for the past few days on business and visiting his family, who reside at that place.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, October 22, 1891, page 3


G O L D !
AND SILVER BULLION, OF SEVEN BARS IN NUMBER,
WEIGHING IN ROUND FIGURES 30 POUNDS, OR 480 OUNCES!
THE FIRST DAY'S CLEANUP OF THE NEW SMELTER.
IT WAS BUT FIVE LOAVES AND TWO FISHES THAT LAID THE FOUNDATION
FOR A FEAST IN OLDEN TIMES.
YOU CAN FIGURE IT OUT.
    The following article, had it not been for a stupid blunder, might have originated in a Cheyenne paper. The Commonwealth is aware that it will do no good to Cheyenne to republish this very interesting account of the starting up of one of the finest smelting plants ever built in the United States, but there are many of our citizens who will be interested to read what we might have had here if the people of the city had been allowed to have their own way.
    The Argentine smelters in Kansas were constructed at a cost of $45,000; that was less than ten years ago; they now have a plant valued at nearly $3,000,000. The Pittsburg plant cost something over $100,000 as it stands today, and it is not unreasonable to suppose that its career will be quite as prosperous as that of the Argentine; it certainly has a much better opportunity to make money.
From the Pittsburg (Kan.) Daily Star:
    "The building of a city is like unto the building of a character, and everyone connected with or interested in the work very naturally feels that there is a large amount of responsibility resting upon him.
    "It is a little less than three years since the residents of the then small but respectable mining village of Pittsburg became convinced that, by the proper effort, this could be made a very important manufacturing and industrial center. There were four large zinc smelting plants here at that time, the proprietors of which were growing rich as fast as time would allow them. The fact that the cheapness of fuel here would enable these smelter people to make fortunes prompted others to commence speculating on the practicability of encouraging other manufacturing enterprises of various characters to come and utilize the advantages of the immense coal deposits here. The industries now in operation and furnishing employment to hundreds and hundreds of skilled workmen illustrates what prudent effort can accomplish when rationally directed. During the first two years of work on the line of advanced thought, it was but natural that many disappointments should be encountered. The fact that our people had resolved to encourage those who were in search of locations for the establishment of industrial enterprises naturally brought to them scores of men who were desirous of securing bonuses without any intention of complying with their part of a contract. Our people were inexperienced and of course unable to distinguish the difference between the real and the spurious. They were quick to learn, however, and before very much time or money had been squandered, scores of men who meant business began to come, and the fraudulent speculator found his day at an end. Up to a little more than a year ago, very few enterprises of a genuine character had been secured, though the foundation work had been laid for the future great city of the West, and the people were in earnest. Scores of men who had been induced to come here from the many boom towns of the West, where the bottoms had fallen out of the booms and left the property holders with great ungainly sacks filled only with wind to hold, had discovered that this was no place for them, and had quietly sneaked away. It was different with the genuine city builder who had come. He discovered at a glance that there was nothing in the line of a boom here, and that the natural resources of the new Pittsburg would make of it a great manufacturing center without the aid of the subterfuges so commonly used during the past few years in other localities. Those who came here with legitimate propositions to put in industrial works of any character were impressed with the advantages they would enjoy here, and if they could not make the terms they had hoped to make when they left home, they were anxious to effect a reasonable compromise, and in some instances when a bonus could not be secured the new plants were located anyway, and they are in successful operation today. A year ago there came to Pittsburg a party of gentlemen who had been attracted by the assurance of the cheap coal here, who were in search of a location for the building of the mother plant of the Chick Short Method Smelting and Refining system, with which the refractory gold and silver ores are handled.
    "The proposition of these gentlemen to locate in Pittsburg and erect a plant here was accepted by the Commercial Club, and work was commenced upon the buildings a little more than nine months ago. The plan in the beginning was to erect a plant that would cost about $40,000, but the company reconsidered their plan and instead have invested over $100,000 in the plant, and have for their labors a smelting works that is not equaled in any way in the United States. Mining men throughout the country, [who] were ready as soon as shown what could be done by this short method to handle the refractory ores, came forward and put their money into the enterprise unsolicited. Not a dollar's worth of the stock in this plant has ever been offered for sale, but scores of people have desired to obtain it without being able to find any for sale.
    "Mr. George H. Chick, the custodian of the secret process, and owner of a majority of the stock in the United States company, is also the owner of half of the stock in the plant here, and no one could buy any of his stock at any price. Mr. Chick knows what he is doing, and there is no danger of any of the works which are permitted to use his process falling into the hands of schemers who will abuse the business.
    "In the early part of the history of the location of this large smelting plant in Pittsburg, there were of course doubting Thomases, though none of these were to be found among the men who were putting up their money in the enterprise, and all of this class have quietly sneaked away, and not one of them was present yesterday at the opening of these great works to witness the successful operation of the Chick short method of extracting the valuable gold and silver metals from the refractory ores heretofore considered worthless for smelting purposes.
    "For fifty years the mining people of this and all other gold- and silver-bearing countries of the world have been seeking some process whereby the millions of tons of ores known as base ores, that which contains a reasonable assay of the precious metals and at the same time would not pay for the working, could be handled at a profit. Some of the most experienced experts the world has produced have spent their lives and expended fortunes for themselves and their friends, experimenting in the hope of devising a method by which these refractory ores could be handled at a profit. Mr. George H. Chick is the first gentleman to solve the mystery, and he was not able to reach the coveted goal without devoting twenty-five of the best years of his life to study and scientific experimenting. The starting up of the new silver smelter here yesterday, and the turning out of bullion from the same grades of ores which are today thrown away as useless in hundreds of places in all mining sections, demonstrates, beyond all doubt, the practicability of Mr. Chick's secret. It opens in fact a new industry, not only for Pittsburg alone, but for the whole world. By this method of smelting, the millions of wealth which have been thrown aside by miners will become marketable ores, and hundreds of mines producing very rich ores in abundance, but of such a nature that the mines [that] are abandoned because of the waste in handling the ores will be reopened and worked at a profit. Such is progression due to inventive genius.
    "Mr. Chick's entire life might be said to have been devoted to the one study, the successful culmination of which, as is now fully demonstrated, will naturally make him many times a millionaire. But it is not the money he will make from his excellent discovery that most pleases him. He is not a covetous man, on the contrary, a very modest, economical, prudent gentleman, who feels prouder of the fact that he is able to inform his fellow miners who have been searching for so many, many years for a secret, that he can aid them in their work than he is that all his relatives will be made independently rich from his discoveries. This is a feeling that naturally grows in the breast of a man who has spent his life in the mines and understands the difficulties under which the miner labors.
    "The advantage claimed for the Chick Short Method Smelting and Refining Works is that with this process the low-grade, hard, refractory ores, that which bears a small amount of the precious metals to the ton, can be smelted without being mixed with those ores known as fluxing ores. In other words, heretofore the plan of smelting where some of these ores have been used at a small profit to the miner by the process of purchasing other ores and mixing them. In this process a large loss of the precious metals could not be avoided, and in most cases the profit has all been absorbed by the smelting works, and the owner of the ore left nothing for his work of taking the quartz from the mines. Men who are acquainted with mining understand that when they are compelled to carry the products of their mines to the smelter, they are first forced to stand a discount because of the ore being wet, then another for the reason that it is a base ore, another for waste, another for the purchase of those other ores which must be mixed with it before it can be smelted, then they are ready to negotiate for the smelting at so much per ton, in some cases as high as $28. By this routine it will be seen that a quality of ore that contains from fifty to seventy dollars' worth of silver or gold will just about pay for its working. Through the method introduced by the Chick system of smelting all this monkey process of discounts is avoided, because the dry, refractory ores are taken direct from the mines and passed through all the necessary states of preparation without necessitating the mixing with it of any other ores, and the result produced is the same as though the ore was what is termed free milling or fluxing ore. Thus it will be seen that this system is a revolution in the mining business by reason of the short method of smelting ores heretofore thrown away because there was no money in working them.
    "The capacity of the works here and the concessions of the United States company, of which Mr. Chick is the president, is 200 tons per day. At present, with all the machinery new, this amount of course will not be handled, but the works will be running regularly from this date, and the capacity increased as rapidly as the prudence will permit.
    "The ores treated yesterday were of the most refractory found in Colorado, and known as third-grade ores, never before treated at a profit by any smelting system. There is no sort of doubt of the success of the system, and Pittsburg is proud to be the location of the mother plant.
    "The witnesses of the work yesterday were of course restricted to those who are entrusted with partial knowledge of the secret process by which this great work is accomplished, and while there may be those who feel that they should have been admitted to the opening, sensible people will understand readily that such enterprises are not for the public eye. The men even working in the smelter are not permitted to enter any of the many departments except where their work calls them, and but one man, except Mr. Chick, Mr. Varcoe, is possessed of the entire secret. This is all the protection that can be had, since no secret can be patented. Only so many men, one for each smelting plant, is entrusted with the entire secret.
    "The number of strangers that will be drawn to Pittsburg during the first few months of the running of this plant will be the greatest card for the city it has yet secured, and those who believe that it is only necessary to see this city to admire it are congratulating themselves upon the happy thought of securing the location of this great smelter here. The owners of the smelters are also congratulating themselves upon the location because they are enabled to secure fuel here, a quality of coal equaled in very few places in the country, cheaper than at any other place they have yet visited.
    "Seven bricks of gold and silver bullion were produced yesterday which weighed over thirty pounds, or 480 ounces. While the value of this cleanup cannot be determined until after the assay is made today, the best judgment of experts agree that the total will reach in the neighborhood of $4,000.
    "The Associated Press of the nation is teeming this morning with the glad tidings of the opening of the great Short Method Silver and Gold Smelting and Refining Works in Pittsburg, Kansas."
Wyoming Commonwealth, Cheyenne, October 24, 1891, page 1


    George H. Chick, the inventor of the Chick Short Method smelting and refining process, was in town yesterday, the guest of Mr. Newton, and departed for the West in the afternoon.
"North Topeka," The Topeka Daily Capital, October 27, 1891, page 5


REDUCTION OF ORES REVOLUTIONIZED.
A Simple Process for Handling Refractory Ores of Moment to Local Mining Men.

    George H. Chick is a Kansas City metallurgist who is known to a great many business men throughout New Mexico, especially to those interested in mines. He was a visitor to Santa Fe two years ago and spent some time here looking into the mines in this locality, and much of his attention was devoted to the consideration of low-grade refractory ores, which abound throughout the mineral regions of Santa Fe County. At that time Mr. Chick was working on a simplified process for extracting the mineral from such ores. He was impressed with the fact, he said, that for fifty years the mining people of this and all other gold- and silver-bearing countries of the world have been seeking some process whereby the millions of tons of ores known as base ores, that which contains a reasonable assay of the precious metals and at the same time would not pay for the working, could be handled at a profit.
    Now comes the cheering news from Kansas City that Mr. Chick has signally triumphed in his work, and the Chick short method smelting and refining system has just been thoroughly tested and demonstrated to be a success. A 200-ton smelter built after this plan is in operation at Pittsburg, Kas., and the Daily Star, of that city, has a four-column article [October 24, above] detailing the result of the first day's run. It says the ores treated were of the most refractory found in the Rocky Mountains, and known as third-grade ores, never before treated at a profit by any smelting system. Seven bricks of gold and silver bullion were produced which weighed even thirty pounds, or 480 ounces, valued at about $4,000. The miners of Santa Fe County can well afford to investigate the claims of this new process.
Santa Fe Daily New Mexican, October 30, 1891, page 1



GOLD MINE.
The Pittsburg Silver Smelter Now Own Their Own Gold Mine.

    George H. Chick, manager of the Pittsburg Silver Smelter, returned home yesterday from an extended trip through California and Arizona. While absent Mr. Chick made a large purchase for the company, which was the gold mine known as the Keystone Group, near Boulder, Col. The mine is a very valuable one, but owing to the fact that the ore is principally all base refractory ores, he purchased the mine comparatively cheap, there being no other smelter in the world that can handle all the ore. In conversation today Mr. Chick stated that their reason for purchasing this mine was that they bought several thousand tons of ore from another mine before they started their smelter, and when their smelter at this place proved a grand success an English syndicate purchased the mine that they contemplated getting their ore from and refused to sell them the ore at the agreed price. He then went to Colorado and purchased the Keystone mine, which are now being operated, and several thousand tons are on the dump. Every mine owner and most of the miners in the West are talking of Pittsburg as the great smelting city, and many of the mine owners will visit our city in the near future.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, November 14, 1891, page 4


FIFTY MORE FURNACES.
The Directors of the Silver Smelters Decide to
Increase the Capacity of Their Plant.

    The directors of the Pittsburg Silver Smelters held a meeting last evening in their office at the Stilwell, for the purpose of acting on the purchase of the gold mine and the advisability of increasing the capacity of their plant. The meeting ratified the purchase of the Keystone gold mine in Colorado by manager Geo. H. Chick. The matter of increasing the capacity of their plant was discussed at length, and considered by the meeting.
    The decision reached was that as soon as their ore from the new gold mine was received, and the twelve furnaces that are now built are crowded to their utmost capacity, they would continue to operate the twelve and erect fifty more furnaces, which will make the plant a sixty-two-furnace plant. They were exceedingly well pleased with the great success of their plant, and will make it the finest one in the world, one that our city can well be proud of, as well as being a profitable institution.
    They expect to declare a dividend next month, which will be published later.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, November 19, 1891, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick, of the Pittsburg Silver Smelters, returned home this morning from Kansas City, where he has been visiting his family.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, December 10, 1891, page 4


A BILK.
    George H. Chick, the oily-tongued all-around fraud, erstwhile of Colton, is in Kansas plying his vocation as a deadbeat and a swindler. He started a smelter and refinery at Colton some years ago, known as the "Chick short-method smelting and refining system." True to its name, the method of smelting the projectors out of their hard earnings was very short. The stockholders remain short to the present time. Even the poor laborers who toiled for the graceless scamp are short of their pay for the labor performed, while a certain banker, who lives not a thousand miles from Riverside, is short $790 on a brick purchased from this wonderful alchemist for $800 and upon which he realized $8 or $9 at the United States Mint in San Francisco.
    The Pittsburg, Kansas Daily Star devotes to the laudation of Chick and his swindling method a four-column double-leaded article, describing in detail the process by which Chick and his confederate rascals produced seven bricks of gold and silver weighing thirty pounds avoirdupois, or 480 ounces, as the result of the first day's cleanup.
    The Star says: "Mr. Chick's entire life might be said to have been devoted to the one study, the successful culmination of which, as is now fully demonstrated, will naturally make him many times a millionaire." Of course it will if he can find fools enough to give him their hard earnings, and aid him to dupe the unsophisticated.
    Again, the Star says: "He is not a covetous man; on the contrary, a very modest, economical, prudent gentleman."
    Of course, he modestly economized other men's time and money, hence they have nothing left for him to covet. If the Star had said that Chick is a dishonest devil devising a villainous scheme by which he can relieve suckers of their substance, it would have told the truth. Despite the warnings against this fellow given by the press of Southern California, the people of Kansas receive him with open arms and invite him to rob them and call it scientific smelting by the Chick short method.
Daily Courier, San Bernardino, California, December 23, 1891, page 2


    Geo. H. Chick returned home last evening from an extended trip to Chicago and St. Louis.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, January 11, 1892, page 4


    Geo. H. Chick and his sister Mrs. Cushing, of Boston, who is visiting him at the Stilwell, left this morning for Kansas City.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, January 28, 1892, page 4



Stockholders Meeting.
    The stockholders of the Pittsburg Short Method Smelting and Refining Company held a meeting at their office in this city this afternoon at 4 o'clock, for the purpose of electing officers for the ensuing year. The entire capital stock was represented, either by person or proxy. Those present from other cities were: Jas. T. Richie, of Manhattan; R. B. Coons, of Kansas City; E. P. Baker, Jas. Nunn, H. S. Ohmer, and W. A. Williams, of Topeka, C. F. Newton, Geo. H. Chick, Wm. L. Patterson and F. W. Lanyon of this city. The party visited their plant this afternoon and was escorted through the same by C. F. Newton and Geo. H. Chick. On going to press their meeting was still in session, the result of which will be published in tomorrow's issue.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, January 28, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. C. B. Cushing, of Boston, is visiting her brother Geo. H. Chick, of the Stilwell Hotel. Mrs. Cushing was very much surprised when she landed in this city last evening and was escorted to such an elegant hotel as the Stilwell, which she says is one of the most magnificent hotels west of St. Louis, and much finer than she expected to see in the West. She is very much pleased with the little Smoky City.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, January 28, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. George H. Chick of Kansas City and her sister, Mrs. C. B. Cushing of Boston, are visiting Mrs. James Nunn. Mr. Chick is also in town from Pittsburg, Kan.
"North Topeka News Notes," Topeka Daily Capital, February 4, 1892, page 4


    George H. Chick, a prominent financier of Kansas City, is at the Windsor.
"Hotels and Personal," Denver Rocky Mountain News, February 18, 1892, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick of the Pittsburg Silver Smelter returned home this morning from an extended trip through California and Arizona purchasing ore for his smelter.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, February 27, 1892, page 4


Talking of Utah.
    Mr. E. B. Ridgeley returned yesterday morning from a four weeks' trip to the East, where he has been in the interest of Ogden.
    He visited Kansas City as well as other large eastern cities. At Pittsburg, Kan., he visited the electric smelters of the Pittsburg Short Method Smelting and Refining Company, which are said to be the best in existence. Mr. Ridgeley states the company is greatly interested in the establishment of a smelter in this city.
The Salt Lake Herald, Salt Lake City, Utah, February 23, 1892, page 3


    Pittsburg has recently added another star to her escutcheon by securing the first plant of the Chick short-method process of smelting gold and silver ores ever put into active operation. The secret of profitably handling base clay and other refractory ores has been sought since scientific research was begun, but it was left for Mr. George H. Chick, one of the most practical and best-informed chemists and mining men in the United States, to discover the secret, and it is the application of this secret that is working a revolution in the mining world of today.
"Kansas' New Boom," The Inter Ocean, Chicago, March 5, 1892, page 10


    Geo. H. Chick will leave in about a week for Chicago to make preparations for their silver smelter exhibit at the World's Fair.
    Geo. H. Chick, of the Pittsburg silver smelter, bought thirty shares of the smelter stock this morning from J. F. Douglas, of Kansas City, Kansas.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, April 1, 1892, page 4


    Mrs. Geo. H. Chick and children left yesterday afternoon at 1 o'clock on the Gulf for Chicago, and arrived at their destination this morning at 8:30 o'clock, which was the best time ever made from this city to Chicago.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, April 20, 1892, page 4


    Geo. H. Chick, of the Pittsburg Silver Smelter, returned home Tuesday evening from Chicago, accompanied by his wife who is now living in Chicago. They left last evening for Denver to spend a few weeks visiting friends, viewing the country and attending to some business for the company.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, June 2, 1892, page 4


PITTSBURG SILVER SMELTER.
    Material and Machinery on the Ground to Double its Present Capacity.

    Mr. Geo. H. Chick, manager of the Pittsburg Silver Smelter, returned home Wednesday from an extended trip through Colorado, Arizona and the West, where they have been for the past few weeks in the interest of the smelter at this place. Mr. Chick informed a Headlight reporter today that he had received from the East a carload of machinery for increasing the capacity of their plant to twice its present capacity.
    He brought a number of rich samples of the ore he purchased home with him, and says that the ore is very rich and will work up into gold and silver bullion quite different to the majority of the ore used in the plant heretofore.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, June 16, 1892, page 8



    Geo. H. Chick, of the Chick Short-Method Gold and Silver Smelter of this city, will leave this evening for Topeka.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, June 30, 1892, page 4


    Ex-Governor Osborne, of Topeka, and P. I. Bonebrake, president of the National Bank of Topeka, were visitors in the city today, the guest of Geo. H. Chick, at the Stilwell. They were here for the purpose of having some samples of ore assayed.

Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, July 21, 1892, page 6


THE BIG FISH.
They Are Trying to Gobble Up the Little Ones.
A SENSATIONAL SMELTING SUIT
Pete Kline and Nels Acers Seek to Enjoin George H. Chick
From Disposing of Chick Short Method Smelter Property.

    P. W. Kline and Nelson F. Acers, prominent mining brokers of Kansas City, Mo., have filed an important suit with the clerk of the district court. The defendants are the Chick Short Method Smelting and Refining Company, George H. Chick, M. R. King, W. S. Wing, C. F. Newton, James Ritchie, J. F. Varcoe and the Pittsburg Short Method Smelting and Refining Company.
    The petition is a voluminous one and abounds with many sensational charges against Chick and the directory. Upon the outcome of this suit, the plaintiffs claim, depends the rights of the minority of the stockholders in the company to recognition. In the petition an alleged plan is exposed showing the manner in which Chick and the directors are trying to freeze out the plaintiffs and prevent them from receiving the benefits of the corporation.
    The petition states that the Chick company was organized on September 19, 1889, that the Pittsburg company was organized by Chick August 22, 1890; that prior to organizing the latter company Chick had granted to him by the Chick company a franchise to use its process for refining ores, without paying one cent therefor. Afterwards disposing of it to the Pittsburg company for $50,000, Chick received in payment therefor stock in the latter company which he now claims as his own. The Pittsburg company agreed, however, to pay $1 royalty per ton to the Chick company for each ton of ore refined. They have refined many tons without paying one cent royalty, so it is alleged.
    The books and records of the company are maintained in Kansas City, Mo., in violation of the company's charter and contrary to the laws of Kansas.
    It is further stated, among other things, that the Chick company is insolvent and owes some debts which it cannot satisfy.
    A sensational feature of the suit is the charge that Chick is attempting to transfer the parent company's property to the other corporations. It is alleged that at a meeting of the Chick company's directors on June 24, in Kansas City, Mo., the following resolution was adopted:
    "Owing to the difficulties labored under by the Pittsburg company, to whom a franchise was granted by this company, that the royalties due up to the first day of September, 1892, be donated to said Pittsburg company."
    The plaintiffs fear that the same resolution will be ratified in Kansas City, Kansas, July 9. The petition says further that a company called the American Smelting and Refining Company has been organized by Mr. Chick with a capital stock of $15,000,000, not one cent of which has been paid; that said Chick threatens to transfer all of the assets, rights and franchises of the Chick company to the latter organization, therefore with the intention of absorbing the Chick company. The plaintiff claims to hold a minority of the stock and that Chick and the codefendants who are in power own a majority, and that they vote for whom Chick dictates as directors.
    The petition cites the duty of the officials of the company and charges them with "gross negligence and misconduct, and have knowingly and willfully abused the trust placed in them as officers and directors for their individual gain," and "that said defendants confederated together to defraud the company and the plaintiffs."
    "They have so managed the affairs of the company," says the plaintiffs, "that large profits belonging to them have been misappropriated to their own use; that by such conduct the value of said plant has been reduced $50,000; that said corporation is on the verge of bankruptcy by reason of said misconduct." They further allege that Chick is insolvent and has no property or effects.
    The plaintiffs pray that the defendants be restrained and enjoined from donating any funds or property of said Chick company, or from attempting to carry out the contents of said resolution and that the property and effects remain in status quo until the final hearing of this cause, and that defendants be suspended as soon as the guilt of said abuses appear to the court, and that they be removed from their offices and directory as soon as the charges made are proven; that defendants be ordered and compelled to pay over all sums of money and property which they have illegally acquired to themselves or transferred to others; that said company be compelled to maintain offices in Kansas City, Kansas; that Geo. Chick be compelled to account for all money and funds received by him for stock and other property; they further ask that a receiver be appointed to take charge of the company's affairs.
Kansas City Gazette, Kansas City, Kansas, July 14, 1892, page 3


A Big Deal.
    Geo. H. Chick, of the Pittsburg Silver Smelter, and also of the American Smelting and Refining Company, returned home this morning from Chicago, where he has been for the past few weeks visiting his family and closing a deal with the Gates Iron Works Company, transferring to them the right to use his short-method process in Montana. The deal was closed Thursday. The company pays $75,000 for the right to use the process in that state, and will commence at once to erect a large smelter in their territory and expect to put it in operation this year.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, July 21, 1892, page 8


    Many people of this county remember Geo. H. Chick, who put up an ore reduction plant at Medford of his own invention and which proved a failure. He went from here to Redding, and thence to Los Angeles, making a failure in each instance. From there he went to Pittsburg, Kansas, where he erected another plant. In this venture his method of treating rebellious and refractory ores has proved a great success, as we see in a copy of the Pittsburg Headlight. This plant reduces twenty-five tons every twenty-four hours, and pays a dividend of 5 percent each month on the capital stock of the corporation. A company of Chicago capitalists has paid him $75,000 cash for the right to use his process and erect a large plant in the Black Hills in Dakota. The Headlight says the Pittsburg plant is the only one of the kind in existence in the world, has been running for six months and has proved a grand success. It is called the Chick Short Method Smelting Process.

Valley Record,
Ashland, August 18, 1892, page 3



A GOOD ADVERTISEMENT.
The Smoky City Advertised at Denver, Colorado.

    Geo. H. Chick arrived in the city Saturday afternoon from Chicago en route to Denver, Col., where he is superintending the construction of Short-Method Silver Smelting and Refining Company's concentrating plant at that place.
    Mr. Chick informed a Headlight representative that the building is now enclosed, and about finished. That the name of the Pittsburg Short-Method Silver Smelting and Refining Company is in large letters on the new Denver plant, with Pittsburg, Kans., very prominent, and that the sign causes many inquiries to be made about the Smoky City of Kansas, and many people of means express a desire to visit our city. This is no doubt one of the most beneficial advertisements that Pittsburg could have in the West, as it interests the class of people that our city needs. Mr. Chick left Sunday morning for Kansas City.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, November 17, 1892, page 1


 
    Pittsburg, in Crawford County, besides being the headquarters of zinc smelting, has the works of the "Chick Short-Method Gold and Silver Refining Company," which, established in 1891, is dealing by a new process with the ores of the precious metals.
Geology and Mineral Resources of Kansas, by Robert Hay, Topeka: 1893, page 34


The Denver Branch.
    Geo. H. Chick, of the concentrating works of the Pittsburg Short Method Smelting and Refining Company, returned from Denver, Colorado, last night, where he has been engaged for several months past erecting a plant of the same kind as the one he has here in Pittsburg. It is now almost completed and will be in operation in a short time. He is well pleased with the western country and says there is lots of money to be made there. The plant there is an imposing structure and fronts on the Union Pacific and Santa Fe tracks entering the city, and what is a good advertisement for Pittsburg, is the following, painted in large letters "Concentrating Works of the Pittsburg Short Method Smelting and Refining Co." In regard to the starting out of the works here he said that as soon as improvements could be made and an extension to the works built, they would start them up. The company's mines in Colorado, he reports, are turning out well, and a good quality of gold is being taken out in considerable quantities.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, January 11, 1893, page 4


A Quiet Visit.
    George Chick, discoverer and inventor of the Chick short method and refining process for the reduction of refractory ores, will arrive in the city tomorrow accompanied by prominent capitalists of New York City and Denver, Colorado. The gentlemen are all interested in the process, and after inspecting the Denver part of the process are here to view the actual smelting process as done by the Chick patent furnace.
Pittsburg Headlight, Pittsburg, Kansas, March 27, 1893, page 4


G. H. CHICK
Gold-Washing Apparatus.
No. 613,494.                                      Patented Nov. 1, 1898.
Patent No. 613,494
To all whom it may concern:
   Be it known that I, George Horatio Chick, a citizen of the United States, residing at Oakland, County of Alameda, State of California, have invented an Improvement in Gold-Washing Apparatus; and I hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the same.
Excerpt, U.S. Patent Office. Application filed April 21, 1893


Declared a Fraudulent Dividend.
    Topeka, Kan., Sept. 14.--George H. Chick, who went to Kansas City two years ago and organized a company to smelt silver ore by a new process, is wanted by the company. A dividend was declared, while the concern was losing money. Chick is in Wyoming, and extradition is urged.
The Daily News, Mount Carmel, Pennsylvania, September 14, 1893, page 3

    Three years ago George H. Chick, a smooth man who is evidently no spring chicken, came to Kansas City and began to advertise the fact that he had discovered a method of greatly simplifying the process of smelting silver and gold ores. He made it appear that there were millions in it and soon organized a company to test it. The company began operations at Pittsburg, Kan. Chick hatched up some method of declaring a good dividend in a short time and then the demand for the stock began to increase, and it soon went up to 250. Then Chick and the other roosters unloaded most of their stock and realized handsomely. But the new stockholders have not been able to feather their nests so well. On Wednesday the company held a meeting in Topeka and decided to close up their business. They have sunk $40,000 in the business besides what their stock cost and now discover that Chick's process is a fraud. This is but another example of how men, business men, can be led into investing their money by slick-tongued fakirs. Leavenworth knows how it is herself.

The Leavenworth Times, Kansas, September 15, 1893, page 2


    For declaring a 17 percent dividend on a Kansas smelting company's stock, while it was losing money, George H. Chick, the president, will be dragged from Wyoming, whither he fled.
"Paragraphed News," Harrisburg Telegraph, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, September 15, 1893, page 1


    The Pittsburg Short-Method Refining Co. of Kansas has a sheriff after George H. Chick, who sold them a worthless secret.
"Telegraphic Brevities," The Decatur Herald, Decatur, Illinois, September 15, 1893, page 6


Lost Everything
    The stockholders of the Short Method Smelting and Refining Company of Pittsburg, Kan., met at the Copeland Hotel yesterday and decided to wind up their business. George H. Chick, a sharp individual who claimed to have a secret which would materially reduce the cost of smelting silver and gold, came to Kansas City three years ago and organized a company to float his scheme. He promised to make millionaires of everybody interested in the stock. C. T. Newton, formerly with the Rock Island in this city; E. Wing, a Missouri Pacific official; Nelson F. Acers and others went in with Chick to organize a company to sell the secret process. The Pittsburg company bought the right to use it in Kansas. Chick managed the affairs of the Pittsburg company and by some sort of legerdemain succeeded in declaring a dividend. This was before the company had really accomplished anything. He made it appear that his wonderful secret had turned out to be the greatest discovery of the age and figured it out that a dividend of 5 percent a month would be immediately declared. So plausible was the showing made by Chick that his stock immediately doubled in value, and soon it was worth 250 percent. Of course Mr. Chick and his associates then unloaded and gathered in many thousand dollars. Some of the leading men of Pittsburg, Fort Scott, Kansas City and other places became interested in the enterprise, but in a few months it began to dawn upon them that the Chick smelting process was not the bonanza it had been pictured to them. At a meeting of the dissatisfied stockholders held here last spring Chick was thrown out of the company, and James T. Ritchie of Manhattan was made president and manager. An assessment was made on the stock for the purpose of placing the company on its feet, and the new company was instructed to push the investigations to such an extent that at the next meeting the stockholders could have positive information as to what the Chick method amounted to. At yesterday's meeting president Ritchie reported that he had given the process a thorough trial and was satisfied beyond doubt that it is a failure. He advised that the business of the company be closed up at once. About $25,000 in cash has already been invested in the enterprise, and the company has about $15,000 in debts hanging over its head. It is not likely it can be proved that Chick was a swindler. It is said he had all faith in his scheme and that he put everything he had in the venture. He is now in Wyoming trying to work the same scheme. Among those who attended the meeting yesterday were James T. Ritchie, Manhattan; W. L. Patterson and D. O. Johnson, Pittsburg; Roland Davies, Bala; W. C. Perry and C. F. Drake, Fort Scott. The two last mentioned were at the meeting as proxies of stockholders.
Topeka Weekly Capital, September 21, 1893, page 11


Geo. H. Chick in Limbo
    People who lived in and about Medford something like seven years ago will well remember the name of "Geo. H. Chick." It was he who was so smooth and glib of tongue as to interest several of our people in a new process for reducing refractory ore, and very cheaply. He preyed upon the kindly indulgence of our people to the extent of persuading them to invest money in a stamp mill, which was built just across the railroad track from where the A. A. Davis flouring mill now stands. [This would place the Medford Reduction Works on the site of today's Channel 5 studios.] After the machinery had been purchased and the mill erected Chick and his process failed to materialize and those who invested were beautifully left, as his process was only an imaginary one and intended for no other purpose than to defraud. He made little or nothing out of his Medford deal but at Redding he fleeced one man out of $15,000 on the same proposition. From California he went to Kansas and this is what the telegraph dispatches say of him there:
TOPEKA, Kan., Sept. 14.--At the meeting of the stockholders of the Chick Short Method Silver Smelting Co. held last night it was decided to close up the affairs of the concern in the best and quickest manner. The present management has discovered, it is believed, that the assets of the company will be sufficient to pay all liabilities without any further assessments on the stock. At this meeting was read the first accurate report ever made of reducing refractory and worthless ore by the Chick process. It is on this report the present action is based.
    George H. Chick came from California about three years ago and by his representation of the matter induced capitalists in Omaha and many cities in Missouri and Kansas to take stock and build a smelter. Pittsburg willingly gave land and erected the necessary buildings, and Chick began what the stockholders now denounce as a swindle. When sales of stock would diminish he would declare a dividend of 5 percent a month, which never failed to bring more cash.
    The charges made against him and his officers are numerous and grave, and an officer is now on the way to Wyoming to bring him back for trial on the charge of swindling. Other charges will be lodged and papers issued so that should he escape punishment under one he will have to meet others. The closing up of the business will be slow because Chick and his secretary have carried the books to some other state, making it very difficult to obtain a correct statement of the affairs of the company.
    It was shown at this meeting that Chick began his famous career with this famous company without a dollar. He now has the cash, and the stockholders have a fine stock of valuable experience.
Medford Mail, October 6, 1893, page 3  The quoted article ran in the Pittsburg Daily Headlight, Chanute Daily Tribune, Salina Daily Republican and Kansas City Gazette of September 14, 1893, page 1, under the headline "Feathered His Nest."


Cleanup at the Burr Mill.
    The Lander [Wyoming] Gazette says that the cleanup at the Burr mill was anything but satisfactory to the president of the company, Mr. J. D. Woodruff, and as soon as the amount of gold retained on the plates was ascertained he promptly discharged one of the archconspirators, that widely advertised patent process fraud, George H. Chick, and some of the latter's assistants. 
    The rock that was being milled was estimated to be worth at least $9 per pound and about fifty tons were milled but when the cleanup was made it was found that only about $16 per ton was saved.
    It is said that upwards of $12,000 has been expended upon the representations of Chick and his friends, and the returns therefrom will not exceed $800. Mr. Woodruff relied upon his friends, and they either deliberately robbed him or in their ignorance destroyed the value contained in the ore.
    The "Chick process" seems to be a good thing for the "inventor," but a costly investment to the man who risks his money in it.
The Salt Lake Herald, Utah, November 14, 1893, page 3


Denver Riffle Plate.
    The annual meeting of the Denver Riffle Plate Manufacturing Company was held yesterday afternoon at Room 38, News Block, when the following directors were chosen: W. F. Sperry, T. G. Walters, A. W. Gifford, Frank Brooks and George H. Chick. The riffle is used in connection with stamp mills for the purpose of collecting gold and mercury from the tailings. It is now in use in California and Wyoming.
Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colorado, January 16, 1894, page 3


G. H. CHICK
Amalgamator.
No. 545,011.                                      Patented Aug. 20, 1895.
Patent No. 545,011
To all whom it may concern:
   Be it known that I, George Horatio Chick, a citizen of the United States, residing in the city and county of San Francisco, State of California, have invented an Improvement in Amalgamators; and I hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the same.
Excerpt, U.S. Patent Office. Application filed February 9, 1894


MRS. CHICK AFTER YOUNG GOLDSON.
Caustic Answer to Her Son-in-Law.
STARTLING ACCUSATIONS.
MORE SHOT FOR HIM YET IN THE LOCKER.
The Young Wife in a Critical Condition at the Pardee House.

    Mrs. W. H. Goldson Jr., who was Musette Chick, is still lying critically ill at the Pardee House, in Oakland, suffering, her mother days, from a complication of ailments, resulting from a year of life with Goldson at the Oak Street Sanitarium.
    None but the physician, Dr. Shannon, the nurse and mother of Mrs. Goldson is allowed at her bedside, and of the articles being printed about her affairs in the papers she as yet knows nothing. Her husband has not called at the Pardee House since his visit with his father a week ago, and he has not again undertaken to write to her.
    Goldson's mother-in-law, Mrs. Josephine Chick, feels bitter toward her hypnotic son-in-law. In a letter to the press he accused her of making false statements. The lady says she does not intend to let this attack on her veracity go unanswered, and comes back at the young man in this caustic way:
    "Pardee House, Oakland, November 11, 1895.--To the Public: I am sorry that the action of this contemptible, cringing, sneaking, cowardly little piece of humanity has compelled me once more to resort to the columns of a public paper in defense of my daughter, who, I am sorry to say, is now in a precarious condition owing chiefly to the unnecessary worry and trouble caused by Goldson and his family. Mr. Goldson takes the opportunity, in his reply, to remove all responsibility from the shoulders of the rest of the family; especially is he anxious to exonerate his mother. But this is very strange to everyone acquainted with the family, for those who know Goldson best know full well that he has always been under his mother's surveillance and control, that he was never capable of earning a livelihood for himself, leaving out his wife, and that whatever he wishes for in Oakland or anywhere else he always had to ask Mamma Goldson for, and only got it at her pleasure. Does it seem likely that such an individual would be capable of providing for a wife and family? Is it any wonder that after a girl entered the state of matrimony with such an incompetent and deceitful little wretch as this man has proved himself to be and found out that he was not only incapable of providing for her but that her life was one continual drudgery in a sanitarium, that she should return to the home of her parents? I repeat what I asserted in a previous interview, that when my daughter left me she was amply provided with everything that a young lady of means could desire, always accustomed to the luxuries of a comfortable home, but when she returned she was broken in health, wan and wasted, with hardly an outfit respectable enough to make a decent appearance on the street. Since that time she has been continuously sick, causing much uneasiness and anxiety in the family and incurring a large expense for medicine and doctor's fees. And all this I attribute to the rough--I almost say inhuman--treatment that she received at the hands of the Goldson family in the much-vaunted sanitarium.
    In his letter this bundle of incompetency and unmanliness, which he and his parents are pleased to designate a man, states that he would not notice the matter in a public way had it not been for the fact that I had attempted to asperse the character of his mother. I wish to say that I have never aspersed the character of his mother, if such a thing is possible, and whatever statement I have made in reference to the entire family I am prepared to substantiate from the lowest to the highest tribunal of justice in Alameda County.
    It is a well-known fact that Goldson mére runs the family, conducts the family affairs in conjunction with the sanitarium and has entire control of the acts of my daughter's husband. How is it possible, then, to consider the actions of this young scapegrace as being independent of his mother's influence? If she directed him in his other affairs, is it not reasonable to infer that she directed and controlled his matrimonial life? To prove the truthfulness of my assertion, I take the liberty of recounting a confidential conversation I had with Mrs. Goldson Sr. some months after the marriage of her son and my daughter. Their married life had been a most unhappy one because young Goldson had a peevish, fretful, jealous--I might say satanic--temperament, so unsuited to the tastes of my daughter.
    On several occasions he had threatened to take her life, and once, while she was in my care, he brought her a large powder which he said the doctor had prescribed for her. The doctor had only left the room a few minutes previously, and I was greatly surprised at this powder being sent at his instigation. I made inquiries and found that no such medicine had been prescribed. On another occasion he threatened her life with a revolver. In view of this condition of things, Mrs. Goldson advised me to take my daughter away, stating that he was incapable of providing for a wife. In answer to my inquiry as to what her son would do in the event, she told me she would take care of him, as she had always done, and that he was so constituted that he ought never to be away from his mother's apron strings. But a most important fact she omitted--she never suggested how the expenses of her son's wife were to be met after her removal, and I can here truthfully say that he has not contributed one penny toward her support since she left the sanitarium. In reply to his statement that he would not be responsible for any debts his wife might incur, I must say that no one expects him to be, for it is impossible to get blood out of a turnip. He is not permitted to be responsible for himself, much less to assume responsibility for anyone else.
    Young Goldson, in his declaration, states that the publicity already given the unpleasant matter, of which he must be held as being the chief cause, for had he not provoked us with undesirable importunities and threats and by disavowing in the local papers any responsibility for his wife's actions the matter would never have been made public, is most painful to him. If truth is so painful, then I can assure him that the future has its full quota of pain for him, for this is only the beginning of the end, and I intend, before the matter is concluded, to send these little arrows of pain home to him and his very fiercely. I can assure him that his attempt to wreck a young girl's life, to disrupt a happy home and rob it of the pleasures and comforts that should surround every home, shall not go unpunished. I intend, when the proper time arrives and in the proper place, to make such an exposure of this human monster as the case requires. I shall handle him and his lying, contemptible and garbled statements without gloves. Truth for truth, I can say that I have evidence enough in my possession to relegate into oblivion forever.
JOSEPHINE CHICK.
San Francisco Chronicle, December 12, 1895, page 11


    A NEW AMALGAMATOR. There is approaching completion at No. 148 Fifth Street a new mineral amalgamator, for which great things are claimed by the inventor, George H. Chick, who asserts that he can save 96 percent of the mineral in tailings from mills, catching all the "float" gold, which generally runs off. So many of these new devices have been brought to the attention of the public during the past few years, and have failed to realize the expectations of the inventors, that much skepticism naturally exists in regard to these claims. If the new contrivance does only half of what is promised it will work a revolution in mining. The owners invite miners who have tailings from which they have extracted all the mineral that can be saved under the old processes to send in samples of a few thousand pounds, on which the freight will be paid, and a cash offer then made for the dump, if it is found to contain a sufficient percentage of the precious metal.
Los Angeles Times, January 12, 1896, page 30


GOLDSON MET WITH REBUFF.
HIS WIFE WOULD NOT SIGN THE TRANSFER.
Wife No. 2 Receives a Visit from Wife No. 1, Now a Resident of Healdsburg.

    Mrs. Musette Goldson has recovered her health sufficiently to be able to travel, and left yesterday with her mother, Mrs. Josephine Chick, for Los Angeles.
    Before she departed she had a visit from her husband, W. H. Goldson Jr. The young man said he wanted to transfer some of his property to his father and was anxious to have the signature of his wife. Mrs. Goldson refused point blank to sign her name to any papers, and, instead, consulted an attorney, who now has the matter in charge. She says Goldson will have to make a good, hard fight in the courts before she will consent to the transfer of any property.
    The rupture in the Goldson family has been pretty well ventilated in the public prints. Mrs. Goldson, as Miss Musette Chick, went to the Goldson sanitarium for treatment, and while there, it is claimed, the girl was hypnotized by Goldson. At any rate, there was a hasty marriage during a trip to Alameda. After the wedding things went wrong with the young couple, and the wife left Goldson and went to her parents. They took her to Grass Valley, where she became ill, by reason, she alleged, of Goldson's maltreatment of her. The family brought her back to Oakland for medical treatment. Goldson called on her and wrote, but the mother would have none of him, and finally gave him a sharp scouring in the papers. Since then matters have been quiet in the family until Goldson concluded to transfer his property.
    Just before she left Oakland Mrs. Goldson received a visit from a young married woman of Healdsburg, who said she had been the wife of Goldson for a short time. She said her name was King when she first met the young man. She had gone to the Goldson sanitarium for treatment. Their acquaintanceship ripened and a wedding was the result, but the match proved uncongenial and divorce proceedings finally set her free.
    Since that time, the lady said, she had married a man in Healdsburg and was now very happy. She had read in the Chronicle of Mrs. Goldson's troubles, and determined to seek her out and off her the sympathy her own experience told her was needed.
    Mrs. Goldson will return to Oakland in May, when, it is understood, steps will be taken toward a legal separation.
San Francisco Chronicle, January 24, 1896, page 11


    Millicent H. Olmsted has brought suit against George H. Chick, to recover possession of a house on South Main Street, $35 for rent due and unpaid, and $50 damages for retention of property.
"New Suits,"
Los Angeles Times, March 4, 1896, page 3


    M. H. Olmstead has filed a complaint against George H. Chick, for restitution of certain property, $50 damages, $35 alleged to be due, and that the damages be trebled.
"Court Notes," Los Angeles Herald, March 4, 1896, page 3


MADE THE PACE IN LOS ANGELES.
Mrs. Musette Goldson Is Awarded an Absolute Divorce.
A SURPRISED HUSBAND.
He Was Expecting the Decree in the Alameda Court.
SOME ELECTRIC ROMANCE.
Result of a Three-Days' Courtship and an Elopement Two Years Ago.

Oakland Office, San Francisco Call
    908 Broadway, June 11.
    Mrs. W. N. Goldson Jr., better known as Miss Musette Chick, has outwitted her husband. This morning she was granted a divorce in Los Angeles by Judge Smith, and ten minutes later she had wired the news to her friends in this city.
    About a month ago W. N. Goldson brought suit against his wife for divorce in the Alameda court. He named desertion as the ground on which he considered himself entitled to the decree. In the meantime the young wife in Los Angeles had not been idle. She also filed a complaint for divorce in that county, where she is now residing with her mother. Her complaint is more interesting than that filed by her husband. It contains allegations that throw considerable light on the domestic life of the young couple while living at the sanitarium on Lake Street.
    The marriage took place in Alameda after a courtship of three days. It was an elopement, and the young bride said that she was under the influence of a peculiar power exercised by Goldson at the time. After the marriage they lived together just one year, and then the young wife went home to her mother. She declares she had been roughly treated, and that Goldson and his mother tried to make a drudge of her and to work her almost to death. On various occasions her husband made unpleasant references to pistols, and once he was so jealous because his wife was talking to the man who attended the baths at the sanitarium that he picked her up bodily and carried her upstairs. Her life was one of torment and fear, and living with Goldson she declared to be altogether impossible.
    A few month ago, the young wife was in Oakland and Goldson made several attempts to see her. He was denied admission, and Mrs. Chick wanted the district attorney to issue a warrant for his arrest, but this could not legally be done. Then the respective mothers-in-law rushed into print and publicly denounced each other.
    Previous to leaving Oakland Mrs. Goldson published a long statement, in which was the following:
    "It is a well-known fact that Mrs. Goldson runs the family, and has entire control of the actions of my daughter's husband. How is it possible, then, to consider the actions of this young scapegrace as being independent of his mother's influence? If she directed him in other affairs, is it not reasonable to infer that she directed and controlled his matrimonial life? To prove this I take the liberty of recounting a confidential conversation I had with Mrs. Dr. Goldson some months after Musette's marriage.
    "Once while she was sick young Goldson brought her a large powder which he said the doctor had prescribed for her. The doctor had only left the room a few minutes, and on inquiring I found that no such thing had been ordered.
    "On another occasion he threatened her life with a revolver. In view of this condition of things, Mrs. Goldson advised me to take my daughter away, stating that he was incapable of providing for a wife. In answer to my inquiry as to what her son would do in the event, she told me that she would take care of him as she had always done, and that he was so constituted that he ought never to be away from his mother's apron strings. A most important fact was omitted--she never suggested how the expenses of her son's wife were to be met after her removal, and I can here truthfully say that he has not contributed one penny toward her support since she left the sanitarium. I must say that no one expects him to do anything for her, for it is impossible to get blood out of a turnip."
    About a month ago commenced the race for a divorce. Goldson said he filed with complaint so as to get ahead of his wife.
    The young wife in Los Angeles, however, made the pace, and today Goldson was surprised to hear that the decree had been granted to her. Although only 26 years of age, this is the second time he has been divorced.
San Francisco Call, June 12, 1896, page 13


SPERRY v. PITTSBURG SHORT-METHOD SMELTING & REFINING CO. et al.
(Court of Appeals of Colorado. March 8, 1897.)
CONTRACT WITH AGENT — LIABILITY OF PRINCIPAL — PLEADING AND PROOF.
 
1. Where an officer of a corporation obtained money from plaintiff by check payable to his individual order, and, in consideration thereof, transferred his own corporate stock to plaintiff, with an agreement that, if the business of the corporation paid a certain monthly percentage on the stock, plaintiff should keep it, otherwise it should be regarded as collateral security, and the money refunded with interest, the corporation was not bound by the transaction, though the money was used for its benefit.
2. Where a person receives corporate stock under an agreement with the owner that he will keep it if the business of the corporation yields a certain profit, but that otherwise the money paid therefor shall be regarded as a loan, proof that the business did not yield the specified profit is essential in a suit by such person to recover the mоnеу as a loan.
            Appeal from district court, Arapahoe County.
            Action by W. F. Sperry against the Pittsburg Short-Method Smelting & Refining Company and others. From a judgment of nonsuit, plaintiff appeals.  Affirmed.
            Thomas Ward, Jr., for appellant. Charles J. Hughes, Jr., and Tyson S. Dines, for appellees.
            THOMSON, J. This suit was brought by W. F. Sperry to recover from the Pittsburg Short-Method Smelting & Refining Company the sum of $1,500 which he alleged he had loaned to the defendant. The transaction was had with one George H. Chick, and the questions presented to the trial court were —First, whether Chick obtained the money as the agent of the company; second, whether he was such agent, with authority from the company to effect the loan in its behalf; and, third, whether, if there was no such authority originally, the acts of Chick in the premises were subsequently ratified by the company. At the conclusion of the plaintiff's case, and upon the evidence introduced by him, the court rendered judgment of nonsuit against him.
            The only witnesses to the transaction were Chick and the plaintiff. The testimony of Chick was taken by deposition, and he was the principal witness in the case. From his testimony the following appears: The defendant company had its principal office and business in Pittsburg. Kan., and also operated a concentrating plant in Denver, Colo. Chick was its manager and assistant treasurer. The loan was negotiated in Denver on the 5th day of January, 1893. Chick received $800 of the amount on that day, by Sperry's check on the Denver National Bank. The remaining $700 was obtained by draft drawn by Chick on Sperry, at Kansas City, Mo., on January 9, 1893. The check was payable to the individual order of Chick, and the draft was made by Chick individually. Except the check and draft, there was no written evidence of the transaction. At the time the loan was agreed upon, Chick transferred to Sperry 10 shares of the capital stock of the company. This stock was the individual property of Chick. We copy the following questions and answers from the examination and cross-examination of Chick, which, together with the foregoing synopsis, embraces substantially all he had to say concerning the transaction: "Q. Did you have any business transactions with the plaintiff in this suit in the month of January, 1893, while acting for defendant as its treasurer and manager? If so, please state what those transactions were. A. I did, on both the dates mentioned, and while I was acting as treasurer and manager. Those transactions were borrowing money to the amount of $1,500 from the plaintiff. It was borrowed money in this way. It was a stock transaction,— that is, providing the stock was worth so much money a share, then he would take the stock; if not, then I was to refund the money or stock, considering it then as collateral security. Q. If, in answer to Interrogatory 4, you say you did have business transactions with the plaintiff on or about the 5th and 9th of January, 1893, state where they occurred, and who were present, stating the exact dates and place. A. I went to plaintiff's office in the People's Bank Building, room 408, in the city of Denver, on or about that date, to negotiate this loan upon this stock, and the loan was made with the understanding, if the stock paid five per cent, or, rather, the business paid five per cent, on the capital stock a month, he then was to take the stock; if it did not, then he was to have his money back, with interest at one per cent, per month" All that Sperry said in relation to the transaction was: "I loaned Mr. Chick for the benefit of the company $1,500. * * * At the time I let Mr. Chick have this money, I took ten shares in the Pittsburg Short-Method Smelting & Refining Company's stock"
            It seems to us to be a legitimate conclusion from the foregoing evidence that Sperry, when he parted with his money, was not dealing with the company, or with Mr. Chick acting as the agent of the company, but with Mr. Chick individually. In so far as any light can be had from the check and draft, the transaction was between Mr. Sperry and Mr. Chick, each acting in his individual capacity. The evidence outside of these papers is that, in consideration of the money, Chick transferred to Sperry 10 shares of the company's stock, which was the private property of Chick; and the agreement, made at the time, was that, if the business of the company paid 5 per cent, per month on the stock, Sperry should keep the stock; otherwise the stock should be considered as collateral security, and Chick would refund the money to Sperry. Therefore, if the company's business yielded the specified profit, the transaction was a sale of stock; if not, it was a loan of money. The allegation is that it was a loan; and the plaintiff seeks to charge the company with the amount on the hypothesis that Chick, in obtaining the money, acted as its agent, and that the transaction was with it through him. But the stock did not belong to the company. It was Chick's private property. If, therefore, there was a sale, as the parties contemplated there might be, it was a sale by Chick of his own property to Sperry, and Chick was dealing with Sperry on his own account. If the transaction turned out to be a loan, then, upon the refunding of the money, Chick was entitled to a return of his stock, because in such case it would be held by Sperry only as collateral security. If there was a sale, the transaction was Chick's; if there was a loan, it was still Chick's, to the extent, at least, of his receiving back the collateral he had pledged; so that, if the company was bound by the agreement at all, It was only bound for the repayment of the money, or, in other words, for the redemption of Chick's stock. We are unable to dissect and take to pieces the agreement in this way. An agent cannot engage in a transaction which shall be his own if successful, and his principal's if not. This transaction was unitary; it was indivisible; and it must be considered as an entirety. It was either wholly a transaction of the company, or no part of it was. In so far as it involved a sale of stock, or a pledge of stock with a right in the pledger to reclaim it, it was not a transaction of the company, and therefore the company was not bound by any part of the agreement.
            No extended discussion of the law of principal and agent is necessary in this connection. There is no question of undisclosed principal in the case, and we conceive it to be the rule, where that question is not involved, that a party seeking to charge a supposed principal upon the contract of an ostensible agent must show at the very outset that he gave credit to the alleged principal, and that he intended, so far, at least, as he was concerned, to bind the principal; for, if he did not, it would be entirely immaterial whether the party with whom he dealt was an agent or not, or, being an agent, how comprehensive his authority was. That a person is an agent does not preclude him from making contracts in his own behalf, and by such contracts himself, and not another, is bound. Now, there is not in this record a syllable of evidence tending to show that a liability of the company, in any event, was contemplated by either party at the time the agreement was made and the transaction consummated. It is nowhere said that Chick approached Sperry as a representative of the company, nor can we infer, from anything that is said, that Sperry at the time relied upon the company, or intended to hold it to any responsibility. Not only is there a want of evidence of that kind, but there is evidence indicating that the reverse was the fact. Mr. Chick stated that, the company being pressed for money, he made an agreement with its officers to take the plant and run it himself, and keep them out of debt as far as possible, and that, in pursuance of this agreement, he afterwards ran the business himself, but in behalf of the company. It was after the business had been turned over to him that the alleged loan was made by Sperry. Mr. Sperry testified that, so far as he knew, the business was conducted by Chick in his own name. It may be that the money obtained was afterwards used for the benefit of the company, and it may be that Chick obtained the money for the purpose of so using it; but if he obtained it on his personal responsibility, and not on the responsibility of the company, it is immaterial what disposition he made of it, or what disposition he intended to make of it when he received it. An agent may borrow money on his own account, or obtain it by sale of his property, and give his principal the benefit of it. In such case a liability in his own favor against his principal may arise, but whatever cause of action the person with whom he dealt may have is against him.
            We dismiss the question of ratification by saying there was nothing to ratify. By a ratification a party estops himself to deny that a person ostensibly acting in his behalf was his agent. There is no such thing as a ratification by an alleged principal of an act which was not intended, by any of the parties to it, to bind him. The plaintiff entirely failed to show such connection of the company with the transaction as would authorize a judgment against it. But there is still another reason why the nonsuit was properly allowed. There was a sale of stock, conditioned on the company's business yielding a certain profit. It was only in the event of a failure to realize this profit that the money paid for the stock was to be regarded as a loan. As Sperry sued for it on the theory that it was a loan, it devolved on him to prove the facts which made it a loan. No such proof was offered, and the plaintiff, therefore, failed to show a cause of action against either Chick or the company. The plaintiff complains that certain portions of the testimony of Chick were stricken out of his deposition. The testimony stricken out consisted, for the most part, of general statements that the money was paid for the company's benefit, and that his acts as manager were  approved by the company. Among the statements stricken out we find none of any relevancy or materiality, or which could have any effect on the real questions in issue. They would have done the plaintiff no good if they had remained, and their rejection did him no harm. The Judgment must be affirmed. Affirmed.
Pacific Reporter: Kansas Courts of Appeals, West Publishing Co.: 1897, page 315


    The Pittsburg Short Method Smelter site was identified in the spring of 2003 through historical reviews and reconnaissance activities. [It's described as being one block west of 29th and Broadway in Pittsburg.] The Pittsburg Short Method Smelter apparently operated as a silver and gold smelter rather than lead and zinc. A Phase I Focused Former Smelter Assessment (FFSA) Report completed in May 2004 confirmed smelting operations and smelter wastes on site.  
    After access issues were resolved in mid-2005, Phase II FFSA sampling activities were conducted and a Phase II FFSA Report was completed in October 2005. Sample results confirmed that soil and shallow subsurface soil were impacted by the heavy metal contaminants of arsenic, lead, and mercury. Ground water was not encountered above bedrock and, therefore, samples were not collected. Based on the results of Phase I and Phase II FFSA activities, the site was evaluated for a potential responsible party (PRP). A responsible party was not identified and additional investigation and/or cleanup actions will be conducted under the State Water Plan Contamination Remediation Program (SWPCRP).
Kansas Department of Health and Environment Bureau of Environmental Remediation, Identified Sites List Information, 2004  


BERKELEY'S ELECTION
    The officers and polling-places will be as follows: Second Ward--Inspectors, G. H. Chick, M. S. Blanchard. . . .
Excerpt, The San Francisco Call, April 12, 1897, page 7   The "G. H. Chick" references are likely to Guy Hyde Chick--George's son.


    Sheriff Johnson has received a letter from Fred E. Palmer, of Bandon, Oregon, asking for information of the whereabouts of C. H. Chick [sic], who was in this city when last heard from, nearly fifteen years ago. The aged mother of Chick still resides in Maine and wishes to find her long-lost son.
"Local Notes," Riverside Independent Enterprise, October 3, 1897, page 5


    M. J. McDonald has sued P. W. Johnson and George H. Chick to recover $500 on a note.
"Court Notes," San Francisco Chronicle, July 12, 1898, page 10


Dry Washer.
    G. H. Chick has on exhibition at the planing mill of Buchanan & Powers the latest thing in the way of a dry washer. It weighs but 35 pounds and can be taken apart and adjusted in less than three minutes. This little machine is known as "the mint," and by its use a man can accumulate a "mint" of money in a comparatively short time.
    Mr. Chick has a machine of 40-ton capacity being made, and it is about completed. All orders for these washers will be filled by the El Paso Development Company and manufactured right here in El Paso. These machines are now on exhibition at the above place, and Mr. Chick will take great pleasure in explaining the merits of them to all who call.
El Paso Herald, August 11, 1898, page 1


    G. H. Chick was a passenger on the Mexican Central yesterday for Chihuahua, to look after new mining interests.
"Personals," El Paso Herald, August 17, 1898, page 4


    G. H. Chick of Berkeley is back from a trip through Oregon, Washington and Northern California.
"Personal and Social," Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California, October 11, 1898, page 4


   
GOLD WASHING APPARATUS.--George H. Chick, Oakland, Cal., assignor of one-half to C. Zander, of Alameda, Cal. No. 613,494. Dated Nov. 1, 1898. This invention is designed to provide a continuously working apparatus for washing out gold and separating it from sand and other debris without stopping the work for cleaning up. It comprises a supporting frame with a chute mounted at an incline thereon, a main bottom having a stop or abutment at its lower end, a supplemental bottom formed of independent removable sections resting thereon and abutting endwise, each of said sections having a transverse riffle bar at its lower end, a superposed amalgamated plate and a plate fixed to the upper portion of the transverse riffle and projecting upwardly to form a chamber or pocket between itself and the amalgamated plate. A receiving box is fixed above the upper end of the apparatus having a screen bottom by which the coarser material is first separated and thrown out, and other screens situated above the inclined amalgamated plates so that a portion of the material passing through the first screens will be deposited on the first or upper set of plates, while a second coarser portion will be deposited on a second set of plates, thus separating and distributing the material and reducing the work to be done by either set of plates.
"Notices of Recent Patents," Pacific Rural Press, November 12, 1898, page 341


ALAMEDANS DENOUNCE SPEAKER WRIGHT
    G. H. CHICK, Berkeley--To say I am surprised at Wright's flop is putting it mildly. Wright has disgraced himself and everybody that voted for him has been betrayed. What will be the opinion of the university town when it is known that our representative voted for Dan Burns?
    E. P. BANCROFT--I would like to be one of the number to tar and feather the man who voted for Burns. Three of Berkeley's leading men--J. W. Richards, G. H. Chick and Professor Boone--had the utmost confidence in him. . . .
Excerpt, The San Francisco Call, January 13, 1899, page 2    Again, this is likely Guy Hyde Chick.


Census date: June 7, 1900
Name: George H. Chick
Residence: 1035 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco, California
Occupation: Miner/Dealer
Birth location: Maine
Married for 34 years
Household members:
George H. Chick, 60, male, born in Maine January 1840, parents both born in Maine
Josephine Chick, 40, female, born in Illinois May 1860, parents both born in Kentucky
Musaette Chick, 25, female, born in Kansas March 1875
Lloyd Chick, 24, male, born in Kansas January 1876
Gertrude Chick, 21, female, born in Washington January 1879
United States Census


Census date: June 8, 1900
Name: George H. Chick
Residence: First Avenue, Seattle, Washington
Occupation: Miner
Birth location: Maine
Married for 33 years
Household members:
George H. Chick (hotel lodger), 64, male, born April 1836, parents both born in Maine
United States Census


   
Florence Hyde Chick (a widow) (by G. H. Chick, attorney) to same, lot on N line of Durant Avenue, 75 E of Bowditch Street, E 25 by N 130, block 9, same, Berkeley; $10.
"Real Estate Transactions: Alameda County," San Francisco Call, November 15, 1900, page 10

George Horatio Chick, December 27, 1903 Times Dispatch, Richmond, Va..
December 27, 1903 Times Dispatch, Richmond, Virginia

    The Virginia Oregon Development Company, principal office Portland, Or.; capital stock, $100,000; incorporators, H. Charles Dunsmore, Joseph W. Pearl, A. Rose and G. Horatio Chick.
"New Oregon Incorporations," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, April 29, 1906, page B18


    Mr. Horatio Chick, one of the best-known citizens of Norfolk, Va., now visiting Washington, was a sufferer from rheumatism for many years. Munyon's Rheumatic Remedy cured him.
Advertisement, The Washington Post, February 6, 1907, page 27


    G. H. Chick left yesterday for Mexico City.
"Personal Mention," Bisbee Daily Review, Bisbee, Arizona, June 17, 1908, page 7


WOMAN AGENT SAYS SHE RETURNED ORE
    Mrs. Anna L. Krause, a mining stock saleswoman, was arraigned before Police Judge Smith this morning on a charge of grand larceny preferred by P. Horatio Chick [sic], a mining broker with offices in the Bacon Block.
    Chick said he had entrusted the woman with valuable specimens of ore and that she had failed to return them.
    Mrs. Krause acknowledged having received the ore, but told that she merely took [it] with her for the purpose of selling stock and that she had already returned it to Richard Phelan of San Francisco, one of the promoters of the company in which Chick is interested.
    Mrs. Krause put up bail and will have her preliminary examination on Monday. It is probable that the case will be dismissed.
Oakland Tribune, August 13, 1909, page 10


POLICE WILL FORCE MAN TO PROSECUTE
Horatio Chick Must Press the Charge He Preferred Against Mrs. Krause
    OAKLAND, Aug. 13.— When Horatio Chick, a mining man of this city, after causing the arrest of Mrs. Anna L. Krause on the charge of taking two lumps of quartz valued at $500 from his office attempted to drop the case, the Oakland police, believing that they had played the roles of dupes in a personal quarrel, determined to compel Chick to press the charge against the woman.
    Mrs. Krause was called in police court No. 1 this morning, and Chick's attorney announced that his client was anxious to "have the charge dismissed, but Prosecuting Attorney Decoto, acting upon the advice of Captain of Detectives Petersen, refused to acquiesce in the dismissal, and Police Judge Smith ordered Mrs. Krause to appear for trial next Monday. She was liberated on $l00 bail.
    Captain Petersen explained that he was tired of having the police department used as a collection or peace making agency by hotheaded citizens, and that he was going to attempt to instill a more wholesome respect for the majesty of the law, as exemplified by the Oakland police force, into the minds of the public. Therefore he insisted that the charge against Mrs. Krause be pressed.
San Francisco Call, 
August 14, 1909, page 12



    WOMAN RETURNS GOLD QUARTZ--Oakland, Aug. 17.--Mrs. Anna L. Krause, who was arrested on a charge of grand larceny preferred by Horatio Chick, a mining man, alleging that she had stolen two lumps of gold quartz valued at $500 from the Butte Saddle mining company of San Francisco, was released this morning by Police Judge Smith, when it was shown that she had returned the quartz before the warrant was served upon her.
"Suburban Brevities," San Francisco Call, August 18, 1909, page 8


Census date: April 18, 1910
Name: George H. Chick
Residence: Fourteenth Street, Oakland, California
Occupation: Mine Operator, Mine Promoter
Birth location: Maine
Married to his second wife for 20 years
Household members:
George H. Chick, 70, male, born in Maine, parents both born in Maine
Josephine Chick, 55, female, born in Illinois, parents both born in Kentucky
Gertrude Chick, 30, female, born in Washington
United States Census


CHICK--In Oakland, October 11, 1912, George H., beloved husband of Mrs. Josephine Chick, and father of G. H. Chick of Berkeley, a native of Maine, aged 76 years.
"Deaths," San Francisco Call, October 12, 1912, page 27


    George H. Chick, whose meteoric career in Medford is still fresh in the minds of local pioneers, is now a resident of Berkeley, Cal., in which city his aged father recently died.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, October 15, 1912, page 2


(First Published in the Cheney Sentinel October 14, 1914)
Notice of Service of Summons by Publication
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF SEDGWICK COUNTY, KANSAS,
DIVISION NUMBER 2.
Florence Chick, Plaintiff.
    vs.
George Chick, Defendant.
    The state of Kansas, to the defendant, George Chick, Greetings:--You are hereby notified that you have been sued in the above entitled court in the above entitled action by Florence Chick, the above-named plaintiff, and that unless you appear and answer the petition filed by the said plaintiff in the said court on or before the 30th day of November, 1914, the said petition will be taken as true, and judgment rendered therein of the following nature, to wit: forever divorcing the plaintiff from you the defendant and giving to the plaintiff the care, custody and control of the minor child Sarah Elizabeth.
Florence Chick, Plaintiff
    By Souders & Souders,
        Her Attorneys
(Seal) Attest: Chas. D. Fazel,
    Clerk of the District Court
Cheney Sentinel, Cheney, Kansas, October 15, 1914, page 4


"DEAD" MAN WELCOMES MOTHER
WHO COMES TO CLAIM BODY IN MORGUE
Pacific News Service
    PORTLAND, Oct. 23.--When Mrs. G. H. Chick of Oakland, Cal. stepped off the train in Portland today, a journey that was begun in the deepest sorrow a mother can know ended in supreme joy.
    Mrs. Chick stepped from the train into the arms of her son, Lloyd W. Chick, who hugged her vigorously to prove that he was very much alive, instead of a ghost.
    The mother left Oakland on telegraphic advice that her son was dead, a suicide. Today Chick is alive and well, and in the morgue, still awaiting identification, is the body of a young man who hanged himself last Wednesday in a public rest room. So closely did the dead man resemble Chick in face and form, the clothes he wore and even in scars on his body, that he was positively identified as Chick by more than half a dozen intimate friends, including Louis B. Marks, a dealer in novelties for whom Chick is a traveling salesman; H. Rossie, a fellow salesman, and the parents of Miss Florence Alexander of Spokane, Chick's sweetheart. Of the many who viewed the body, only Miss Alexander expressed any doubt that it was Chick.
    Chick was in Amity, Ore. when he read newspaper accounts of his death. He telephoned to the deputy coroner in Portland that they had the wrong man, and hastened to Portland to prove it. Miss Alexander met him at the train. Chick telegraphed is relatives in Oakland, but his mother already was on her way to Portland for his body.
Evening Tribune, San Diego, October 23, 1915, page 8


MRS. F. HYDE-CHICK DIES
Mother of Spokane Resident Expires in Arizona March 5.

    Mrs. Florence Hyde-Chick, mother of Ralph Hyde-Chick of this city, died at Douglas, Ariz., in the home of her niece, Mrs. Gerald Sherman, March 5 at the age of 75.
    Mrs. Hyde-Chick was the sole surviving child of David Niles Hyde, early pioneer of Seattle, and crossed the plains at the age of 5, coming from Madison, Wis., her birthplace, in an ox team, over the Lewis and Clark trail to Eugene, Ore., reaching there in 1853, fighting Indians and facing starvation on several occasions.
    After some years in Oregon this family moved to Boise, Idaho, where Mr. Hyde, her father, was a merchant and a leader in the vigilance committee that held their meetings in his stone warehouse. In 1867 Mrs. Hyde-Chick married George Horatio Chick of Maine and went to California, remaining there until 1879, her father and family removing to Seattle the same year.
    Mrs. Hyde-Chick was one of the earliest graduates of St. Helen's Hall at Portland, and all her life was a deep student of literature and politics. She spent many years in later life traveling in Europe and Africa and was a voracious reader and student of affairs up to the time of her death.
The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Washington, March 19, 1924, page 6


    During the summer of 1890 some men looking for a suitable place for locating a silver smelter visited Pittsburg [Kansas]. They were attracted by cheap coal and the desire of the citizens for additional industrial plants. After looking the field over they decided to locate if sufficient aid in establishing the plant could be obtained from local citizens. After a few days' negotiations between the visitors and the Pittsburg Commercial Club an agreement was reached and a formal contract was entered into.
    This agreement between the Pittsburg Commercial Club and the Short Method Refining Company of Pittsburg provided that the smelter company should refine not less than twenty tons of refractory ores at Pittsburg daily for a period of three years; and that the Commercial Club should erect a suitable building on a five-acre tract, which was to be donated, and supply $2,000 to be expended in the construction of furnaces. In addition, the smelter company agreed to install machinery in the amount of $16,000.
     The smelter company started construction work without delay, but was slow in completing the plant. Not until September, 1891, was it put into operation.
    The Commercial Club was equally slow in paying its bonus. The day before the expiration of a "six months" clause of the contract, it lacked $750 of the amount due the smelter company. That night it held a meeting for the purpose or raising the amount due. Two hundred dollars was raised from those present. As a means of enthusing others arrangements were made to run a special train to the plant the next morning. About one hundred men took advantage of the excursion. The enthusiasm of the occasion raised another $100. On returning to Pittsburg a committee raised the balance, $450, in about three hours.
     The silver smelter operated at a profit for some four years. It shut down for want of operating capital, due to the fact that the ore-purchasing agent had managed to get hold of most of the money in the treasury through fraudulent invoices and other means and had left for parts unknown. The plant shut down, never to reopen. Fortunately for stockholders, the plant had earned and had paid to them in dividends during its period of operation more than the stock had cost.
    The silver smelter was not a financial success for its owners, nor did it add materially to the pay roll of the town. But it was considered to have performed a valuable service for the town in advertising it and in furthering business enthusiasm.
"Some Phases of the Industrial History of Pittsburg, Kansas," Fred N. Howell, Kansas Historical Quarterly, May 1932, page 273




Last revised April 21, 2017
*Thanks to Daniella Thompson, website editor of the Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association, for this information.