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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


The Flour Bin Trouble


Economy Flour BinSt. Francois County, Missouri
Patrick H. Gooch, 29, grocer, born in Tennessee
Sarah J., 23, born in Missouri
Mary J., 4, born in Missouri
William J., 2 months, born in Missouri
U.S. Census, August 10, 1860


    Mr. W. J. Gooch, manager of the Economy Flour Bin, and his salesman have been canvassing the town the past week for the new patent and have taken a large number of orders. When the canvass is completed here they will make a tour of the country, visiting every house, and will be pleased to exhibit the bin to all who may desire so useful an article. For neatness and convenience there is nothing approaching it in use. This is its first introduction in this country, and the success with which it is meeting fully attests its endorsement by the public.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1893, page 3


    The town is full of men selling flour bins. They will remain in the valley some time.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 3, 1893, page 3


A Successful Hunt.
    In order to while away the evening hours, and also to afford some amusement to strangers within our gates, the boys, one evening last week, organized a snipe hunt. A committee was appointed to wait on the three strangers, who shall be nameless, but who are canvassing the county in the interest of a certain domestic necessary, and request that they join the party. The different maneuvers employed to entrap the unwary snipe were fully explained. It was further explained that the post of honor was invariably conceded to the strangers, in order to save them the more arduous labor of driving therefore they would be allowed to "hold the bag." "Gentlemen, it does not require any great amount of nerve to hold open the entrance to an ordinary bag, and, once opened, unlike the human mouth, we hope you will not find it difficult to close," said the committee in conclusion. The party gathered, and, with the unsuspecting strangers in their midst, the hunters disappeared in the shades of evening, bound up Jackson Creek to the haunts of the snipe. Nothing was heard of the party for some time. Soon, however, your correspondent, who was taking an evening stroll in that direction, heard sounds of conflict, shouts and cries and the sound of trampling feet, in the direction in which the hunting party had gone. I seated  myself in the shadow of a huge boulder and waited. Soon the sound of rapid footsteps approaching reached my ears and two forms appeared advancing at double quick down the creek, ever and anon casting apprehensive glances over their shoulders as they ran. "I guess they've killed the rest of 'em," gasped one, and then catching sight of your correspondent, "Oh, Lord! There's more of  'em!" and Nancy Hanks would have kicked the pneumatic tires off her sulky and laid down and died if she had seen the gait those valiant snipe hunters struck for town. In a few moments another procession appeared moving slowly out of the gloom. In front strode the colossal form of one of the tenderfeet (?) while the other two brought up the rear. Between, tied together with ropes, marched three of the crestfallen snipe hunters. "We thought," said one of them, "that we were going to hunt snipes, but those confounded 'flour bin men' were hunting suckers, and, by the great horn spoon, they caught 'em."
Rambler.           
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 10, 1893, page 3


The Economy Flour Bin.
    The flour bin men who have been in our midst for the past two weeks soliciting orders for the Economy Flour Bin are meeting with remarkable success. They surely have an article that recommends itself to housekeepers at sight and is beyond doubt one of the most useful articles for the household department that was ever invented and fills a long-felt want in every kitchen in the land. It consists of a bin holding either fifty or one hundred pounds of flour as desired and several drawers for soda and the various spices and seasonings used in the culinary department. It is made of a good quality of imported plate and elegantly finished with rubber japan which is thoroughly baked into the tin, making it impervious to dampness and free rust, consequently will last a lifetime. It has an oscillating sieve attached at the bottom, and by shaking it any quantity of flour desired can be sieved out without opening the bin. So when the bin is filled and the cover placed on, there is no need to ever remove it until the bin is empty. Consequently mice, rats, bugs and all other insects are excluded. It is intended to be placed on the kitchen table or a small shelf in the corner of the room for that purpose just high enough for the hand to take hold of the lever without stooping, which entirely does away with the old plan of dipping the flour out of a barrel, box or sack and often scattering it over the floor and getting it on the clothes, and wasting it generally. By using the Economy there is practically no waste, and you have the satisfaction of knowing the flour is clean. The gentlemen handling this article are representing a responsible company that is doing business over a number of states. They come highly recommended, and no one needs to hesitate in the least to deal with them. The manager of the entire business is here in person and will soon open up an office in Jacksonville which place he intends to make his permanent headquarters for the spring and summer. He will keep on hand in his offices a large- and small-sized bin filled with flour and invites the public to call and see that it works to perfection..
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 10, 1893, page 3


Things Have Changed.
    In the days long agone it was generally figured, particularly by the womenfolks, that the head of the family required all the most modern improvements in machinery to perform his work, while almost anything was considered sufficient for the wants of the good housewife. This state of affairs existed longer ago than any of us can remember. Things have changed since then, and the wife is on an equal with the husband in the requirement and purchase of modern improvements which greatly help to lessen the multifarious labors incident to both. For a real clever device, and which would surely be the pet of all households, the one shown us this week leads them all. It is the Economy Flour Bin. A description of which is here given and consists of a bin holding either fifty or one hundred pounds of flour as desired and several drawers for soda and the various spices and seasonings used in the culinary department. It is made of a good quality of imported plate and elegantly finished with rubber japan which is thoroughly baked into the tin, making it impervious to dampness and free rust, consequently will last a lifetime. It has an oscillating sieve attached at the bottom, and by shaking it any quantity of flour desired can be sieved out without opening the bin. So when the bin is filled and the cover placed on, there is no need to ever remove it until the bin is empty. Consequently mice, rats, bugs and all other insects are excluded. It is intended to be placed on the kitchen table or a small shelf in the corner of the room for that purpose just high enough for the hand to take hold of the lever without stooping, which entirely does away with the old plan of dipping the flour out of a barrel, box or sack and often scattering it over the floor and getting it on the clothes, and wasting it generally. With the use of this bin there is no waste of flour, and it is always clean. The husband who purchases one of these bins for his wife will find it a joy forever and a saving to the purse. Agents are now canvassing for the sale of these articles in the valley, and an office will soon be established in Medford where the bins will be on exhibition.
Medford Mail, March 17, 1893, page 3


    Over four hundred orders have been taken in the valley for the Economy Flour Bins in the last three weeks.
    Call at the flour bin office--you will not be bored for an order, but they want everyone to see their article in use, for the sake of advertising it.
    Have you seen the large-size Economy Flour Bin? It is a daisy. Go to the office and see for yourself. As the old marksman would say, "It knocks the black out."
    The Economy Flour Bin Co. have fitted up a nice office in town in Ryan's building on Third Street, where all are invited--especially the ladies--to see the two sizes operate with flour in them.
    Mr. Gooch and family have secured comfortable rooms at the Orth residence and will remain in our midst for some time. Mr. G. is manager of the flour bin co.'s business in Oregon, and has several men soliciting orders in the valley at present.
    When you have gone to every place else in town and would like to sit down and rest for a few minutes, drop in at the flour bin office, where the manager, Mr. Gooch, will be glad to furnish you with an easy chair and a comfortable fire to sit by.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 17, 1893, page 3


Should Be in Every Home.
    The Economy Flour Bin men are still in Jacksonville, we are glad to note, and are doing well. They have about completed the canvass of the town and have branched off in different directions in the country, where they have met with like success. The article is neat and durable, and we see no reason why it should not come into as general use as a cook stove or sewing machine, as the next thing in importance to bread is "clean bread," and by using the Economy you are certain of this. The top is secured by a heavy cover and the bottom by wire gauze, so the flour is secure against rats, mice or any insects at all. The heavy japanning protects it from different changes in atmosphere or weather. it is these, together with the facts that it is handsomely decorated, takes little room, [is] always ready for use and will last a lifetime, that we predict a brilliant future is near for it. The company have a well-fitted office in the Ryan brick, where they invite their friends to call in and pass the time socially and see the bin work with flour in it. If you should make a call at their office you can rest assured that you will not be bored for an order, if you do not wish to purchase. In consequence of the courteous demeanor of both the manager and his men, we wish them success the few months they remain with us.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, March 24, 1893, page 2



    Everybody should have one--what? An Economy Flour Bin.
    Flour bins are becoming as numerous as snowbirds in December.
    Every household should have an Economy Flour Bin. It makes a nice piece of kitchen furniture; and oh! so useful, handy and economical.
    The Economy Flour Bin is gaining great popularity. Hundreds have already been sold in Jackson County, and the work has hardly begun.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 24, 1893, page 3


    The Economy Flour Bin men are camping on our trail. They have leased Mrs. Stanley's rooms on C Street for several months, and to be used for an office and exhibit stand for their celebrated household necessity. Messrs. S. W. Tate, H. W. Clopton and C. C. Coleman are the three gentlemen who will make a canvass of this immediate country. It is safe to hazard a guess that the doors of several residences hereabouts will not be closed against them when their mission is made known. No well-regulated culinary department is replete without an Economy.

"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, March 31, 1893, page 3


    The flour bin men have been circulating in Medford in a lively manner and have been taking many orders for their handsome and useful article of kitchen furniture.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 31, 1893, page 2


    W. J. Gooch, manager of the flour bin co., has been in Medford several times during the week, accompanied by his wife.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 7, 1893, page 2


    The flour bin canvassers are still in the country and doing a land office business.
    The Economy Flour Bin fills the economical, enterprising housewife's long-felt want. No wonder that they are so popular.
    Your household is incomplete if you have not an Economy Flour Bin. They are handsome, useful, ornamental. Be sure to get one.
    Hundreds of orders are being taken by agents for the Economy Flour Bin, because it is just what the energetic, frugal housewife needs.
    Don't fail to call on W. J. Gooch at his comfortable, inviting office in Jacksonville and see the Economy Flour Bin. You will find it worth your while.
    A carload of Economy Flour Bins will arrive in the valley, direct from the factory at St. Louis, in May. Give your order at once, so that you will be one of those served first.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 7, 1893, page 3

March 31 through May 19, 1893 Medford Mail
March 31 through May 19, 1893 Medford Mail

    The Economy Flour Bin is the greatest economizer--both of time and money--yet presented to the consideration of the housewife--buy one and be happy.

"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, April 14-May 5, 1893, page 3


    The flour bin men are about as thick in this part of the valley as are mushrooms after a June shower, and judging from the sales which these men are making there will be an Economy Flour Bin in every household hereabouts. The article which these gentlemen are handling outranks all contrivances yet thought of by Yankee ingenuity. They are by far the most convenient article that could possibly be placed in a kitchen or pantry. they are the acknowledged housewife's pet, a saver of time and money and don't cost much, considering their usefulness.

"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, April 14, 1893, page 3


    The handsomest present you can make your wife is one of those handsome flour bins. Get one if you want to make her happy.
    And the good work goes on. Hundreds of these flour bins are being sold weekly in Jackson County. Why? Because they are useful, economical and ornamental at the same time.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 14, 1893, page 3


    If every housewife who possesses a Economy Flour Bin was given space to print her testimony in its behalf, there would be a string too long to print in several columns of this paper. They all like it, and after using it they all praise it.
    Every married man knows full well that unless some suitable receptacle is procured for flour, things don't move as smoothly as they might under other circumstances. Instead of hammering together a box or sawing off the end of a barrel--buy an Economy flour Bin and ever after settle all questions of differences in the flour line. The Economy is King of them all.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, April 21, 1893, page 3


    Everybody buys the Economy Flour Bin.
    Going off like hotcakes--the Economy Flour Bins.
    Handsome, durable and economical--the Economy Flour Bin.
    Stacks of Economy Flour Bins are still being sold. They have no equal.
    The canvassers for the flour bin will soon deliver the goods for which they have taken orders.
    The neatest present which can be made the housewife is one of those flour bins. There is nothing like it.
    There never was an article which gained popular favor at once like the Economy Flour Bin. It takes at sight.
    The revolution in South America is nothing as compared with that being worked by the Economy Flour Bin in the average household.
    Economy is wealth; therefore invest in an Economy Flour Bin. There is no chance for loss of flour, spices, etc., when they are stored in one of these bins.
    "Seeing is believing"; therefore go to Mr. Gooch's office in Ryan's brick building and inspect the flour bins he has on exhibition there and be convinced that they are all that is claimed for them.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 21, 1893, page 2


    Invest in a flour bin and make your female relatives happy.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 21, 1893, page 3


    The Economy Flour Bin men are taking the place by storm and putting a bin in every household. The ladies pronounce them the most convenient article they have ever seen.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 21, 1893, page 3


    W. J. Gooch, who owns the Economy Flour Bin patent, has been disposing of the right to sell that popular household article in several counties in the state to parties living in Jacksonville.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 28, 1893, page 3


    Frank Brown is going to take the road for the Economy Flour Bin, soon.

"Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail, May 12, 1893, page 4


    The Economy Flour Bin beats a Sunday beau for solid comfort. Try one--the bin, we mean.
    The old man can go to lodge, if he only provides the careful housewife with an Economy Flour Bin. Try one.
    Your worse half isn't treating you properly if he hasn't attended to your needs and bought you an Economy Flour Bin ere this. Jog him up about it.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 12, 1893, page 3


    The Economy Flour Bin men have a large shipment of bins on the road, which will be here soon for delivery.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, May 19, 1893, page 3


Of Interest to Purchasers of Flour Bins.
    The Economy Flour Bin Co. are expecting a car of bins soon at Jacksonville. Parties who have given orders for same will please be ready, as the delivery will commence immediately on receipt of them.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, May 19, 1893, page 3



    Carver Smith will start in about a week for the Umatilla country to act as agent for the flour bin co. in that section. Carver is a rustler, and the company did well to secure his services.

"Flashes from Phoenix," Medford Mail, May 26, 1893, page 1


Notice to Flour Bin Purchasers.
THE ORDER YOU SIGNED.
. . . . . . . . . .. . . .  . . . . . . . . . . Post Office, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County, State of
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ., 189 . . . .
M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,
    Deliver to me in the month of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ., 189 . . . , or as soon thereafter as convenient, in perfect order, a No. 1 Economy Flour Bin, for which I will pay you or your collector, upon delivery of same, the sum of Six Dollars and Fifty Cents.
    The Bin, for delivery, to be in every respect like the sample shown by salesman.
                (Signed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
This order taken by
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    All parties who have ordered Economy Flour Bins are hereby notified that unavoidable circumstances will cause us to make delivery in June instead of May. Above we give an exact copy of the order you signed, which you will notice reads: Deliver to me in the month of May, or AS SOON THEREAFTER AS CONVENIENT, thereby making the order just as binding for June as May, so we sincerely hope that none will delude themselves with the idea that they can get out of taking the bin, simply because it was not delivered in May. Our bins have been shipped and are now somewhere on the road, and as soon as they arrive we will go to delivering. After the goods arrive if there are any parties who want their bins before the agents can get to them they can get them by calling at our office.
    The company keeps a list of all orders taken, and the agents are compelled to deliver every bin they have an order for, so please have the money in the house when our agents call. By so doing you will save both us and yourself trouble. We hope we will not be compelled to force collection on any of our orders by law, but if it becomes necessary we will most assuredly do so, for we expect everyone who has signed an order to take the bin.
    We feel very thankful for the liberal patronage we have received, and feel assured that all will be well satisfied with the Economy. If anything should prove wrong with the bin delivered, it can be made right by a call at our office.
        Respectfully,
                THE ECONOMY FLOUR BIN CO.,
                        Jacksonville, Or.
Medford Mail, May 26, 1893, page 5


    Mr. S. H. Cook, of Applegate, was in our midst this week soliciting for the Economy Flour Bin.

"Rock Point Pointers," Medford Mail, May 26, 1893, page 6


    Mr. Charlie Penninger left this week for Napa County, California to canvass for the Economy Flour Bin. On last Wednesday night his friends made him a farewell party. An immensely good time was had. It was out of sight, so to speak. Refreshments were served in abundance, consisting of cakes and lemonade. And if Charles has all the success wished him in his canvass, every housewife in Napa County will have an Economy bin.

"Central Point Items," Medford Mail, June 2, 1893, page 2


    Numerous flour bin agents took their departure from this depot during the week to work in their respective territories. May success attend them.

"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1893, page 2


    Miss Nellie Gooch entertained a few of her friends last Monday afternoon, it being her fifth birthday.
    S. H. Cook and John O'Brien of Applegate are canvassing Josephine County for the Economy Flour Bin.
    The Economy Flour Bins arrived this week, and the agents will at once take the road in their several territories.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1893, page 3


    Lindsey Sisemore, who has been acting as deputy sheriff for some months past, has gone to Portland to canvass the metropolis for the Economy Flour Bin.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1893, page 3


    J. B. Dungan of Gold Hill precinct will leave for California in a short time, to canvass Yolo County for the Economy Flour Bin.
    A party complimentary to the agents for the Economy Flour Bin was given at the U.S. Hall last night, under the auspices of W. J. Gooch. It was well attended and passed off pleasantly.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1893, page 3


Jacksonville Excited.
    JACKSONVILLE, Or., June 7.--There has been much excitement here the past few days, occasioned by certain articles published in the Central Point News and directed against the flour bin company operating here. No notice was taken of the first article, but the second contained statements directed against the members of the company, which they felt called upon to resent, and which resulted in the severe castigation of the News editor, after he had admitted being the writer of the article.
Evening Journal, Salem, June 7, 1893, page 1


    County Treasurer Bloomer is in the northern part of the state on flour bin business. He took the agency for a county.
    G. A. Hover left on Monday morning's train for Redding, Calif. to try his luck at the flour bin business. good luck, G.A.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, June 9, 1893, page 2


    It has always been the ruling in newspaper offices we have had charge of to never make mention of street brawls and fistic encounters, but the Central Point News escapade is creating just a little more excitement than the average, hence this item. Last week there appeared in the News an article, acknowledged to have been written by one Roberts, a solicitor for the paper, in which was given an account derogatory to the methods the Economy Flour Bin men have been using in conducting their business. When the article reached the eyes of the flour bin men there was said to be a feeling a long ways from being akin to good nature toward the said paper. Saturday evening last a trio of the employees of the flour bin man took a drive to Central Point and Colman, one of the trio, proceeded to do bodily injury to the editor. The crowd interfered--Colman was arrested and fined $25. Monday morning on the depot platform in Medford another skirmish was had between Clopton, another employee, and Roberts, the author of the article. There was considerable of a tussle had which ended by citizens interfering, but not until several blows had been exchanged with some little effect on both. One of Roberts' fingers was bitten by Clopton, but probably not seriously. Clopton was arrested and upon a hearing before Judge Walton was bound over to appear before the grand jury at its next term. Attorneys Vawter and Webster appeared for the defense and prosecuting attorney Benson, assisted by A. S. Hammond, for the state.

"All the Local News," Medford Mail, June 9, 1893, page 3


A Statement of Facts.
    Whereas certain erroneous and false reports have been published and circulated concerning the operations of the Economy Flour Bin Company and their manner of conducting business, we hereby state that we have severally made contracts with them to work a county and after a thorough investigation can say that in our business relations and connection with them we have found nothing misrepresented. In fact all our transactions with them from the beginning have been entirely satisfactory.       Signed,
C. C. McClendon                    L. A. Rose
E. F. Walker                            J. N. Woody
E. P. Pickens                           G. W. Hoxie
A. S. Moon                               W. H. Bostwick
J. C. Smith                                Bloomer, Cronemiller & Co.
G. E. Neuber
    The above statement has been handed us for publication. The names which appear therein are some of the newly appointed agents for the Economy Flour Bin Company, and as the statement is made by those directly interested and who have the best opportunity of knowing what they are talking about it would seem sufficient to settle all discussion, at least so far as these gentlemen are concerned. A goodly number of their agents have left for their respective counties and are reported, by their agents at home, to be doing well.
Medford Mail, June 9, 1893, page 3


    Will Nichols is now canvassing for flour bins down in Polk County.
    Sam McClendon and G. T. Hershberger are in Napa County, Cal., selling Economy Flour Bins, and are found to meet with success, as both are excellent salesmen.
    C. C. Coleman, a representative of the Economy Flour Bin company, and our editor had a rumpus over an article which appeared in the News. The former paid $25 for the thumping he gave Mr. Carson.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1893, page 2


    C. C. Coleman, a representative of the Economy Flour Bin company, and our editor had a rumpus over an article which appeared in the News. The former paid $25 for the thumping he gave Mr. Carson.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1893, page 2


Bound Over.
    A representative of the Economy Flour Bin company and Mr. Roberts, representing the Central Point News, had a scrap the forepart of the week over an article the latter was charged with writing, over the nom de plume of "Farmer Hayseed." During the melee Roberts got his finger in Mr. Clopton's mouth and afterward preferred a charge of mayhem against his assailant. Judge Walton, who heard the case, held the defendant to answer at the next term of court, with bonds placed at $300, which were given.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1893, page 3


The Economy Flour Bin.
    The majority of the newly appointed agents of the Economy Flour Bin Co. have gone to their respective territories and started to work, and from reports received thus far we are glad to announce their success. One man took six orders the first half day he canvassed, another reports twelve for his first three days' work, while a third, who had just worked a week, had twenty-five orders. We trust that all who are engaged in this new enterprise will meet with like success.
    On account of recent false and misleading reports published, we are requested to publish the following statement, given by some of the agents who have not yet gone to their counties, and who are some of the very best citizens of our county:
JACKSONVILLE, June 8, 1893.       
    Whereas, certain erroneous and false reports have been published and circulated concerning the operations of the Economy Flour Bin Company and their manner of conducting their business, we hereby state that we have severally made contracts with them to work a county, and after a thorough investigation can say that in our business relations and connections with them we have found nothing misrepresented. In fact all our transactions with them from the beginning have been entirely satisfactory.
J. C. Smith,
L. A. Rose,
E. F. Walker,
A. S. Moon,
J. F. Brown,
G. W. Hoxie,
Bloomer, Cronemiller & Co.,
C. C. McClendon,
J. N. Woody,
W. H. Bostwick,
E. P. Pickens,
Pelton & Sisemore.
    These parties all being financially interested in the flour bin business, have surely investigated the same satisfactorily, and if there had been any fraud connected with it some of them would surely have found it out. One of the men interested, L. A. Rose, states that he quit his work and put in his whole time for three days riding over the country, visiting Medford, Central Point, Jacksonville and every possible place where there was a shadow of a chance for information, and he is free to state that in no instance did he find anything wrong with the business; but all reports, when traced up, proved to be groundless.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1893, page 3


    I. M. Muller went to Butte County, Cal. last Sunday to canvass for the Economy Flour Bin and was accompanied by Messrs. Clements, Scoggin and Parker.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1893, page 3


    J. F. Brown and R. G. Brown departed last Tuesday for the scene of their operations in the interest of the Economy Flour Bin, in eastern Oregon, R. G. coming over from Yreka the previous evening with that end in view.
    E. F. Walker took fifteen orders for the Economy Flour Bin in the upper valley in less than two days lately. Nearly everybody who is canvassing for the Economy Flour Bin reports success. This is one of the most economical, handy and ornamental of household articles, and consequently is proving quite popular.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1893, page 3



"Licked the Editor."
    Lincoln Clarke Carson, of the Central Point News, ran afoul of one of the contingencies of a humble editor's life last Saturday. In his paper issued June 2d, he published a communication characterizing as swindling the operations of the Economy Flour Bin men who have been in this county for some months, with headquarters at Jacksonville. One of the bin men, a big, sledge-hammer-fist sort of fellow, went over to Central Point, met Carson on the street in front of a saloon, and hammered his face to his satisfaction, after which he paid the town recorder for his fun. Carson is a little fellow and was caught without any means of defense, or we might have had a coroner's item.
    The flour bin business seems to be about as follows: Several very suave gentlemen came into the county and exhibited a tin concern, cylindrical in shape and holding about 100 lbs. of flour, having a sieve at the bottom and little spice drawers up one side. It was nicely painted, and probably cost the manufacturer a dollar or more. The suave gentlemen were able to convince numerous housewives that this tin bin, at $6.50, was something that no home could do without. Numerous orders in the shape of notes were taken, and the business made such a showing that the real profits of the business began to appear. The bin men had "territory" for sale, and it is asserted by the Central Point News that one hundred county rights to sell the patent flour bin have been disposed of to citizens of Jackson County.
    The price for a county right, at least in some instances, was $400, and the rumor goes that the flour bin men will clear up from $15,000 to $25,000 from the sale of the rights.
    The bins are a good thing to keep flour in, and if the 100 men in the county who bought the right to sell in various counties were willing to make from two to four dollars upon a little concern that can be made for about a dollar, they are not subjects for any great sympathy upon the ground that they have themselves been "worked" and have given somebody else a share in the big profits of the business. Some of them know what they are doing well enough, and the others want to be initiated in the patent right profession before they get too old to cut any more eye teeth.
Ashland Tidings, June 9, 1893, page 3



    Geo. E. Bloomer, Lindsay Sizemore, Walter Williams and John E. Ross left for the northern part of the state this week, where they go to begin the sale of the Economy Flour Bin in which they are interested.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, June 9, 1893, page 2


Jacksonville Excited.
    JACKSONVILLE, Or., June 6--There has been much excitement here the past few days, occasioned by certain articles published in the Central Point News and directed against the flour bin company operating here. The flour bin company has disposed of a large number of bins and 30 county rights, the purchasers being business men and leading citizens of this county. The business here is not considered a fraud. No notice was taken of the first article, but the second contained statements directed against the members of the company, which they felt called upon to resent, and which resulted in the severe castigation of the News editor after he had admitted being the writer of the article.
The Dalles Times-Mountaineer, June 10, 1893, page 2


    The muscular discussion that the Central Point News man had recently with the Economy Flour Bin Co. is a pointer for country editors in general. It has convinced us that we had better lose no time in getting on the good side of the E.F.B. Co. So here goes. We advise everybody to buy the patent flour bin.
    You can't get along without one. Then keep it full of flour and peace will reign in your household. How people got along before the Economy Flour Bin was invented, we are at a loss to conjecture.
    Its name alone ought to commend it to the public. If everybody would buy an Economy Flour Bin, enough money would be saved in a year to pay off the national debt. Then such sales would place the E.F.B. Co in a fair financial condition. They, of course, would be benevolent and help out the community.
    Buy at once. If you have an old-fashioned flour bin move it the the woodshed and fill it with mill feed. Remember our foredads were poor; they had no patent flour bins. Then think of the enormous quantities of time, tin and talent used up by the inventor before he got the bin to perfection! Don't delay.
    We would be willing to insert, now and then, complimentary notices like the above and--take it in flour bins.
Talent News, June 15, 1893



    John Bellinger has taken the agency for the Economy Flour Bin in some county in California. We believe he is the right man in the right place. That he is a lady's man all can testify who know him--and it will be a sour-tempered housewife indeed whom he cannot convince that life isn't worth living without an Economy Flour Bin in the kitchen. John, may your lot be cast in "floury" places.

"Griffin Creek Gatherings," Medford Mail, June 16, 1893, page 1


    E. F. Walker will leave soon for Tehama County, California--flour bins. If Mr. Walker don't make a success of the venture it will not be for want of hustle.
    W. J. Gooch, of Economy Flour Bin fame, went south Monday accompanied by his wife and child.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, June 16, 1893, page 1


    James Grey is among the number from Central Point to canvass for the Economy Flour Bin.

"Central Point Items," Medford Mail, June 16, 1893, page 2


    The flour bin men have been busy this week delivering bins to their customers.

    G. A. Hover, who left Medford last week for Redding, Calif. to canvass the Economy Flour Bin, writes E. F. Walker like this: "I find territory all right, and have had good success so far--and everything strange. I have not advertised the bins as yet--all well pleased--had no trouble to get people to look at the bins." Don't think we print the above in vindication of the flour bin men--they are big enough in stature and number to do that themselves--but as a personal request made by Mr. Hover.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, June 16, 1893, page 3


    We found the flour bin excitement beyond description in Sams Valley, which came very near cooling off our gold fever for awhile. We found nearly all of the young men who could recite the multiplication table properly and could scribble names and dates attired in new dress suits, with huge pencils adorning ears, seated on dog carts with a flour bin behind, in the act of starting out to test their proficiency as canvassers, some of whom were employed by A. C. Stanley, Sams Valley's popular merchant, some by C. C. McClendon, others by A. S. Moon. All of these gentlemen have invested in county rights. Two lively agents were dispatched from headquarters in Jacksonville to scoop in Uncle James Pankey. One of them relieved him of the plow handles and proceeded to keep up plowing while the other prepared him for a flour bin sale, but Uncle James utterly refused to invest in tin.

"Lake Creek Creeklets," Medford Mail, June 16, 1893, page 4


    The Economy Flour Bin Co. are filling orders for their wares.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1893, page 3


    W. J. Gooch, manager of the Economy Flour Bin Co., has gone to Los Angeles, Cal. with his family.
    Mr. Clopton, one of the Economy Flour Bin Co.'s solicitors, is dangerously ill with hemorrhage of the lungs.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1893, page 3


Should Be in Every Home.
    The Economy Flour Bin men are now in Ukiah, we are glad to note, and are doing well. They will make a complete canvass of the town and county. The article is neat and durable, and we see no reason why it should not come into as general use as a cookstove or sewing machine, as the next thing in importance to bread is "clean bread," and by using the Economy you are certain of this. The top is secured by a heavy cover and the bottom by wire gauze, so the flour is secure against rats, mice or any insects at all. The heavy japanning protects it from different changes in atmosphere or weather. It is these, together with the facts that it is handsomely decorated, takes little room, always ready for use and will last a lifetime, that we predict a brilliant future in uses for it.
Mendocino Dispatch-Democrat, Ukiah, California, June 16, 1893, page 2


    County Treasurer Bloomer, accompanied by Miss Orth, has returned from his Portland-San Francisco trip. He reports his flour bin business all right.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, June 23, 1893, page 3


    Mr. Tate, who has been assisting W. J. Gooch in the management of the flour bin line in this section, left for San Francisco yesterday morning. He will engage in other business.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1893, page 3


    The Flour Bin Co. has filled nearly all of its orders, and Messrs. Coleman, Clopton and Tate expect to leave for California soon.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1893, page 3


    Will Nichols, of Central Point, and David Cardwell, of Sams Valley, returned from Willamette Valley Sunday, where they have been canvassing for the Economy Flour Bin. They report flour bin business a failure in that country.

"Central Point Items," Medford Mail, June 30, 1893, page 1


    The Economy Flour Bin men, Clopton, Coleman and Tate, took the train Saturday morning for California.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, June 30, 1893, page 3


    G. A. Hover reports to E. F. Walker from Redding, Cal. to the effect that he finds the people there favorably disposed toward the Economy Flour Bin, and that he is meeting with success.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 7, 1893, page 3


    I heard that Andrew Moon, who lives in Sams Valley, just got back from some backwoods county canvassing for the flour bin. He doesn't shine as bright as he did just before he started, to give light to the backwoods county. He says the people would rather live in darkness, because their deeds are evil. He got two orders just the same.
"Student of the Old School," Medford Mail, July 14, 1893, page 1


    Editor Carson is now reported to be sojourning in Portland. He will doubtless go back to his old reportorial job on some of the dailies that city.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, July 21, 1893, page 3


    Mr. Roberts, whose finger was bitten in a scrapping match with Mr. Clopton of flour bin fame, is suffering severely, and the wound may result seriously. His finger and arm are badly swollen.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 21, 1893, page 3


    Mr. Roberts, he who had the altercation a few weeks ago with one of the flour bin men, was in Medford this week having his hand attended to. It will be remembered that his hand was bitten by Clopton in the fight, which at the time was not considered in any way dangerous, but it has been getting worse ever since, and it is now possible that it will have to be amputated.
    J. H. Woody is one of the gentlemen who purchased a flour bin territory. His was Umatilla and in which he has been canvassing for the past few weeks. He sold quite a few bins, but now is found another stumbling block in his way. It appears that when the county right was sold Mr. Gooch gave an order for a specified number of bins which were to be delivered to Mr. Woody, but when it came to ordering the goods a reply was received from the manufacturers to the effect that they knew no such a man as Gooch--and his order was not filled.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, July 28, 1893, page 3


    Mr. Roberts, who had one of his fingers bitten by Mr. Clopton several weeks ago, has been admitted to the county hospital. His arm pains him very much, and he may lose it ultimately.
    The report that Mr. Clopton of flour bin fame had died is an erroneous one. He was in San Francisco when heard from a few days since, but intended leaving for his home in the East, as his health did not seem to improve.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 4, 1893, page 3


    G. A. Hover returned last Friday from Redding. The gentleman has been engaged in canvassing for the Economy Flour Bin for the past few months and reports having taken a goodly number of orders, but says the times are too close to make satisfactory collections--in consequence of which he will wait until about the middle of September before further prosecuting his work.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, August 25, 1893, page 3    The repercussions of the Panic of 1893 are beginning to be felt.


    The Mail has no personal knowledge as to the whereabouts of Gooch, the flour bin man--notwithstanding assertions to the contrary.
Medford Mail, September 1, 1893, page 2


The Heavens Be Praised.
From the Eugene Register.
    The Kickapoo Medicine Company will close up shop and quit business today. They will pack their things and store them in this city, while the people will be discharged, some of them remaining here and some going east.
    This combination of money filchers were headed this way, and it is a kind providence which heads them off before they reach us. A gang of flour bin fakes, two circuses, and a defaulting county treasurer is quite as much of the fake infection as we can reasonably be expected to tolerate in one season.

Medford Mail, September 1, 1893, page 2


 September 15, 1893 Medford Mail
September 15, 1893 Medford Mail


    The notes given in payment of the county rights sold by the Economy Flour Bin Co. are coming to the surface, having been hidden away so well that nobody knew where they were. Arrangements had been made by some parties to settle their obligations at the discount offered by W. J. Gooch, the manager, but he left these parts so suddenly that he failed to make good his contracts. We learn that an effort will be made by a number of the victims to avoid payment of the notes.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 1, 1893, page 3


    An attempt was made to indict W. J. Gooch of flour bin fame for obtaining money under false pretenses, but it failed from lack of evidence.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 15, 1893, page 3

Gooch Patent
Cuthbert As a Winter Resort.
    Cuthbert, Ga., October 15.--(Special.)--The northern tourist is beginning to leave home and strike for the "sunny southland." Cuthbert has been the winter home of several of these people, and this winter she expects quite a number. Dr. G. Sprague, of Chicago, who has already spent several winters here, and who was so well pleased, has returned to winter again in our midst. Mr. Gooch, of the Gooch flour bin patent, has established quarters in our city, and will winter here also. Those who have tried our city are easy to be brought back, and generally bring others with them.
The Atlanta Constitution, Georgia, October 16, 1893, page 3
Gooch Patent

    J. K. Roberts was over from Applegate last Saturday. The gentleman is teaching school in that vicinity. It was he who had the fracas with Clopton, the flour bin man, and who had his hand bitten by him, from the effects of which he has not yet recovered. As a matter of fact he is very little improved, the poison from the bite having scattered quite generally through his whole system. His eyesight has also been impaired considerably.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 27, 1893, page 3


    T. J. Clopton, who died at Klamath Falls a few months ago, was a member of Banner Lodge No. 23, A.O.U.W., of Jacksonville. Recorder Wilson has just received notice that the $2000, to which the family of every member of the order is entitled at the death of the insured, is ready, and Mrs. Clopton will soon be in possession of the money.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 22, 1893, page 3



    J. K. Robins, who had his hand severely bitten some months ago, in a little misunderstanding with Clopton, the flour bin man, is teaching school on Applegate. Mr. R. has never fully recovered from the effects of the blood poisoning, which arose from his wound, the poison having permeated his whole system.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 3, 1893, page 3


    Deputy sheriff Sisemore has been busy during the week, serving legal documents on a number of flour bin victims. Many thousands of dollars will be wrung from the citizens of this county by W. J. Gooch, the Kentucky bunko sharp.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 17, 1893, page 3


    Several of the flour bin victims intend testing the legality of the notes they signed and have engaged the services of Francis Fitch of Medford to contest their side of the case.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 1, 1893, page 3


    The flour bin cases have been continued until the April term of the circuit court, on account of the illness of one of the defendants' attorneys.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 8, 1894, page 3


    John Sisemore is running his placer mine day and night now--getting even on the flour bin.
"Gold Hill Nuggets," Medford Mail, February 9, 1894, page 2


    Jackson County should change its name and keep from insulting "Old Hickory"'s character and sturdy, stiff-backed integrity. In view of the flour-bin and Bloomer fakes I would suggest the name of Sucker County. However, if this should appear unseemly let us suggest Sardine County in honor of the taxpayers who have been "voting as they prayed and shot" for over a quarter of a century. Of if that does not fill the bill name it Fossil County in honor of the farmer who, lathered, plastered and bespattered with mortgage, debt and taxes, wants a high tariff "to keep Europe out" and a gold basis so that he can trade with Yurrup. If these are faulty let the county court and the late Mr. Bloomer's bondsmen "get together again" and change the name to suit themselves, but for "Old Hickory"'s sake don't call it Jackson.
"Medford Items," Valley Record, Ashland, Oregon, February 22, 1894, page 3


WILL NOT PAY THEIR NOTES.
    JACKSONVILLE, Or., April 14.--It will be remembered that a number of persons appeared in this county last summer, as agents for an article called the "economy flour bin." They canvassed the county energetically and sold many bins, and at the same time sold a large number of county rights in this and the state of California. The counties were sold for $400 each, for which they took notes with approved security, payable in a few months. They sold the notes at a small discount, pocketed the money and left the country. Of the makers of the notes a number refused to pay on the grounds that they were procured through fraud and misrepresentation, and allege that no value was received for them. The party who bought them brought suit to enforce payment. The makers combined together in defense and a test case will come before this court to determine their validity. This case is of unusual importance, on account of the number of influential and well-to-do people who claim to have been victimized by the flour-bin men, and also on account of the character of the defense, which will be set up in bar of the payment of the notes.
Oregonian, Portland, April 15, 1894, page 2



You Can't Afford To Be Without It.
    One of the greatest inventions ever produced and one that is appreciated by every housekeeper. There are thousands in daily use throughout the United States, and it gives universal and perfect satisfaction wherever it has been introduced. It is a combination Flour Bin, Sifter and Spice Receptacle, all in one article. It is made from imported tin plate, substantial and durable, japanned and baked, making the finest finished piece of kitchen furniture ever put on market.
    Where servants are used it is especially adapted, as they are usually careless and wasteful.
    It is absolutely proof against dampness, waste, mice, rats, roaches and insects of all kinds that infest the kitchen. It does away with all barrels, boxes, bins, sacks and tin cans strewn around your shelves and kitchen. We are introducing this article for the first time in this state. Our company is a reliable and responsible concern, represented by courteous and gentlemanly salesmen, who will make a thorough canvass of this vicinity. We sell our goods strictly on their merits, and you will not be insisted upon to buy because you are kind enough to examine our article, for our object is as much to introduce and get it before the public as to make sales. Kindly requesting the public to examine our goods when our salesmen call, we remain,
                Very truly yours,
                        E. Y. WATTS, Manager,
                                The Economy Flour Bin Co.
Bradford County Telegraph, Starke, Florida, March 1, 1895, page 4


A Household Necessity
    Is the Economy Flour Bin. It is substantially made from imported tin plate; will last a lifetime. This bin will be offered throughout Shenandoah County by polite and gentlemanly salesmen.
    Sample can be seen in operation and orders received at Mauck & Young's store.
J. W. BILLER, Mangr.,
Woodstock, Va.
Shenandoah Herald, Woodstock Virginia, August 28 through November 6, 1896


    Last Wednesday week was Jackson County day in the supreme court. The case of T. J. Kinney, respondent, vs. Enoch F. Walker and Prudence Walker, appellants, was argued and submitted on behalf of respondent; attorney for appellants not being present. This is the much talked-of flour bin case. Francis Fitch, formerly of this city, now in San Francisco, is the appellants' attorney. The Hockersmith-Hanley case was also argued and submitted upon the same day.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, February 21, 1896, page 5


Postponed.
    The clever gentlemen representing the Economy Flour Bin Co. received orders Wednesday from the head of their firm to transfer their operations to a different field and postpone their canvass in this territory until fall, when it is hoped that the effects of a drought will not exist, as it does now in some sections of our parish. The orders taken here will not be binding unless renewed when the company resumes operations here, at which time we hope these affable gentlemen may be returned here by their firm.
The Louisiana Populist, Natchitoches, February 19, 1897, page 3


West Cedar Street, Franklin, Kentucky
Gooch, William J., 51, m. 25 years, born in KY, father born in TN, mother MO
              Benona, 49, born in KY, parents born in KY
              Patrick H., 80, born in TN, parents born in VA
Travelstead, Conley, 21, born in KY, parents born in KY
                      Nelle, 21, daughter, born in KS
                      Will Gooch, 5 months, grandson, born in KY
U.S. Census, April 23, 1910



Last revised January 13, 2015