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Giants vs. White Sox


Giants vs. White Sox, Sporting Life 11-29-1913p5
Sporting Life, November 29, 1913, page 5

MEDFORD TO HAVE GALA DAY
Stores to Close and Neighbor Towns to Send Fans to Giant-White Sox.
    MEDFORD, Or., Oct. 14.--(Special.)--November 17, when the Giants and White Sox will play an exhibition game here, will be made a gala day. All stores will close, there will be a parade before the game and Governor West will be invited to throw the first ball. Klamath Falls persons have reserved 250 seats and applications from ten other towns have been received.
    New bleachers are being constructed to accommodate the crowd, half-fare railroad rates will prevail from Red Bluff to Roseburg, and preparations are being made to entertain from 5000 to 6000 visitors.
Medford Oregonian, Portland, October 15, 1913, page 8


MEDFORD'S GREATEST BASEBALL DAY TOMORROW:
FAIR WEATHER FORECAST;
FANS PLAN VISITORS' ENTERTAINMENT
    Medford's greatest baseball day is tomorrow, and everything is fixed but the weatherman. He predicts a continuation of the present weather, fog in the morning and a clear sky by noon, for the Giants and White Sox and the fans of southern Oregon who will be on hand when the game starts at one o'clock.
    In honor of the occasion the business houses of Medford and the circuit court and the county offices will close during the game to allow their employees to attend. Delegations of fans from Roseburg to Redding will be in attendance. The ball grounds have been put in excellent condition for the contest, and the boys will have a chance to play real baseball.
    If the roads are good, a delegation of Medford fans will journey to Ashland, leaving the Nash Hotel at 8:45 o'clock, meet the players of the two teams and take them on an auto trip through the orchard district. Among those donating their machines for this purpose are Judge TouVelle, Lyman Orton, Shorty Garnett, Bobby Brevard, Court Hall, Ben Sheldon, R. H. McCurdy, Mose Barkdull, two cars, O. V. Meyers, Charlie Young, J. C. Barnes, Ad Helms, Joe Rader, F. E. Merrick, Con Leever, Charles Gates, J. E. Watt, E. C. Gaddis, Ed Brown, G. L. Treichler and J. A. Westerlund.
    A luncheon in honor of the visiting baseball men will be given at the Medford Hotel at 3:00 o'clock. Judge Colvig has charge of this feature, and desires that all who wish to attend give him their name before noon. A dollar plate is the price.
    The ticket sale for the game is good, with much interest from out-of-town points, and indications for a banner day and the biggest crowd in the city's history are bright.
Medford Sun, November 16, 1913, page 1


MEDFORD PLANS BIG TIME
Giants-White Sox Game May Be Witnessed by Thousands.
    MEDFORD, Or., Nov. 15.--(Special.)--Medford is preparing a gala reception for the Giants and White Sox, who play here Monday afternoon. All the stores will close for the game, and special trains will be arriving from early morning until noon. A dozen boosters will journey to Ashland to meet the teams there and escort them through the orchard district by automobile. Immediately after the game there will be a luncheon at the Hotel Medford in honor of the ballplayers. Judge Colvig will preside, and a number of speeches are down on the programme.
    As a special feature it is planned to have a Spitzenburg apple pitched by Mathewson as the first ball, and if the batter makes a hit it will mean a box of extra fancy Spitzenburgs for him, and, if he fans, Matty will get the prize. The ball park has been specially prepared, new stands have been erected, and the local managers are prepared to entertain from 2000 to 3000 visitors.
Sunday Oregonian, Portland, November 16, 1913, page 22


LARGE CROWD AT BIG GAME SPITE OF MIST
Rain Threatens, But People Turn Out from All Parts of Southern Oregon
To See Big Players, Who Are Met at Ashland and Given Tour.
Business Practically Suspends in Medford--Banks and Savings Houses Close.
November 16, 1913 Medford Sun    Despite the peevishness of the weather man, indications this morning pointed to a big crowd at the White Sox-Giants game. Heavy cloud overcast the sky, and drizzles of rain fell intermittently, causing fears the game would be called, but failing to dampen the ardor of the fans.
    Out-of-town visitors began to arrive Sunday for the game, and this morning's train brought large delegations from Southern Oregon points.
    The special train bearing the baseball visitors arrived at noon, the autos leaving at 10 to meet the party at Ashland for a tour of the orchard districts. The grounds are in good condition, and the rain will not prevent the game.
    During the game business will be practically suspended, banks, business and public offices closing.
    A full list has been secured for the banquet at the Medford Hotel after the game.
    The brides and women of the baseball party will be entertained during their stay here by a committee from the Greater Medford Club. Teams is as follows:
    The probable lineup is:
White Sox
    Weaver, [ss]; Rath 3b; Speaker, cf; Crawford, rf; Chase, 1b; Schaefer, 2b; Evans, lf; Schalk, c; Russell, p; Daly, 1b.
Giants
    Snodgrass, cf; Magee, lf; Lobert, 3b; Doyle, 2b; Merkle, 1b; Doolan, ss; Thorpe, rf.
    The White Sox-Giants' special arrived at noon. All of the party except attaches and president Comiskey and family left the train at Ashland for a tour of the valley by auto. Mrs. Comiskey and daughter and other ladies of the party were met by a committee of ladies from the Greater Medford Club and taken to the Medford Hotel.
    A large crowd of fans greeted the train. Christy Mathewson and Chief Meyers, the Giants' star battery, left the teams at San Francisco.

Medford Mail Tribune, November 17, 1913, page 1


DIAMOND KINGS AT BANQUET BOARD
EVERYBODY JOVIAL BUT THE PEEVISH WEATHERMAN
Members of the White Sox-Giants Party Guests of Medford Fans
    Everyone in Jackson County worked to make the Giants-White Sox game a success but the weatherman. His Excellence J. Pluvius did his worst and let down buckets of moisture before the game, through the game and after it. But he failed. The ball diamond was rolled at noon, and when the game was called at 1:30 there was a good surface to play on. And the teams played. Umpire Sheridan wore an overcoat, Doyle carried an umbrella, and the world-touring ball tossers went through five and a half innings as nonchalantly as if the sun had been shining and they were at home on the Polo Grounds.
    Some idea of the local interest may be gained from the fact that J. D. Kilgore of Evans Creek, a well-known pioneer of that section, arose at 3 a.m., walked 14 miles, forded two creeks and arrived in Medford in the forenoon determined to see "Matty take off his hat."
    Matty wasn't there. He had left the team at San Francisco to look over his ranch in southern California. Chief Myers, the star catcher, had also departed. But if anyone was disappointed there was no evidence of it. As Umpire Klem bawled out the notables as they came to bat everyone yelled, and the lightning work of the New York infield aroused great enthusiasm.
    The special train was met at Ashland by a squadron of Medford motor cars and the players driven through the orchard district en route to Medford. The Natatorium was used as a dressing room, and the game was started promptly on scheduled time. The grandstand was packed with a thousand people, a large proportion ladies, and the field was lined with another thousand who stood in the rain without a murmur and would have stood there for ten more innings if they had had the chance.
    No one missed the way Merkle swung, or Doyle shot to first, or Wiltse cross fired. It was only an exhibition perhaps, but it was the real dope.
    After the game all the players and all the brides--there were six of them on the special--were given a banquet at the Hotel Medford. The tables were arranged like a baseball diamond, and around the edge of the room were long tables marked "bleachers." Two hundred people sat down at 4 o'clock, with Judge W. M. Colvig as toastmaster.
Holbrook Withington    Manager Callahan of the White Sox outlined the purpose of the trip, pointing out that it was not a money-making venture but was an effort to make baseball an international sport. He thanked the Medford people for their hospitality and particularly for their kindness to the teams, who could not give them much of a game under such adverse weather conditions. Mr. Farrell also spoke for the visiting team, praised Snodgrass, explained how the fatal fly he missed was not poor playing but simply ill fortune, and R. J. Brevard, who personally made the $1000 guarantee which brought the teams here, expressed his pleasure in having been instrumental in bringing about such representative American sportsmen to the city. Schaeffer, the famous Washington player and coaching comedian, told a story, and Holbrook Withington of Medford also entertained the company with his famous Chinese interpreter yarn.
    During the afternoon the wives of the players were entertained by a committee of Medford women including Mrs. Edgar Hafer, Mrs. Stanton Griffis, Mrs. W. V. B. Campbell, Miss Putnam, Mrs. Gale and Mrs. Simpson.
    The ladies of the party included Mrs. C. A. Comiskey, Mrs. J. J. McGraw, Mrs. J. J. Callahan, Mrs. Hal Chase, Mrs. Reb Russell, Mrs. Larry Doyle, Mrs. Jim Thorpe, Mrs. Jeff Tesreau, Mrs. J. R. McAleer, Mrs. Louis Comiskey, Mrs. Joe Farrell and Mrs. Jim Mullin.
Medford Sun, November 18, 1913, page 1


AGED MAN'S HIKE USELESS
Medford Pioneer Tramps 14 Miles in Storm to See "Matty" Pitch.
    MEDFORD, Or., Nov. 17.--(Special.)--J. D. Kilgore, an aged pioneer of Jackson County, walked 14 miles from Evans Creek to Medford in a drenching rain to see Christy Mathewson pitch in the game here between the New York Giants and Chicago White Sox.
    Mr. Kilgore did not learn until he reached Medford that "Matty" left the tourists in California. The pioneer said he arose at 3 a.m. and waded across two swollen creeks to reach Medford in time for the game.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, November 18, 1913, page 1



NEW YORK GIANTS DEFEAT WHITE SOX 3-0
IN INTERESTING GAME PLAYED IN HEAVY DOWNPOUR
WILTSE STAR OF GAME, HOLDING CHICAGO TEAM TO 4 HITS--FIELDS BRILLIANTLY
NEW YORK INFIELD PLAYS HIGH-CLASS BALL IN SPITE OF BAD WEATHER
2000 People Gather at Ball Park--Game Called After 5 and Half Innings--
Rader Plays at Third
    With umpire Sheridan in an overcoat, Doyle with an umbrella, a crowd of one thousand in the grandstand and another thousand in the rain, the New York Giants defeated the White Sox at the ballpark yesterday afternoon by a score of 3-0.
    Considering the weather, the game was a good one. It might have been better in the Nat tank, but the weatherman gave no announcement of his intentions. At one o'clock the grandstand was packed, and when the game started there was an overflow on the field. Of course it was impossible to give a good exhibition of baseball, but the way Doolan and Doyle scooped up the grounders and sent them shooting to first and the way Crawford and Speaker gobbled up the flies was joy to the fans, and every good play was cheered and applauded to the last splash.
    Wiltse, the Giant pitcher, was the star of his team. He not only fielded his position superbly, but had a delivery that the White Sox couldn't fathom and held them to four scattered hits. He also cracked out a two-bagger when it was needed.
    Benz for the White Sox got a bad start. He was pounded for four hits and two runs in the first inning, then he tightened until the fifth when Lobert and Merkle cracked out two doubles and another run came swimming in.
    The crowd was good-natured, and the players did their share by playing five innings and a half when they could have pulled down the money by going through one. Don Rader, who played with the White Sox early in the season and is still a recruit, took Schaeffer's place at third and accepted every chance without an error. He was given a howling reception when introduced by umpire Klem and lined out one that would have been a three-bagger if it hadn't fallen a few inches foul. Don is a great favorite with the boys and was busy shaking hands throughout the day.
    Thorpe, the Indian outfielder for the Giants, attracted a great deal of attention. As holder of the world's amateur all-around athletic championship, ex-football star and Carlisle baseball player, he came up to expectations in general architecture, but the best he could do in the way of a hit was to let the rain-soaked bat swing out of his hands for a gain of 30 yards.
    Mike Dolan, the famous star, hard hitter and vaudeville artist, who with Mabel Hite made a reputation behind the footlights, paddled about in the coaching box for a while and struck some of the poses that made him famous in days gone by.
    One of the best-appearing men was Snodgrass of the New York Giants, who dropped that fatal ball in the 1912 series which lost New York the championship. He fielded his position without an error and made a clean bingle. Snodgrass has not forgotten that error, nor have his teammates, and he has suffered enough without any more allusions to a misplay which was one of those accidents which are apt to befall the best players. He took the banter in the way it was intended, however, and showed himself a good sportsman and a gentleman in every way.
    Financially the game was a success in that $1200 was paid to the teams--$200 over the guarantee--and no one was bankrupt as a consequence. R. J. Brevard, who personally guaranteed the amount, was the recipient of congratulations on all sides.
    The victory by the Giants put them one game ahead of the White Sox on the present world tour series.
    The score.

White Sox
                                            R     H     P     A     E
Egan, 2b.  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     0     3     0
Rath, ss. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     0     1     0
Speaker, cf. . . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     2     2     0
Crawford, rf. . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     2     0     0
Chase, 1b.  . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     8     1     0
Rader, 3b.  . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     0     2     0
Evans, lf.  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     1     0     0
Schalk, c. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     4     0     0
Benz, p.  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     1     1     0
          Totals . . . . . . . . . .   0     4   18     8     0
Giants.
Snodgrass, cf.  . . . . . . . . . 1     1     0     0     0
Magee, lf.  . . . . . . . . . . .  . 1     1     1     0     0
Lobert, 3b.  . . . . . . . . . . . . 1     2     2     2     0
Doyle, 2b. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     2     3     0
Merkle, 1b. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     1   11     2     0
Doolan, ss.  . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     0     5     0
Thorpe, rf. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     1     0     0
Wingo, c.  . . .  . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     0     0     0
Wiltse, p.  . . . . . . .  . . . . . . 0     1     1     4     0
           Totals  . . . . . . . . . .   3     8   18   16     0
    Innings--
White Sox . . . . . . . 0    0    0    0    0    0----0
Giants . . . . . . . . . .  2    0    0    0    1    0----3
    Two-base hits, Crawford, Doyle, Merkle, Wiltse, Lobert.
    Double plays, Doolan to Doyle and Merkle.
    Struck out by Benz, 4; wild pitches, Benz 1.
    Umpires, Klem and Sheridan.
Medford Sun, November 18, 1913, page 1

Medford Mail Tribune, November 17, 1913

GIANTS WINNERS IN GAME PLAYED IN POURING RAIN
    The thanks of the community are due to R. J. Brevard who put up the $1000 guarantee for the Giants-White Sox game, to Sidney Brown, who cooperated with him in the management of the game, and to the many others who assisted in making the event a success. That their efforts were appreciated was shown by the good attendance despite a pouring rain. The receipts were approximately $1500, $1250 of which went to the players; the balance goes for advertising and expenses incurred.
    The exhibition game was fast and as good as could be expected under the conditions. Five and a half innings were played in a cold drizzling rain, in which players wore their coats and one of them an umbrella. Despite sloppy grounds and wet balls, the fielding was as classy as clockwork. The Giants started off hitting the ball, and when the deluge ended the game the score was three to nothing in their favor.
    Not all the players who have played in the previous games were present. Mathewson the great and Chief Myers left at San Francisco, Walter Johnson in Texas. At Seattle, Hal Chase, Tris Speaker, Morris Rath, Ray Schalk, Jeff Tesreau and Snodgrass leave. But Medford fans saw nearly all of the diamond stars who originally comprised the two teams, including Thorpe, the amateur all-round athlete of the world, Comiskey, the manager of the tour and owner of the White Sox, Mugsy McGraw, Snodgrass the star fielder, Jeff Tesreau, Tris Speaker, Sam Crawford, Hal Chase, James Callahan and Herman Schaefer, the comedian.
    McGraw is the man who has piloted the New York Giants to five National League championships, while Snodgrass and Tesreau, not to forget Larry Doyle and Merkle, have been his lieutenants in much of the campaigning.
    Tris Speaker is the famous slugging Boston outfielder, while Crawford has a similar distinction in Detroit.
    Comiskey's personal party includes Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Comiskey, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Comiskey, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Farrell, Mr. and Mrs. William Farrell, Thomas E. Lynch, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Mullen and Mrs. Hugh E. Keogh.
    Don Rader, the Medford boy, appeared in a White Sox uniform and received a warm welcome from his home folks. He played with the Sox the first of [the] season and is still a Sox recruit.
    Wiltse pitched a fine game for the Giants, keeping the White Sox from smashing the sphere and fielding superbly. Benz for the Sox was freely hit in the first inning, and again in the fifth.
    Following the game the players were served a turkey dinner at the Hotel Medford attended by two hundred fans. Judge Colvig acted as toastmaster, and brief speeches were made by the toastmaster, manager Callahan of the White Sox, Hermann Schaeffer and J. C. Farrell. Holbrook Withington told his Chinese story. R. J. Brevard assured the players that no guarantee was too large for the pleasure enjoyed by seeing such players in action.
    During the afternoon the wives of the players were entertained by a committee of Medford women including Mrs. Edgar Hafer, Mrs. Stanton Griffis, Mrs. W. V. B. Campbell, Miss Putnam, Mrs. Gale and Mrs. Simpson.
    The ladies of the party included Mrs. C. A. Comiskey, Mrs. J. J. McGraw, Mrs. J. J. Callahan, Mrs. Hal Chase, Mrs. Reb Russell, Mrs. Larry Doyle, Mrs. Jim Thorpe, Mrs. Jeff Tesreau, Mrs. J. R. McAleer, Mrs. Louis Comiskey, Mrs. Joe Farrell and Mrs. Jim Mullin.
    The players departed for Portland on the evening train, all expressing their pleasure at the entertainment they received which they pronounced the most cordial on the trip.
    The victory by the Giants put them one game ahead of the White Sox on the present world tour series.
    The score:

White Sox
                                            R     H     P     A     E
Egan, 2b.  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     0     3     0
Rath, ss. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     0     1     0
Speaker, cf. . . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     2     2     0
Crawford, rf. . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     2     0     0
Chase, 1b.  . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     8     1     0
Rader, 3b.  . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     0     2     0
Evans, lf.  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     1     0     0
Schalk, c. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     4     0     0
Benz, p.  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     1     1     0
          Totals . . . . . . . . . .   0     4   18     8     0
Giants.
Snodgrass, cf.  . . . . . . . . . 1     1     0     0     0
Magee, lf.  . . . . . . . . . . .  . 1     1     1     0     0
Lobert, 3b.  . . . . . . . . . . . . 1     2     2     2     0
Doyle, 2b. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     2     3     0
Merkle, 1b. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     1   11     2     0
Doolan, ss.  . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     0     5     0
Thorpe, rf. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0     0     1     0     0
Wingo, c.  . . .  . . . . . . . . . . 0     1     0     0     0
Wiltse, p.  . . . . . . .  . . . . . . 0     1     1     4     0
           Totals  . . . . . . . . . .   3     8   18   16     0
    Innings--
White Sox . . . . . . . 0    0    0    0    0    0----0
Giants . . . . . . . . . .  2    0    0    0    1    0----3
    Two-base hits, Crawford, Doyle, Merkle, Wiltse, Lobert.
    Double plays, Doolan to Doyle and Merkle.
    Struck out by Benz, 4; wild pitches, Benz 1.
    Umpires, Klem and Sheridan.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 18, 1913, page 6


GIANTS SHUT OUT WHITE SOX, 3 TO 0
Magee Makes One-Handed Catch With Umbrella Over His Head.
RAIN HALTS EXHIBITION
Comiskey and McGraw Willing to Let Forfeit Go but Medford Fans Refuse to Quit
After Paying $2 to See Big Leaguers.

    MEDFORD, Or., Nov. 17.--(Special.)--With umbrellas for the background, foreground and centerpiece, the Giants defeated the White Sox here 3 to 0 today in a five-inning game and broke the tie of the series. It rained before the game, during the game and after the game, making it such a natatorial exhibition as has not been seen on the trip.
    Magee, in the outfield for Giants, made a one-handed catch with an umbrella over his head, while Sheridan umpired in an overcoat.
    During the forenoon it rained, but when the tourists arrived it stopped for a few minutes and immediately the committee insisted that the game be played. Comiskey and McGraw were willing to let the forfeit go by, but the fans had paid $2 a throw to see the major leaguers in action and they would not be satisfied without a game. The first inning went by without a hitch, then the clouds began to leak, and for four solid hours it poured. The ball diamond had been rolled at noon, and when the game was called at 1:30 there was a good surface to play on. Umpire Sheridan wore an overcoat. Doyle carried an umbrella and the tourists floundered through five innings as nonchalantly as if the sun had been shining.
    As Umpire Klem bawled out the notables as they came to bat everyone yelled. The lightning work of the New York infield also aroused much enthusiasm. The presence on the White Sox team of Don Rader, an ex-high school star of Medford, who was recruited by Comiskey last summer and is spending the winter at his home here, added to the interest. Rader played an errorless game and knocked a hard liner to the left field fence, which was a foul by three inches.
Crowds Cry for More.
    There was a crowd jammed in the bleachers and along the sidelines, but no one made a move to leave and there were even slight murmurs of protest when Umpire Klem called the game at the end of the sixth inning. Not that the fans did not consider that they had had $2 worth of fun, but they simply ate up the "big league stuff." By this time the players were floundering around in the mud while with every ball thrown it was a hit and miss affair. Still it was a remarkably clean game, some of the most brilliant one-hand stops and pick-ups setting the fans wild. Wiltse tried to fool the Sox and Benz had been picked to keep the Giants guessing.
    The Sox never had a chance at Wiltse's slants while the Nationals pounded Joe hard and often, getting a start of two runs in the first inning on two clouts into the outfield. Fast fielding kept the bases clean until the fifth, when Lobert's and Merkle's doubles pulled in one tally.
Rader Plays Third.
    Joe Rader, who lives here and who was with the Sox for a minute last year, played third, as Schaefer was laid up with a lame back. Immediately after the game the Commercial Association here tendered a banquet and the tourists made their getaway for Portland a little after 6 o'clock.
    The score:
[box score]
    Runs--Snodgrass, Magee, Lobert. Two-base hits--Crawford, Doyle, Merkle, Wiltse, Lobert. Double plays--Doolan to Doyle to Merkle. Struck out--by  Benz 4. Wild pitches--Benz. Time--52 minutes. Umpires--Klem and Sheridan.
    After the game all the players and the six brides were guests at a banquet at Hotel Medford. The tables were arranged like a baseball diamond, and around the edge of the room were long tables marked bleachers. Two hundred attended. Judge Colvig presided as toastmaster. Manager Callahan, of the White Sox, outlined the purpose of the trip, pointing out that it was not a money-making venture, but an effort to make baseball an international sport.
    During the afternoon the wives of the players were entertained by a committee of Medford women, including Mrs. Edgar Hafer, Mrs. Stanton Griffis, Mrs. W. V. B. Campbell, Miss Putnam, Mrs. Gates and Mrs. Simpson.

Oregonian, Portland, November 18, 1913, page 9


    The White Sox and Giants are now on the ocean bound for Japan, they sailing as per schedule, from Victoria, B.C. on November 19. The two teams played at Medford, Ore., on November 17 and, in a drizzling rain, the stands and bleachers were filled to overflowing, but not a fan left until umpire Klem called the game in the sixth. By this time it was pouring and the outfielders carried umbrellas in chasing flies. Despite the water and mud it was a sensation game abounding in one-handed stops. Immediately after the game the party sat down to a banquet given by the Commercial Club, and the special got away for Portland shortly after 5 o'clock. The Sox didn't have a chance to score. George Wiltse showed marvelous control, while Joe Benz was hit in bunches. The Giants got a lead of two runs in the first inning, Snodgrass and Magee scoring on two singles and a couple of outs. Some great defensive work kept the Giants at bay, but in the fifth Lobert's and Merkel's doubles were worth another tally.
Excerpt, "The Tour of the World," Sporting Life, November 29, 1913, page 5


    The tour was now almost completed, so far as the United States was concerned. As a matter of fact, but two more games were played in the United States. One was at Medford, Oregon, November 17, when New York defeated Chicago, 3-0, in a driving rain. The game only lasted six innings, and as it was coming to a finish the outfielders carried umbrellas over their heads as they ran for the ball. Immediately the game was over the players were given a banquet by the Commercial Club.
"Another World's Tour of Base Ball Players Successfully Completed," Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide, 1913, page 46



Last revised January 18, 2013