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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Abby Does Jacksonville

    Colvig & Rowe, at McCoy's grove, Willow Springs, are making the largest, best and in every way most comfortable dancing pavilion ever constructed in Southern Oregon. It will accommodate twelve sets at a time.
    Quite a number of ladies and gentlemen from this place paid Willow Springs a visit Sunday to witness the drill for the equestrian exercises announced for the Fourth of July celebration at McCoy's grove, and which proved unique and interesting.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1879, page 3


    Mrs. Duniway speaks at Willow Springs on the Fourth.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 2, 1879, page 3


    DISTINGUISHED VISITOR.--Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway, the talented editress of the New Northwest, is sojourning here and intends remaining a month in the valley. It is the lady's intention to lecture at various points on the disabilities of her sex, and on moral and educational and religious topics. Her established reputation as a laborer in the cause of oppressed womanhood must command good audiences. We hope to be able to announce her appointments. Her lecture on Sunday was to an overflowing house, the subject being "Woman and Bible," and strangely enough to say, the ladies of the audience were less pleased than the sterner sex, who were the subject of attack. The lecturess declared that her mission was to make woman discontented, but we noticed on Monday morning that housewives were at the washtub as usual, happy to know that they had any linen to cleanse and husbands to buy soap. All of which shows the utter perversity of womankind, or their sensible appreciation of the sphere in which God has placed them.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 2, 1879, page 3


    "DAVID AND ANNA MATSON."--This is the title of an excellent little work by Mrs. Duniway, with a copy of which we have been favored. It has been the recipient of many encomiums, and, as it has passed through two editions, is evidently popular. We will attempt its review at some future time.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1879, page 3



    IN TOWN.--Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway, editress of the New Northwest of Portland, and a lady well known throughout the state, arrived in Jacksonville on Friday last. She will remain in this section for several weeks, delivering lectures and looking after the interests of her paper, as also a poetical work written by herself. Mrs. Duniway stands at the head of the Woman Suffrage Party of Oregon, and her lectures in this place during the past week were in a great measure devoted to the inculcation of ideas in consonance with its objects. Much at fault as her views upon the enfranchisement of woman are, and in opposition to those of a majority of her auditors as they must be, her excellent command of language, tempered with a degree of wit and sarcasm, gain for her the attention and respect not always accorded public speakers espousing unpopular causes. Unsupported by cogent arguments, Mrs. Duniway, by ludicrous comparisons and a deft manipulation of extraordinary cases, very likely frames an excuse for the woman suffrage movement in the minds of some. While we cannot endorse the objects of her mission, her ability and perseverance in so hopeless a cause must be complimented. Mrs. Duniway will visit different points of Jackson County before returning to Portland, and may take occasion to deliver further lectures in Jacksonville.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1879, page 3


    Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway will deliver a lecture at the Willow Springs parade ground today, at four o'clock p.m., choosing as her subject "The Declaration of Independence."
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1879, page 3


    Mrs. A. S. Duniway, of the New Northwest, is in Jacksonville, advancing the interests of her paper and the cause of woman suffrage. She began a course of lectures in the church at Jacksonville last Sunday evening. Mrs. D. will spend several weeks in our valley, and will visit Ashland in a short time.

"Local Briefs,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1879, page 3


MRS. DUNIWAY'S LECTURES.
    The course of lectures announced by Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway ended Wednesday evening; at all except one the attendance was very good, and on that particular evening there seemed to be a universal fear on the part of the men that they might hear something unpleasant, and consequently they stayed away. Perhaps they expected to hear enough at home, and worn with the business cares of the day had no desire to anticipate. At all events the superior sex seem willing to show the white feather and by unmanly capitulation left her the mistress of the field. When a lady assumes a public position she invites criticism, and the examination of her theories should be fair, without reference to sex or "previous condition of servitude," and to say that her lectures were the mere twaddle of a discontented woman would be unfair. To say they had no [bearing] on many of the abuses of [society] would be unjust, that they were wholly unmixed with common sense and truth would be false. Indeed they were a strange, grotesque mosaic of philosophy and physics, plain common sense and things calculated to excite the mirth of the audience all grouped round the "central idea" of woman suffrage. Mrs. Duniway has achieved prominence among those who hope to redress woman's wrongs and reform the abuses of society, but we do not think that her zeal is controlled by the calm, sober judgment taught by history and experience. Universal, complete, unlimited female enfranchisement, political and social, all embodied in the right to vote, is to be the panacea to cure the civil, political and social ills of life. In this we differ. Reform to be lasting must be gradual, and life bears burdens that no legislation may lighten; society itself inflicts wrongs that only the slow growth of a pure and sound sentiment can redress. In our opinion this sudden, full enfranchisement would only increase the cares and responsibilities of female existence. Let us grow wise slowly. Let us observe the lessons of nature and not try to quicken an oak into a mushroom growth at the expense of fiber and strength and durability. Let us try partial suffrage, first the right to vote on all educational and moral questions, the right to say whether saloons should be opened on Sunday or opened at all--and we doubt not that the experiment would be successful. Mrs. Duniway is hardly fair to the sterner sex, hardly fair to her own in asserting that woman is weak and powerless. She withholds history and forgets to tell of the notable instances of woman's tyranny and by what subtle, gentle power she governs. She might have told us of many a Cleopatra who, with a wave of her jeweled finger, ruled all the nations of half the earth through a weak and doting Antony, and have added that love rules the world today, but it suited her better to make us shoulder all the sins of omission and commission. As a lecturess Mrs. Duniway is bright, spirited, witty, cultured, modest and thoughtful and shows strong will and extraordinary ability. Some of her theories are extravagantly Utopian, some of her pictures of life sadly and truthfully real, others overdrawn and extravagant. Let us be fair to Mrs. Duniway and listen to her as gentlemen. If we are afraid she will say something unpalatable, then there is something wrong. If we are as we claim to be, guiltless, surely we need not fear to face a woman. Her lectures will be found very entertaining, and as we have all learned something from our own it would be singular if we derive no instruction from somebody else's mother.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 9, 1879, page 2


    LECTURES.--Mrs. Duniway is announced to lecture next Sunday at the church at Manzanita at eleven a.m., subject "The Centennial Year." She is at present engaged in lecturing at Phoenix, and will return to Jacksonville on Friday. Next Tuesday she begins a course of lectures in Ashland, and will lecture twice in this city on her return, giving her closing address for the benefit of the M.E. Church.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 9, 1879, page 3


    DAVID AND ANNA MATSON.--This is the title of a poetical work by Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway which has reached its third edition. It is an  Eastern story told in a manner that shows the genius of the authoress, and is one of those works that will bear acquaintance. The binding and general style of the book is elegant, and it contains a faithful engraving of Mrs. Duniway, who is in this county canvassing for it with good success. The volume also contains a number of beautiful Oregon poems.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 9, 1879, page 3


    Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway lectured on Sunday evening to an audience which was large considering the rain. The subject was "everyday religion."
    Mrs. Duniway invited "not" to speak at Willow Springs on the Fourth for fear of disarranging the exercises. We are ashamed of the judgment of our friends down there as to expect to prevent a woman from talking on "Independence" day was simply preposterous and of course she had a large and attentive audience.
"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 9, 1879, page 3


EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE.
Dear readers of the New Northwest:
    On the morning of the 26th ult., after having passed a sleepless night--the result of a strange premonition afterward accounted for in a sad bereavement in a relative's household [the death of Duniway's niece, 20-year-old Elvia H. Fearnside], the news of which reached us four days later in the shape of an obituary in the columns of the New Northwest [Duniway's own newspaper, published in her absence] of the same date--we were roused from a couch of restlessness to try the realities of a hundred-mile journey by stagecoach, our destination Jacksonville.
    When you go by rail or steamer you cannot possibly realize one-half of the incidents of your journey. The fatigue is too slight, the transit too rapid, the comforts too many. In such cases you grow indolent as you travel, and if your way is long you will unconsciously forget to look about you. Very different are your sensations when you mount the box above the stagecoach boot, and, seated behind the prancing six-horse team, suffer yourself to be strapped upon your precarious perch beside the obliging driver, your main business for the next twenty-four hours being an attempt to hold your place and ease, as well as may be, the constantly recurring jolts that shake you to a jelly and bruise you to a pulp.
    All day long the patient horses pursue their winding way, in diligent obedience to the driver's whip. The stage road winds along through the labyrinthine mazes of narrow valleys that form divides between the zigzag heights which stretch themselves away upon either hand, as though, sometime during a great internal rupture in the ages gone, their closed sides had parted, leaving all exposed and bare the erewhile hidden rivers that come tearing down the gorges to form a patch of earth upon either bank, upon which men have founded farms and stock ranches, leaving only room between their borders for the tortuous river and the winding road. And such ranches! The alluvial deposits of centuries of mountainside abrasion have so prodigally enriched them that, almost without human effort, the soil produces with amazing power and regularity. One old man occupies, or, rather, claims several thousand acres in one locality, who has raised a bountiful crop of wheat every season for thirty years, without rotation or the idea of it upon a single field. Of course this man is rich; that is, as men count riches. But he lives in a tumble-down old shanty and dresses in patched butternut, and his equally ragged old wife goes barefoot. They have raised somewhere about a dozen sons, who will inherit these possessions someday, and will, it is to be hoped, prove less greedy than their parents, and enjoy a little more of life than the bare, comfortless idea of struggling through a checkered existence for the sole purpose of ascertaining how little they can use with benefit to themselves.
    Noon, and Canyonville. Here we encounter an intelligent landlady, an hour's rest, and a good dinner. Then we journey on, sometimes passing for miles through a tree-studded gulch, sometimes slowly climbing great mountains and again rapidly dashing down them, and at sundown we reach a beautiful and fertile valley where there is a store and stage station; and here we halt for supper, to be met by genial Mrs. Kitchen and her amiable daughter, Mrs. Levins, the latter a whilom schoolmate of our younger brothers and sisters at Forest Grove, and the former a specially wide-awake woman suffragist. After a supper fit for a king, we journey on and on, into the heart of the night, into the heart of the mountains, over zigzag roads and past many winding turns of the busy Rogue River, our companions for miles the beautiful deer, that are so little afraid of the coach and team that they amble gracefully up to me in the waning twilight and gaze wistfully into our faces, regardless of the murderous wishes of the driver, who vainly swears for a revolver. Then, as darkness takes the place of twilight, the glorious stars come out in myriads and hang their flaming jewels in the limpid heavens, fit monarchs of the mighty solitude.
    Sometime after midnight, we reached a way station, where we changed horses, and, after driving onward for a mile or so, discovered that the whip, that indispensable weapon without which no driver could think of hazarding his reputation as a modern Jehu, had been lost or left behind. The driver suddenly gave us the lines, and, alighting, loosened the off tug of the off wheeler [i.e., the right-hand strap from the collar of the right-hand horse nearest the coach], so that the coach might not run many yards without a complete smashup if the team should get frightened, and, leaving us there alone in the darkness, so securely strapped in the perch behind the apron that we couldn't extricate ourself from the buckles, though we tore our gloves to shreds in the attempt, hurried back with a lamp, and was gone a trifle over twenty minutes, though to the solitary wanderer it seemed nearer twenty hours. Once, while the stillness was so profound that we fancied we could almost hear the twinkling of the distant stars, we were startled by a sudden "loo" from some awakening cow in ambush, which so frightened the near leader that he danced an equine hornpipe. Maybe we didn't pull the ribbons and say, "Whoa beauties!" and "Oh mercy!" and "Why did the driver cripple the coach before he left it?" and many other things which can't now be remembered. But that off wheeler proved a veritable brick. He acted as though he was fully aware of the situation, and felt that the entire responsibility of the safety of the United States mail was resting on his tug-burdened shoulders.
    "Why did you unhitch the tug, throw off the brake, and leave me wholly at the mercy of the horses?" we asked, nervously, as the driver came panting up.
    "The horses won't start when one of the wheelers knows a tug's loose and on his back," he said, carelessly, as, readjusting the hooks, mounting to his perch, and vigorously damning the socket that wouldn't hold a whip properly, he lashed the team to a tight run, and on we crashed at a fearful rate, obliged to make up for lost time.
    Morning, and breakfast at Rock Point, fourteen miles from Jacksonville, a picturesque spot to which we shall again allude before returning home. Then a three hours' ride brings us to Jacksonville, our place of present destination, and we give a sigh of relief at the prospect of speedy rest, as we look abroad over the landscape and think of the nearby hotel.
    Away, away to the left, as the stage bounds, bumps and crashes along, we see the broad and beautiful valley of Rogue River, looking in the uncertain haze of the summer morning like a vision of Paradise. The valleys are so level, the trees so graceful, and the whole so vastly magnificent that it would seem impossible that want or greed or turmoil or politics or drunkenness or scandal should ever enter. At the head of the valley, hemmed in by an amphitheater of billowy hills, sits Jacksonville, in solitary state, like a reigning queen who scorns to hold communion with her surrounding subjects. The little wooden hotel, in which we find cozy quarters, is a model of neatness and comfort, and is kept by Mr. and Mrs. Savage, who certainly deserve the patronage they get. There are ever so many well-filled stores, and a bank, of which C. C. Beekman is president. There are two churches, three livery stables, three hotels, three millinery stores, and more lady clerks than in any other town on the coast. There is a notable lady here, Mrs. P. J. Ryan, who was editor of a newspaper in Indiana at the opening of the rebellion, who is now heavily engaged with her husband in the dry goods business [Elizabeth St. Clair Ryan, 1838-1913]. Mrs. Plymale, estimable wife of Hon. W. J. Plymale, who was once a member of the legislature, is one of the most active workers in the woman suffrage field whom we have met anywhere. She is sharper than lightning, and it is little wonder that evil-doers fear her. In addition to the care of her family of eight children, she is a high officer among the Odd Fellows and in the Grange, is a writer for the newspapers, and a good public speaker.
    We had crept, more dead than alive, to our room at the hotel, and, after a bath and luncheon, had spent several hours in a vain attempt to coax jaded nature into a tranquil slumber, when to our great delight Mrs. Plymale, accompanied by Mrs. McDonough, of Willow Springs, was shown to the room, where we planned for a campaign, which began on Sunday evening, the 29th ult., in the Methodist Church, before a large and, for the most part, happy audience, though the subject, "Woman and the Bible," proved so clearly the palpable fallacy of the "one-sided curse" theory that several man's rights fogeys got awfully scared to think we'd knocked their Bible pins from under 'em, and they have since endeavored to move heaven and earth to prevent the men from attending other lectures. The masses of women and the smartest men will attend, in spite of them, however, though the Sentinel, in trying to carry water on both shoulders, gave a very flattering and yet altogether unfair account of the first lecture, in the evident hope to aid the opposition and mollify us. But the editor really meant to compliment us, and it isn't his fault that, after we had given him arguments, we couldn't give him brains to comprehend them. The Times, the other newspaper here, has not, at this writing, spoken, though the editor is an able young man, and we look for courtesy from him when he does speak. He is a financial success, and is consequently above being a hack for weak-minded man's rights simpletons. One peculiarity of the men has amused us greatly. Quite a number of them have run like Turks--or turkeys--at our approach. One, a merchant, who is a commissioned brigadier general of the home guards under Governor Taylor [Thomas G. Reames], scooted out at the back door of his store as we entered, and we could easily have captured the whole concern with a single blank cartridge if his younger brother hadn't held the fort like a man. In this instance, the Governor, who is usually correct in his conclusions, gave the commission to the wrong person. Surely he could not have been personally acquainted with little Tommy Reames, or he would not have removed a veteran of thirty years' standing like General Ross to make room for a brigadier who would run from a lady whom everybody knows had no evil designs upon him. The deputy sheriff was another protector of the public interests who deserted his post at our approach, although our old friend McPherson had come along to introduce and protect him, and even if we had had any evil designs upon him or his office, would not have permitted us to injure a single hair of his cowardly head.
    Every city has its dignitaries, and prominent among those of Jacksonville is Madame Jane Holt, who keeps a famous and well-regulated hotel, and who is granddaughter to the French Duke de la Roboam, whose family was one of the most powerful in France during the palmy days of the Bourbon dynasty.
    This (Wednesday) evening is to be the fourth occasion of our protracted meetings. The audiences on week nights are not large, as it is near the glorious Fourth. The evenings are short and everybody is busy.
    We forgot to say that Judge Prim is another protector of the people's interests who ducks his head and runs when he sees us. His protected and supported wife, whom he once banished from her home and children for two years because he was weak enough to permit somebody to slander her, and who finally allowed her to come back to him for her children's sake and his own convenience, is keeping a very nice and prosperous millinery store, and is wise enough to buy her goods in Portland and patronize her own state, instead of California. We're glad we've heard the other side of the Judge's well-known domestic story. While men only had control of newspapers, such men could pass for angels of mercy, no matter how tyrannical they had been. But a better day is dawning, and justice will yet assert herself everywhere, not even excepting in the men's rights courts. But, to return to the men who run at our approach. They remind us of the old schoolday rhyme, which, with a little variation, reads as follows:
"We charged upon a flock of geese
    And put them all to flight,
 And not one sturdy gander
    Has thought to show us fight."
    We bear letters of introduction from various lower valley dignitaries to various masculine nabobs in this beautiful region, and, after we've had time to see what we can do on our own responsibility, just as we used to be compelled to do everywhere, we'll present the letters, and then, dear, confidential reader, we'll tell you all about the fun. There are a number of would-be prominent men in this place who have tried their best, because of their ignorance of our position, to snub and ignore and ridicule us, who, did they but know what their impudence will cost them, would bow like monkeys and chatter like magpies. It's too jolly for anything.
    On the Fourth we are to orate by special invitation at Willow Springs, although the regular order of business was arranged before our arrival. We also acknowledge a like invitation from Jacksonville, though it came too late for acceptance, and we are physically unable to do the necessary traveling and make the two addresses in the heat of one tropical day.
A.S.D. [Abigail Scott Duniway]    
    July 2nd, 1879.
The New Northwest, Portland, July 10, 1879, page 2


    The celebration at McCoy's grove, near Willow Springs, was nonetheless an unqualified success. Many from a distance were no doubt deterred from attending by the gloomy weather prevailing that morning, but the crowd was, if anything, larger than the one present at the celebration in Jacksonville. Estimates made by those who had an opportunity of judging place the number at not less than 1,100 persons, who came from every portion of the country. The committee of arrangements was assiduous in its duties, neglecting not the slightest detail, and that its efforts were eminently successful all will attest. The exercises were very interesting and duly appreciated, comprising prayer by Elder M. Peterson, reading of the Declaration of Independence by Frank Sifers, and an eloquent oration by Nat. Langell, all of which was interspersed with excellent music by the tuneful glee club. The equestrian quadrille and lancer's tournament proved a prominent feature and displayed to good effect the equestrianism of the ladies and gentlemen participating as well as the training they had received at the hands of Major Colvig. The grounds had been furnished with a spacious dancing pavilion by Colvig & Rowe, and the afternoon and evening were agreeably spent in "tripping the light fantastic toe" to the dulcet strains of Prof. Scott's string band. The whole affair was enlivened by a short and pithy address from Mrs. Duniway, who did not fail to avail herself of this opportunity to score "those awful men." Various amusements were also afforded, and the "wee sma' hours of morn" had arrived before the last could prevail upon themselves to conclude the festivities of the event. Nothing occurred to mar the pleasures of the day, a fact that added greatly to the success of the celebration.
"The Celebration of Our Natal Day," Democratic Times, July 11, 1879, page 2


    LECTURES.--Mrs. Duniway will lecture at the Manzanita Church next Sunday at eleven a.m., subject "The Centennial Year." She is at present engaged in lecturing in Phoenix, and will return to Jacksonville today. Next week she goes to Ashland and will begin a course of lectures in that place on Tuesday, the 15th inst. On her return to this city she will give two additional lectures before returning homeward. The last address will be given as a benefit for the M.E. Church. The times for and subjects of these lectures will be announced hereafter.

Democratic Times,
July 11, 1879, page 3


    Mrs. Duniway held forth at the M.E. Church on Sunday last, delivering an interesting lecture upon a theological subject. A fair attendance was noticeable.

"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, July 11, 1879, page 3


    COMING TO LECTURE.--Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway writes us from Phoenix that she will be in Ashland on Tuesday, the 15th, and begin a course of lectures on the evening of the same day. Her subjects are: First "The Woman Question," second "Constitutional Liberty," third "The Centennial Year." We predict large audiences for Mrs. Duniway, as she is an interesting lecturer, and well known to many of our people.
Ashland Tidings, July 11, 1879, page 3


    A CORRECTION.--An impression is prevalent in the valley that Mrs. Duniway was mobbed simply because she was an advocate of "woman's rights." It is false. This woman was treated with courtesy until she stripped off the mask of a lady and showed her true character as a social scavenger. The orientals believed in a class of females being ghouls, who nightly dug into graves and feast on the putrefying carcasses of human beings. This being is only a ghoul who feasts on [illegible] social scandal, and the course she has commenced here will not be
brooked by any community. The homes of this town were kindly opened to her, but today there are but few doors in Jacksonville that will not be slammed in her face with contempt.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 16, 1879, page 3


    The flying accounts of the egging are exaggerated, and meddlesome people are busy circulating false reports on persons entirely innocent of any participation in it. Our country friends will do well to be quiet until they learn the whole truth.
    It is reported in certain quarters that Rev. D. A. Crowell refused Mrs. Duniway permission to lecture in the M.E. Church. This is a mistake. Neither Mrs. Duniway nor any of her friends ever asked Mr. Crowell for the church. In fact, he is not the custodian of the church building. It is in the power of the trustees, only, to permit the church to be used for any purpose except for divine service. Mrs. Duniway had no authority whatever to enter the church to lecture.
"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 16, 1879, page 3


    ANOTHER SENSATION.--On Saturday last copies of the New Northwest were received here containing an uncalled-for allusion to a family scandal that had almost died out of remembrance. Mrs. Duniway was in town, and the ill-advised allusion was received [illegible] parties referred to stand high in this community. About ten in the evening a dummy dressed in female attire, and labeled "She Devil Duniway, the family libeler," was burned in front of Mrs. Vining's hotel where Mrs. Duniway was stopping, and as the correspondent stepped to the door she received a slight volley of eggs, but retired too quickly to receive all that were in store for her. We deprecate this proceeding which was the work of the juvenile element, who took advantage of a moment of public exasperation, not because the correspondent wears the garb of a woman, but it is not a proper manner of expressing public contempt. The family circle is a sacred thing that no libeler or slanderer can invade with impunity, and although this community is justly indignant the law is competent to punish and should be first invoked. If one of the results of the "woman's" rights movement is the right to take advantage of the difference due the sex and drag dead scandals that the public have no business with to the surface, the pretended reform will soon die of its own nastiness. Mrs. Duniway announces her intention to lecture here again, which is her undoubted right, but the great American privilege of the public to listen or not is equally undeniable. We condemn any kind of outlawry as wrong in principle and earnestly hope that this woman will not be again molested.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, July 16, 1879, page 3



EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE.
Dear readers of the New Northwest:
    At this writing the shimmering midsummer has seated herself down upon the billowy hills and undulating vales of Jackson County, and the indications are that she has come to stay. But we did not take up the editorial pencil to scribble about the heat of the summer, for we have decidedly more tropical facts to chronicle than those of climate. Last week, as you remember, we wrote you of an invitation to lecture on the Fourth at Willow Springs. Well, we went and fought and conquered, though we had no idea of a battle when we started in. The evening of the third, after we had declined all other invitations for the Fourth, and after those interested had sent out posters all over the country, saying we would "orate" at Willow Springs, and when it was everywhere known that the largest crowd in Southern Oregon would be gathered at that point on that day, partly because of the promised speech by a woman on the Declaration of Independence, the chairman of the committee on arrangements, Wm. M. Colvig by name, whom we had once honored at a popular public lecture in Illinois in '72 by asking him to preside, and publicly complimenting him as a fair specimen of the average Oregonian during the meeting; the gallant Major, who had stood up for the woman question like a man in a community where the general sentiment in its favor was so strong that even he could see that it would be unpopular to do otherwise, wrote us a note, signed by his own hand with the names of the two other members of the committee, and his own (the chairman's) as footpiece, and curtly informed us that the committee objected to our using any portion of the Fourth of July for a speech that was presumed to be out of the usual order of such orations; they wanted the afternoon from half-past two--the entire time from that hour till the morning of the fifth--for dancing, and their request was not unreasonable, and they should see that it was complied with. But it transpired, before the holiday was over, that the "Jedge didn't know the family."
    On the evening of the third we were driven over to Willow Springs by Mrs. Plymale, our team an elegant turnout from her good husband's livery stable, our destination the beautiful country home of Mrs. H. McDonough, where we met the aforesaid chairman and imaginary footpiece of the committee, who talked fairly enough on his own side of the question, saying that he had a pecuniary interest in the dancing hall, and the lecture would keep a large number from dancing who would otherwise pay him for tickets for the afternoon. We soon saw that this was only a subterfuge, for we offered to pay him in full for every minute of the Fourth of July we should use, and that didn't suit. So we finally compromised by agreeing, with his permission, to step to the stand, before the crowd was dispersed for dinner, and explain, for the satisfaction of the public and our own justification, that we did not wish to occupy the time in cultivating brains which time-honored usage had devoted to heels [i.e., dancing]--or words to that effect--so we would withdraw the published appointment till a future day. This compromise effected, we possessed our soul in serenity and repaired to the grounds, where there was some very fair singing by a choir (principally ladies, of course), and an oration by the Hon. Mr. Langell. Of his oration we can say little, for we couldn't hear much of it. Long before it was over the news had spread through the crowd that Mrs. Duniway had been ruled out by the dancing committee, and the commotion was so great in consequence that, though we strained our ears to the utmost, we couldn't even learn the fate of the bewitched historic "hog with six pigs" of whom he sought to tell the public; nor were we certain whether he said a word about an "ox with six calves" or "a horse with six colts" or "a man with six babes." But we presume the oration was first-rate, though it was lost, in the main, on that audience. But it will doubtless be preserved to posterity through printer's ink, and then we shall know just what that "hog with six pigs" had to do with a Fourth of July celebration. After some more singing, Major Colvig, protector of dancing, announced that they would now adjourn to dinner, after which they would have a horseback tournament and then the dance, thereby entirely ignoring his promise to give us opportunity to explain to the multitude that, in consideration of the committee's pecuniary and other interests, we should postpone our lecture till another day. And then the commotion increased, and the fan was refreshing. More people of both sexes and all ages than we had ever before been introduced to upon a single occasion, and all the friends we had met before who were present, and their name was legion, kept coming up and asking for the promised speech. We steadily declined to infringe upon the prior rights of heels; but the horseback tournament was long and unsatisfactory, and the dancing did not commence, and the discontent grew more manifest, and finally such a pressure, by leading citizens of the county, was brought to bear upon the Marshal of the day that he came to us, and, being introduced by Mr. Plymale, stated that it was the pleasure of the company, and of himself as Marshal, that we should make a short address. Thus protected, we entered the stand and spoke for twenty minutes, while the gallant Major was sweeping off the dancing floor. We had explained that the remarks would be brief, as we should not interfere with the trip of the light fantastic toe; but the self-constituted footpiece of the committee, nothing daunted by a woman speaker nor the eager crowds that pressed around the stand in attitude of respectful listening, ordered the music to begin while we were delivering the closing sentences, and, stepping forward, said, in a voice fairly choking with baffled man's rights dignity, "You will now choose your partners for a cotillion." We gently reminded the heel-protecting Major that we were speaking under the guardianship of the Marshal, but nevertheless we shouldn't detain him a minute. That explanation didn't stop him or the music, and we bowed to the audience, smiling, and saying, "heels were trumps," left the platform, only to be conveyed a little distance by the enthusiastic crowd to a big open farm wagon, which was soon filled with ladies, in whose midst we stood, while the augmented throng gathered in the sun and wind and dust and listened for a full hour to the gospel of liberty as we had learned it from the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States. The work of this hour has broken the back of the opposition to woman's complete emancipation in the county of Jackson. Lots of subscribers are coming in unbidden, and invitations to lecture are crowding upon us from every direction.
    The Fourth is over! Thank Heaven! And now we're ready for sightseeing.
    It is the morning of the fifth, a bright, balmy, beautiful forenoon, and we are off, accompanied by our hospitable friends, the McDonoughs, and good Mrs. Dean, their neighbor, our destination the diggings, two or three miles away, hard by the site of old Fort Lane, where a few logs are yet lying to mark the spot where troops were stationed during the memorable Indian war of '55 and '56. Mr. McDonough discovered this mine about four years ago, the placer gold having lain undiscovered a few inches beneath the surface of the ground, over which hundreds of soldiers had in the years gone by tramped for months, in innocent unconsciousness of the auriferous wealth beneath their feet. Owing to the scarcity of water, the work in these diggings is slow, but with plenty of this element the yield would be simply marvelous. Nuggets weighing hundreds of dollars have been picked up, and many pieces of from five to fifty dollars' weight have been found. The quartz ledge, from whence these outcroppings of the ages have descended, runs in a zigzag course up the mountainside, into which a shaft has been sunk, from which quartz assaying $300 to the ton has been taken. But Mr. McDonough is not wild over gold mining. He takes a common-sense view of the enterprise, and tills his broad fields in their season, and raises blood stock and reads the newspapers, and with his amiable consort, to whose efficient aid the woman movement owes much of its vitality and good standing in this community, enjoys a well-balanced life to the uttermost. It does one's heart good to see such people get rich.
    In the evening we return with Mrs. McDonough to Jacksonville, and on the morrow a genial party, ably engineered by Mr. and Mrs. Plymale, depart for the Sterling mine, prepared to make a day of it. The morning is glorious and the scenery grandly magnificent. A ride of ten miles, up and down the billowy, zigzag vales and hills, and the little village of Sterling comes to sight, and we are soon met by Mr. Ennis, the gentlemanly superintendent of the mine, who, after a bountiful lunch beneath the trees, conducts the party to the hydraulic works, where a head of water, brought in a ditch from Applegate Creek, eighteen miles distant, and conveyed into the mine through a 24-inch pipe, which at the base of the gulch is divided into two branch pipes of fifteen inches in diameter, and from thence into five-inch nozzles, pours a thundering, incessant stream of angry water as a vigorous broadside into the resisting heart of the rock-bound mountain, disemboweling the complaining earth and sending it crashing to the gulch below. Rocks, some of them weighing half a ton, are torn by this double-headed hydraulic monster from the ledge's side, and placed by miners upon dumps, from which they are lifted by a mighty derrick, also worked by hydraulic power, and cast in piles upon the ridge above, Mr. Ennis, the conductor, managing the machine with a tow line a little larger than the band of an old-fashioned spinning wheel. We looked innocently around for his "hollyhock," of which a certain editor had said a good deal in the Sentinel, but were laughingly informed that said "hollyhock" was simply a cataract in the said editor's eye. [This is a "goak."] [sic]
    After the hydraulic ram has spent its heaviest power against the mountainside, it gathers its remaining forces at the head of the gulch, whose depth it constantly increases, and forming a roaring, muddy cataract, is collected in sluiceboxes, and goes tearing onward toward the lowlands, leaving behind in the boxes an auriferous deposit sufficiently captivating to tempt the cupidity of even a political missionary.
    We learn that the company, of which ex-Gov. D. P. Thompson, present Mayor of Portland, is president and principal shareholder, has spent a hundred thousand dollars in developing his mine, and when we look at the character of the country over which the ditch has been carried, and note the stability and power of the machinery employed, we consider the estimate reasonable. There are but few men engaged now in the mine, the hydraulic power easily accomplishing the work of many hundred pairs of human hands.
    Several miles further on in the mountains, and we reach the famous placer beds on the lands of the Camerons, which are leased for operation to Gin Lin, an enterprising Chinaman, who is mining with machinery quite equal to that in use at Sterling, and, we believe, with like satisfactory results. Here our party spent a half hour in sightseeing, and then we retrace our steps, viewing as we come down the mountain gorges a magnificent thunderstorm on the adjacent heights, its fresh breezes filling the air with the balmy odors of Araby the blest.
    Now we are on the heights overlooking Jacksonville. What a prospect! The broad valley below, belted with dark green forests, with its trailing robe of amber wheat caught up here and there with festoons of orchard trees, and embroidered at its hem with floral phylacteries; the mountains, adjacent and afar, and away, away, till the eye is pained by the seemingly illimitable distance, the clear-cut crystal top of Diamond Peak [Mount McLoughlin?], beyond which, we know, lies Winnemucca, flanked by the transatlantic railroad, and afar to the northward the dark green mountains that rear their bristling heads between ourself and the dear ones at home.
A.S.D.                     
The New Northwest, Portland, July 17, 1879, page 2


Phoenix, July 11.               
    This Rogue River Valley grows yet more beautiful to behold as the eye grows more and more accustomed to it. With a railroad through to Roseburg from Redding, and a narrow-gauge connecting with the seat at Crescent City, this would become a veritable paradise for tourists in search of the beauties of nature. And then, the agricultural and mineral resources of the country are alike wonderful. No more fertile vales are to be found anywhere than these, where Nature would seem to have exhausted herself in making a soil, from one to nobody knows how many feet in depth, where every production of the earth that is to be found in temperate climes, and many of the fruits of tropical lands, are growing without irrigation and in the open air. The rainfall of this valley, as compared to that of the Willamette, is light and yet it is amply sufficient for agricultural purposes, although a more humid climate would render the abounding gold fields infinitely more productive. We opine that discoveries of gold are yet to be made beside which many of the mines that are now being worked will sink into insignificance. And yet, it is a subject of grave doubt as to whether gold mining pays humanity in the aggregate, no matter what its yield. Had the efforts that have been made in Jackson County for a quarter of a century to burrow into the earth for gold been used for tilling the soil and manufacturing the raw materials of the county into articles of home consumption and for general export, there is little doubt that this beautiful land would be far more prosperous today than it now is. In some sections whole creeks have been burrowed out and their beds turned literally upside town. They do have classic names for some localities, "Louse Creek," and "Tail Holt" being among the euphonious titles which are named in your hearing by polite society, which has become so accustomed to such terms that they no longer convey a ridiculous idea to any but the newly initiated.
    On Sunday evening, after the long ride to Sterling mine, of which we last week wrote you, we met a fair audience, after a pouring rain, the subject, "Everyday Religion," being exceedingly well received by the best element of the city. The newspapers, this week, have been exceedingly respectful to our work, although the Sentinel has not failed to "crib our thunder," and, calling it his own, say that we are unfair or we'd use it ourself. By the way, speaking of newspapers, the Sentinel is a very racy, readable and successful paper. Mr. Turner, the editor, who has hit us hard, and we've hugely enjoyed hitting back to get even, has built it up to a handsome circulation from a very small beginning, and the politicians stand in wholesome awe of him. His estimable wife is a twin sister of Mrs. Judge G. H. Stewart, of Vancouver, who (the latter lady), with her mother, Mrs. Chrisman, of Lafayette, and a younger sister, is at present visiting at his home in Jacksonville. Among the prominent and worthy gentlemen and their excellent families whose acquaintance we have made, and to whom we have been indebted for substantial aid in the prosecution of our labors, are the Danforths, Ryans, Beekmans, Rosses, Plymales, Wrisleys, Constants, and Savages. Mrs. M. H. Vining, formerly of Albany, whose excellent husband met a melancholy fate in the Puget Sound country by drowning, keeps a first-class boardinghouse and honorably supports her seven children, her noble work requiring a heroism as exalted as it is enduring.
    On Tuesday, the 8th, accompanied by Mrs. Plymale in one of their elegant turnouts from her good husband's livery stable, we drove over to Phoenix, our gallant lady pilot proving efficient and successful at her business.
    Phoenix is a charming little country village, chiefly noted as the abiding place of Hon. Sam. Colver and his splendid spouse, with whom we spent several delightful days, and lectured in the evenings to overflowing houses. Here are two grist mills of apparently sufficient capacity to grind the grain of the entire valley. There are two flourishing dry goods stores, one kept by J. R. Reames, Esq., and the other by Mr. Sargent, each of whom subscribed to the People's Paper [i.e., the New Northwest], thereby setting a praiseworthy example for the benefit of the merchants in Jacksonville. There is also a flourishing Good Templars lodge, a church, a schoolhouse, a drug store, a blacksmith shop, etc., and a surrounding country vastly rich in agriculture, fruit and blood stock. Phoenix is about a dozen miles from Jacksonville, and it is thought by many will yet become the county seat.
    Mr. Colver, or Uncle Sam, as he is familiarly called by everybody, is a noted personage, who began his career many years ago as a theological student, but apostatized, and turned his attention to verse-making, lecturing on anti-slavery and woman suffrage, and running an underground railroad. He was once cast into a dungeon for opinion's sake, and has ever been a consistent advocate of the freedom of the press, the tongue and the people. Evil-doers fear him, friends honor him, and enemies are compelled to respect him.
    Our lectures here have been so largely attended and so well received that we have promised to return on Monday, the 14th, on our way to Ashland, and give a fourth address; subject, "The Temperance Reform."
    Tomorrow (Sunday) we are to lecture at Manzanita [the Central Point area], in a free church in the center of a large farming settlement, and in the vicinity of some of the prettiest and most prosperous homes on the Pacific slope.
    On Tuesday, the 15th, our labors begin at Ashland, after which we will give two more lectures in Jacksonville before turning our longing footsteps homeward.
    Later.--It is Saturday, 4 p.m., July 12th, and we've come back to Jacksonville, and behold! there's a mighty tempest in the social and political teapot. The New Northwest of Thursday has just come to hand, containing our letter of the 2nd inst. And Brother Turner, of the Sentinel, whom we've been praising to the skies in the first pages of this letter, is madder than two hornets. Of course he doesn't care for what we said in that letter in retaliation, after he'd attacked us! That's not it, at all! But he is furious to think we've justified an injured lady [Mrs. Prim] by vindicating her in the women's paper. We guess he'll get over it, however. And, as to the Judge, whose champion he has suddenly become, if he can outlive Brother Turner's defense, he needn't fear any further notice at our hands. At this writing, squads of men are holding indignation meetings on the street, hard by the store of a certain brigadier general, and it really looks as though they'd be calling out the militia pretty soon for the express purpose of fighting a lone woman whose offense against them has consisted in simply telling the truth.
    We learn, by couriers who have invaded the enemy's camp and brought us the news, that there is a terrible exhibition of virtuous wrath among the chaste protectors of women because we used the words "for his own convenience" in reference to an act of tardy conjugal justice from a well-known member of the bench. We had to come to Jacksonville to learn that such a remark meant anything immodest or immoral. We know of more than one hundred who, but for his own convenience in keeping his wife as a house servant, without wages, would turn her out on the common to starve, if he could. We pity men whose minds and morals are on so low a plane that we cannot penetrate the epidermis of their understanding with a single ray of the sunlight of truth without stirring up mire and dirt. And the worst of it all is, they are lawmakers, under whose rule licentiousness and drunkenness abound in the land. But it's a good sign to see 'em squirming when they're hit. The Standard [a Portland newspaper published by Anthony Noltner] of the 10th is also at hand, and we see that a certain major of militia, or one of his colleagues, who can't quite hide his earmarks, has been calling us a he-hen, and otherwise classically caricaturing us, as becometh self-constituted "protectors of women." Let 'em write. They'll feel better after their vomit is over. A moral physician don't expect to give humanity a badly needed emetic and see 'em get over it without ejecting putridity by the way of the mouth.
    Still later.-The plot thickens.
"Oh, ye brave!
Who seek for glory or the grave!"
    The "militia's" been out and egged us! And they've burnt us in effigy, the image being a fair likeness of George Washington, so we're told, though we didn't see it; and it wore a white apron with the words "libeler of families" on it in big letters--a fitting name for the cowardly canaille who seek, under cover of darkness, to exhibit their true inwardness. Verily, there's no other form of tyranny that dies so hard as man's rights. Let us be patient with it while it undergoes its death agonies. Only one egg hit us, and that was fresh and sweet, and it took us square on the scalp and saved a shampooing bill. But what a comment on the morals and manners of an incorporated town! A barrel of tartar emetic rolled into Pandemonium couldn't have stirred up a greater degree of foulness than a quarter of a column of simple truth in the New Northwest has awakened in Jacksonville. But, to the credit of the better class of men be it spoken, they were not engaged in the mob at all. It was bearded hoodlums and bad whisky that did it, incited no doubt by the silly indignation of a certain editor, who has learned to his confusion that some editors can write sharp sayings for their newspapers as well as some others. The good will go on and women will be free. Selah?
A.S.D.                     
The New Northwest, Portland, July 17, 1879, page 2


THE OUTLOOK IN SOUTHERN OREGON.
    From the tenor of our Southern Oregon exchanges, it would seem that Mrs. Duniway and her lectures are the principal theme of thought and comment in the Rogue River Valley. The editor of the Jacksonville Sentinel devotes a column of his issue of the 9th inst. to what would seem to those who are unacquainted with the lady's teachings to be a very fair and candid criticism of her labors, but those who have read her writings and attended her lectures cannot be made to believe that she has suddenly changed her tactics, and, from proving that woman's influence is all potent for either good or evil, has gone to "asserting that her sex is weak and powerless." Neither can the thousands of women who have winced under the scathing power of her criticism of her sex's shortcomings believe the Sentinel to be honest in its assertion that "it suits her to make the sterner sex shoulder all the sins of omission and commission." The Sentinel but quotes Mrs. Duniway's own sentiments, and almost her exact language, when it says, in a connection which the reader is expected to interpret as the editor's idea, and as the very opposite of her own teachings, that "reform, to be lasting, must be gradual, and life bears burdens that no legislation may lighten; society itself inflicts wrongs that only the slow growth of a pure and sound sentiment can redress."
    It is well for this reform that it no longer fears the ridicule or misrepresentation of the press. Newspapers like the New Northwest are now circulated everywhere in advocacy of the truths the lecturers are teaching, thereby compelling the opposition press to treat every measure that carries real merit with a certain degree of respectful consideration, even if accompanied by foxy unfairness. The Jacksonville papers, which, during the first week of Mrs. Duniway's labors in the strongholds of masculine supremacy, either characterized her mission as hopeless, or tried to treat the whole subject as a burlesque, are now saying, by way of easing their somersault, "Let us try partial suffrage--the right to vote on all educational and moral questions, the right to say whether saloons should be opened on Sunday, or opened at all--and we doubt not that the experiment would be successful."
    Mrs. Duniway, in her most "extravagantly Utopian theories" (again we quote the Sentinel), has never demanded more than this. All matters of public interest properly belong under the head of "moral questions," and it is a tacit admission of the great need of her mission when an editor inadvertently admits that he considers the masculine policies in which he is engaged as immoral. We think he has failed to attend upon Mrs. Duniway's lectures closely who thinks it necessary to assert in his paper that "she might have told us of many a Cleopatra, who, with a wave of her jeweled finger, ruled all the nations of the earth through a weak and doting Antony." Those who have paid sufficient heed to Mrs. D.'s teachings to be able to fairly criticize them cannot but be aware that she lays much stress upon this very fact--that the United States is ruled today by "Cleopatras with jeweled fingers through weak and doting Antonys," and that this is just what is ruining the country. The advocates of woman suffrage realize that there is but one possible way of dethroning the Cleopatras of American politics, and that way is through the ballots of the wives and mothers of these same "weak and doting Antonys" who are now "ruled" by the unlawful "love" of designing and unscrupulous women; men who leave their wives at home while they go unprotected to the capitol of state or nation, to fall easy and willing victims to the charms of the Aspasias and Cleopatras who wield a usurped scepter that belongs of right to the lawful mothers of the politicians' legitimate children.
    A great step is gained when an editor in a remote county where the woman movement is not yet two weeks old feels the cause to be sufficiently bolstered up by public opinion to be compelled to say: "Let us be fair to Mrs. Duniway, and listen to her as gentlemen. If we are afraid she will say something unpalatable, then there is something wrong. If we are, as we claim to be, gentlemen, then we need not fear to face a woman."
    The outlook is encouraging for Southern Oregon. Let the wives of men take courage, and the mothers of the land rejoice.

The New Northwest,
Portland, July 17, 1879, page 2


A Contemptible Affair.
    The indignation of the people has been aroused to its highest pitch by the appearance in the New Northwest of a slanderous article reflecting in a most unjust and uncalled-for manner upon one of our foremost citizens. And this resentment has been heightened, if that were possible, by the abandoned manner in which the sanctity of the family circle has been invaded and matters that were buried and forgotten in the long ago have been revived for the sinister purpose of venting malignant spite upon one who enjoys the high esteem of all for the simple and only reason that he has chosen to differ with the author of this contemptible article. We are amazed that one professing to be laboring for the best interests of woman and claiming the attention of the intelligent masses should thus debase the columns of a newspaper under her control. If these are teachings of woman suffrage it should be prohibited by statute. Mrs. Duniway has by this fell stroke done more injury to herself and her cause here than years can repair. The people can have patience with none who would so ruthlessly violate the holiest laws of the land. We are not surprised that public execration should be unbounded, for it cannot be amiss.
Democratic Times, July 18, 1879, page 2


    LECTURES.--Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway will lecture at the courthouse this evening at 8 o'clock p.m., choosing as her subject "The Centennial Year." On Sunday next she will be at Foots Creek. Returning, she will deliver her last lecture in this place on the Monday following--subject: "A Week in Salt Lake City." Her further appointments are Rock Point July 22nd; Grants Pass, July 23rd; [illegible] July 25th; Canyonville, July 26th, and Myrtle Creek, July 28th.

Democratic Times, July 18, 1879, page 3


    Mrs. Duniway lectured at the Manzanita Church on Sunday last.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, July 18, 1879, page 3


    BURNT IN EFFIGY.--Mrs. Duniway was burnt in effigy on the streets of Jacksonville on the night following the advent of the New Northwest containing her correspondence from this place, and which reflected in a shameful and unjust manner on at least one of our citizens. The offense is deserving of the severest condemnation, but we doubt very much whether this was an appropriate way of expressing it.

Democratic Times, July 18, 1879, page 3


    "DAVID AND ANNA MATSON."--We are indebted to Mrs. Duniway for a copy of her beautiful little book of poetry of this title. It is handsomely bound and beautifully illustrated, is published by S. R. Wells & Co., of New York, and has passed through two editions, thus establishing its acceptance to the public. It may be had upon application to Mrs. Duniway, price $2.50.

Ashland Tidings, July 18, 1879, page 3


    MRS. DUNIWAY IN ASHLAND.--Mrs. A. S. Duniway lectured in the academy building in this place on Tuesday evening to a large audience. After devoting about half an hour to the relation of her experiences in Jacksonville, the speaker narrated how she was led to make of herself an editor and a public speaker, weaving in with the narrative striking life pictures illustrative of the points she wished to make for her cause. Mrs. Duniway is a fluent and interesting speaker, and is thoroughly posted upon the subject of "woman's rights" in all its bearings. On Wednesday evening she lectured upon "Constitutional Liberty," but we were unable to be present, and consequently can give no report on it. Last evening she lectured here again and this evening she will lecture in Jacksonville.

Ashland Tidings,
July 18, 1879, page 3


Mrs. Duniway at Phoenix.
    Mrs. Duniway has Phoenix on her side, as the following report of her lecture at that place will show. We trust that war will not be formally opened between Phoenix and Jacksonville.
Editor Tidings:--
    The citizens of Jackson County, to the number of three hundred, assembled last evening at the hall in Phoenix to listen to Mrs. Duniway's lecture upon the "Temperance Problem." The occasion was one of intense interest and the audience listened as though spellbound for over an hour and a half to a logical and original dissertation upon the lady's idea of the correct manner of solving the problem of temperance and extracting the evils of drunkenness by the root. Your readers are doubtless aware that Mrs. Duniway was mobbed in Jacksonville by a crowd of bearded and beardless hoodlums, who burned her in effigy and pelted her with eggs. At the close of her address here last night the following resolutions were offered by the undersigned and unanimously adopted by a rising vote:

    Whereas, Liberty of speech and of the press is guaranteed to all by the Constitution, parties being rightly held amenable to the courts for any abuse of the same; and all citizens should guard these rights with jealous care; and,
    Whereas, The action of the rabble of Jacksonville toward Mrs. Duniway, on the evening of Saturday, July 12th, deserves the severest condemnation of the good people in all civilized communities; therefore, be it
    Resolved, That we, as citizens of Jackson County, are unwilling to bear the justly deserved odium of the hoodlums of Jacksonville, incited to acts of violence against a woman by a set of soulless ingrates, who by their cowardly acts disgrace the mothers who bore them.
    Resolved, That such acts are a burning shame upon any community, and deserve the universal execration of all lovers of virtue and liberty.
Samuel Colver,
Chairman Committee
Phoenix, July 15, 1879.
Ashland Tidings, July 18, 1879, page 3


TAKE MRS. DUNIWAY'S PART.
    The people at Phoenix have taken Mrs. Duniway's side of the trouble in Southern Oregon, as have also the better portion of those in Jacksonville. Mr. Samuel Colver, in a letter from Phoenix to the Ashland Tidings, gave a good account of her lectures in that place, and after fitly condemning the fact that "Mrs. Duniway was mobbed in Jacksonville by a crowd of bearded and beardless hoodlums," furnished that journal with the following resolutions, which were unanimously adopted by a rising vote at the conclusion of Mrs. Duniway's lecture on "The Temperance Problem":
    Whereas, Liberty of speech and of the press is guaranteed to all by the Constitution, parties being rightly held amenable to the courts for any abuse of the same; and all citizens should guard these rights with jealous care; and,
    Whereas, The action of the rabble of Jacksonville toward Mrs. Duniway, on the evening of Saturday, July 12th, deserves the severest condemnation of the good people in all civilized communities; therefore, be it
    Resolved, That we, as citizens of Jackson County, are unwilling to bear the justly deserved odium of the hoodlums of Jacksonville, incited to acts of violence against a woman by a set of soulless ingrates, who by their cowardly acts disgrace the mothers who bore them.
    Resolved, That such acts are a burning shame upon any community, and deserve the universal execration of all lovers of virtue and liberty.

    It is encouraging indeed to find good and true friends in the midst of such opposition as was met in Southern Oregon.
"And ever right comes uppermost,
And ever is justice done."
The New Northwest, Portland, July 24, 1879, page 2


EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE.
Phoenix, July 18, 1879.               
Dear readers of the New Northwest:
    The last jottings we remember of chronicling for your perusal come back to us at this writing accompanied by a vision of eggs and effigies. Taking up the thread of the narrative where we that evening dropped it, we begin again the pleasant task of descriptive correspondence, an occupation rendered all the more enjoyable because of the exciting facts we have in store for your perusal.
    Sunday morning, the 13th inst., dawned brightly, and discovered a quiet atmosphere and equally quiet street in Jacksonville, the latter disfigured by the remains of the picture of George Washington in woman's garb, which had been burned in front of Mrs. Vining's hotel the night before as a feeble effigy of our humble self.
    At nine o'clock one of friend Plymale's buggies came for us, and a span of spirited horses, held well in hand by Master Willie Plymale, carried us over the beautiful country to Manzanita, eight miles distant from the scene of the riot, and here we met a splendid audience in the pleasant church among the spreading oaks, and for over two hours the good people listened with the deepest interest to the gospel of human liberty.
    In this neighborhood there are some of the handsomest and thriftiest farms we have ever seen, even in this preeminently beautiful country. The families of General Ross, Mr. Wrisley, Mr. Constant and Mrs. Merriman are among the wealthiest landowners whose acquaintance we have made, their elegant farms being well stocked, containing many acres of well-tilled soil, and large and exceedingly thrifty orchards.
    After a bountiful dinner and an hour's rest at good Mrs. Merriman's, Mr. James Curry and family, accompanied by Hon. Sam. Colver, drove by in a carriage and took us over to "Sticky"--another euphonious title--to the beautifully located farm of the former gentleman, where we tarried for the night, Uncle Sam departing for Phoenix on horseback to arouse the people there, as we had done at Manzanita, by giving an account of the mob in Jacksonville, and reading the letter in the New Northwest that had fired the heart of the editor of the Sentinel until he had gone stark crazy. In our simplicity of soul we had imagined that he would take our innocent satire on his lack of "brains" as a capital joke, but the sequel proved that we had hit him harder than he could bear. Before we had made him crazy by a joke, we had not dreamed that he was witless enough to be brained by a lady's pencil, but the deed is done, and we're awful sorry! (This is said to let our irate brother down easy. We don't mean a word of it, only as a joke.) The pretext that we have "slandered Judge Prim's family" is just as false as everything else he has tried to say about our uttered sentiments since our work in Jackson County began. We only exonerated and vindicated an injured woman, though it doubtless caused her untold agony for the moment, but her agony is intensified a thousandfold by the thugs of Jacksonville, who, in seeking to justify her husband in a deed which it is the sheerest nonsense to say had been forgotten, continually irritated the wound that otherwise would heal without further pain. We did but an act of justice, and were it to do over again, we would do no less. But it does go awful hard with man's rights when the time comes for its long abuse of usurped absolute power to receive its death blow. Indeed, it is kicking around awfully in its agonies, but its die is cast.
    On Monday evening, after we had spent a quiet day in the happy home of Mrs. Curry, at Sticky, we all went in their carriage over to Phoenix, where, after a rousing meeting (of which account is given in the Ashland Tidings, and notice elsewhere in the columns of the People's Paper), we spent the night in the home of the Colvers, whose hearts are as big as their house, and that's saying a good deal for both house and hearts.
    On Tuesday, accompanied by "Uncle Sam," the indomitable and irrepressible champion of liberty, whom all knaves are afraid of, we went on to Ashland, our way leading through a fertile valley of yet more radiant loveliness than any we had seen hitherto. The landscapes, that are in many places wild to intense ruggedness, now soften into billowy undulations, and, as we approach very near the beautiful city of peace, the verdant vale narrows into a cove-like "cuddy," and on the hills and at their feet the little city nestles, like a brooding dove in her content and loveliness. Flower gardens and fruit trees, handsome homes and sloping lawns abound, and clear, trickling water courses through pebbled ditches, with a merry, rippling melody, suggestive of continued human happiness.
    The man's rights element of Jacksonville had sent out prominent emissaries to forestall our mission, and so the Methodist Church, which had been promised for the lectures, was not only closed against us, but a religious (?) meeting was begun in it, for the purpose of protecting the pastor's idea of God from the logic of the women. The zealous trustees, who volunteered to stand between Jehovah and danger, next tried to prevail upon Mr. W. Myer (whose honored father, now in the Willamette Valley on business, had written him to place the Academy at our service, if we should need it) to disobey both father and mother by refusing us opportunity for a hearing. But the brave young gentleman proved incorruptible, and the Academy bell rang on time, keeping almost everybody away from the church, and bringing out a very large audience, which increased every evening, notwithstanding the feeble efforts to oppose our mission by the misguided brethren, of whom we could truly say, in the language of humanity's great Exemplar, "Father, forgive them; they know not what they do."

Ashland House hotel, circa 1880, J. W. Riggs
The Ashland House hotel, circa 1880.
    The Ashland House, where we found comfortable accommodations and excellent food, is kept by Mr. and Mrs. Houck, who made our sojourn at their hotel decidedly pleasant. The well-known mercantile firm of McCall & Baum have a commodious and handsome brick store, where they do an immense business, their trade ranging from darning needles to Haines' harvesters, and from chewing gum to tons after tons of staple dry goods and groceries. We had not time to visit the woolen mills, though the neat, painted buildings looked invitingly at us from their location under the hill, but we called at the office of the "Ashland grist mills," which were established here in '54, and which have grown from a small beginning to a mammoth enterprise. There are a number of small dry goods and grocery stores, a drug store, a hardware emporium, a milliner's store, a splendid saddlery and harness shop (kept by Mr. Klum), a jeweler's corner, a boot and shoe shop, etc., but not a single groggery or house of ill repute. The contrast between the reception we have met from the prominent gentlemen of Ashland, as compared to that accorded to us by the ringleading, whisky-pandering element in Jacksonville, that thinks it owns the city, is just what we might expect from the different moral elements of the two places. Jacksonville is ruled by lies and rum, Ashland by truth and soberness. The Ashland Tidings is a very creditable weekly paper, of which Mr. Leeds is the present editor. There is a large liberal element both here and at Phoenix, and the morals of these towns speak significantly well in favor of free religion. If we wanted to settle in an inland town, we know of none where there are greater promises for the future than in Ashland. The decent citizens of Jacksonville are anxious to get away from their modern Sodom and settle here, where they can send their children to school without fear of their being decoyed into wickedness by a riot-producing mob.
    Our last lecture was finished in Ashland, and, amid the enthusiastic goodbyes of scores of excellent Christian ladies, we took our departure this (Friday) morning for Phoenix, where we have spent the day at dear Mrs. Colver's in needed rest, and are now ready to take our departure for the city of the Philistines, where we are appointed to speak tonight, and thereby beard the Jacksonville mob in its den. You shall hear more anon.
A.S.D.                     
The New Northwest, Portland, July 24, 1879, page 2


Jacksonville, July 19.                    
    Dear reader, we know you are anxious to hear the result, so this morning (Saturday) at five o'clock we are awake and ready to try, though we know we cannot do the subject justice.
    At good Mrs. Vining's hospitable boardinghouse we were warmly welcomed, the brave woman being all undaunted by the threatening man's rights mob, which was waiting for the coming darkness to begin its raid. But we declined to risk exposing her home to the violence of the rabble by remaining in it, and, gathering up our baggage, we entered the carriage, accompanied by Mr. Colver and Mr. Casto, from Phoenix, and drove through the crowded street and howling rabble to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Plymale, who, like all the other respectable citizens of Jacksonville, were afraid to venture out after nightfall, for fear of the mob and the eggs. Here our baggage was considered safe, and we left it till after the lecture, which was given in the courthouse, the gentlemanly sheriff, Mr. Bybee, having, at the risk of his life, lighted it up for our use. But, so far as we know, not one resident of Jacksonville dared to attend the meeting. They bowed before the press and the mob like reeds, so thoroughly intimidated that, but for the presence of about fifty brave persons from the country, of whom a dozen or so were ladies, we should have had nobody for audience except the county sheriff.
    The lecture over, we explained that we scorned to remain overnight as a guest in a city that dared not protect a truth-telling missionary of human rights from a howling mob. We would spend the night in the country among the good people who could not be overruled by prostitutes, man's rights and whisky.
    McPherson, who is to be editor of the Sentinel for the next month, attempted to defend the citizens of Jacksonville, but the effort was too thin. Actions speak louder than words. If the good people, and there are many in the town, were brave enough to deserve commendation, they would not yield to the success of a riot without protest.
    But we were not disturbed except by yells and threats, as, after the lecture, the country carriages drove through the principal streets, on the way to Mrs. Wright's pleasant home, five miles from the corporation, where we have spent the night in sweet serenity, enjoying the sleep of the righteous. Today (Saturday) we go to Willow Springs, and from thence tomorrow to Foots Creek, from which place you shall hear from us again.
    The mail is going, and we must stop.
A.S.D.                     
The New Northwest, Portland, July 24, 1879, page 2


JUST INDIGNATION.
To the editor of the New Northwest:
    The people of this remote district are surprised and shocked by hearing of an evidence of the refinement (?) and intelligence (?) of Jacksonville society, that rather eclipses anything of the kind ever heard of in this part of the country. You have often heard the adage, "The pen is mightier than the sword," but Jacksonville is the first to match eggs against brains. Notwithstanding we deprecate the practice of airing unpleasant family histories for public reading, we have not heard that anyone has attempted to deny the truth of what Mrs. Duniway has written in regard to a member of the bench.
    It is a notable fact that the mob did not attack Mrs. D. during her lectures, but made the assault at the house of a defenseless woman. One would naturally suppose the honorable (?) people of the city would take some steps to have the disturbers of the peace punished. Had a crowd of our Butte Creekers been guilty of such an outrage, the penitentiary would scarcely be too great punishment. But it makes all the difference in the world (to the just Judge) whose ox is gored.
    The presence of Mrs. D. in this county has brought to the surface so many more friends of the cause she advocates than her best friends anticipated, that we feel quite jubilant, even though none of them appear willing to fight for her, especially with Jacksonville weapons. We consider the weapons emblematic of the cause they are used to defend, which must be rotten indeed when such means of defense must be resorted to. Doubtless the advocates of the "aristocracy of sex" call such conduct argument.
LAW AND ORDER.                    
Butte Creek, Oregon, July 26, 1879.                     
The New Northwest, Portland, July 24, 1879, page 2


EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE.
Willow Springs, July 21, 1879.               
Dear readers of the New Northwest:
    As we are well aware of the excitement and indignation of the thousands of friends of human rights who are gaining new strength and zeal in the prosecution of our work because they see more and more the need of another and better element in the lawmaking power of the land to hold in check the lawless classes who are now in possession of the balance of power everywhere, and who, through this power, virtually tie the hands of the best and most honorable men whenever they are so inclined, thereby placing the sacred liberties of the people, for which our fathers fought and died, in constant jeopardy, and, as we know these thousands of friends to our sacred cause are waiting anxiously to hear further news from the political missionary who has been compelled to become the Arnold Winkelried of the new dispensation in Jacksonville, we this morning, Monday, the 21st of July, awake with the dawn, and regarding you, our friends and readers, with far more consideration than another badly needed nap for our humble self, we sharpen our pencil and proceed to business.
    On Saturday morning we stopped over in daylight in the city of the Philistines, where a woman who preaches morality and human rights is in danger of losing her life at the hands of a mob after nightfall, though she is perfectly safe from molestation when the sun shines, and lo! and there wasn't a man of any claim to respectability who wasn't ready to swear that he was the very fellow who had been our staunch friend all along! Very well, let 'em think so, but we wish we hadn't made our appointments to lecture in other places in such a way before the riot that we cannot now stop to test their woman-protecting bravery. On Friday night, only a few hours before, we well remember seeing brazen prostitutes standing unmolested among the lawmakers on the street, while we were being conveyed away to the country for personal safety in the closed carriage of Mrs. Wright, one of the good Methodist sisters, who, with Mrs. Plymale, had opened the church for our lectures, but had at last had it locked in their faces by the pastor, who, as usual in such cases, had taken sides with the prostitutes and their associates, who, under the stop-thief cry of their class, had risen en masse to mob a woman who had dared to say in public, in answer to the "free love filth" with which they had sought to beslime her, "Both the fallen women and the fallen voters who support them know as well as I that just so soon as the wives and mothers of men in Jacksonville shall have the power of the ballot to aid them, they will make and enforce such statutes as shall banish drunkenness and prostitution from your city limits, and drive them in confusion to the abode of owls and bats." We can't see the utility of the "protection and esteem" of such lawmakers as desert their post when the sun goes down, and who compel their dear good wives and mothers to remain away from lectures they have been long planning to hear, for fear the rabble will pelt them with eggs. Where these virtuous daylight friends come out over their own signatures in the county papers, and declare themselves on the side of law and order, and determined to maintain it, we'll be a little more ready to accept their apologies and explanations. Anybody can be a sunshine friend. But we're not done with Jacksonville. We're going back there today to defy our defamers, and, if possible, shame them into decency. You shall know how we have succeeded.
    On Saturday we came out to Willow Springs, to the houses of our staunch friends the McDonoughs, and on Sunday, having previously engaged the best livery turnout from friend Plymale's well-stocked stable in Jacksonville, we started, with Mr. and Mrs. Plymale and Mrs. McDonough, to Foots Creek, where we were appointed to lecture at one p.m. Our road lay along the foot of the mountains, and, after a three or four hours' drive, led us up into the very heart of an old mining camp, yet vastly rich in the golden ore, but the diggings are now dry, and mining has ceased, and the good country people are turning their attention to farming, home-making and stock-raising. At the beautiful farmer's home of Mr. and Mrs. Lance we were all hospitably entertained, and after a sumptuous dinner we repaired to the school house a mile or two further up the little valley that lies between the Delectable Mountains.
    We had no idea that there were so many people here. They were thicker than July blackberries, and they kept coming after the lecture began till we had to pause frequently till new benches could be improvised, and then everybody couldn't get seats. Our speech continued for over two and a half hours, and when, at last, we bade the friends goodbye, it was difficult to leave them. But we promised to go back sometime.
    On our return to Willow Springs we came by another route, through a lovely, verdant and fertile valley, past innumerable gold fields, yet fabulously rich in ore, where the diggings have so long been dry, owing to the scarcity of the rainfall, that many places that have been burrowed out and turned over in bygone years are now overgrown with trees and briars, as though Nature were ashamed of the nudity to which the avarice of her children had wickedly subjected her.
    It is almost night when we reach Mrs. McDonough's pleasant home, and here we dismiss our team and retire to rest at an early hour, as calm and carefree and happy as a weary and sleepy child.
    But, as we told you in the beginning, it is Monday now, and we are again off for Jacksonville. Kind friends, everywhere, do not worry. There is a higher Power than men or mobs that overrules this woman movement.
A.S.D.                     
The New Northwest, Portland, July 31, 1879, page 2


Willow Springs, July 22.               
    Again, as we are well aware that anxious friends by thousands are awaiting a truthful version of the closing scenes of our sojourn in Jacksonville, we hurriedly seize our oft-offending, though truth-telling, pencil to portray facts as they have occurred during the interim since last we wrote you.
    On Monday, the 21st, we returned to the city of the Philistines as we had promised, though we were careful to enter and depart during daylight, as the "militia" and other protectors of women with whom we have had to deal in that modern Sodom are of the kind that are only to be feared in the darkness.
    At Mrs. Vining's we again found hospitable welcome, and, after a quiet, social dinner with Mrs. Kenney, Mrs. McDonough and Mrs. Plymale at Mrs. V.'s well-filled board, we scribbled an open letter to the men of Jacksonville, which, after a little elimination, the editors of the Times and the Sentinel agreed to publish, the former in his issue of the 24th, and the latter, whose paper was already full for this week, on his next publication day. We found our brethren of the press disposed to be affable, though they are not yet sufficiently over the licentious craze of a few of their evil-minded, loud-mouthed patrons to fairly distinguish virtue from vice, and so they still persist in saying that we have scandalized a lady by declaring her to have been unjustly attainted with masculine oppression and slander. "You ought to have permitted her and her children to bear the stain forever, because it was no longer the subject of street talk, and the judge's wife had got used to it," is the substance of their so-called logic. A man who is either so blind that he cannot, or so perverse that he will not, see the sacred principle involved in the facts we have published, and who has tried mob law to check the progress of free speech, free press and free women, is a thousand times wiser in his own conceit than seven women who can render a reason. You may "bray a fool seven times in a mortar," says Solomon, "and yet his folly will not depart from him."
    We refrain from publishing the unwise attempt of a certain young man to defend the injustice of his father at the expense of his mother's character, for the boy will be deeply enough ashamed of it after he has come out from among his mother's defamers and learned a little wisdom. It is not natural for a son to assist in defending a rabble in its indignation against a lady who has dared, in the face of long-established masculine opinion to the contrary, to declare that his mother is innocent of a crime. The youth, the inexperience, and the bad example that surround the boy are generously brought forward in his defense. Let us cover his mistake with the mantle of charity.
    We have another matter to tell you of, good reader, and it concerns the infamous conduct of the brigadier general of the Oregon militia, but eminent counsel advises us to wait till the matter has first been ventilated in a court at law. Even could we bring our pencil low enough to make it write them, we could not put the common street expressions of this chief of the home guards about us and to us upon paper without danger of being indicted for sending obscene matter through the United States mails.
    In the afternoon of Monday we made an address on the street, right in the midst of the crowd where we had been threatened with eggs and publicly howled at on the Friday before, and there was the most respectful silence and attention while we spoke. We defended the boys who had been accused of instigating the riot. We charged the whole cause of the disturbance upon older heads--voters and lawmakers--and we here predict that the sequel will prove it. The boys are not to blame. It was bearded and beardless hoodlums, and bad whisky and voters and lawmakers that did it.
    But, after all, it's fun to see how we have scared the politicians. Quite a number of the bedrock Democrats think we have come out here under the patronage of the Republican Party, for the purpose of laying wires in the interest of some candidate or other for the United States Senate. Others say we are surreptitiously working for the success of the greenback or independent movement, and still others that we are in the interest of the dominant wing of the Oregon Democracy. But, no matter which horn of the dilemma they accept, they seize hold of it like drowning men catching at straws. The editor of the Sentinel hurls ruin in the path of Judge Prim, by pretending to be angry because we have told the truth, and a hundred Democratic voters who read the Sentinel have failed to see the point till they have fallen in the trap. The Independents and the Democrats of the Thayer school are also jealous of the man's rights judge, and they are a unit with the Republicans in secretly exciting the bedrock ring to go ahead and spoil the future chances of the judge. But he is wiser in one sense than them all.
    Years ago, when the Republicans joined with the Democrats in an organized warfare against the woman movement, we successfully silenced their "free love" cry by publishing a partly hidden chapter of gossip concerning the domestic history of the President of the United States. The outcry for a while was almost equal to this one, but the President had sense enough to say, when his attention was called to it: "The woman tells the truth. And she is right. If our wives and mothers had all along been equal with men before the law, such things would not have been." It was not to degrade the President, but to establish a principle, that we applied the hair of the political cur of politics to the venomous bite of the rabid quadruped. The application was incisive, but the cure was certain. But when will scurvy politicians learn that the influence of women who dare to strike for liberty because it is their rightful heritage is not, like theirs, for sale?
    We've got away with Jacksonville. We've defied its eggs, its whisky, and its thugs. We've left every intelligent woman sorrowing because she did not dare, for fear of her protectors, to attend our closing lecture. But we're coming back again, good ladies. The earthquake has come among your lawmakers, and it has come to stay. Its eruptions will henceforth be periodical. The rotten eggs with which your protectors were prepared to pelt you if you ventured out that night will be consumed before this time next year with the glowing fires of law and liberty. We thank God and take courage.
A.S.D.                     
The New Northwest, Portland, July 31, 1879, page 2


    The Jacksonville brass bad complimented Mrs. A. S. Duniway with a serenade after her lecture in that place on Monday evening of last week.
    Mrs. Duniway lectured in the Presbyterian Church Wednesday evening to a good audience. Her subject was woman suffrage, and it was handled in her usual forcible and effective style.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 30, 1881, page 3


    Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway, editor of the New Northwest, was in Jacksonville several days this week. She lectured at Holt's hall to a large audience on Wednesday evening. She is also taking orders for the famous picture "The Coronation of Womanhood," which contain in its unique design splendid lithograph portraits of many of Oregon's most distinguished men who voted for the Woman Suffrage Amendment. She lectured at Phoenix last night, and will also lecture at Medford tomorrow (Sunday) night.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 27, 1885, page 3


    Mrs. A. S. Duniway delivered the oration at Josephine on the Fourth.
"News of the Northwest," Oregonian, Portland, July 12, 1887, page 6




Last revised January 24, 2017