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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Medford News: 1884

The fledgling town of Medford didn't have a newspaper in 1884, but that didn't stop it from making news. Below are Medford-related news items from 1884, gleaned from other towns' papers Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.


    J. S. Howard, father of Medford, sat on a box in front of the Economy Meat Market and watched with reminiscent eyes the first trolley in Jackson County. He will ride on the first trip. "Thirty years ago I cooked beans on the spot where that car now stands," the pioneer said. "Then I little thought I would ever see a street car there."
Medford Mail Tribune, March 21, 1914, page 8

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

O&C Railroad construction train circa 1890, March 25, 1934 Oregonian

    The tracklayers are now on Capt. Barnes' place, having resumed work yesterday. As the ground is too wet for the construction train to run, rails and ties are hauled over the track by horsecars. This method will not allow rapid progress.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 4, 1884, page 2


    The other unfortunate was Wm. Egan, who was struck in the face by a falling board, receiving a painful wound. Erysipelas setting in, his condition was dangerous at one time.
"Great Conflagration," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 4, 1884, page 3

 
Railroad Blacksmith Shop!
MEDFORD, OR.
Mulvany & Slagle, Props.
---
HAVING FITTED UP A SHOP AT MEDFORD and stocked it with a full line of material, we take pleasure in informing the public that we are fully prepared to do all kinds of work in our line in the best style and at low rates. Give us a trial.                                                                                   MULVANY & SLAGLE

Medford, Jan. 2, 1884.                                                                
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 4, 1884 et seq., page 3


    A considerable amount of brick is being hauled to Medford for Byers & Co.
    J. S. Howard was offered $500 in gold for his lot in town, since the fire, but promptly refused it. Who says that property in Jacksonville is tumbling?
    The party at Medford on new year's night was a success, over forty tickets being sold. Excellent music was furnished by Wilson's string band, and the supper was also appreciated.
    Mulvany & Slagle have opened a blacksmith shop at Medford and are now ready to accommodate all who may need their services. They guarantee the best work in their line at reasonable prices.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 4, 1884, page 3

 
    The construction engine was ditched in Baker's field down the valley one day last week, by reason of the settling of one side of the track, but was righted again and ready for use the next day.
"Railroad Notes," Ashland Tidings, January 4, 1884, page 3

 
BORN.
WILSON--At Medford, Dec. 28, 1883, to Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Wilson, a daughter--weight 14 pounds.
Ashland Tidings, January 4, 1884, page 3   The child was Donna Medford Wilson, later Donnie Dillinger of Portland.

 
    When the telegraph line is completed to this place along the railroad, the wires following the stage road through the valley will probably be taken down, and a loop put in at Medford for Jacksonville.
    The land at Phoenix on which the depot grounds and town lots have been surveyed belonged to Messrs. Samuel and Louis Colver, who have given the railroad company every alternate block, as did the proprietors of the tract at Medford. Thirty-six blocks have been laid out at Phoenix, we believe.
    A large brick building 50x60 feet is to be erected at Medford this winter.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 4, 1884, page 3


    Ten new houses are in the course of construction at the new town of Medford.
    Track laying was resumed this week, and if the iron holds out the construction train is expected to reach Medford early next week.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 5, 1884, page 3


Conflagration at Jacksonville.
    About 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon [sic] fire was discovered in the New State Saloon in Jacksonville. The flames spread very rapidly and soon passed beyond the control of the fire department. There was a great scarcity of water, which embarrassed the action of the firemen, and, for a time, that whole town was threatened. At the time of the fire no wind was blowing. The roofs were also covered with snow and ice, which impeded the progress of the fire and aided the department in obtaining control. One man leaped from the second-story window in a panic and broke his arm. Several women barely had time to escape from some of the buildings. The firemen concentrated all their efforts and finally prevented the flames from crossing the street at a critical moment and gained control.
    Following is a list of the losses and insurance: G. W. Savage, building and effects, $4000, insurance, $2000; J. S. Howard, merchant, building, $14,000, insurance $4500; Max Muller, merchandise, $16,000, insurance $6000; L. Solomon, post office building, $20,000, fully insured; B. Fisher, goods, $3000, fully insured; Noland & Ulrich, liquors and fixtures, $1000, insurance, $400; P. J. Ryan, building, no insurance; H. M. Rice, photographer, fixtures, $250, no insurance. There are several minor losses, which will swell the total loss a few thousand dollars.
Eugene City Guard, January 5, 1884, page 4


In the matter of the application of        )
Work & Betterton for Liquor License )
    On this day this cause came on to be heard upon the petition of T. E. Stanley and 12 others asking the Court [of commissioners] to grant license to Work & Betterton to sell spirituous liquors in a quantity less than one quart, in Medford, Precinct of Eden, Jackson County, Oregon. And it Satisfactorily appearing to the Court that due notice of the pendency of this proceeding has been given as by law required, that the petition contains the names of the legal majority of the voters of said Precinct, that the sum of $50.00 has been paid to the County Treasurer and the receipt therefore filed with the Clerk of this Court and that a good and sufficient bond in the sum of $500--Conditioned as by law required has been filed--It is therefore considered and ordered that a license be and hereby is granted to said Work & Betterton to sell spirituous liquors in a less quantity than one quart, at Medford in the Precinct of Eden County of Jackson State of Oregon, for a term of six months from this date and no longer.
Jackson County Commissioners Journal, January 9, 1884


    Tracklaying has progressed as far as Medford and is slowly progressing southward. The ground is too soft to admit of rapid work.
    The plat of the new town known as Gold Hill station has been filed and lots are now offered for sale. The railroad company has about completed a good-sized depot there.
    The construction train ran up to Central Point last Saturday and unloaded a large amount of ties and rails. Since then the tracklayers have been busily at work, horse cars being used.
    It seems to be the impression that Ashland will be terminus for some time after the railroad runs there regularly, as the Central Pacific seems to be in no hurry to make connection. It may be two years before a junction is effected between the Oregon and California systems.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 11, 1884, page 2


    W. H. Robinson has opened a barbershop at Medford.
    Several deeds for Medford property have been delivered.
    H. F. Torrey is putting up a building at Medford, which will be used as a boardinghouse.
    Baruch Fisher saved some of his goods [from the Jacksonville fire January 1], which he will probably dispose of to some merchant. He intends leaving for San Francisco as soon as he can have a settlement with his insurance company.
    Lots in the business portion of new railroad towns range as high as $350, but notwithstanding the croaking of the enemies of Jacksonville, the same kind of property could not be obtained for three times that sum here.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 11, 1884, page 3


    D. Loring started for Portland last week, but met Manager Koehler and returned with him. Having finished his work as right-of-way agent in this section, it is probable that he will soon go to other scenes. Mr. L. has made many friends while here, who wish him success wherever he may go.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 11, 1884, page 3


    Abraham, Wheeler & Co. intend to open a store at Medford.
    J. T. Roloson is building Wm. Egan's livery stable at Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 11, 1884, page 3


    The track was expected to reach Medford yesterday, and as the weather was clear and the ground hard a long stretch of rails were laid, no doubt. A week of this weather ought to put the track into Phoenix.
"Railroad Notes," Ashland Tidings, January 11, 1884, page 3


    The new livery stable at Medford for McMahon & Egan was finished this week and is pronounced a substantial and commodious structure. Messrs. J. T. Roloson and Adam Schmitt of this place done the carpenter work.
    Mr. Koehler informs the Tidings that the southern terminus of the operating division of the railroad will be moved from Grants Pass to Phoenix as soon as the track can be laid and ballasted that far. Track laying is progressing slowly now--at the rate of from 500 yards to 1000 yards a day, on the days when the men can work at all. A little season of good weather would soon put the track into Phoenix, and Mr. Koehler thinks it will be but a short time after that before the graveling will be done so that the trains can run regularly. Just how soon Phoenix will be the terminus, however, depends, of course, greatly upon the weather.
    Noland & Ulrich have purchased a lot in the town of Medford and will put up a building to be used for saloon purposes. They have a good location, put opposite the depot, and will do their share of the business.
    The new livery stable at Medford, owned by McMahon & Egan, is a most substantial structure. And the proprietors will always be ready to furnish food and stable room at lowest rates. Vehicles of all kinds to go in that part of the country can also be had at this stable.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 12, 1884, page 3


    ANOTHER ACCIDENT AT SISKIYOU TUNNEL.--Last Saturday news was received of a fatal accident to Johnnie Neilon, of Etna, while he was at work in the railroad tunnel at the south side of the Siskiyou Mountain, says the Yreka Journal. He was tamping gunpowder for a blast, with a hickory stick, when the powder exploded, driving the stick through his body, entering at the side and coming out above the kidneys. Two doctors were summoned immediately from Ashland, who removed pieces of the stick, but it is believed that the young man is fatally injured. It is reported that another man had all but one finger of his left hand blown off. A man working below him and others around him sustained no injury whatever.
Eugene City Guard, January 12, 1884, page 5


    Ballasting of the track is progressing satisfactorily again, the ground being solid enough to bear up the gravel train.
    The roundhouse at Grants Pass is nearly covered. An excellent section house, situated near the other, has lately been completed.
    Pfeifer's crew has been engaged in putting up cattle guards for some time past, but have not reached Medford as yet, owing to the scarcity of material.
    The railroad company is building a good-sized house at Gold Hill station. Some think it will be an eating house, though it is more likely a section house.
    The tracklayers did not do much work last week, consequently they did not reach Medford until Tuesday [January 15, 1884]. The track is now a short distance south of that place and slowly progressing toward Phoenix.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 18, 1884, page 2


    Isaac Woolf is about building a dwelling house at Medford.
    Egan & McMahon's stable at Medford is finished and ready for business.
    John Simmons has made application for a liquor license and will open a saloon at Medford.
    Noland & Ulrich have bought a lot at Medford and propose opening a saloon there at an early day.
    Sneak thieves are pestering the citizens of Medford. Several articles, including some money, have been missed.
    The construction train can be plainly seen and heard at this place now. The locomotive's shrill whistle was heard on Sunday for the first time.
    T. E. Stanley, having been granted a license, has opened a saloon at Medford, where will be kept the choicest wines, liquors and cigars. Give him a call.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 18, 1884, page 3


    J. S. Sims is foreman of the bridge carpenters who are working in the vicinity of Medford.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 18, 1884, page 3


    It is denied that any promises have been made by the railroad company to locate a depot or side track at Central Point. It looked strange that a depot should be established there--within so short a distance of Medford.
    The track reached Medford last Tuesday, and Phoenix is expecting to see the cars tomorrow, or the first of next week, at the latest.
"Railroad Notes," Ashland Tidings, January 18, 1884, page 2


    BAPTIZED.--The town of Medford is building up right along. The first birth occurred there last week and on Monday Thos. T. Kearney went through the ceremony of baptism by getting dumped into one of the numerous ponds there while riding a stumbling horse. Wm. Ulrich acted as godfather, presenting him with a dry set of clothes.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 19, 1884, page 3


    Have you heard the locomotive whistle?
    Saml. R. Taylor runs an express between this place and Medford.
    Report says that Phoenix will soon be the railroad terminus for a time until the road reaches Ashland.
    A. L. Johnson does a land office business in selling real estate, Call on him if you want to buy or sell.
    Noland & Ulrich have purchased a lot in the town of Medford and will put up a building to be used for saloon purposes. They have a good location, just opposite the depot, and will do their share of the business.
    Several new liquor licenses were granted this week by the county commissioners, among which were the following: W. B. Worlow of Eagle Point, McCurdy & Co. and Gabbert & Harkness of Grants Pass. Fuller & McNulty, Riddle & Wolters and Cann & High of Siskiyou Mountains, Werk & Betterton and T. E. Stanley of Medford.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 19, 1884, page 3


    Times continue good in southern Oregon and more business is being done than ever before. The advent of the railroad seems to have rejuvenated everybody and everything.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 25, 1884, page 2


    The rumor that a station will be established at Central Point is denied.
    The ballasting train got to Medford the middle of the week [January 23, 1884] and the road is well graveled that far. Capt. Hyzer is foreman of the hands employed in this work.
    Some of the lumber for the depot at Medford has arrived and the work of construction will soon be begun. The well which will supply the water for the tank is nearly completed, while the sidetrack will also soon be in readiness.
    M. Volk, superintendent of construction, says that the reason why work is delayed on the road is the failure of one of the ships, loaded with steel, to arrive. She was due two months ago and it is feared that she is lost.
    The tracklayers reached Phoenix Tuesday and it is probable that they will not go further than Wagner Creek as there is considerable piling to cap and some trestle work to build south of there. Some wooden structures are also incomplete, so that it will be some time before the track reaches Ashland.
    The people of Phoenix are highly elated over future prospects, as it is thought that the railroad company will put up other buildings beside a depot there. They are also of the opinion that the regular passenger train will run there soon and rendezvous for some time to come. In consequence there is considerable activity in their real estate market.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 25, 1884, page 2


    DIVISION DESIRED.--Those residents of Heber Grove district living at Medford desire the division thereof, as they claim that the school house is too far distant to be available to them. As there are quite a number of voters who desire a new district, their petition may receive favorable recognition.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 25, 1884, page 3


    Sam Hadley has opened a store at Medford.
    A. S. Johnson has started a butcher shop at Medford and is prepared to furnish the public with good meat of all kinds.
    J. A. Howard, lately of Foots Creek, is officiating at Tom Stanley's saloon at Medford.
    J. S. Howard will also put up a brick building on his lot in the burnt district [in Jacksonville], we learn.
    J. S. Howard expects to receive his appointment as postmaster of Medford in a  few days.
    G. W. Crystal, having opened a blacksmith shop at Medford, is building a dwelling home and will remove there with his family soon.
    When the construction train rolled into Medford for the first time last week a great many people from some distance around were there to receive it. Many of those present had never seen a locomotive.
    A fellow met C. W. Broback at his door with a club, as if to strike him, a few days ago, when that gentleman drew his pistol and the intruder vanished forthwith. In his hurry to get out of the way he fell into a mudhole and left that neighborhood in a sorry plight.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 25, 1884, page 3


MEDFORD
Livery and Feed Stable,

EGAN & McMAHON, Props.
    Having just completed a comfortable and commodious stable, we are now ready for all business in our line. Horses boarded and good turnouts furnished on short notice.
    Rates reasonable as anywhere else,                              EGAN & McMAHON
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 25, 1884 et seq., page 3


    Residents of the lower part of the valley, to the number of about fifty, boarded the construction train last Sunday, by permission of the officers in charge, and rode up to the end of the track below Phoenix, returning home on the train in the evening. A pleasant excursion, and a novel one for some of the passengers.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1884, page 3


    Saml. R. Taylor runs a daily express back between Jacksonville and Medford.
    A. L. Johnson, the real estate agent, came up from Jacksonville Tuesday. He informs us that a large number of immigrants will arrive in this valley to settle during the coming season, many of whom are corresponding with him.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1884, page 3


    The graveling of the track, preparatory to the regular running of trains, is proceeding southward at the rate of nearly a mile each day, and if it is not interrupted by storms Phoenix ought to be reached by the first of next month.
    The track was finally brought to the Phoenix depot grounds last Tuesday morning, since which time track laying has progressed very little, if any. It is to be continued, however, with a reduced force, until Wagner Creek is reached, Mr. Volk says.
    The O.&C.R.R. paymaster distributed about $80,000 to the men on the payrolls for last month's work. Besides this amount, probably $20,000 was paid to parties not in the employ of the company--making a total of about $100,000 left in the valley for the month. The disbursement of the last preceding month was the largest of the season, over $120,000.
"Railroad Notes," Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1884, page 3


Phoenix the Terminus.
    The fine weather of the present month has enabled the railroad company to push construction work to good advantage, and the graveling and ballasting is progressing so rapidly that officials of the company say the freight and passenger terminus of the road will be moved from Grants Pass to Phoenix about the first of February. This is good news, not only for Phoenix, but for all the valley. Instead of having to "stage it" and "team it" 125 miles to the railroad, as formerly, Ashland people will find the cars only eight miles away. Merchants and others here who have been delaying orders for the shipment of goods until the railroad could bring them further than Grants Pass will now forward their orders, and Phoenix will be awakened from its hitherto easygoing, sleepy air by the bustle and stir of an extensive business in the way of transferring passengers and freight. If the railroad company can not get rails until another ship sails from New York around Cape Horn, Phoenix will be the terminus for many months, but however that may be, it will be well along in the spring before the cars run to Ashland.
Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1884, page 3


Medford Livery
--AND--
FEED STABLES,
Egan & McMahon, Proprietors,
Medford, Oregon.
We have a good outfit of driving teams, hacks and buggies, and can furnish the public with first-class livery rigs at all times, and at reasonable rates.
Horses Boarded and Fed
We keep on hand a good stock of Grain and Hay, and persons putting up their teams at our stables may be sure their horses will be well cared for.
EGAN & McMAHON
Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1884 et seq., page 3
also Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 26, 1884 et seq., page 2



RAILROAD
Blacksmith Shop
Medford, Oregon.
MULVANY & SLAGLE, Proprietors.
Having fitted up a shop at Medford and stocked it with a full line of material, we take pleasure in informing the public that we are fully prepared to do all kinds of work in our line at low rates. Give us a trial.
Mulvany & Slagle.
Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1884 et seq., page 3


Medford Restaurant,
F. B. Voorhies, Prop'r.
MEDFORD    --    --    --    OREGON.
GOOD MEALS AT ALL HOURS!
-- and --
No China Cooking.
Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1884 et seq., page 3


J. S. HOWARD,
Notary Public & Conveyancer.
MEDFORD,   OREGON.
All kinds of real estate business given careful attention, and information furnished concerning property in the new town.
Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1884 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD ITEMS.
    It begins to "look like business" at Medford now since the cars have reached the place. A large well has been dug to furnish water for the locomotives, and a windmill has arrived to pump the water up into the tank which will soon be built. The lumber for the depot building, all dressed and fitted, was brought up by last Saturday's train and can be put together in a very short time. The town has more than a dozen buildings now ready for occupancy, and several in course of construction. All the sawmills within reasonable (or unreasonable) distance in the valley have been drawn upon for lumber, and still there has been obtained only a small proportion of what was wanted. As soon as lumber is brought up on the cars the building boom will set in, in earnest.
    The several proprietors of the town, Messrs. Beekman, Phipps, Mingus and Broback, have divided their lots, each taking an agreed number, to which he has secured full individual title. Thus far lots to the value of about $8000 have been sold. The following list comprises most of the purchasers, although there are a few whose names are not down. Some of them have bought two or more lots each: W. B. Roberts, P. B. O'Neil, S. B. Hadley, Rachel E. Stanley, B. Rostelle, Byers & Jacobs, D. H. Miller, H. C. Mulvany, T. E. Stanley, F. B. Voorhies, Augustus Johnson, Nettie L. Howard, Vrooman & Miller, R. T. McCullough, Wm. Egan, P. McMahon, J. W. Cunningham, James Hamlin, A. L. Johnson, S. L. Dolson, G. Naylor, F. Heber, Wm. Robinson, ---- Robinson, J. C. Slagle, A. A. Raine, Isaac Woolf, Thos. McAndrew, John Wolters, Wm. Angle, J. S. Howard, H. F. Torrey, Mr. Hurt. The lots range from $100 to $500, those in what is considered the business part of town, 25x100 feet are held at $300, and a higher price is asked for the corners.
    Vrooman & Miller have their store building about finished. It is a fine room, 24x40 with a neat front, which they had made in Portland. One side will be occupied by Dr. Vrooman's Drug Store, and the other by Mr. Miller with a large stock of hardware, stoves and tinware. Mr. Miller will also have a tin shop completely fitted, and has engaged a first-class tinsmith. They will receive 10,000 lbs. of freight from Grants Pass this week, and will be ready for business within a few days.
    Byers & Jacobs will build a brick block 50x60 and another brick store 20x40. Large piles of brick are already on the ground, having been hauled from Jacksonville. The buildings will be made but one story high at first. Thos. McAndrew promises to burn a large kiln of brick and also put up one or more brick buildings during the coming season.
    T. E. Stanley and Betterton & Work have the two saloons, have been occupied for some time, as have also the blacksmith shops of Emil Peil and another of whose proprietor [George Crystal] we cannot give the name at this writing.
    J. S. Howard has the appointment of Notary Public, and is ready to attend to any business pertaining to that office, and also to conveyancing in all its branches. He has done all this work in the transfer of town property thus far.
    J. S. Howard has his store completed, and a portion of his stock of groceries already in it, with new goods on the way. He will be the postmaster, and it is expected the office will be opened very soon.
    Egan & McMahon have a fine, roomy livery stable building and barn, and are well prepared for business, having good horses, new buggies and hacks, and a good supply of hay and grain.
    Mulvany & Slagle are carrying on business at the Railroad Blacksmith shop, and if you want good work done a low prices give them a call. You will find John Slagle at the forge.
    J. W. Cunningham, of Jacksonville, is building a good sized hotel, and wants to have it ready for a dancing party on Washington's birthday.
    H. F. Torrey, of Willow Springs, is also building a good sized hotel, and wants to have it ready for a dancing party on Washington's birthday.
    A. L. Johnson, the real estate agent, has lumber on his lot for an office and will move over from Jacksonville as soon as the building is ready.
    Wm. Angle has a good sized dwelling house about completed for himself. H. C. Mulvany also has a dwelling house built and in use.
    S. B. Hadley has a good assortment of merchandise in a temporary store building, and will put up a good, permanent building, 25x40.
    F. B. Voorhies has his restaurant building completed, and is prepared to furnish the public with good meals at all hours of the day.
    A. S. Johnson has just finished a building for a meat market, and will begin the butchering business within a few days.
    Some six or seven wells have been dug in the town, all furnishing good drinking water at a moderate depth.
    George Howard is clerking in his father's store and F. W. Broback is clerking for Mr. Hadley.
    Roberts & O'Neil will build on their lots as soon as lumber can be had.
    Robinson Bros. have their barber shop about ready to move into.
    F. Heber will put up a wagon or cabinet shop on his lot soon.
Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1884, page 4


    MEDFORD.--In company with several others we paid a visit to the new town of Medford this week and found considerable activity there in the building line. The lumber for the depot buildings has commenced arriving from the north, and the work of putting it up will be commenced at once. A water tank to be run with windmill power will also be placed here. Among the business men who have got started in business we noticed the following: J. S. Howard, with a stock of general merchandise, and Sam Hadley in the same line of business. McMahon & Egan keep a livery stable there well supplied with livery outfits to go to any part of the country. Two saloons have also opened out there, one kept by Werk & Batterton and the other by T. E. Stanley, both appearing to do a good business. The new building for Vrooman & Miller's drug and hardware store is about finished, and a portion of their stock has already arrived so that they will be ready to commence business in a few days. Besides this there are two blacksmith shops, owned by Slagle & Mulvaney and Geo. W. Crystal, a boarding house by Wm. Angle and a butcher shop and barber shop owned by parties whose names we did not learn. Several other buildings are in course of construction, one being a substantial hotel building owned by Mr. Cunningham of this place.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 26, 1884, page 3



    Medford is petitioning for a separate school district.
    A petition for the appointment of J. S. Howard as Postmaster at Medford has been forwarded to Washington and his commission is looked for soon. A good appointment.
    The end of the railroad track is now about one mile above Phoenix and a change will soon be made to make that the terminus for passenger travel and mail purposes.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 26, 1884, page 3


MEDFORD LIVERY
--AND--
Feed Stable.
Egan & McMahon, Props.,
Medford, Or.

We have a good outfit of driving teams, hacks and buggies, and can furnish the public with first-class livery rights at all times, and at reasonable rates.
Horses Boarded and Fed.
   We keep on hand a good stock of Grain and Hay, and persons putting up their teams at our stables may be sure their horses will be well cared for.
EGAN & McMAHON
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 26, 1884 et seq., page 2


    Trains on the Oregon & California road now run to Medford, the new town in Rogue River Valley, and the line will soon be completed to Ashland. How long the latter place will remain the terminus will depend upon the progress made in the Siskiyou tunnel. The contractors were ordered to suspend work on the tunnel February 7, and the time when it will be resumed is not announced, though officials say the delay is only temporary.

"Railroad Notes," The West Shore, February 1884, page 3



    The new town in Rogue River Valley, which is to be the railroad shipping point for Jacksonville, is called Medford. Considerable building has already been done and more is in progress. Several business houses have located there, much activity is displayed in the sale of lots, and the appearances indicate the growth of a town of considerable importance. Phoenix, further south, has awakened into new life under the influence of the railroad, and displays symptoms of future growth.
The West Shore, February 1884, page 36


No detailed accounts of the arrival of the first train in Medford survive; presumably it was greeted with enthusiasm similar to its arrival in Phoenix:

THE CARS ARRIVE AT PHOENIX
Our Correspondent Describes the Sensation
They Create "Among the Natives."
    Editor Tidings.--The track was laid to Phoenix on the 23d, and the first construction train ran in yesterday. The people turned out en masse to witness the track laying, something new to most of them. When the first train arrived it seemed to bring a heavy load of merriment to the town. The boys and girls ran, like the little gutter snipes after the circus procession; old men with the "rheumatiz" hobbled up to the track to see an engine for the first time in their lives; and one old fellow with a lame back ran just as "spry" as the boys. I believe that run cured him. Talk about the chills making people old and still I don't believe it.
    Well, the crowd gradually concentrated about the "iron horse," and were curiously listening to his subdued and quiet breathing, when the engineer, finding he had too much steam on hand for Gasburg, yanked his escape valve wide open and there followed a sudden rush of the steam with a noise like a thunderclap and a tornado's voice commingled, and there was a panic "in the land." Now, there were stumps, logs and ditches in profusion about the new track, and some of the crowd climbed stumps for safety, some, in their ecstasies of terror, turned handsprings over the logs, while the braver ones, with half-maintained dignity, fell into the ditches. One old gentleman, who had fought all through the Mexican War and the Rogue River Indian Wars, and who spent many hours giving Mr. Rockfellow a biographical sketch of his bravery in bygone days--how he had fought the Indians hand-to-hand with knives and tomahawks, and always came out victorious--this valorous hero just clapped his hands and shouted: "My time has come! This 'engine' is bustin'!" and made a lunge for the nearest ditch, where he "laid low" until the excitement was over, when he came out and said he knew all the time it was only a cartridge "busted" in the magazine.
    All this time your correspondent was in the bottom of a ditch, with three or four fellows between him and the sky, but finally crawled out; and when I had knocked some of the sand off my mustache, and gouged some of the gravel out of my eyes, and fished my hat out of the muddy water, I was just in time to see the train steam off down the track. The crowd gradually dispersed, each person saying he or she knew what it was that "bursted loose." One thing I am resolved upon, the next time any new kind of animal comes to town, I will stay at home, where I belong.
Ashland Tidings, February 1, 1884, page 1


NEARLY SCARED TO DEATH.
Engineer McCarthy's Joke in Railroad-Building Days in Oregon.
    One of the most popular and best-known locomotive engineers on the Southern Pacific Railroad on its branch from San Francisco to Portland, Ore. is Dan McCarthy, who has a daylight run through the famous Rogue River Valley in the southern part of Oregon. He has been with the railroad ever since it was built, and, in fact, helped to build it up through all that country, where the Modocs used to roam in full mastery. McCarthy came from the East, but now nothing would induce him to return to his old home except for a brief visit. He owns some of the choicest fruit orchards in all that country, probably the best valley in the world for fruit growing. He also owns a gold mine all to himself, which has just been opened in a cut in the railroad through which he runs every day, and this world's affairs look somewhat rosy for him.
    McCarthy has many interesting stories of his early experiences in railroading in Oregon, and the one that amuses him the most occurred at a place called Phoenix, in the Rogue River Valley, not far from the prosperous town of Ashland, where he lives. When the road had got as far as Phoenix, about ten years ago, there gathered one Sunday from miles around not less than 1,500 persons. Many of them had never seen a locomotive. They came on horseback and in all sorts of conveyances, and it seemed as if there could not be that many persons in all Southern Oregon. The curiosity and excitement over the new railroad were tremendous. Inasmuch as the company had a large force at work building the road, and as work there was easy, it was necessary for the citizens to move quickly if they would see the road go through and be on hand to see the first locomotive that came up.
    The spectators tied their horses to the trees that had been felled, and there was great confusion in the throng. As far as the rails were laid McCarthy kept moving up his engine while the people gathered round to watch his machine and its wonderful workings. They interfered with the tracklayers to some extent, but that was unavoidable. Finally one old man came up close to the engine and asked if he could not climb up into it as a mark of special distinction. McCarthy gave his permission, and soon the old man was sitting in the cab. He was in rapture and could not hold himself in. He exclaimed in the hearing of nearly all those who were present:
    "Thank God I have lived to see this day. I never thought it would come that I should see a locomotive again. I am an old forty-niner, and have not seen a locomotive since I left the East, so many years ago. Now I am riding on the locomotive. Thank God, thank God."
    The old man went on in this way for a long time, and had worked up the crowd to a great deal of enthusiasm. They cheered him and they cheered the locomotive with great zest. The crowd was interfering with the work, and McCarthy thought he would have a little joke and also see if he could not clear the tracks to some extent. He tipped the wink to his fireman to blow off steam in the liveliest fashion. The old man was beginning his fourteenth oration to the spectators when, with the noise of a tornado and a terrific shh! the engine began to snort and roar. Panic seized the entire throng. The horses ran away by the dozen, men fell out of trees, hid themselves behind boulders, ran hatless for hundreds of yards, crashed through debris, plunged through streams, and panting and frightened disappeared in the underbrush across the valley. It was every man for himself and horses and wagons might go to perdition.
    The last day had come for scores of them. Some dropped in the attitude of prayer and others fell flat on their faces in the hope of escaping some of the missiles that they were sure would soon begin to fly. The old man, who thanked God that he had lived to see that day, simply fell out of the cab window and lay beside the engine unable to get up and waiting for the end, which he hoped would be without prolonged agony. No such stampede was ever seen in that country, and the memory of it lingers vividly with those present to this day.
    At last the extra steam became exhausted, and by degrees the crowd began to return. They came cautiously at first and kept a respectful distance. The old man was so bruised that he could not get away very far. He soon plucked up his courage to approach McCarthy and to say, standing on the ground this time:
    "Neighbor, I'm an old forty-niner, and I have seen many hardships and have had all sorts of close calls. I fought all through the Modoc War and I know what danger is from Indians and wild animals. I tell you I have been in some pretty tight fixes, but I want to say I was never scared to death before."--New York Sun.
Sumner Gazette, Sumner, Iowa, January 17, 1895, page 2



    Harry Luy spent his boyhood days in Jacksonville, but he remembers when the first train came through Phoenix, because a lot of the Jacksonville people went over to Phoenix to view the big event.
    The boys were all excited. Harry Luy had gone over with Billy Muller, Charlie Nunan and Henry Orth, and they lined up on the top rail of the fence.
    The ties had been laid at that time, but the train was hauling gravel and the men were shoveling it out of the cars to fill up between the ties. The only thing the boys looked at was the big, wonderful black engine.
    A Mr. McMillan was the conductor, and when the train was ready to back up and get some more gravel, he hollered out to the boys, "Look out, I'm going to turn around." Billows of smoke and noise came out of the funnel, and the boys were so surprised they fell backward off the fence and took to the brush, bound for a safer part of the country.
"First Train Through Phoenix was Big Event for Residents," Medford Mail Tribune, June 20, 1954

 
    The platform of the depot at Medford has been completed and the frame will soon be raised.
    The construction train runs as far south as Phoenix every evening, returning next morning.
    The tracklayers would have been at Wagner Creek by this time, had not the supply of rails given out.
    As all of the timber for the structures must come from the sawmills north, there is considerable delay with this part of the work.
    Most of the lumber for the depot at Phoenix has arrived and work has commenced on the building, which will be completed in a few weeks.
    T. P. Kahler, who was in town Wednesday, reports that about 100 Chinese, engaged in leveling the bed of the road, are still camped in the vicinity of Fort Lane.
    A correspondent of the Times, writing from Phoenix, says that two trains arrived on the 26th ult., bringing up camp 11, which has heretofore been stationed in the vicinity of Fort Lane.
    The force at work ballasting is in the vicinity of F. M. Plymale's place and will not arrive at Medford for several days yet. It will be some weeks before the road is ballasted as far as Phoenix, especially if stormy weather intervenes.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 1, 1884, page 2


    Isaac Woolf has quit teaming and will go into business at Medford.
    S. B. Hadley, who has a store in Medford, paid Jacksonville a visit Saturday.
    Two Germans, recently from California, are talking of building a brewery at Medford.
    It is more than likely that Heber Grove district will be divided and another school established at Medford.
   F. B. Voorhees is conducting an excellent restaurant at Medford, but expects to start a variety store there soon.
    E. Peil, the Medford blacksmith, visited Jacksonville this week. He is doing a good business.
    The case of W. P. Huff vs. C. W. Broback has been transferred from the Lake County court docket to that of Jackson County.
    J. W. Cunningham has about completed his boarding house at Medford. He proposes keeping a first-class place.
    Sam  Swear, one of the carpenters at work on A. L. Johnson's land office at Medford, fell from the roof one day this week and injured himself severely.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 1, 1884, page 3


    NEW ROAD.--It is proposed to make as near a straight road to the railroad depot at Medford from this place as possible, and a petition for the establishment of the same will be presented at the March term of county commissioners' court. W. J. Plymale and others went out one day this week to find the best route for the new thoroughfare.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 1, 1884, page 3


    A man employed in digging one of the wells for the railroad company at Medford, W. B. Roberts informs us, fell across the track a few days since and cut his head severely on a rail. He was taken to Phoenix on a handcar for treatment.
    H. F. Torrey expects to have the Medford Hotel in running order soon and will give a grand ball on the evening of the 14th as a "starter." The best of music and supper will be furnished and those who attend will not regret it. See advertisement.
    Vrooman & Miller's building at Medford having been completed, Dr. V. is packing up his stock of drugs, medicines, etc., at this place and will soon be permanently located at the new town. Mr. Miller will have charge of the hardware and tinware department of the business.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 1, 1884, page 3 

St. Valentine's Ball
February 14, 1884,
At the Medford Hotel.
BEST OF MUSIC AND SUPPER WILL BE PROVIDED.
Everybody is invited to attend and have a good time.
H. F. TORREY
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 1, 1884 et seq., page 3
 

     AT MEDFORD.--A number of lots have been sold since our last report, and four new buildings are going up, besides the depot, which will be ready for the reception of freight by the last of next week. The four new buildings mentioned are Johnson's land office, Noland & Ulrich's saloon, and dwelling houses for Messrs. Woolf and North. Henry Smith, of Wolf Creek, has bought lots, and will open a general merchandise store. Within a few days work on the smaller brick building of Byers & Jacobs will be commenced. It will be used as an express office. The larger building, 50x60, will be two stories high. Miller & Vrooman, not being able to get their stock fast enough, brought nearly a dozen stoves from Ashland this week, having secured them from Miller & Co. County Superintendent Colvig has agreed to have Heber Grove school district divided and a new district created for Medford.
Ashland Tidings, February 1, 1884, page 3


    A side track has been laid at Phoenix, and work on the depot buildings is under way.
"Railroad Notes," Ashland Tidings, February 1, 1884, page 3


    Dr. M. Vrooman has commenced moving his stock of drugs and medicines to Medford and will be ready for business at the latter place in a few days.
    The railroad station at Medford has been placed on the opposite side of the track from the town--contrary to the former expectations of the residents of the place.
    The commissioners' court in response to a petition of the residents of the district will consider the advisability of changing and straightening the road from here to Medford. Viewers were appointed last term.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 2, 1884, page 3


    Grading for the turntable at Phoenix has commenced.
    The depots at Medford and Phoenix are well under way.
    A force of railroad carpenters are now engaged on the depot building at Woodville, where a section house and other structures will be put up at once.
    It is expected that the passenger trains will run into Phoenix by the middle of the month, which place will remain the terminus for a few months at least.
    The road has been ballasted as far as Medford. It is stated that the passenger train will run to Phoenix, whether the track is ballasted that far or not, when the authorities get ready to change the terminus.
    There is a scarcity of rails, which interferes considerably with the laying of the track. It is said that enough will be borrowed from the Oregon Railway and Navigation Co. to build the road to Ashland, which will likely be the end of the road for some time to come, from present appearances.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 8, 1884, page 2


    Isaac Woolf has opened a grocery store at Medford.
    Dr. Vrooman has move his stock of drugs, medicines, etc., to Medford.
    Two children of a Mr. Raynes, living at Medford, have died during the week of scarlet fever.
    Remember the ball at Medford on the evening of St. Valentine's Day. It will no doubt be a success.
    We learn that P. W. Olwell has sold some land in Phoenix to the Germans who at first thought of establishing a brewery at Medford. They propose going into the same business at the former place.
    John Simmons has been granted a license to retail liquor at Medford. He keeps a fine stock of everything in his line and of good quality, too. He will always be glad to see you. Read his advertisement.
    Several parties now at Grants Pass are getting ready to move to Phoenix and Medford as soon as the terminus is moved.
D. M. Osborne Catalog 1890
    F. Hubbard, agent for D. M. Osborne & Co.'s agricultural machinery, Studebaker's wagons, etc., is having a large warehouse put up at Medford. He will have a branch at this place [Jacksonville].
    [Land agent] A. L. Johnson this week received a fine two-seated conveyance from the East. His business has increased to such an extent that he finds two vehicles necessary.
    Jacksonville people are obliged to content themselves with the sound of the locomotive whistle, which is as near as Jacksonville will ever get to a railroad. But they don't propose to give up their fine location and mean to prosper, railroad or not railroad. They have energy enough to frown down all railroad opposition.--(Roseburg Plaindealer)
    We learn that the railroad company will put in a side track somewhere between Medford and Gold Hill station. J. W. Hayes of Rock Point will establish himself there for the sale of agricultural implements, etc.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 8, 1884, page 3

 
New Billiard Saloon,
JOHN SIMMONS, Prop.
MEDFORD                                               OREGON
    I hereby give notice to all my friends and the traveling public that I have opened a fine Billiard Saloon in the new town of Medford, where can be found the finest Liquors and Cigars the market affords; and also the leading papers of the day. Give me a call.                                                                                  JOHN SIMMONS
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 8, 1884 et seq., page 3
 

    The flying stumps afford an amusing sight on the railroad south of Ashland, when the blasts are touched off.
    The Jacksonville people want the wagon road between that place and Medford straightened and improved, and the commissioners will probably agree to have it done.
    Dr. Geary has bought a lot at Medford and will move down there in a short time. We are sorry to see him leave Ashland, but wish him success in his new location.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 8, 1884, page 3


    The graveling of the track has nearly reached Medford.
"Railroad Notes," Ashland Tidings, February 8, 1884, page 3


    Railroad work in Rogue River Valley is progressing finely, and the trains have reached a point known as Medford, and the whistle from the old iron horse brings music to our ears. Vegetables and farm produce bring a fair price all along the line of the railroad. We hope to hear of a railroad leading to the coast via Crescent City soon. Ruffians are in abundance at all the railroad towns. We are having an open winter.

"The Grange in Josephine County," Willamette Farmer, Salem, February 8, 1884, page 7



    Isaac Woolf has opened a grocery store at the new town of Medford.
    The Tidings says that Dr. Geary has bought a lot at Medford and will move down there in a short time. We are sorry to see him leave Ashland, but wish him success in his new location.
    A daily express is now run between here and Medford by T. Curry's team with Sam Taylor as driver. The fare is only twenty-five cents each way--too cheap for the distance traveled.
    The end of the track is now at Wagner Creek, and the [rail]road is ballasted as far as Medford. Passenger trains are expected to run to Phoenix by the 15th. Depot buildings are nearly finished at Medford and Phoenix.
    The saloon building for Noland & Ulrich at Medford is under way and will be ready for occupancy by March first.
    Henry Smith of Wolf Creek was in town yesterday. We learn that he has some intention of opening a store at Medford.
D. M. Osborne Catalog 1890
    A branch of the D. M. Osborne agricultural machinery establishment will be opened at Medford with F. Hubbard in charge as agent.
    The Roseburg Plaindealer says: "Jacksonville people are obliged to content themselves with the sound of the locomotive whistle, which is as near as Jacksonville will ever get to a railroad. But they don't propose to give up their fine location and mean to prosper, railroad or no railroad. They have energy enough to frown down all railroad opposition."
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 9, 1884, page 3


    The track has been ballasted half way between Medford and Phoenix.
    Phoenix will be headquarters [of railroad construction] for several weeks to come, and the burg is consequently lively.
    The depots at Medford and Phoenix are approaching completion and work on the warehouses is commencing.
    Only one gravel train is on duty, which is making slow headway, as the gravel must be hauled from the vicinity of Fort Lane, and only a few trips can be made each day.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 15, 1884, page 2


    It only costs 25 cents to ride to Medford by Curry's line.
    Noland & Ulrich's saloon at Medford will be finished in the next fortnight.
    Byers & Co. will commence the building of their brick buildings at Medford as soon as the cold snap is at an end.
    Phoenix again boasts of a telegraph office, the railroad company having opened one there. Medford will soon have one also.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 15, 1884, page 3


    Isaac Woolf has commenced business at Medford and will conduct a first-class grocery and provision store, also keeping candies, tobacco, cigars, notions, etc. His goods are superior in every respect and will be sold at bedrock rates. Read his advertisement and give him a call.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 15, 1884, page 3


MEDFORD
GROCERY AND PROVISION
STORE
Corner C and Sixth Streets.
    The subscriber takes pleasure in announcing that he has opened his place of business in the new town of Medford, Oregon, and is now prepared to furnish in quantities to suit.
Groceries, Provisions,
TOBACCO AND CIGARS,         
               CANDIES, NUTS, ETC.
    My stock is fresh and first-class, and I propose to keep a full assortment of everything in my line and sell at
Prices Lower than the Lowest.
All I ask is a trial.
Highest price paid for Produce
Medford, Feb. 9, 1884.                                                                      ISAAC WOOLF.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 15, 1884 et seq., page 3


    GRAND BALL.--J. W. Cunningham will give a social party at his new hotel in Medford next Friday evening (Washington's birthday) and extends a cordial invitation to everybody to attend. A fine supper will be served and Wilson's well known string band furnishes the music, so that a good time is assured.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 15, 1884, page 3
 

    DEDICATION BALL.--J. W. Cunningham will give a social party at his new hotel in Medford next Friday evening (Washington's birthday) and extends a cordial invitation to everybody to attend. A fine supper will be served and Wilson's well known string band furnishes the music, so that a good time is assured. Everybody is invited.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 16, 1884, page 3
 

    ATTENTION MERCHANTS.--George Freeman will continue the business of teaming between this place and Medford and Phoenix or any other point where freight is stored. He has one of the best freighting outfits in the State and his well-known reputation for promptness and reliability should command for him a large share of the patronage in this line. All who have ever had dealings with him know that he can be relied upon at any and all times.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 16, 1884, page 3


    Messrs. Byers and Jacobs will soon commence putting up a brick store building at Medford.
    We are informed that Supt. Brandt of the O. and C. R. R. says that the passenger train will not run regularly to Phoenix before the first of March.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 16, 1884, page 3


    Goldsmith, Julius. Partner in firm of Goldsmith & Father. Affable, accommodating and gentle. Has a sweet little mustache--when exposed to the microscope. Waiting to be asked.
"Eugene Matrimonial Market," Eugene City Guard, February 16, 1884, page 5


    A company has been incorporated with a capital of $50,000 to establish a sash and door factory at Grants Pass.
"Oregon and Washington," Eugene City Guard, February 16, 1884, page 8

 

Reaching Towards Phoenix
    The Oregon and California Railroad will in a few days be opened for business to Phoenix. This point is 383 miles from Portland, 37 miles from the present terminus at Grants Pass, and about 7 miles beyond Jacksonville. A new town site has been laid out a few miles from Phoenix on which is to be built the future great city of Medford, which is to eclipse both Jacksonville and Phoenix.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 17, 1884, page 5


    Tracklaying has ceased for the present.
    A neat section house is being built at Medford.
    The ballasting of the road is nearly completed to Phoenix.
    Surveying for a side track on Beall's place near Central Point commenced yesterday.
    Thirty miles an hour are often made in the valley by the construction and gravel trains.
First passenger train 1884
The first passenger train in Phoenix in 1884
    The passenger train did not run to Phoenix on the 15th, as expected, as everything was not in readiness. Unless the storms interfere, that place will be the southern terminus after this week.
    It seems as if the railroad company will build few if any warehouses along the line in the valley, relying upon private enterprise to furnish storage. Notices are posted at Medford inviting the erection of such buildings at that point, the company agreeing to furnish the ground at a nominal sum. Similar proposals are made at other points.
    It is now asserted that the Willow Springs route was misrepresented by a certain engineer, which caused its rejection by the railroad authorities. A great many people have always thought this much the cheapest and shortest route that could be adopted. The right-of-way would have been bought for a nominal sum as compared with that which the company did pay.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 22, 1884, page 2


    ACCIDENT.--A lady named Hill, residing at Medford, was accidentally shot last Tuesday. It seems that she was in the act of pulling a loaded rifle from under the bed when it went off, the bullet striking her in the thigh and coming out below the hip. Although a painful wound, it is not considered dangerous.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 22, 1884, page 3


    Egan & McMahon propose running a large passenger coach between this place and Medford soon.
    H. F. Torrey will give another party at Medford on March 31st. It will no doubt be an enjoyable affair.
    W. H. Robinson has opened a barbershop at Medford and is now prepared to give you a clean shave and cut your hair in the best style. Read his advertisement and give him a trial.
    The party given at Medford by H. F. Torrey on the 14th was much of a success. There was a large attendance and everything passed off gaily. The music was excellent and the supper ditto.
    The social party at Medford this evening will be held in Noland & Ulrich's new building. Wilson's well-known string band will furnish the music, while a splendid supper will be provided by J. W. Cunningham.
    Attention is called to the card of Dr. E. P. Geary, who has located at Medford for the practice of his profession. The doctor is a first-class physician and surgeon and will no doubt soon build up a good practice in his new location.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 22, 1884, page 3


E. P. GEARY, M. D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Office in A. L. Johnson's building.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 22, 1884 et seq., page 3


THE ELITE BARBER SHOP,
MEDFORD, OREGON,
W. H. ROBINSON, Proprietor.
Hair cutting and Shaving done in the best manner and at reasonable prices.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 22, 1884 et seq., page 3
 

G R A N D   B A L L !
on March 3, 1884,
At the Medford Hotel.
Best of Music and Supper will be provided.
Everybody is invited to attend and have a good time.
H. F. TORREY
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 22 et seq., 1884, page 3
 

    Dr. Vrooman of Medford paid his family here a visit this week.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 22, 1884, page 3


     STILL ANOTHER.--Still the cities multiply in Jackson County. J. S. Howard is now engaged in surveying town lots near Amy's place at Central Point. The report is circulated again that the railroad company will put in a side track there, but we have no authoritative information to that effect yet.
Ashland Tidings, February 22, 1884, page 3
 

     DON'T DESPAIR.--Our contemporaries at Jacksonville are startled into gloomy forebodings over the "effect of the railroad" by the discovery that "John Orth is shipping sugar-cured hams from Iowa, and K. Kubli has ordered flour from Douglas County." When wheat has been selling at $1 a bushel here it is hardly to be expected that either bacon or flour would be as low as in sections where grain is cheaper. Even "Jack Bunsby's" logic would satisfy an ordinary mind on that point. But we would ask our contems. how many years in the last fifteen have seen the price of wheat up to one dollar a bushel during the whole season, and whether the average for the years mentioned hasn't been nearer 60 cts.? The prospects are that hereafter the price of grain will be a little higher here than the average in the past, with an unlimited market, while the cost of those necessaries and luxuries of life which must be brought here from other sections will be considerably reduced. In addition to the encouragement of this view, it may be added that many people of sagacity are firmly convinced that Rogue River Valley is just entering up on a new and much brighter era with regard to her industries--an era in which the raising of fruits for export is to take rank among the most important, if not as the chief, of the occupations of her people. If this be true, there will be little grain left to ship away after the home needs are supplied. The land will be worth more for orchards than for grain fields.
Ashland Tidings, February 22, 1884, page 3


    The new hotel of J. W. Cunningham at Medford is to be "christened" with a social dancing party this evening.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 22, 1884, page 3


    AN ACCIDENT.--A woman named Hill, living at Medford, shot herself in the thigh accidentally on Tuesday last inflicting a painful but not dangerous wound.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 23, 1884


    The section houses at Medford and Phoenix are nearly finished and passenger trains are expected to run through to the latter point some time next week.
    Dr. E. P. Geary has located at Medford for the practice of his profession. The Dr. is a graduate of one of the leading medical colleges of the Eastern States, has been in active practice several years and we hope to see him command a large share of the public patronage.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 23, 1884, page 3


She Pulled the Wrong End.
    Miss Hill, a young lady living at Medford, Oregon, was dangerously shot by accident last Wednesday [February 20]. She was in the act of pulling a loaded rifle from under the bed when it went off, the bullet striking her in the thigh and coming out below the hip. The wound is considered very dangerous.
Nevada State Journal, Reno, February 29, 1884, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary has moved to Medford, Jackson County, where he has established an office for the practice of his profession.
"Personal," Eugene City Guard, February 23, 1884, page 5
 

    A new town has been laid out on Beall's place in Manzanita precinct, half a mile from Central Point, in anticipation that the railroad company will lay a side track there. Some lots have been spoken for. [At that time Central Point was located near its current I-5 interchange, clustered around the county road--today's Freeman Road.]
    The passenger train came up the valley last Sunday for the first time and is at present making regular trips. A very large crowd welcomed the advent of the iron horse at both Medford and Phoenix. The latter is now the terminus and will no doubt remain such for a number of weeks at least, as a great deal of work remains to be done between there and Ashland.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 29, 1884, page 2


MEDFORD ITEMS.
    A new school house will be built here soon.
    W. A. Wilshire of Ashland has purchased some lots here.
    Considerable improvement is still going on at this place.
    A. S. Johnson supplies this market with meat of all kinds.
    Henry Smith of Wolf Creek is about establishing a lumber yard.
    Work has commenced on F. Hubbard's agricultural implement warehouse.
    E. Peil, Mulvany & Slagle and G. W. Crystal are engaged in blacksmithing here.
    J. H. Hoffman has returned from Ashland and commenced work for Vrooman & Miller.
    Isaac Woolf has a neat store and keeps it well supplied with groceries, provisions, etc.
    The depot is being painted, which will improve its appearance. It is one of the neatest buildings on the line.
    Noland & Ulrich's saloon building is approaching completion. It is well located and will present a neat appearance.
    The liquor business is represented by John Simmons, T. E. Stanley and Betterton & Work, all of whom keep a good assortment of liquid refreshments.
    The Medford House is well patronized. Mr. Torrey and his wife are furnishing good meals and lodgings and succeed in giving the fullest satisfaction.
    The party at the Medford Hotel has been postponed until March 17th, St. Patrick's Day. Everybody should attend, for it will no doubt be a pleasant affair.
    J. S. Howard has received his commission as postmaster at Medford and has forwarded his bonds. He expects to be distributing the mails at this point in a very few weeks.
    The Empire Hotel, conducted by J. W. Cunningham, is a commodious and well-arranged building. As excellent accommodations can be obtained here, guests are numerous.
    Vrooman & Miller are occupying their commodious building and have a good stock of hardware, paints, oils, etc. The drug and medicine department, in charge of Dr. Vrooman, is also full. Advertisement next week.
    Byers & Co. have commenced work on their fine brick buildings and expect to have them ready for occupancy in the course of a few months. They propose to make the structure opposite the depot a two-story one.
    Sam. Hadley keeps a large and excellent assortment of general merchandise and sells very low. He proposes putting up a new building soon and enlarge his stock of goods. Don't fail to read his advertisement elsewhere.
    F. B. Voorhies is putting his building in shape and will soon open a large and excellent assortment of tobaccos, cigars, candies, nuts, notions and other goods usually kept in a variety store. Look out for his advertisement next week.
    The party given at Medford last Friday evening by J. W. Cunningham was quite a success, 47 tickets being sold. Excellent music was furnished by Wilson's string band and the supper at the Empire Hotel could not be surpassed. All present enjoyed themselves hugely.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 29, 1884, page 2


    Dave Crosby is acting as driver of Egan & McMahon's express running between Jacksonville and Medford.
    A large crowd from this place was at Medford and Phoenix last Sunday, to welcome the first passenger train.
    The stage co. did not find it advisable to make this place its northern terminus and Phoenix therefore enjoys that distinction. We now get our mail from Medford.
    McMahon & Egan, having been awarded the contract for carrying the mail between this place and Medford, are running a hack for the accommodation of the public between the two places.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 29, 1884, page 3


    MAIL CHANGES.--Under the new railroad arrangement we read the Portland papers of yesterday this morning, mails coming through in less than a day. Mail matters from the south are unchanged, the stage connecting at Phoenix with the train, which leaves there at 7 o'clock P.M. and arrives at Medford 37 minutes later; while that from the north arrives at Medford at 4:22 P.M. For the present mails from both directions will arrive here at 7 A.M., leaving for Medford at 5 P.M.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 29, 1884, page 3


    Mr. Cunningham, lately of Douglas County, is railroad agent at Medford. A. L. Johnson will act as agent for Wells, Fargo & Co. when an office is opened there, which will not be long.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 29, 1884, page 3


MEDFORD HOTEL,               
                H. F. Torrey, Prop.
    The Medford House is conveniently situated and well fitted for accommodation of the traveling public. The table is supplied with the best in the market, and the beds are clean and comfortable. Call at the Medford when in town.
H. F. TORREY
Medford, Feb. 29, 1884.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 29, 1884 et seq., page 3


EMPIRE HOTEL.
Medford, Oregon,
J. W. Cunningham, Pro.
    This commodious and well-arranged hotel is now open for the accommodation of guests, and will be kept on the most approved plan.
    The table will always be supplied with the best the market affords. Especial inducements are offered the traveling public.
Medford, Feb. 25, 1884.                                                           J. W. CUNNINGHAM
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 29, 1884 et seq., page 3


S. B. HADLEY,
DEALER IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Medford, Oregon.
Would notify the public that he has recently
opened at his store in Medford a
COMPLETE ASSORTMENT
Of seasonable goods, which he offers for sale at
a very small profit.
Fresh Goods
Constantly received by rail, and everything kept
on hand, or quickly procured, that may be wanted.
Especial effort will be made to meet the wants
of all who may favor me with their patronage.
Good Stock and Low Prices
Will always be found at my store.
Farm Produce Exchanged.
Medford, March 1, 1884.                                                                      S. B. HADLEY
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 29, 1884 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD ITEMS.--
    Work on the foundations of the two brick buildings of Byers & Jacobs at Medford is now in progress. Messrs. Byers and Steadman are doing the work.
    The Medford people smile over the talk of a town at Central Point, and say the rumor of a railroad company having agreed to put even a side track there is without foundation. They argue that it would be absurd for the railroad people, who own so large a share of the town site at Medford, and who have built a fine depot, water tank, etc., there, to help start a rival town so near as Central Point. It takes more than a survey of lots to make a town.
D. M. Osborne Catalog 1890
    A good-sized building for the Osborne & Co. machinery warehouse is in course of erection.
    It is understood at Medford that the mail for Jacksonville will be made up on the train and put off at Medford. The Medford post office will be established soon, it is expected.
Ashland Tidings, February 29, 1884, page 3


    Phoenix is awakened at 5 a.m. now by the locomotive whistle.
    A lady named Hill, at Medford, accidentally shot herself with a rifle one day last week, inflicting a painful flesh wound.
    A large number of people from Ashland, Jacksonville, Wagner Creek and other places went to Phoenix last Sunday to see the first regular train arrive.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 29, 1884, page 3
 

    The turntable is now in use at Phoenix.
    Five locomotives were in Phoenix at one time last Sunday.  A year ago they were not so "thick" there.
    At Phoenix M. J. Green is the passenger and freight agent, and is assisted by L. H. Potter and T. L. Skaggs. All three are telegraph operators, and can take turns at the instrument.
    The regular trains, passenger and express, began running from Phoenix to Portland last Monday, or rather Sunday evening, and the first train from Portland arrived there Tuesday morning. The train will leave for Portland every day at 7 p.m., and will arrive at Portland at 4:25 on the evening of the next day. Coming from Portland, the train leaves that city every morning at 7:30, and will arrive at Phoenix the next morning at 5 o'clock--making the time from Portland to Phoenix 21 hours and 30 minutes.
"Railroad Notes," Ashland Tidings, February 29, 1884, page 3


    Phoenix has become the southern terminus of the Oregon & California road, and shipments of the products of Rogue River valley are now being made from that point, as well as from Medford and other new stations in the valley. The road is having an extremely invigorating influence in that hitherto isolated region; nor are the benefits to accrue solely to the valley, for our markets will now be supplied with the luscious fruits of that region, and our merchants will enjoy an increased trade with the valley and tributary country.
"Notes of the Northwest,"
The West Shore, March 1884, page 6


    RAILROAD SCHEDULE.--Trains from the north reach Medford at 4:37 a.m. and from the south they arrive there at 7:23 p.m. The fare from Medford to Portland is $19.25.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884, page 3


    NEW MAIL ROUTE.--Messrs. Egan & McMahon have taken the contract for carrying the mail from here to Medford arriving here at seven in the morning and going back at five in the evening. Dave Crosby is in charge and runs either a two or four horse stage to accommodate the travel on the route. Passenger travel has been lively this week, many going down to see the railroad.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884, page 3


    MEDFORD NOTES.--Mr. Cunningham, the agent and telegraph operator, has arrived and will be ready for business today . . . . A post office has been established with J. S. Howard as Postmaster. His bonds were forwarded to Washington several days ago and the office will be opened in a few days . . . . A. L. Johnson has been appointed agent for [Wells Fargo] & Co. and his new office will be opened in a few days . . . . Work on Byers and Jacobs' new brick building was commenced this week and [is] progressing finely. Two bricks, one fronting the depot and the other adjoining it on the side street are to be erected and the plans show that they will be large and roomy structures . . . . J. T. Roloson has purchased two lots and will commence putting up buildings in a few days . . . . Cunningham's hotel does a rushing business nowadays and an excellent meal can be had there anytime . . . . For a fine glass of import beer or any kind of liquors call on John Simmons who is well supplied with a choice stock. A billiard table can also be found at this house . . . . J. H. Hoffman is working for Vrooman & Miller, stocking their store with tinware . . . . The new depot is one of [the] finest on the line and the painters are now giving it the finishing touches . . . . Isaac Woolf keeps a good stock of fresh groceries and sells cheap . . . . The arrangement by which no trains are to be run on Sundays works as follows: no train goes north from Phoenix Saturday evening and none passes Medford from the north on Monday evening.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884, page 3


    As was expected the railroad company has settled with all the parties who fought them for right of way and the full amount of the judgments were paid.
Amador Andrews
Amador Andrews
    Wm. Carll and Amador Andrews, agent for [Wells Fargo] & Co., have been here this week making arrangements for the carrying of mails and express from here to Medford.
    Every vehicle in town was brought into use last Sunday [February 24] to take passengers to Medford to witness the arrival of the first passenger train there. An immense crowd had congregated when it arrived.
    Five carloads of freight arrived at Medford yesterday for that place and Jacksonville. Two freight trains will arrive there each week--Tuesdays and Fridays. Sleeping cars are attached to the passenger train going north on Tuesday and Friday of each week.
    Jacksonville scored one this week for selling goods cheaper than anyplace else. A drummer was trying to sell overalls to a merchant at Medford when the latter informed him (the rummer) that he could buy them cheaper at Colvin's, in Jacksonville, Colman's old stand, than he was asking for the same at wholesale. The drummer packed up and came to Jacksonville to see how it was done.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884, page 3


BORN.
    RICHARDSON.--At Medford, Feb. 25, 1884, to the wife of Jessie Richardson, a daughter.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884, page 3
 

EMPIRE HOTEL
Medford, Or.
J. W. Cunningham, Prop.
----
    This commodious and well-arranged hotel is now open for the accommodation of guests, and will be kept on the most approved plan.
    The table will always be supplied with the best the market affords. Especial inducements offered the traveling public.
           J. W. CUNNINGHAM
Medford, Feb. 25, 1884.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884 et seq., page 2


E. P. GEARY, M.D.
Physician And Surgeon.
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Office in A. L. Johnson's building.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884 et seq., page 2


    Mr. Strang will have been continuously the owner and head of Strang's Drug Store 50 years on March 1, 1934.
"Charley Strang Is 'Vet' of Veterans," Medford News, June 23, 1933, page 1
 

    Freight trains arrive at Medford and Phoenix twice a week, on Tuesdays and Fridays.
    The passenger train leaves Phoenix every evening, excepting Saturday, at seven o'clock, arriving at the same place from Portland at about five o'clock A.M. The time consumed between Portland and Phoenix is nearly 22 hours. From the north the trains arrive at Medford at about 4:30 A.M. and at 7:30 P.M. from the south.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1884, page 2
 

    Noland & Ulrich will open their saloon at Medford tomorrow.
    M. Loughlin is employed on Byers & Co.'s buildings at Medford.
    T. E. Stanley of Medford has gone to Glendale, but will return soon.
    The railroad has brought a multitude of hackmen to the surface, between whom there is considerable rivalry.
    M. Colwell has put a hack on the road between here and Medford, to connect with the trains. D. W. Crosby is driver.
    The first freight train came up last Friday and brought up a large amount of goods for our merchants. They were landed at Medford and Phoenix.
    F. B. Voorhies of Medford, who recently opened a variety store, has just received a fine large stock of goods. Read his advertisement and give him a call.
    Vrooman & Miller of Medford elsewhere [in this newspaper] present their claims to the public. They have a large and first-class stock of everything in their line and intend selling at the lowest living rates.
D. M. Osborne catalog 1882
    The warehouse built at Medford for D. M. Osborne & Co. by A. L. Johnson is nearing completion and has some implements in it already. It is a large building and will be in charge of F. Hubbard.
    L. Colver is offering a number of desirable lots in the railroad addition to Phoenix for sale at reasonable figures. That place has a promising future and there will no doubt soon be a ready demand for these lots.
    Those who have been looking for the decadence of Jacksonville will not find much consolation in the fact that a larger vote than ever before was cast at the late town election; besides, several citizens did not vote.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1884, page 3
 

F. B. VOORHIES
Takes pleasure in announcing to the public that
he has opened a first-class
VARIETY STORE
AT MEDFORD,
Where can always be found a choice variety of
Cigars,
Tobacco,
Cigarettes,
Candy,
Nuts,
Cutlery,
Jewelry,
Laces,
Pins,
Needles,
Thread,
Stationery,
Handkerchiefs,
Ladies' Hose,
Gents' Socks,
Overalls,
Underwear,
Clothespins, etc.
We make a specialty of manufacturing
OUR OWN CANDY,
Which, for purity, cannot be excelled.
Give me a call and be convinced.
Medford, March 6, 1884.                                                                F. B. VOORHIES
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1884 et seq., page 3

 Buckeye Catalog Cover circa 1885
Buckeye mower catalog, Adriance, Platt & Co., circa 1885

VROOMAN & MILLER,
Having permanently located in Medford, will
keep on hand a constant supply of
STOVES, TINWARE
HARDWARE,
PAINTS, OILS, PAINT BRUSHES,
COAL OIL, LIQUORS,                            
                                CIGARS & TOBACCO.
Which they will sell for cash at a very small profit.
Also, agents for the Buckeye
Mowers, Reapers and Twine Binders,
                            HAINES HEADERS,
                                                    SCHUTTLER WAGONS
                                                                    and JOHN DEERE PLOWS
DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
In this same building they have a Drug Store,
where will be kept the most select medicines for
prescriptions, and the choicest
PATENT MEDICINES
Now in general use.
                                              DR. VROOMAN,
                                              Druggist and Apothecary.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1884 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD ITEMS.--
    Things are lively at Medford. The new buildings going up and the trains arriving and departing give an air of briskness and "business" to the place which is something novel for the people of this valley to witness.
    There are now thirty-six buildings in the town, all new, of course--a pretty good record for three months, with lumber as hard to get as it has been.
    The windmill for the water tank is nearly completed--the large arms, or wings, are being put on this week. If there is wind enough to turn the mill one day in each week the pump will carry up water enough to keep the engines supplied.
    F. B. Voorhies has his restaurant and variety store building nicely painted--a great improvement to its appearance.
Ashland Tidings, March 7, 1884, page 3
 

    First-class freight rates from Portland to Phoenix are $1.50 per hundred lbs.
    The boarding train is switched off on a temporary side track at Wagner Creek.
    Jacksonville merchants are shipping their freight to Phoenix. They don't like Medford.
    If the railroad windmill at Medford proves to be a success, there will no doubt be others put up in some portions of the valley.
    Egan & McMahon, the Medford livery firm, have the contract for carrying the mails between Medford and Jacksonville, and Dave Crosby is driving the stage for them.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 7, 1884, page 3
 

    Mr. Williamson, formerly of McMinnville, arrived in town Wednesday, to inspect our valley with a view to locating here.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, March 7, 1884, page 3


    NEW ARRANGEMENT.--Madam Holt will hereafter run a free coach from Medford to the U.S. Hotel. Arrangements will be perfected in a few days by which a daily coach will be put on from the hotel to Medford thus enabling her guests and others to go to and from the two points without the trouble and annoyance of looking up a private conveyance.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 8, 1884, page 3


    SOUTHERN OREGON SHIPMENTS.--The first freight shipment from Medford, the new station on the Oregon and California extension, arrived here [Portland] Tuesday. It was 550 pounds of wool, consigned by Max Muller of Jacksonville to Kitchen Bros., New York, as a sample. Medford is the station nearest to Jacksonville. The first shipment from Phoenix was six cases of woolen goods, from the Ashland mills consigned to San Francisco.--Oregonian.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 8, 1884, page 3


    CHEAP FREIGHT.--George Freeman will haul freight from Medford to this place for $1.50 a ton. He will bring it here for fifteen cents per hundred pounds. Patronize him and you will be assured of having your business attended to promptly and with dispatch. He will pay all back charges when receiving the freight at the depot which will prove quite a convenience to our merchants as they can thereby make full settlement for all freight charges when receiving the goods.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 8, 1884, page 3


    Karewski's team has been making regular trips to Medford this week bringing loads of new goods for this market.
    Noland & Ulrich have commenced business at Medford. They have a fine saloon building and keep the finest liquors and cigars.
    A. L. Johnson will move to Medford next week to take charge of [Wells Fargo] & Co.'s express office, and he will also continue the land business there.
    Egan & McMahon carry the mail and express regularly between here and Medford. The passenger travel is divided between them and M. Colwell, who also runs a hack to the trains.
    The usual trouble occasioned by change of railroad stations has been experienced by our merchants since the road got as far as Phoenix, but now that things have got settled down everything works smoothly once more. Mr. Cunningham, the agent at Medford, is an obliging official and attends to the business with promptness and dispatch.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 8, 1884, page 3


MARTIN VROOMAN, M.D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
MEDFORD, OREGON
Calls promptly attended to at all hours.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 8, 1884 et seq., page 1
 

    The railroad company has put up a windmill in the water tank at Medford.
    A section house has been built near Geo. S. Walton's place in Willow Springs precinct, and there is some talk of a side track.
    We received our first freight at Medford last week. It cost us about $1.20 a hundred to transport it on the railroad from Portland.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1884, page 2
 

    FIRST FREIGHT.--The first shipment from Medford was made by Max Muller. It was 550 lbs. of mohair for New York. The Ashland Woolen Mills made the first shipment from Phoenix--six cases of goods for San Francisco.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1884, page 3


    Henry Smith of Wolf Creek will open a store at Medford soon.
    We understand that J. B. Cann of Ashland, who understands the business, intends opening a fine saloon at Medford soon.
    Don't fail to attend the ball at the Medford Hotel next Monday evening. It will be a pleasant one, without doubt.
    D. W. Crosby is again in charge of Egan & McMahon's express and mail line running between this place and Medford.
    We are informed that the O.&C.R.R. Co. proposes charging 64 cents per hundred pounds for freight to Medford in cases where a car is chartered. Twenty thousand pounds constitutes [a] carload.
    Freight is hauled to town from Medford by teamsters for $1.50 a ton, at 15 cents per hundred pounds, 25 cents being charged for packages less than 100 lbs. This is very cheap.
    John Dyar and Veit Benz are now conducting the new meat market in this place and have rented the Medford market, which they will run in connection with the one here. They propose keeping choice meats of all kinds constantly on hand.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1884, page 3
 

    Baruch Fisher is expected to return from San Francisco soon and engage in business somewhere in the valley.
    A. L. Johnson and wife will remove to Medford this week, where Mr. J. will act as agent for Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express. He will continue his real estate business and also keep an office here.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1884, page 3


    Jacksonville papers have been put up in the wrong sack by the mail agent on the railway between Medford and Phoenix for two weeks in succession, and have been carried down into California somewhere, to return here about a week behind time.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 14, 1884, page 3


    Veit Benz has associated himself with John Dyar in the butchering business here and at Medford. Both are enterprising young men and are deserving of a good patronage.
    A. L. Johnson has moved to Medford where he will continue the land office business and also act as agent for [Wells Fargo] and Co. He will continue the real estate office here nevertheless.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 15, 1884, page 3


    CONTRACT LET.--Postmaster Muller has let the contract for performing temporary mail service between this place and Medford to Pat. McMahon at 72 cents a trip. There were four other bidders. After this month the mails will be carried under another contract, which will be awarded to the lowest bidder in a short time.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1884, page 3
 

    One of Byers & Co.'s brick buildings at Medford is nearing completion, while the foundation is being laid for the other.
    Thos. Curry is running his express regularly to Medford and charges only 25 cents for carrying each passenger and small parcel.
    Henry Smith of Wolf Creek is building a neat store building at Medford, which he will stock with goods as soon as it is completed.
    It is rumored that Miller & Co. of Grants Pass, Henry Smith of Wolf Creek and Abraham & Willis of Cow Creek will each establish lumber yards at Medford.
    The citizens of Medford district levied a seven-mill tax for the purpose of building a school house. Isaac Woolf, the clerk, is now engaged in making the assessment.
    J. S. Howard has added an apartment to his store building at Medford, in which the post office will be kept. He has received his commission and will be ready in a few days.
    The party given at the Medford Hotel by H. F. Torrey was a success and thoroughly enjoyed by all present. Good music was furnished by Wilson's string band, while the supper was voted excellent.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1884, page 3


Apples from Jackson County.
    The extension of the O.&C. road has been a great benefit to the people of that section, in affording them an outlet for their produce. Parties from Ashland have leased a stall in Central Market, and the first carload of apples from Phoenix was received by them a day or two since. The good price now paid for apples may render this enterprise profitable, but the excessive freight charges at present ruling will prove a barrier to the shipment of apples from that section in ordinary years. It is expected that large quantities of apple butter, jellied cider, etc., will be received here from Phoenix before long.--Oregonian.
Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1884, page 1


    Dr. Geary has a large practice already at Medford.
    Only $1.50 per ton is charged by teamsters for hauling freight from Medford to Jacksonville.
    Mr. Byers has begun laying brick for the second brick building of Byers & Jacobs at Medford. It will be two stories high. The walls of the smaller building are up ready for the joist.
    We understand that J. S. Howard, the postmaster at Medford, has received his commission, but up to Wednesday had not received the mail lock key, an important part of the outfit. Those of our subscribers in that section who wish their mail sent to the new office of Medford will please notify us as soon as business is regularly opened there.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1884, page 3


    ACCIDENTALLY SHOT.--While fooling with a pistol at Medford last Thursday a fifteen year old son of C. W. Broback shot himself in the arm, accidentally inflicting a painful but not dangerous wound. He will recover to try it over again if he wants to.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 22, 1884, page 3


    THE MEDFORD CONTRACT.--The special contract for a ten days' mail service between here and Medford was awarded to Pat McMahon last Saturday, the contact price being 72 cents per trip. Four other bids were in, the next lowest agreeing to fill the service for 89 cents per trip. It won't be long before government contracts will be taken for nothing and a premium offered for the honor of having it.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 22, 1884, page 3


    Three lumber yards are to be established at Medford. Miller & Co., Abraham & Wheeler and Henry Smith are the ones talking of opening out there.
    The employees of the railroad company have not yet received their pay for the last month on account of the illness of Mr. Reed, the paymaster. It is expected in a few days, however.
    The post office at Medford with J. S. Howard as Postmaster and the [Wells Fargo] & Co.'s express with A. L. Johnson in charge will be in working order in a few days more. An agent of the North Pacific Express Co. will also be established there but it has not yet been decided who is to be agent.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 22, 1884, page 3


SUNDAY 23 Mar 1884
A beautiful day  I went to Pheonix.  Met N. B. Crane, and he rode with me to Medford the new Town near Ide Phipps.  It is quite a town.  I bought 800 lbs wheat of Roberts and ONeal, for hog feed.  got home at night
Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon


    SHOOTING.--Just before the Times went to press the news was received that Wm. Caldwell had been shot and killed by C. W. Broback at Medford. The deceased had first assaulted Mr. B.'s crippled son, who started to this place after a warrant for his arrest. From what we can learn, Caldwell then became engaged in an altercation with the boy's father, and the above is the result. Caldwell has always been considered a desperado and no doubt was again the aggressor. Full particulars will appear next week.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1884, page 1


    John H. Lacy has moved from Ashland to Medford.
    Wm. Angle has recently put up a store building at Medford.
    Caldwell was shot through the left lung and survived only a few hours.
    Wilson's string band will give a party at Medford on the evening of April 1st.
    W. F. Williamson, a newcomer, has been engaged to teach the Antioch school district.
    Isaac Woolf of Medford has a large number of superior shingles for sale at reasonable rates.
    The Medford post office is now open for business and mail will go to and come from there direct hereafter.
    The N. P. Express Co. has established offices at Jacksonville, Medford and Phoenix, which will be in running order soon.
    Howell and Deneff's string band furnished the music for the recent party at Medford and gave the fullest satisfaction.
    Egan & McMahon's contract for carrying the mail between this place and Medford will expire Monday night. It is not known who has got the new contract.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1884, page 3



    ACCIDENT.--A son of C. W. Broback of Medford, aged about 15 years, accidentally shot himself in the arm with a pistol last week. Dr. Geary dressed the wound, which is not considered dangerous, though painful.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1884, page 3


    The prospect of a change in the affairs of the O.&C.R.R. has made money matters pretty close with the company just at present, it is reported, at least, so far as construction expenses are concerned, but there is little doubt that the tracklaying will be continued as at present until Ashland is reached. This requires but two miles more of track. Ballasting of the new track is now continued as rapidly as the extension, and if this is kept up the road will be ready for use as far as Ashland about as soon as the first construction train reaches here.
"Railroad Notes," Ashland Tidings, March 28, 1884, page 2
 

    Wm. Angle intends to open a general merchandise store at Medford.
    Five new houses have been put up and roofed at Medford within the past week.
    Pat. McMahon receives 75 cents per trip for carrying the U.S. mails between Jacksonville and Medford.
    It is reported that Miller & Co., Abraham & Willis and Henry Smith will each establish a lumber yard at Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 28, 1884, page 3


    A. L. Johnson now occupies his real estate office in Medford.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, March 28, 1884, page 3


    Medford, the new station on the Oregon and California road, five miles from Jacksonville, is growing very rapidly, and many new buildings are growing up. It is the station for Jacksonville, all freight and passengers leaving the cars at Medford for that place. Many new settlers are locating in that vicinity. A regular agent of the railroad company is to be appointed at once for the greater accommodation of the traveling public. Medford bids fair to become one of the most important towns in the beautiful Rogue River Valley before the year 1884 has expired.
"General News," Willamette Farmer, Salem, March 28, 1884, page 5


    Medford, the new station on the Oregon and California road, five miles from Jacksonville, is growing very rapidly, and many new buildings are growing up. It is the station for Jacksonville, all freight and passengers leaving the cars at Medford for that place. Many new settlers are locating in that vicinity. A regular agent of the railroad company is to be appointed at once for the greater accommodation of the traveling public. Medford bids fair to become one of the most important towns in the beautiful Rogue River Valley before the year 1885 has expired.
"General News," Willamette Farmer, Salem, March 28, 1884, page 5


    C. W. Savage has purchased J. S. Howard's residence here paying $600 therefor.
    The Northern Pacific Express Company has opened offices at Medford, Jacksonville, Phoenix, and Ashland, Oregon.
    All the paraphernalia for a post office at Medford has been received by J. S. Howard and mail matter can be sent there now.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 29, 1884, page 3


Another Tragedy.
    News was received here Thursday evening of the shooting of Wm. Caldwell by C. W. Broback at Medford in the afternoon of that day, Caldwell dying from the effects of the wound about three hours after getting shot. The facts of the case are about as follows: Caldwell was drunk and had several rows with residents of the place, several times drawing his revolver on those with whom he quarreled. Later in the afternoon he met [Fernando] W. Broback and asked him for $2.50 saying that he (Broback) owed him that amount in a gambling game some time before. The boy denied the debt and said he had no money even if he did owe it. With this Caldwell grabbed the boy by the throat and commenced twisting a silk handkerchief that the boy was wearing, choking him, and threatening to choke him to death if he did not pay the money forthwith. With this hold Caldwell led young Broback around for some time, every little while giving the handkerchief another twist, and only when outsiders interfered would he let the boy go. After this he met the boy's father, C. W. Broback, and commenced a quarrel with him, drawing his pistol but Broback was too quick for him and got in the first shot. Some say that Caldwell's pistol would not work from some cause and things would be reversed if it had. Deceased has been a resident of this valley for a number of years, has been in numerous shooting and cutting scrapes here and elsewhere, having also killed a man in California before his arrival in this valley, and was generally looked upon as a very hard case. His last serious trouble was his attempt to murder Chas. E. Hanna over a year ago for which he was tried but for some reason not convicted. He was about forty years of age and leaves a wife and several children. Broback gave himself up to Sheriff Jacobs immediately after the shooting but has not yet had an examination, a Coroner's inquest being held first. The sympathy of the entire community is with Broback and there are several residents of this place who will breathe easier when they hear that he is no more.
    Just before going to press the verdict of the jury was handed us by Justice Huffer, acting as Coroner, and is appended below:
MEDFORD, OR., MARCH 28, 1884.
    We, the Coroner's jury empaneled to inquire into the cause of the death of William S. Caldwell, find that the deceased came to his death by a gunshot wound from a pistol in the hands of C. W. Broback, and find that the said C. W. Broback was perfectly justifiable and acted in self-defense, and we exonerate him from all blame.
        WILLIAM ULRICH, foreman
        GEO. W. WILLIAMS,
        JOHN BYERS,
        WM. EGAN,
        J. H. WILSON,
        ISAAC WOOLF.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 29, 1884, page 3


Fatal Shooting in Jackson County
    William Caldwell was shot and instantly killed by a man by the name of Broback at Medford Thursday [March 27], says the Roseburg Plaindealer. It seems that a son of Broback owed Caldwell about $2.50, so he attacked young Broback and choked him very badly. Subsequently the father of the boy, meeting Caldwell, asked if his son owed him anything, and received the reply that he did, naming the amount. Broback then put his hand in his pocket to get the money to pay it when Caldwell said, “Do you want to shoot it out?” at the same time drawing his revolver. Broback quickly drew his pistol and fired, the ball taking effect just above the heart and passing entirely through Caldwell’s body and striking the ground back of where he was standing. Caldwell lived only a few minutes. Broback gave himself up. This Caldwell is the same party who shot and stabbed Charles Hanna, and for which he was recently acquitted at Jacksonville.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 30, 1884, page 4   This account was also reprinted in the Eugene City Guard of April 5, 1884, page 1.
 

    FULLY EXONERATED.--Shortly after the shooting of W. S. Caldwell at Medford last week, by Chas. W. Broback, the latter came to Jacksonville and delivered himself up to the sheriff. Justice Huffer, acting as coroner, then repaired to the scene of the tragedy, and after summoning the following jury, proceeded to hold an inquest on the body of Caldwell: Wm. Ulrich, foreman; Geo. W. Williams, John Byers, Wm. Egan, J. H. Wilson and Isaac Woolf. After hearing all the evidence the jury returned the following verdict: "We, the coroner's jury empaneled to enquire into the cause of the death of W. S. Caldwell, find that the deceased came to his death by a gunshot wound from a pistol in the hands of C. W. Broback, and find that the said C. W. Broback was perfectly justifiable and acted in self-defense, and we exonerate him from all blame." From the testimony given before the coroner's jury, it seems that Caldwell had some trouble with a son of Mr. Broback, over a debt, and handled him rather roughly. The father met the deceased soon afterward and signified his willingness to settle the boy's indebtedness. This did not satisfy Caldwell, who was under the influence of liquor and had had several quarrels during the day with other parties. He was informed that no difficulty was sought and then warned not to advance further as he came toward Broback. Retreating a short distance, he suddenly made a motion for his pistol, but the other, knowing the man, was too quick for him, and fired, the ball striking Caldwell above the heart. The later made several attempts to use his weapon, but it would not work. This alone saved Broback's life, for he indiscreetly walked off after firing, which gave his assailant ample opportunity to shoot him. Caldwell then went a short distance toward Dr. Geary's office and fell. A few hours afterwards he was dead. His remains were buried in the Phoenix cemetery on Saturday last. He was about 40 years of age and leaves a large family.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1884, page 3


    There is some trouble in school matters at Medford, but it is hoped that the same will soon be adjusted.
    J. S. Howard has sold his residence property in town to C. W. Savage for the sum of $600. Mr. H. and family will live at Medford hereafter.
    Betterton & Work have retired from the saloon business at Medford. The former has gone to other scenes and the latter is now in the employ of T. E. Stanley.
    Application will be made at the ensuing term of the commissioners' court for the formation of a new voting place at Medford. It is proposed to make a new precinct out of portions of Jacksonville, Manzanita and Eden precincts.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1884, page 3

 
HOMICIDE AT MEDFORD
    Wm. Caldwell was fatally shot at Medford last Thursday afternoon by C. W. Broback, one of the proprietors of the town site, and a prominent citizen of the county. The circumstances of the affair, as nearly as we can learn, are as follows: Caldwell, who was notorious as a quarrelsome, reckless and dangerous man when in liquor, had been on a spree for some time and on Wednesday had assaulted F. W. Broback, son of C. W. Broback, claiming that the young man owed him two dollars and a half. He caught the young man (who is a cripple) by a handkerchief which was about his neck, and handled him roughly, twisting the handkerchief and threatening to choke him to death unless he paid the money. On Thursday he was provoking quarrels with different people about the town and flourishing his pistol with conspicuous bravado. In the afternoon he was met by C. W. Broback in front of S. B. Hadley's store. Mr. Broback asked him about the money which he had claimed young Broback owed him, and, after some talk, put his hand in his pocket to get the money, he says. At this juncture Caldwell said "---------- you, do you want to shoot it out," and drew his ready pistol. Before he had time to shoot, Broback drew his pistol and fired, the bullet passing through Caldwell's left lung and out at the back. Caldwell tried to shoot, but could not operate his pistol, having battered it against the saloon and store counters so much during the day that it was out of order. After being shot and finding he could not use his pistol, he walked nearly a hundred yards before he fell. He was then carried to a tent in which he was staying, and Dr. Vrooman was called. The doctor found that nothing could save him, and within about four hours from [the] time of shooting he died. It is generally believed that if Caldwell's pistol had been in working order he would have shot and perhaps killed both Mr. Broback and Mr. Hadley, who was standing near them. Caldwell was well known in this county, having lived here many years and having taken part in numerous cutting and shooting affrays. His last before this was in Jacksonville something more than a year ago, when he shot Chas. Hanna. He has been badly cut and punished himself a number of times, and also had the reputation of having "killed his man" in California before he came to this valley. He was about 40 years of age and leaves a wife, an estimable lady, and several children. Mr. Broback, who was a member of the State Senate from Lake County some years since, is a substantial and respected citizen, and is sustained by the sentiment of the community in the unfortunate circumstance to which he was reduced by the necessity of self-defense.
    Justice Huffer, of Jacksonville, summoned a coroner's jury and held an inquest over the body on Friday. Following is the verdict rendered:
MEDFORD, Or., March 28, 1884.
    We, the Coroner's jury empaneled to enquire into the cause of the death of William S. Caldwell, find that the deceased came to his death by a gunshot wound from a pistol in the hands of C. W. Broback, and find that the said C. W. Broback was perfectly justifiable and acted in self-defense, and we exonerate him from all blame.
        WILLIAM ULRICH, foreman
        GEO. W. WILLIAMS,
        JOHN BYERS,
        WM. EGAN,
        J. H. WILSON,
        ISAAC WOOLF.
Ashland Tidings, April 4, 1884, page 3


    George H. Chick, one of the gentlemen who recently bonded the extensive mining and timber property of the Pacific Hydraulic Mining Co., in Josephine County, was in town last week, and is greatly pleased with Ashland. W. C. Tindall, a correspondent of an eastern journal, accompanied him out from Portland.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 4, 1884, page 3


    J. S. Howard is building a new residence at Medford and will move his family there in a few days to live.
    Medford wants to become a separate voting precinct and school district and the matter will come up before the next meeting of the board of County Commissioners.
    H. B. Miller & Co. are putting in a fine lot of lumber of all grades at Medford and Phoenix for the market which they say they can sell at lower prices than has ever before been offered in this valley. Builders will find it to their interest to call on their agents.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 5, 1884, page 3


    WHAT WE BUY AND SELL.--The business of Medford railroad station, the Jacksonville shipping point, foots up as follows for the month of March, the figures being furnished us by Mr. Cunningham, the agent. Exports, 8,365 pounds; imports, 714,012 [sic] pounds. A good showing for a dull month.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 5, 1884, page 3

 
    The citizens of Medford district will hold a meeting in a few days to consider the propriety of levying a tax for building a school house. It is to be hoped that this matter will be amicably settled then. The public schools are the bulwarks of our country.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1884, page 2


    Considerable improvement is still going on at Medford.
    $800 to loan, on good real estate, at A. L. Johnson's land office in Medford.
    Two large freight wagons for sale at A. L. Johnson's land office in Medford.
    At Medford, during the month of March, nearly 720,000 lbs. of freight was received and 8,385 lbs. sent from that station during the same time.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1884, page 3

 
    ACCIDENT.--From A. L. Johnson, who was up from Medford yesterday, we learn that the horse "Frederick the Great," which had just been sold to T. E. Stanley of that place, became frightened at a passing railroad car and ran away with the vehicle to which he was attached, throwing Robt. Westrop, who was holding him, to the ground and cutting his head rather severely. Wm. Egan, who was assisting Mr. W., was not so fortunate. He was thrown from the wagon in a violent manner and had three ribs broken.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1884, page 3


    DON'T LIKE MEDFORD.--A Medford correspondent writes us as follows: "The Jacksonville people have clubbed together and subscribed a fund to pay one dollar and a half a trip to have their mail carried to the railroad at Phoenix, instead of at Medford. Tip Plymale put in his bid, offering to carry it to Phoenix for four cents a trip, with the understanding that he was to receive his pay by subscriptions from the people in this way. Medford is getting to be a pretty sharp "thorn in the side" of Jaxon already; and it will certainly not be very much damaged by the people of the county seat sending their mail to Phoenix, instead of here--the nearest point.
Yours, MEDFORD.
Ashland Tidings, April 11, 1884, page 3


    The windmill pump at Medford is a success.
    Everybody goes down to see the railroad now.
    Henry Smith is putting up a nice store building at Medford.
    Medford has had two shows this week, and a dancing party at Angle's new store building.
    J. S. Howard will remove his family from Jacksonville to his new residence in Medford this week.
    A large amount of lumber has been received at Medford from the mills of H. Smith and Abraham & Willis.
    The express matter for Jacksonville is still carried from Medford by Egan & McMahon. The mails go from Phoenix.
    A merchant named Rosenthal talks of opening a store at Medford. J. S. Howard's new stock has arrived at the post office store.
    The seven-mill school tax voted in the Medford district some time ago could not be collected because the assessment was not made within the ten days period prescribed by law. Another school meeting is to be held soon, however, and the money will be raised and the school home built within a short time. Isaac Woolf, the clerk, having resigned, A. L. Johnson has been appointed in his stead.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 11, 1884, page 3

 
    Prof. Williamson, an excellent teacher, is in charge of the private school at Medford.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, April 11, 1884, page 3


Now at this day comes on to be heard the Petition of John Noland and 76 others asking this Court to set off and establish a new voting Precinct with the house of District School in the town of Medford as the voting place of said Precinct--and it appearing to the Court from the remonstrance herein filed that the boundaries described in said Petition are too large and would not be acceptable to [a] great many voters residing therein; and it further appearing from the Petition that it would be to [the] best interest and convenience of the said Petitioners that a new voting Precinct be established comprising the boundaries hereinafter described--Therefore
    It is ordered by the Court that a New Precinct be and hereby is established, to be designated Medford, described and bounded as follows, to wit. Commencing at the South East Corner of Section 32 in Township 37 S.R. 1 West--thence running West to the South East Corner of Section 34 in Township 37 S.R. West, thence running North to North West Corner of Section 23 in Said Township, thence East to North East Corner of Section 20 in Township 37 S. R. 1 West thence South to the place of beginning, and that the house of the District School in [the] Town of Medford be the voting place of said Precinct.
Jackson County Commissioners Journals, volume 6, page 64, April 12, 1884


    F. Hubbard, agent for Jacksonville, Medford, Rock Point and Grants Pass, will sell this year the 7-ft. Harvester and Twine Binder for $250 here. The boss machine will cut nicely wherever a plow can run; also, mowers for $90. Miller & Co., Ashland, are also agents for Osborne machines.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 12, 1884, page 2



    NEW PRECINCT.--Residents of Medford are making an effort to get a district of their own for school and voting purposes. They ask for so much territory, however, that they came near taking the Court House away from us, and a remonstrance against taking anything from Jacksonville precinct was circulated. The petition asks for a portion of Jacksonville, Eden and Manzanita precincts and would be one of the largest in the county.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 12, 1884, page 3


    SERIOUS ACCIDENT.--Railroad agent Cunningham at Medford sends us the following item from that place: While the gravel train was passing through Medford last Thursday Mr. Westrop's horse, which was hitched to a buggy, took fright and started to run away. Messrs. Egan and Westrop each caught hold of the horse and tried to stop him but failed. Mr. Egan then jumped in the buggy and Westrop still held to the horse until he reached the railroad track near the depot where Mr. Westrop fell and Mr. Egan started to jump out and at the same time the horse starting down the middle of the track throwing Mr. Egan on his side against a bank. The horse kept on and completely demolished the buggy. Mr. Westrop was cut around the head and face, Mr. Egan getting some of his ribs broken in the fall. Dr. Geary was immediately called and thinks Egan is not fatally hurt but cannot tell just at present. Later reports say that he is getting along all right.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 12, 1884, page 3
 

    Dave Crosby has disposed of his crutches and cane and is up and around as usual again.
    Miller and Co. are prepared to furnish all kinds of lumber at the most reasonable rates. Orders can be left at Medford or Ashland.
    Wells Fargo and Co's. express still connects at Medford although the mails are taken to Phoenix. C. R. Wilkinson drives the mail wagon and Henry Mensor the express.
    County Court has been in session this week. The Grants Pass road business was postponed till next term, and the matter of establishing boundaries for Medford precinct was not yet decided last evening.
    The seven-mill school tax voted in the Medford district some time ago could not be collected because the assessment was not made within the ten days period prescribed by law. Another school meeting is to be held soon, however, and the money will be raised and the school house built within a short time. Isaac Woolf, the clerk, having resigned, A. L. Johnson has been appointed in his stead.--Tidings.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 12, 1884, page 3


    Wm. Egan of Medford is slowly recovering from his injuries received last week by being thrown from a buggy.
    Jas. S. Howard and family, with their household effects, moved to Medford this week, where they will permanently live hereafter.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1884, page 3


    ACCIDENT AT MEDFORD.--A runaway accident occurred at Medford last Thursday, in which Wm. Egan, the livery man, was seriously hurt. A horse belonging to Robt. Westrop, hitched to a buggy, was standing near the track when the gravel train passed. The horse was frightened and started to run. Messrs. Egan and Westrop both caught hold of the horse and both were thrown and hurt. Mr. Westrop was cut about the head, but Mr. Egan was most seriously injured, having several ribs broken and other internal injuries of a more serious nature.
Ashland Tidings, April 18, 1884, page 3


    Mr. Byers, the bricklayer and stone mason, came up from Medford last Monday. He has the new brick buildings of Byers & Jacobs at that place enclosed, and they will soon be entirely finished.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, April 18, 1884, page 3


THE CARS IN ASHLAND.
    Last Wednesday was a memorable day for Ashland. On that day the iron rails were first laid within the town limits and the first train of railway cars arrived in town.
    Our townspeople were out in crowds along the track on Wednesday afternoon, watching the laying of the track--something which many of them had never seen before, those who have ridden over thousands of miles of track as well as some who have never been on the cars. It seemed like a gala day for the town, a genuine 4th-of-July-picnic occasion, and notwithstanding the chilly, raw wind which would have driven idle people into the house for comfort at any other time, "everybody" was out to see the cars come in, and stood about the track front with curiosity and pleasure.
    Ashland is now connected by rail with the great cities of the continent. It has attained the position to which the older residents have looked forward with hope for many years, and which less than three years ago seemed much farther in the future than it has proven to be.
    Probably within two weeks the operating terminus of the road will be removed to this point, and regular daily trains will be running between here and Portland. Then we can take a Pullman coach at Ashland in the evening and arrive at Portland the next evening. Making close connection at Portland with the fast mail train, passengers might be carried from Ashland to New York City in less than seven days. To the people of Southern Oregon, who are accustomed to the stagecoach, this seems like traveling by telegraph.
Excerpt, Ashland Tidings, April 11, 1884, page 3

D. M. Osborne catalog 1882
An Osborne mower pictured in their 1882 catalog.

F. HUBBARD
    Osborne's agent for Jacksonville, Medford, Rock Point and Grants Pass, will sell this year, the 7-ft. Harvester and Twine Binder for $250 here. The Boss Machine will cut nicely wherever a plow can run; also, mowers for $90. Miller & Co., Ashland, are also agents for Osborne machines.
F. HUBBARD
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 19, 1884, page 2


    Dyar & Frauenknecht is now the name of the new butcher firm, Veit Benz retiring.
    Three families from southern Illinois arrived at Medford Thursday morning and will probably remain in this valley if anything can be found that suits them.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 19, 1884, page 3


    Henry Smith's store at Medford will soon be opened for business.
    Miss Nettie Howard of Medford was injured somewhat by falling from a wagon a few days since, but not seriously.
    Medford precinct was established at the last meeting of the county commissioners and polls will be opened there on election day.
    I. J. Phipps of Medford informs us that a number of newcomers have located there recently, some of whom are building residences.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1884, page 3


    The camp at the boarding cars down at the mines was closed up Tuesday evening, and the only railroad camp now on the line is that near the depot, Camp 11.
    The frame of the Ashland depot is up. The building will be the same size as that at Medford, except that the Ashland depot will be some three feet higher, from the sills to the top.
"Railroad Notes," Ashland Tidings, April 25, 1884, page 3


    John Noland has moved his family to Medford.
    Mrs. Miller, mother of David H. Miller of Medford, died at that place this week.
    The boundaries of Medford precinct were established by the Commissioners at their last meeting.
    Residents of Medford have made application for a lodge of the A.O.U.W. [Ancient Order of United Workmen] with a charter membership of twenty.
    Mr. J. S. Howard has been appointed agent to sell [the railroad] company's land at Medford, and there are quite a number of buildings going up there this week.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 26, 1884, page 3


    The railroad leaves Jacksonville on the right about four miles from Medford, a new town situated in the center of the valley, and destined apparently to become the center of trade for that region. It has already some business and good prospects.
Excerpt, "From Portland to Ashland," Morning Oregonian, April 26, 1884, page 2


    The railroad company is selling lots at Ashland, but the demand is not brisk, as high prices are demanded.
    The Ashland depot building is being rushed toward completion and will no doubt be finished next week.
    The railroad track has been laid as far as the Ashland depot grounds and also ballasted to the same place. Everything is being put in readiness for the removal of the terminus to that town by the first days of next week, and it is expected that regular trains will commence running there on the 5th.
    Very few of those heretofore engaged on the railroad extension will remain after this week. When the track reaches the 145-mile stake, located a short distance south of Ashland, the construction work will be completed for some time to come, and all but a few necessary employees will be discharged.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1884, page 3


    F. Hubbard expects another son to arrive from Iowa before long.
    M. Loughlin, who has been at Medford for some time past, has returned to Applegate.
    Chas. Griffith is monopolizing the transportation business between this place and Medford, which is considerable every time the freight train comes in. Charley gives satisfaction.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1884, page 3
 

    T. E. Stanley is building a hotel at Medford.
    J. S. Howard has charge of the sale of the R.R. Co.'s lots at Medford.
    G. M. LaPorte, the barber, has removed from Phoenix to Medford.
    Medford voting precinct has been established by the County Commissioners Court.
    Mrs. Miller, of Medford, mother of David H. Miller of the firm of Vrooman & Miller, died at her home in Medford on Sunday of last week. She was a lady of advanced age, but had seemed unusually active for one who had seen so many years.
    The little boys of the town are allowed too much dangerous freedom in playing about the moving trains down at the railroad track, and we fear there will be a sad accident to report some day, unless they are more careful. They do not realize the danger as fully as children who have lived about railroads and seen or heard more of the terrible effects of carelessness in such affairs.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 2, 1884, page 3


    We are in hopes that there may yet be several granges organized in Jackson County. The little town of Medford is upon the line of rail, five miles from Jackson[ville] and near the center of the valley, and I think ere many years will be the principal town in the county.

H. E. Hayes, Stafford, Oregon, "Notes by the Wayside," Willamette Farmer, Salem, May 2, 1884, page 7


    Travel between here and the railroad stations at Medford and Phoenix has been increasing of late, stages being crowded every evening to catch the train.
    The cheapest and best route to San Francisco is by way of Crescent City. Through fare to the Bay City is $18 when taking the steerage and $22 in the cabin. Only fifty cents extra is charged for passengers from Medford, and close connection with steamers is made every five days at Crescent City.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 3, 1884, page 3


    The O. and C.R.R. have not paid their employees for three months.
"Brief Items," Eugene City Guard, May 3, 1884, page 5


    ASHLAND, THE O.&C. TERMINUS.--The people of Ashland are on the eve of celebrating an event very important to them, and one which they have for years looked forward to with anxious expectancy. Hedged in and deprived of communication with the cities, both of the south and north, except by rough wagon roads, their days of isolation are at an end; their bonds are broken. Next Monday the Oregon & California Railroad will be formally opened to Ashland. It is understood that the Central Pacific will open about forty miles of its northern extension soon. This will reduce the stage line to less than 150 miles, and the summer schedule overland between Portland and San Francisco ought to be reduced to sixty or sixty-two hours. It may now be confidently expected that travel from the East will be directed to the rich sections of southern Oregon, and that hundreds and perhaps thousands of useful citizens will be added to that section during the present year.
Eugene City Guard, May 3, 1884, page 5


    Ashland having been made the terminus, a special train went up Sunday, since when the road has been regularly operated between that place and Portland. The largest crowd ever seen in Ashland was on hand to welcome the first train, which was decked in gay attire. Speeches were made and there were many other manifestations of delight over the auspicious event.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1884, page 2


    Several buildings are still going up at Medford.
    Priddy & Son are starting a brick yard in the vicinity of Medford.
    A. L. Johnson has resigned as agent for Wells, Fargo & Co. at Medford and J. S. Howard has been appointed in his stead.
    Wm. Egan of Medford was in Jacksonville Monday, looking after the interests of a proposed county road between the two places. It is intended to make the road as straight and short as possible, which is a very good scheme.
     School troubles being satisfactorily adjusted in Medford district, it is likely that a tax will be levied and collected and a neat schoolhouse built soon.
     A family from the East has brought a case of scarlet fever to Medford; but nothing serious is apprehended, as care is being taken that the disease is not spread. School has been closed there as a precaution.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1884, page 3


      MEDFORD PRECINCT.--The following are the boundary lines of the precinct of Medford, just established: Commencing at the S.E. corner of Sec. 32, in township 37S, R1W; thence running west to the S.E. corner of Sec. 34, in township 37S, R2W; thence running north to N.W. corner of Sec. 23 in said township; thence east to N.E. corner of Sec. 20 in township 37S, R2W; thence south to place of beginning; containing 12 sections, 6 in each township. The district school house was designated as the place of voting.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1884, page 3
 

     THROUGH TRAINS TO ASHLAND.--The Oregon and California railroad has been completed to Ashland and on Monday trains began to run regularly between their place and Portland. Trains will leave Portland at 7:30 A.M., arriving at Ashland at 5:40 the next morning. Returning, the train leaves Ashland at 6:20 P.M. arriving at Portland at 4:25 P.M. Trains leaving Portland on Mondays and Thursdays will have a Pullman palace sleeping car attached, which will leave Ashland for return by the Wednesdays and Fridays' trains. The completion of the road to Ashland leaves only about 140 miles of staging and renders the overland trip to California a much less formidable matter than in days gone by.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1884, page 3


    A gentleman tells us there are four stores in operation, four in course of construction and two more contemplated at Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 9, 1884, page 3


     APRIL SHIPMENTS.--James Cunningham, railroad agent at Medford, furnishes us the following figures of exports and imports at that station for the month of April: Imports, 615,154 pounds, exports, 34,235 pounds.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 10, 1884, page 3


     SERIOUS ACCIDENT.--While riding on a handcar at Medford Thursday afternoon, James Wilson, the section foreman at that place, was thrown off and run over, receiving serious if not fatal injuries. The accident was caused by someone having placed rocks on the track, which Wilson tried to remove with a crowbar while the car was in motion, and losing his balance he fell under the wheels with the above result.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 10, 1884, page 3


    J. S. Howard is Wells, Fargo & Co's. agent at Medford, A. L. Johnson having resigned.
    There is some talk of another brick block being built at Medford by parties of that place.
    Baruch Fisher has returned from San Francisco and talks of opening a general merchandise store at Medford station.
    The slide which occurred about ten days ago in tunnel No. 6 has been cleared, and trains arrive at Medford on time.
    W. L. Record has opened a sandstone quarry near Medford, and good stone for building purpose can be had for half the amount heretofore paid.
    A new residence is being built at Medford for William Ulrich, but we are not informed as to whether or not it will be for rent or not--probably or not.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 10, 1884, page 3
 

    W. L. Record has opened a sandstone quarry near Medford.
    Henry Smith's store at Medford has been completed and the goods for it are expected to arrive this week.
    During April 615,154 pounds of freight were received at Medford, while 34,235 lbs. were sent out from there.
    Dr. Geary and Wm. Ulrich are building neat dwelling houses at Medford, all of which looks rather auspicious.
    O. M. Krewson, a first-class carpenter, has taken the contract for constructing several buildings in Medford and vicinity.
    A number of brothers, named Webb, and lately from the East, are putting up buildings at Medford for business purposes.
    J. M. Horton, an excellent painter from the East, has located at Medford and elsewhere [in this newspaper] makes his bow to the public. He guarantees satisfaction.
    Byers & Co. have leased a large body of ground near Medford and are about getting ready to manufacture brick on a large scale.
    If you want choice tobacco and cigars, fresh candies, nuts and notions, call on F. B. Voorhies of Medford. He keeps a good assortment.
    A large amount of lumber of different kinds from Miller & Son's mill near Grants Pass has been forwarded to Ashland and Medford recently.
    E. E. & H. S. Redfield, scientific watchmakers and jewelers, have located at Medford, in Angle's building, and are prepared to do all kinds of work in their line in the best manner and at low rates.
    Some youngsters placed several stones on the railroad track near Medford the other day, and when the section boss came along on a handcar he was thrown violently to the ground and sustained severe injuries.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1884, page 3


J. M. HORTON
HOUSE, SIGN & ORNAMENTAL
PAINTER,
MEDFORD  .  .  .  .  .  .  OREGON.
    Contracts taken and all orders promptly attended to in first-class style and at low rates.
    Satisfaction guaranteed in every branch of the business. Give me a trial.
J. M. HORTON
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1884, page 2
 

DIED.
STANLEY--At Medford, May 10th, Jane, daughter of H. and R. Stanley; aged 3 years 1 month and 20 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1884, page 3


    A large number of new buildings are going up at Medford.
    J. S. Howard is Wells, Fargo & Co.'s agent at Medford, A. L. Johnson having resigned.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 16, 1884, page 3


    On the passenger train running into Ashland, D. McCarty is the engineer and Jas. Porter fireman. The engine makes a "swing" run between this place and Grants Pass. The conductors and brakemen running between Roseburg and Ashland are B. F. Loher and Frank Guthrie. Each of the express companies (Wells Fargo and the Northern Pacific) keeps four agents on the route between Portland and Ashland, and there are also four U.S. mail agents on the route.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 16, 1884, page 3


    It now takes from two to four passenger coaches to carry the travel between here and Medford, connecting with trains.
    The Republicans of Medford at their primary meeting last Saturday placed A. L. Johnson in nomination for the office of Justice of the Peace.
    Wm. Ulrich was elected delegate to the Republican county convention from Medford and Barney O'Neil will represent the Democracy from that precinct.
    A new Concord coach has been purchased by the stage company by Pat McMahon for the Medford route and he will go over to Yreka next Monday to get it.
    F. Hubbard is now stationed at Medford, Mr. Gard at this place, and O. F. Topping and F. Hubbard, Jr., at Rock Point, all of whom are prepared to sell D. M. Osborne & Co.'s machinery of every description.
    The Empire Hotel at Medford, J. W. Cunningham proprietor, has done such a rushing business of late that the owner has been compelled to commence enlarging his building. He manages to keep up with the demand for supplying meals, and a good one can be had there at any time, but his sleeping accommodations are limited for the crowds that pour in on him at times. He says that he will soon be fixed to accommodate all who give him their patronage.
    The new brick buildings at Medford, owned by Byers and Jacobs, are fine structures and will make beautiful stores. Baruch Fisher has rented the one on the side street [Main] and will open a general merchandise store there. The others are being negotiated for by outside parties, and as they are connected the owners are making an effort to rent them to one party as one large store.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 17, 1884, page 3


    RELIGIOUS ITEMS.--Rev. B. J. Sharp will preach in the Medford church tomorrow both morning and evening. Annual missionary sermon in the morning and a collection will be taken up. In the afternoon at half past two he will preach at Medford.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 17, 1884, page 3


DIED.
STANLEY--At Medford, May 10th, 1884, Jane, daughter of H. and R. Stanley; aged 3 years, 1 month and 20 days.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 17, 1884, page 3


    Rev. B. J. Sharp will deliver a temperance lecture at Medford today.
    Isaac Woolf and Jas. Brandenburg of Medford visited our town Wednesday.
    Building still continues at Medford and improvements may be noticed on every hand.
    J. W. Cunningham of Medford keeps a first-class hotel and will soon build an addition to accommodate the rush.
    Summer fights have opened up in a lively manner at this place and Medford. Discolored optics are more popular than ever.
    A. L. Johnson, land agent at Medford, has sold the McAndrew hill ranch in Manzanita precinct to G. H. Robinson, lately of Los Angeles, Cal., for $3,000; also D. R. Losey's place near Jacksonville to J. D. Gray, formerly of Washington Territory, for $1,500.
    There has been a change in railroad agents along the line. Hereafter E. C. Kane will be stationed at Ashland, M. J. Green at Medford and L. H. Potter at Phoenix.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1884, page 3

 

    RELIGIOUS ITEMS.--Rev. M. A. Williams preaches at the Presbyterian church in this place Sunday morning and at Medford in the afternoon at half-past two.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1884, page 3


    W. L. Record is taking cut sandstone from a fine ledge near Medford.
    Baruch Fisher will open a store in one of Byers & Jacobs' brick buildings at Medford.
    Dr. Geary is building a dwelling house at Medford. Hum--kind'o thought so all the time.
    Byers & Guerin will manufacture brick both at Ashland and Medford, and expect to fully supply the demand in the whole valley.
    E. E. and H. S. Redfield have removed from this place to Medford, where they have opened their jewelry store in Wm. Angle's building.
    A. L. Johnson is the Republican nominee for Justice of the Peace in Medford precinct. Republicans from Medford say they will have a strong majority in the precinct when all the newcomers are entitled to the ballot.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 23, 1884, page 3


    Mr. H. S. Redfield and Miss Laura Morrison were married by Rev. A. Brown at the residence of the bride's parents in Ashland last Monday evening. They will reside in Medford.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 23, 1884, page 3


    NEW STORE.--Wm. Angle has opened a store at Medford and will keep everything usually found in a general merchandise establishment. He calls it the "Farmer's Store" and his prices will carry him out in showing that he sells at bedrock rates. Look out for his advertisement next week and give him a call when traveling that way.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 24, 1884, page 3


    RELIGIOUS ITEMS.--M. Peterson will hold services at Medford . . . . Rev. M. A. Williams preaches at the Presbyterian church in this place Sunday morning and at Medford in the afternoon at half past two.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 24, 1884, page 3


    Spring fights opened out at Medford this week. Nobody hurt.
    Henry Mensor now runs an opposite express to Medford, making close connections with trains each way.
    O. M. Krewson of Medford is building a new barn for Hanley & Love. He has just finished Wm. Ulrich's new residence at Medford and did some good work.
    Baruch Fisher has got his store at Medford opened out in one of Byar's new bricks and is now ready for business. He keeps nearly everything but will make a specialty of goods required by the fair sex.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 24, 1884, page 3


    Wm. Angle has opened a store at Medford and stocked it with a large and excellent assortment of general merchandise. He sells quite low.
    Henry Smith has one of the finest store buildings at Medford and is filling it up with goods. J. A. Jennings is manager thereof and proves a popular one, too.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1884, page 3
 

Those "Spring Fights."
MEDFORD, Or., May 25, 1884.
Editor Tidings:
    I see by the Jacksonville Times that "spring fights" have opened in Medford; but the editor of that very newsy paper neglected in that item to state that it was two Jacksonville men that had the fight mentioned. This is the second time that Jacksonville men have had fights in our peaceable town, and each time the editor of the Times failed to give the whole facts of the case. I do not understand his object, unless it be to cast a slur upon our town.
SUBSCRIBER
Ashland Tidings, May 30, 1884, page 2


   Wm. Angle has opened the "Farmers' Store" at Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 30, 1884, page 3
 

    Medford will celebrate the fourth of July in fine style.
    Thos. Teeson of Medford was here on business this week.
    John Noland has built a neat residence at Medford and his family is now residing there.
    Frank Kasshafer has gone to Medford to officiate as barkeeper for Noland & Ulrich while the junior member of the firm is absent.
    W. G. Kenney and H. H. Wolters have rented the corner room of Byers & Co.'s brick building in Medford and will open a saloon in about two weeks.
    Dr. Adkins, lately from the East, recently purchased two acres of land from I. J. Phipps of Medford for the round sum of $800. He will build a residence on it soon.
    A petition for a county road in Manzanita precinct, commencing at J. W. Smith's place and ending at Thos. McAndrew's farm on Bear Creek, has been presented to the county commissioners. There is an almost general demand for this thoroughfare, we are informed, and it ought to be established.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1884, page 3
 

    W. F. Williamson, principal of the Medford district school, was in Jacksonville during the week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ulrich left Medford Wednesday on a wedding trip. They will visit various points in Oregon and Washington territory.
    A. S. Whiting, who acted as purchasing agent for the O.&C.R.R. while the work of construction was going on, is in Portland, but will return to Jackson County this week.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1884, page 3
 

    The Ashland brass band has been engaged to play at Medford on the Fourth of July. They would have remained in Ashland if they had any assurance of being paid for the day, but the Town Board didn't want to appropriate the money from the treasury, and the boys didn't feel like doing the begging themselves so they accepted the offer from Medford. Ashland will depend on the Wagner Creek band--two drums and a fife--if it plays gratuitously.
Ashland Tidings, June 6, 1884, page 2
 

    H. H. Wolters and Wm. Kenney will open a saloon in Medford.
    A painter named Horton gave some of his friends at Medford considerable uneasiness recently. He was about $200 behind in his accounts with various businessmen there and suddenly left town without making either settlement or explanation.
    Medford is preparing a grand Fourth of July celebration. Judge Webster is to deliver the oration.
    The Medford people expect to run special trains to their place on the Fourth of July--both from Ashland and Grants Pass, stopping at intermediate points.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 6, 1884, page 3


    Isaac Woolf and David H. Miller, of Medford, were in town on election day. They report their town steadily building up.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, June 6, 1884, page 3
 

    Read Wm. Angle's advertisement and patronize him if you want to buy goods cheap at Medford.
    Frank Kasshafer is tending bar at Noland & Ulrich's saloon at Medford while the junior member of the firm is getting settled down to married life.
    Medford proposes celebrating the Fourth of July with a grand barbecue, and Judge L. R. Webster has accepted the invitation to deliver the oration. A big time is promised.
    The report that M. J. Greene would succeed James Cunningham as railroad agent at Medford is without foundation. Mr. Cunningham will continue at that station and Mr. Greene has left the employ of the company.
    The corner room in Byers & Jacobs' new brick at Medford has been rented by W. G. Kenney and H. H. Wolters, who will open a saloon at that place. They propose fitting it up in fine style, will keep none but the best of liquors and cigars and will be ready for business in a couple of weeks.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 7, 1884, page 3


Farmer's Store
MEDFORD, OREGON,
WM. ANGLE - - - Proprietor.
----
    The undersigned takes pleasure in announcing that he has opened his place of business in the new town of Medford, Oregon, and is now prepared to furnish, in quantities to suit,
GROCERIES,                           
                           PROVISIONS,
TOBACCO AND CIGARS,
CANDIES, NUTS,
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, Etc.
    My stock is fresh and first-class, and I propose to keep a full assortment of everything in my line and sell at
PRICES LOWER THAN EVER
All I ask is a trial.
Highest price paid for Produce.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 7, 1884 et seq., page 3
 

    One J. M. Horton, lately of Medford, has skipped, leaving numerous creditors behind him. He is a painter by trade. Look out for him.
    The best turnouts of all kinds can be obtained at the Medford livery stable. Wm. Egan is now sole proprietor and guarantees satisfaction.
    Jas. Cunningham, the efficient railroad agent at Medford, and Chas. Strang visited Jacksonville during the week.
    W. G. Kenney has returned from Portland, where he has been laying in a stock of goods for the new saloon at Medford.
    Pat McMahon has sold his interest in the Medford livery stable and express line to his partner, Wm. Egan, who will hereafter continue the business.
    A petition is in circulation for increasing the mail service between this place and Medford after the 30th inst. to seven times a week. We hope that the increase will be granted.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1884, page 3


    A gentleman named Barnum has purchased C. W. Broback's farm near Medford for $7,000, we learn.
    A gentleman named Freeman, lately from the East, is discussing the project of building a railroad between this place and Medford.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1884, page 3
 

    J. W. Cunningham, the genial host of the Empire Hotel at Medford, will give a grand ball on the 4th of July, and has secured Byers & Co.'s brick building for the occasion. First-class music and supper will be provided. No pains will be spared for the accommodation of the guests, and those who attend may rest assured of having a good time.
    It seems we were mistaken in saying that the proposed road in Manzanita precinct, leading from J. W. Smith's place to Thos. McAndrew's on Bear Creek, was in general demand, for the enterprise was killed, the signers to the remonstrance outnumbering the signers to the petition.
    The people of Medford propose celebrating Independence Day in grand style. We learn that the Ashland brass band has been engaged for the occasion and that an excellent program of exercises is being arranged. Judge Webster will deliver the oration.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1884, page 3


GRAND BALL
AT MEDFORD
On the 4th of July, '84.

    The undersigned, proprietor of the Empire Hotel at Medford, will give a Ball on the evening of July 4th, to which everybody is invited. Good music and supper will be provided.
    Byers & Co.'s large brick hall has been secured.
    FLOOR MANAGERS--J. C. Eubanks, Ashland; C. Nickell, Jacksonville; J. W. Howard, Grants Pass; D. H. Miller, Medford.
    Tickets, $2.50.                                                        J. W. CUNNINGHAM
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1884 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD ITEMS.
    A grand time is anticipated on the Fourth in Medford. The people are determined to make the celebration one they can be proud of, and will prepare to entertain a big crowd from the country and from other towns in the valley. The oration by Judge Webster will attract many of the best citizens of the county, as it is known that he will honor the occasion with something worthy of the name of "oration." During the day there will be public dinner and barbecue, and various games and amusements. In the evening there will be a grand ball in the large hall of the new brick block of Byers & Jacobs. J. W. Cunningham, of the Empire Hotel, has charge of this part of the celebration, and will furnish the dancers with a fine supper at his hotel.
    C. W. Broback, one of the enterprising ones of the townsite proprietors, has just bargained for the sale of his farm to a man named Barnum, recently from New York. The farm (the old Norton place) contains about 200 acres adjacent to the town limits. The price is $7000. Mr. Broback reserves a fine building site and will put up a handsome new dwelling place for himself.
    The dwelling houses of Dr. Geary and Wm. Ulrich, in the southern part of town, are nearing completion, and will both be neat and pretty in appearance. D. H. Miller, of Miller & Vrooman, will build a new dwelling house, also.
    H. S. Redfield, the watchmaker and jeweler, recently from Ashland, has opened business in Wm. Angle's store building, with a neat stock of watches and jewelry, and is kept busy at work. He guarantees satisfaction in all kinds of work in his line.
    Wm. Angle has a good stock of dry goods, groceries, etc., in his new store, and will keep on receiving new goods until he has a large and complete assortment of everything in the line of general merchandise.
    J. S. Howard has the Post Office store full of new goods.
    Dr. Adkins and Webb Bros. are putting up a new store building for business in the hardware and grocery line.
    George W. Williams, who is agent for Miller & Co. in the lumber business, is branching out into the business of furnishing builders supplies, such as sash, doors, moldings, etc., etc.
    I. A. Webb has opened a furniture store, and intends to keep a full stock of such goods as are in demand here.
    Miller & Vrooman have one of the neatest stores in the county. They have one side filled with a good stock of hardware, stoves and tinware, and on the other side is the well arranged drug business of Dr. Vrooman. They are doing a good business, and have the kind of enterprise that will enlarge and build it up on a solid basis. They will have an ad. in next week's Tidings.
Ashland Tidings, June 13, 1884, page 3
 

    Baruch Fisher is in constant receipt of new goods at his store at Medford.
    Immense preparations are being made for the Fourth of July barbecue at Medford.
    W. G. Kenney returned from Portland this week where he purchased a stock of liquors and cigars for the saloon of Kenney & Wolters at Medford.
    Henry Mensor will commence driving four in hand on the Medford route after Sunday next, the travel having increased so of late that two horses are unable to haul the loads. Travel has more than doubled since overland stages quit running through here.
    The Medford livery stable is now owned by Wm. Egan, Pat McMahon having sold his interest in the same. Mr. Egan understands the business and is always prepared to furnish first-class livery outfits on short notice and low prices.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 14, 1884, page 3


    W. G. Kenney and H. H. Wolters, who are getting the corner room of Byers & Co.'s brick building at Medford in readiness for a saloon, expect to have it in running order in a few days. It will be one of the finest business places of the kind in southern Oregon.
"Random Jottings," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1884, page 1


    The railroad company has completed its cattle yards at Grants Pass, from which point it is expected that considerable stock will be shipped.
    The O.&C.R.R. Co.'s large freight warehouse, 40x100 feet in size, has been removed from Glendale to Ashland, and is being put up at the latter place.
"Railroad Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1884, page 2


    Medford will have a grand celebration.
    Isaac Webb has opened a furniture store at Medford.
    Carlos Goddard is building a butcher shop at Medford.
    Cummons Bros. of Medford precinct have fifty acres in corn.
    Wolters & Kenney opened their fine saloon at Medford this week.
    Parties from the East talk of putting up a livery stable at Medford.
    D. H. Miller of Medford will soon build himself a neat residence.
    Ed. Work of Medford was in town Wednesday. He did not come alone.
    Rodgers & Co. are about starting a harness shop at Medford; also a boot and shoe shop.
    F. Hubbard, the genial agent for D. M. Osborne & Co., at Medford, was in town Saturday.
    Miller & Vrooman of Medford, who keep a full assortment of stoves, hardware and tinware, also drugs, medicines etc., offer excellent inducements to purchasers.
    G. W. Wimer, Jr., brought a large wagon for Egan's express line between Jacksonville and Medford from Josephine County this week.
    Stanley Bros. have completed their hotel at Medford and are doing a good business. The building is commodious and well arranged.
    C. W. Broback, who recently sold his farm to a gentleman named Barnum, just from New York, for $7,000, reserved a portion of the place for building purposes. He also retains his Medford property.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1884, page 3


    THE FOURTH AT MEDFORD.--The citizens of Medford have determined to celebrate our natal day in fine style by a grand barbecue and basket dinner. A first-class program of appropriate exercises will also be observed, Judge Webster acting as orator of the day. They propose to have races, games, etc. Their advertisement appears in this paper with full particulars. Read it and see for yourself.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1884, page 3



From "The Social Stage," by George M. Baker, 1873

    ENTERTAINMENT.--The Jacksonville Amateur Association will reproduce the drama "Our Folks" (which met with so much favor here) at Medford on Friday evening, June 27th, and will also present the screaming farce entitled "Thirty Minutes for Refreshments" as an afterpiece. The Silver Cornet Band of this place will furnish music for the occasion. Our neighbors may rest assured in every respect--one that ought to be liberally patronized. Byers & Co.'s building has been engaged.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1884, page 3


    EXCURSION TO MEDFORD.--The R.R. Co. has made arrangements to run excursion trains to Medford, both from the north and south, on the 4th of July. An extra train will leave Ashland at 9 a.m. and return in the evening. At Grants Pass a passenger car will be attached to the freight train, and will be taken back on the regular evening passenger train. The fare from Ashland to Medford and return will be 90 cts.--half rate.
Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1884, page 3


    To loan--$1000 at A. L. Johnson's land office, in Medford, Or.
    Wm. Angle keeps a full assortment of general merchandise, dry goods, groceries, etc., at his new store in Medford.
    Wm. Egan has bought Pat. McMahon's interest in the Medford livery stables, and is new proprietor of the business.
    Read the advertisement of the Medford celebration. The Medford people are determined to make the Fourth a success at their place, and have prepared a complete program of exercises and amusements.
    Henry Mensor will commence driving four in hand on the Medford route after Sunday next, the travel having increased so of late that two horses are unable to haul the loads. Travel has more than doubled since overland stages quit running through here.--Sentinel.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1884, page 3


    F. B. Voorhies, of the Medford notion and variety store, was in town yesterday, and made us a short call. Mr. Voorhies is an "old typo" [printer].
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1884, page 3


    Watches, clocks and jewelry promptly repaired by H. S. Redfield, the practical watchmaker, who has opened his jewelry business at Angle's store at Medford.
Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1884 et seq., page 3

Buckeye mower page, circa 1885
Buckeye mower catalog page, circa 1885

Vrooman & Miller
Having permanently located
A T    M E D F O R D ,
Will keep a full stock of
STOVES, TINWARE,
Hardware, Paints
OILS, PAINT BRUSHES,
Coal Oil, Liquors, Cigars & Tobacco,
All of which they will sell for cash
at a very small profit.
Agents for the                       
Buckeye Mowers, Reapers &
Twine Binders,
Haines Headers, Schuttler Wagons and
John Deere Plows.
Drugs and Medicines.
In the same building is their Drug Store, well fitted up and stocked with a complete assortment of pure drugs and the best of the standard Patent Medicines.
DR. VROOMAN,
Druggist and Apothecary.
Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1884 et seq., page 3


1776      - - -        1884
Grand Celebration!

Of the 108th Anniversary of American Independence, at
MEDFORD, OREGON,
Friday, July 4, 1884.
Officers of the Day.
PRESIDENT . . . . . M. Peterson
                                                  ( Hon. C. W. Broback
                                         ( J. S. Howard   
VICE PRESIDENTS . . . . . ( Dr. M. Vrooman
                                          ( David H. Miller
                                              ( Col. John E. Ross
                                              ( Geo. W. Fordyce
ORATOR . . . . . Hon L. R. Webster
READER . . . . . W. F. Williamson
CHAPLAIN . . . . . Rev. M. A. Williams
MARSHAL . . . . . A. L. Johnson
Order of Exercises.
A Salute of 39 Guns will be fired at sunrise.
At the speaker's stand the exercises will be as follows:
                                    1. Music by the Band
                                    2. Prayer by Chaplain.
                                    3. Music.
                                    4. Reading Declaration of Independence.
                                    5. Music by the Band
                                    6. Oration.
                                    7. Music by Band.
Grand Barbecue
AND BASKET DINNER.
On the grounds, which will be appropriately decorated for the occasion. The amusements will consist of running races, Jumping Races, Fat Men's Races, Married and Single Men's Races, Catching the Greased Pig, and a variety of other games and races.
Reduced R.R. Fare
Arrangements have been made with the O.&C.R.R. for excursion trains from Ashland, Grants Pass, Woodville, Phoenix and Gold Hill at half fare.
Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1884 et seq., page 3


1884 Medford, Oregon 4th of July Broadside

4th OF JULY
BALL AND SUPPER!
At Medford.
J. W. Cunningham, of the Empire Hotel, has made arrangements for a Grand Ball to finish off the first celebration of Independence Day in Medford. The ball will be in the commodious hall of Byers & Jacobs' new brick building; supper at the Empire Hotel.
Floor Managers.
CHAS. NICKELL . . . . . Jacksonville
J. C. EUBANKS . . . . . . Ashland
JOHN HOWARD . . . . . Grants Pass
DAVID H. MILLER . . . . . Medford
Best of Music! Good Supper!
Everybody Cordially Invited!
Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1884 et seq., page 3


A. L. JOHNSON,
Notary Public, Real Estate Agent and Collector
Medford, Or.
    I make conveyancing and furnishing abstracts of land titles a specialty. Loans negotiated and collections made. All business entrusted to my care will receive prompt and careful attention.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 21, 1884 et seq., page 1


GRAND CELEBRATION!
of the 108th
ANNIVERSARY
OF
American Independence,
AT
MEDFORD, OREGON,
Friday, July 4th, 1884.
    A salute of 39 guns at sunrise. Officers of the day--Mr. Peterson, president; vice-presidents, Hon. C. W. Broback, J. S. Howard, Dr. M. Vrooman, David Miller and Col. J. E. Ross.
    Orator, Hon. L. R. Webster; Reader, W. F. Williamson; Chaplain, M. A. Williams, Marshal A. L. Johnson.
ORDER OF EXERCISES.
    1. Music by the band.
    2. Prayer by Chaplain.
    3. Music by the band.
    4. Reading of the Declaration of Independence.
    5. Music by the band.
    6. Oration.
    7. Music by the band.
    Grand barbecue and basket dinner on the grounds, which will be appropriately decorated for the occasion. Running races, jumping races, catching the greased pig, fat men's races, married and single men's races, ladies' and misses' races, and a variety of games. Arrangements have been made with the O.&C.R.R. Co. for excursion trains from Ashland, Phoenix, Woodville, Grants Pass and Gold Hill at half fare rates.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 21, 1884 et seq., page 2
also Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1884 et seq., page 3


W. G. KENNEY                               H. H. WOLTERS
THE GEM SALOON
--AT--
MEDFORD, OREGON,
Kenney & Wolters.
----
    Having opened our saloon in the new brick building of Byers & Co. at Medford we are now prepared to furnish any kind of a drink that can be called for, made with liquors that are acknowledged to be the best in the market.
A Fine Billiard Table
will also be found at this house and on the tables you can find the leading pictorial and sporting papers of the day. Give us a trial.
KENNEY & WOLTERS
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 21, 1884 et seq., page 2


    Wm. Little is now the engineer of the Medford stage line.
    A new butcher shop will be opened in Medford by Carlos Goddard.
    Paints and oils for sale at Wm. Angle's Farmer's Store at Medford.
    Jacksonville, Medford, Ashland and Grants Pass will celebrate the glorious Fourth. Each will try to excel the other.
    J. S. Howard says that it is all a mistake about him selling out at cost. He says he makes all the profit he wants and if his customers think he is robbing himself they are slightly mistaken if prices are low.
    The Gem Saloon at Medford, Kenney & Wolters proprietors, has opened out for business and is one of the neatest places in this end of the State. One of the latest style billiard tables can also be found there and all the fixtures and liquids are in keeping with the age of progress. Give Bill and Ham a call and we will guarantee that you are treated well.
    Medford will celebrate the Fourth in fine style, Judge Webster is the orator and Rev. M. A. Williams chaplain. They will have an old-fashioned barbecue and basket dinner. The Ashland brass band will furnish music for the occasion. On that day passenger trains will leave Ashland at 9 a.m., and [the] return leaves Medford at 5 p.m. Trains from the north will arrive at Medford 10 a.m. and leave at 5:30 p.m. Half fare rates.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 21, 1884, page 3


     THE FOURTH AT MEDFORD--The glorious Fourth will be celebrated by the citizens of Rogue River Valley and vicinity by a grand barbecue and basket dinner at Medford. Music for the occasion will be furnished by the Ashland brass band, and games of various kinds will form a feature of the exercises. Arrangements have been made with the Oregon and California Railroad Company to carry passengers from Woodville, Gold Hill, Phoenix and Ashland to the celebration at reduced rates. The exercises of the day will close with a grand ball in Byers & Co.'s hall and a supper at the Empire Hotel.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, June 21, 1884, page 3


    A. L. Johnson of Medford has been appointed notary public for Oregon.
"Salem Notes," Oregonian, Portland, June 25, 1884, page 1



    THE FOURTH AT MEDFORD.--No pains are being spared to make the celebration at Medford a first-class one in every particular. An excellent program of literary exercises will be observed and the Ashland Cornet Band has been engaged to furnish instrumental music for the occasion. The barbecue promises to be one of the features, as also the afternoon sports. In the evening J. W. Cunningham will give a ball in Byers' brick building, which will no doubt be a very pleasant affair.
    ENTERTAINMENT.--The citizens of Medford will this evening be afforded quite a treat in the shape of an excellent dramatic entertainment by the Jacksonville amateur association. On this occasion will be presented the highly interesting drama entitled "Our [Folks]" followed by the shrieking farce "Thirty Minutes for Refreshments." The company plays well and will give those who attend their money's worth. The Jacksonville Silver Cornet Band will afford some of their choicest music on this occasion. A party will be given after the entertainment.
    CONTRACT SUBLET.--Wm. Carll, representing H. B. Eastman of Boise City, I.T., the person who received the contract for carrying the mail between this place and Medford, was in Jacksonville during the week for the purpose of subletting the same. He learned from Postmaster Muller that the P.O. department had changed the contract so that the mail would still be carried to Phoenix after the expiration of the present contract, and therefore made arrangements with P. McMahon to carry the mail to that point after July 1, 1884, until further instructions.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1884, page 3


    Highest market price paid for hides, furs, pelts, etc., by Baruch Fisher of Medford.
    A. L. Johnson of Medford and G. F. Billings of Ashland have been appointed notaries public.
    Dyar & Co., who have been conducting a butcher shop at Medford, have sold out to Goddard & Co.
    The Empire Hotel at Medford narrowly escaped destruction by fire Tuesday evening. It caught in the second story from a defective flue, but was fortunately discovered in time and extinguished without difficulty.
    A good-sized warehouse is being built at Medford by the railroad company. Mr. Turner, formerly of this place, has the contract for doing the work.
    Travel and express business having increased to such extend between this place and Medford, Wm. Egan will put on a four-horse coach this evening.
    Groceries, dry goods, fancy goods and every description of general merchandise of the best quality can be found at B. Fisher's, Medford. Prices very low.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1884, page 3


    MEDFORD EXCURSION TICKETS.--Mr. Kane informs us that the tickets for the excursion to Medford on July 4th will be good on the 5th, so that parties going down from here can stay to attend the dance there and return by the regular morning train the next day.
Ashland Tidings, June 27, 1884, page 3


    Jos. Rapp, the Wagner Creek gardener, has raised a large amount of produce this year, and disposes of it at Jacksonville, Medford and Ashland.
    F. M. Plymale, one of the pioneer farmers of the valley, is now a partner with Wm. Angle in the Farmers' Store at Medford. The new firm keep adding to their already good stock of general merchandise.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 27, 1884, page 3


    The highest market price for hides and furs is paid by Baruch Fisher at Medford.
    Carlos Goddard is now in the butchering business at Medford. He purchased the tools and fixtures formerly owned by Dyar & Co.
    The Jacksonville Amateurs, accompanied by the Silver Cornet Band, went to Medford last evening to present the play "Our Folks."
    A. L. Johnson, the real estate agent at Medford, sold $8,000 worth of land yesterday. He sold the fine farm of Lewis Shideler near Jacksonville in the lot.
    Medford will celebrate the Fourth in good style and the preparations are going forward on a large scale. They expect a large crowd there and will spare no pains to entertain them.
    France M. Plymale has formed a partnership with Wm. Angle, and the Farmer's Store at Medford will hereafter be conducted in the firm name of Angle and Plymale. Prices have been marked down to the lowest possible notch and the house is building up a fine trade. A carload of salt was received there this week.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 28, 1884, page 3


   FOR SALE.--The undersigned, living near Medford, offers for sale seven fine milch cows, in good order. They will be sold at reasonable rates. For further particulars, enquire of                                                                    C. W. BROBACK
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1884 et seq., page 3


  ENTERTAINMENT AT MEDFORD.--The Jacksonville Dramatic Association performed in Byers & Co.'s building at Medford last Friday evening and was greeted with a good-sized audience. The drama, "Our Folks," and the farce, "Thirty Minutes for Refreshments," were presented; but for evident reasons were not performed as well as the amateurs are capable of playing them. A pleasant dancing party followed, which was also well patronized. The Jacksonville Silver Cornet Band was out in full force and furnished some excellent music.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1884, page 3


   A four-horse coach runs regularly between this place and Medford.
   Several couples from Ashland attended the entertainment given at Medford by the Jacksonville amateurs.
   Wolters & Kenney of Medford were this week granted license to retail liquor at that place.
   The Tidings says that F. M. Plymale has become associated with Wm. Angle in the Farmer's Store at Medford.
   One of the features of the celebration at Medford will be a grand barbecue. There will be plenty to eat for everybody.
   The railroad company has donated two lots in Medford to the M.E. Church, South, which will soon put up a parsonage there.
   The Medford celebration will attract a large crowd. The railroad will carry persons desiring to participate at greatly reduced rates.
   M. Rodgers and A. C. Epps are about opening a harness and saddlery store at Medford; also a boot and shoe shop. They are both good workmen.
   C. H. Barkdull, Medford's justice of the peace, was sworn in Wednesday and is prepared to do all business in his line in a prompt and efficient manner.
   Groceries, dry goods, fancy goods and every description of general merchandise of the best quality can be found at B. Fisher's, Medford. Prices very low.
   The Fourth will be appropriately celebrated at Medford, Grants Pass, Ashland, Sams Valley and this place, with a number of precincts to hear from. Each place is outdoing itself in order to show its patriotism.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1884, page 3


    The railroad company is building a commodious warehouse at Medford.
    A drama entitled "Our Folks" was played by a company of Jacksonville young people at Medford last Friday evening, and is reported as being well acted.
    The Jacksonville mail will continue to be carried to the railroad at Phoenix, instead of to Medford. The contract for the term beginning on the 1st specified that it was to go to Medford, but was changed after being let.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 4, 1884, page 3


    James Cunningham, R.R. agent at Medford, informs us that he sold thirty-nine excursion tickets to Portland at his station.
    The Jacksonville amateurs who went to Medford last week to present the play of "Our Folks" were greeted with a large audience and all who attended seemed well pleased with the performance. The receipts amounted to about $60.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 5, 1884, page 3


THE FOURTH AT MEDFORD.
    The 4th was ushered in by a salute of 39 guns, which made the welkin ring and was heard for many miles. Early in the day people began to arrive from all points, and before noon over two thousand had assembled. First-class music for the occasion was furnished by the Ashland Silver Cornet Band. The officers of the day managed everything well, there being no delay in commencing the exercises. After prayer by the pioneer minister, M. A. Williams, and an excellent piece by the band, W. F. Williamson, Esq., read the Declaration of Independence in his usual happy manner. Then came more music, when Hon. L. R. Webster was introduced by the president of the day (Elder M. Peterson) and favored the audience with an interesting and able oration, couched in choice language and eloquently delivered. The gentleman was heartily applauded at its close. Another tune by the band and then came the barbecue and picnic, which was heartily enjoyed by the multitude. All sorts of sports and games followed, that were kept up till evening. A social dance given by the host of the Empire Hotel closed the day's festivities. Our Medford neighbors are justly proud of the success attending this, their first celebration of the Fourth, as they had by far the largest crowd on that day of any town in southern Oregon. The excursion train, which ran up and down the road at intervals and furnished transportation at greatly reduced rates, proved a feature.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1884, page 2


FARMER'S STORE,
MEDFORD,
ANGLE & PLYMALE, Props.
    We take pleasure in announcing to the people that we have opened a business house in the new town of Medford, Oregon, and are now prepared to furnish, in quantities to suit,
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS,
CANDIES, NUTS,
DRY GOODS & CLOTHING,
TOBACCO AND CIGARS,
PAINTS & OILS,
MACHINE OIL, ETC.
    Our stock is fresh and new, and first-class in every particular, and we propose to keep a full assortment of
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
And sell at
THE VERY LOWEST PRICES.
All we ask is a fair trial.
Highest Price Paid for Produce.
ANGLE & PLYMALE.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1884 et seq., page 2


    BURGLARY AT MEDFORD.--Early last Sunday morning, when J. W. Cunningham of the Empire Hotel at Medford reached for his pantaloons, which had been hung on the bedpost the night before, he found them missing. They were afterward recovered on the rear porch of his building, but minus the $70 that he left in them. The door of Mr. Cunningham's apartment opened into the dining room and had been left unlocked, and the window that faces the street raises easily, so that the thief had no trouble in effecting an entrance. Two or three parties are suspicioned, but no arrests have as yet been made.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1884, page 3


   S. Rosenthal, the clothing merchant at Medford, is getting ready to erect a building for his own use.
    The rumor that Dr. Vrooman of Medford has departed from "this vale of tears" fortunately turns out to be unfounded. He is worth a dozen corpses yet.
    H. S. Redfield, one of Medford's jewelers, will move to Washington Territory in a few days.
    A nice line of clothing, furnishing goods, etc., will be sold cheap by B. Fisher of Medford.
    Angle & Plymale of Medford have lately received a carload of salt and are selling it very cheap.
    The petition for a road from this place to Medford was not favorably acted on by the commissioners, as the proposed thoroughfare does not connect with any other county road.
    The ball given by J. W. Cunningham at Medford on the 4th proved a grand success in every particular. It was better patronized than any similar event in the valley that night.
    Messrs. Williamson and Lawton of Medford are putting up a building, which will be used as a drugstore by Mr. Haskins and also as an insurance office.
    We received a pleasant call from G. W. Williams of Medford on Saturday last. He informed us that several new building enterprises of importance are spoken of there, some of which will amount to more than wind.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1884, page 3
 

    THE FOURTH.--The celebration at Medford was a success in every particular. Early in the morning the people began to arrive from all parts of the county. At 10 o'clock an excursion train beautifully decorated with flags and evergreens arrived from Ashland. The assemblage was called to order at 10:30 by Rev. M. Peterson, marshal of the day. The first order of exercise was music by the Ashland brass band, followed by music by the glee club, with W. H. Gore as leader and Miss Kate Vandyke as organist. The next in order was an impressive prayer by Rev. M. A. Williams. The marshal then introduced the orator of the day, Judge L. R. Webster. The oration was one of the Judge's finest efforts, although as he explained, he had been engaged in court up to the time of the celebration, and had not had time to give it the attention he would like to have done. He began in his usually pleasant style that wins the attention of his audience at once, and grouped together many of the important events of our country's history, its struggles and successes, its aspirations and achievements, indicating clearly that in every page of our national history right had triumphed over every force that had sought to impede its progress and closed with a patriotic appeal to all to ever be guided by the eternal principles of purity and justice, the ground work of our national institutions, and the cornerstone of American liberty and that should ever be the governing principle between man and man. His oration was full of eloquent patriotism and held the audience in close attention until its close. After music by the band and a beautiful song by the glee club, dinner was announced. The barbecue was a success and the dinner, which was prepared almost entirely by the people in and around Medford, was first class, and there was enough left for an ordinary gathering of people. After dinner the audience was entertained by music by the glee club and the brass band and short and appropriate speeches by Rev. M. A. Williams, Rev. M. Peterson and A. L. Johnson these exercises were well received and formed a pleasant part of the day's celebration. Excursion trains came and went during the afternoon and it is estimated that fully 3,000 people visited Medford during the day. The very best order was maintained throughout the day and evening, the ball was well attended and the celebration the largest that ever took place in the county.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 12, 1884, page 3


    Medford is being noticed by the Portland Sunday Mercury. The correspondent sounds very much like the one who reported the young folks of this place.
    The road from here to Medford is in fine condition, and it is a pleasant drive out there in time to see the train pass in the evening and get a splendid supper at the Empire Hotel which is kept by J. W. Cunningham.
    Wm. Angle, of the firm of Angle & Plymale, went to Portland on Tuesday to purchase goods for their house. Their business is increasing so rapidly that they will soon have to enlarge their place of business.
    The Medford people complain that there is great injustice done them by having the mail carried by Phoenix instead of direct to Jacksonville, that it delays their mail that goes by the Crescent City route sometimes several days. Also letters intended for Jacksonville are necessarily a day later. They should have equal mail facilities with the rest of the world and there is no doubt but the matter will be straightened if brought before the proper authorities.
    W. H. Byers of Medford and J. C. Whipp of Jacksonville left for Crescent City this week, having subcontracted the stone work on the new courthouse there; they are both first-class workmen and will give entire satisfaction.
    Wm. Egan of Medford is the boss stable keeper for a big crowd. On the 4th he filled his stables and all the sheds and yards full of horses, and when there was no more room to tie in that vicinity he politely offered to hitch teams out in the suburbs and see that they were watered to oblige his customers.
    J. W. Cunningham of the Empire Hotel at Medford was robbed of $57.00 last Saturday night. Having left that amount in his pants when retiring and the next morning his pants was found in the street with the pockets empty. He may be very thankful to think that the robbers did not take the pants.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 12, 1884, page 3
 

    A CHANGE.--In a few days the mail for Jacksonville and tributary points will come via Medford, instead of Phoenix as at present. Arrangements have been made with Wm. Egan of the former place to furnish the necessary service. We learn that we will then receive the mail every time the regular train comes in, or twice nearly every day in the week. This is the way it should be, and we hope Mr. Egan will afford us this convenience.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1884, page 3


    A stock yard is being built at Medford for the accommodation of those desiring to ship cattle, sheep, etc.
    W. H. Gore acted as leader of the choir and Miss Katie Van Dyke as organist at the recent celebration at Medford.
    C. W. Broback has already sold the cows he advertised for sale in the Times. This is again proof of the fact that there is nothing like advertising.
    Mr. Woodford, of the Woodville firm of Colvig & Woodford, is building the warehouse at Medford, instead of the railroad company, as reported.
    New residences are proposed by several of our farmers. We learn that M. Bellinger, C. W. Broback, G. W. Fordyce and J. N. Woody each contemplate building substantial dwelling houses in the near future.
    Wm. Edwards of Medford precinct informs us that a heavy storm prevailed in that vicinity Monday. In some places a great deal of hail fell and in others there was much rain. No great damage was fortunately done.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1884, page 3


    ANOTHER CHANGE.--Arrangements have now been made for the carrying of mail between this place and Medford instead of Phoenix, where the connection has been made heretofore. Medford is the natural point of connection, and we are glad to see the change ordered.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 19, 1884, page 3


    A large warehouse is now being built at Medford by Mr. Woodford of the firm of Woodford & Colvig of Woodville.
    The Mercury reporter has visited Medford and is now exceedingly mad because some parties have found out who he is.
    While at Portland this week Wm. Angle made large purchases for the store of Angle & Plymale at Medford and the goods have just reached their store. Call on them for bargains.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 19, 1884, page 3

 
   $5000 to loan in sums of $1000 each at A. L. Johnson's land office in Medford.
   If you want to buy or sell farms, mines or mill property, go to Johnson's land office in Medford.
   Angle & Plymale have received [a] large consignment of new goods at the Farmers' Store, Medford, within the past week and now have a more complete stock than ever before.
   When you are trading in Medford don't forget B. Fisher's place in the brick block. Best goods and lowest prices.
   H. S. Redfield, the watchmaker and jeweler, has removed from Medford to Yakima, W.T., where he goes into business with his cousin, E. E. Redfield, who was in Ashland with him last year.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 25, 1884, page 3
 

    Several parties at Medford are fighting ague.
    Baruch Fisher and F. B. Voorhies, Medford merchants, were in Jacksonville Thursday.
    Dr. M. Vrooman of Medford was on the sick list several days this week. Since his return to Jacksonville his condition is greatly improved and he will return to Medford soon.
    A neat and novel sign, the work of a local artist, now ornaments the Gem Saloon at Medford, owned by Kenney & Wolters. A fine new billiard table can also be found there as well as at the Railroad Saloon of Noland & Ulrich.
    The saddler shop of Madison Rodgers at Medford is well stocked with everything usually found in an establishment of its kind besides also having a boot and shoe department attached. All goods are marked down to the lowest notch and satisfaction is guaranteed.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 26, 1884, page 3


NEW SADDLER SHOP
MEDFORD, OR.
Madison Rodgers.
Proprietor.
DEALER IN HARNESS, SADDLES,
BRIDLES, HALTERS, Etc. Etc.
A Boot and Shoe Department is also attached.
Call around and enquire prices and I will promise satisfaction.
MADISON RODGERS
Medford, Or., July 26, 1884
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 26, 1884 et seq., page 3


FALL IN BRICK!
THE UNDERSIGNED HAS JUST FINISHED burning a Kiln of 100,000 superior brick, which will be sold at
Very Reasonable Rates,
In quantities to suit. Satisfaction guaranteed.
    Call at the place, four miles northeast of Jacksonville.              GEO. PRIDDY.
Medford Precinct, July 15, 1884.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1884 et seq., page 2
 

    Kenney & Wolters, of the Gem Saloon at Medford, have just put up a nobby sign.
    A Sunday school flourishes at Medford, with Wm. F. [Williamson] as superintendent.
    You can 
always get a square meal and good treatment at the Empire Hotel at Medford.
    Isaac Woolf of Medford has added a line of dry goods to his stock of groceries, provisions, etc.
    E. E. Redfield has gone to Yaquina Bay. H. S. Redfield has gone to Washington Territory and Medford is now without a jeweler.
    F. B. Voorhies of Medford keeps everything usually kept in a first-class variety store and sells cheap. He is agent for the Ashland Soda Works.
    S. B. Hadley of Medford has sold his real estate to Merriman & Co. and will remove his stock of goods elsewhere. The new firm propose handling oils of all kinds on an extensive scale.
    The Gem and Railroad saloons at Medford each keep one of Brunswick, Balke & Co.'s celebrated billiard tables.
    J. S. Higinbotham, the wheelwright, has removed to Medford, where he will open a shop. He is a good workman.
    S. Rosenthal is getting ready to build himself a neat store at Medford. He owns the lot east of the Empire Hotel.
    Vrooman & Miller of Medford keep a large line of hardware, tinware, stoves, etc. They are also agents for a full line of standard agricultural machinery.
    Woodford's warehouse at Medford is nearing completion. W. M. Turner has the contract for doing the work and is assisted by I. H. Johnston and Mr. Walker.
    Angle & Plymale of Medford are receiving a large quantity of new goods, recently purchased at Portland by Mr. A. Read their advertisement and give them a trial.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1884, page 3


The O.&C.R.R.
    A rumor is floating about in railroad circles that Villard has secured the promise of German capital to complete the Oregon and California line. Under the provisions of the initial agreement, the road which reaches the state line first may continue construction until the connecting line is reached. On this point, it is stated, the Central Pacific company has rested its hopes for the completion of the through line to Portland, and will not push the California & Oregon road any further north. It is willing that the Oregon & California company should have all the honor of making the connection as well as the heavy expense of building a road over the roughest piece of line that has ever been surveyed in the state. The matter of a land grant, the forfeiture of which is now considered only a matter of time, is no object to the shrewd Central Pacific managers. It is said that those interested in the Oregon & California are very anxious to complete the connection, as the company can earn very little until it is done. They ceased construction only because of a lack of funds.
Eugene Guard, July 26, 1884, page 1


    THE DeMOSS FAMILY.--This excellent company, which consists of father, mother, two sons and three daughters, late of Des Moines, Iowa, Musical Institute, with their silver cornet band and orchestra, will give a vocal and instrumental concert in Eugene City Monday, July 28th, at 8 o'clock p.m. This company has been traveling for eleven years, and their concerts have been universally approved by the press and good people. The programme will consist of solos, duets, trios, quartets, quintets, sextets, septets, choruses, cantatas, character songs, orchestral and cornet band selections. The San Francisco Examiner says of this company, "A concert was given in Children's Hall last night by the DeMoss Family. The entertainment was excellent, and was well attended. The programme was made up of numerous musical selections, rendered by the members of the company." For further particulars see bills. Prices of admission, 50 cents; reserved seats, 75 cents; children, 15 cents.
Eugene Guard, July 26, 1884, page 5  The DeMoss Family performed in Medford in 1886.


    W. M. Turner of Medford keeps a restaurant, where square meals can be obtained cheap.
    The handsome sign which ornaments the Gem Saloon at Medford was painted by H. Kinney of that place, who is an excellent artist.
    T. E. Stanley of Medford was in town this week. He threatens to do something surprising soon, and we advise his neighbors to look out for him.
    S. P. Hanna is making a first-class wagon, to be run on Egan's express line between this place and Medford. Cronemiller & Birdsey will do the ironwork.
    John Simmons, who went to Klamath County recently to look after his land interests, has returned. He has closed his saloon at Medford and will soon move back to his ranch.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1884, page 3
 

W. F. Kremer, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
MEDFORD                                                OREGON

Ashland Tidings, August 1, 1884, page 2
 

   Madison Rodgers has opened a saddler shop in Medford.
   F. B. Voorhies is the Medford agent for the Ashland Soda Works.
   Mr. Byers informs us that a block of three or four brick stores will probably be built at Medford this summer.
   When you are trading in Medford don't forget B. Fisher's place in the brick block. Best goods and lowest prices.
   Anything usually kept in a first class drug store may be found at Vrooman & Miller's, Medford, and special attention is given to the compounding of prescriptions.
   Byers & Guerin have at Medford the best brick yard in the county, and will burn this season 400,000 or 500,000 brick, one large kiln having already been burned. Their yard is right on the railroad, and they are prepared to fill orders for shipment, either north or south, on short notice.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 1, 1884, page 3


    Angle & Plymale have received large consignments of new goods at the Farmers' Store, Medford, within the past week, and now have a more complete stock than ever.
Ashland Tidings, August 1, 1884, page 3
 

    FREIGHT SHIPMENTS.--Railroad agent Cunningham at Medford informs us that the freight shipments at his station for the month of July footed up as follows: Freight received, 607,641 pounds; freight shipped, 26,097 pounds.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 2, 1884, page 3


    Baruch Fisher is in constant receipt of novelties at his store in Medford.
    F. Hubbard reports business brisk in the farming machinery line at Medford.
    George Brown is now driving the Medford express for Wm. Egan and makes an efficient and reliable man in that business.
    A fine new thoroughbrace wagon is being put up for Wm. Egan by S. P. Hanna and Cronemiller & Birdsey, to be used on the Medford route.
    Ashland has started the political ball rolling by organizing a Blaine and Logan club with a good membership. Since then Medford has followed suit.
    John Simmons has closed his saloon at Medford and will go to farming. Sam Hadley has also closed out and will go to Lake County to go into business.
    Parties at Medford had petitioned the Grand Master Workman of the A.O.U.W. for a charter to establish a lodge of that order there. They are already assured of a good membership to begin with.
    A. L. Johnson and wife were up from Medford last Thursday attending the Masonic sociable. The former inform us that there is still considerable building going on there but the influx of strangers has diminished somewhat of late.
    The Medford agent must have been thinking of something else when he drove another man's team home after the circus last Saturday night. In fact, he acknowledges that he never looked at the horses after he started, and he knows he did not hitch them up.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 2, 1884, page 3
 

W. F. KREMER, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1884 et seq., page 2


    Haskins & Co.'s new drug store at Medford will be ready for business in a few days.
    Sam Hadley has closed his business at Medford and will go to Lake County, we learn.
    Medford will have a lodge of the A.O.U.W. soon, as a petition to that effect has been sent to the grand master workman.
    At Medford railroad station there was received 607,641 lbs. of freight during the past month, and 26,097 lbs. were shipped.
    Read the card of W. F. Kremer, M.D., lately of Douglas County, who has located at Medford. He comes well recommended.
    The county commissioners this week granted Thos. E. Stanley of Medford and W. B. Worlow of Eagle Point licenses to retail liquor.
    Isaac H. Johnston of Medford died of brain fever last week, after a brief illness, and was buried in the Jacksonville cemetery on Sunday. He was an industrious and upright man, whose death is mourned by a family and large circle of friends.
    Isaac Woolf and others have petitioned the county court for a road between Jacksonville and Medford, which will leave the main road at I. M. Harvey's place (where a gate now obstructs the public travel) and lead directly through the pasture in an easterly direction to the last named place.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1884, page 3


   A lodge of the A.O.U.W. is to be organized at Medford, making the third in the county.
   Every week sees the arrival of new goods at the Farmers' Store of Angle & Plymale at Medford.
   H. C. Mulvany, of Medford, is in town this week canvassing for the sale of "Cram's Family Atlas," a valuable work.
   Dr. W. F. Kremer, who has recently located at Medford, comes from Oakland, Douglas County. His card appears in another column.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 8, 1884, page 3


    C. W. Broback's new dwelling house at Medford is now in course of erection. It will be a fine building.
    Isaac Johnston, of Medford, died last Saturday morning, of brain fever, after an illness of about a week. He leaves a family.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 8, 1884, page 3


    W. G. Kenney is laid up for repairs at Medford with an abscess in one ear.
    Liquor licenses were granted to Wm. B. Worlow of Eagle Point and Thos. E. Stanley of Medford by the Commissioners at their last term.
    The funeral of I. H. Johnston of Medford was largely attended last Sunday. His remains were interred in the Jacksonville Cemetery.
    Residents of Medford have again petitioned the County Commissioners for a new road from that place to the county seat. It should be granted.
    Angle & Plymale of Medford have added a fine 2,500 pound, double door safe to their establishment which looks as if they were going into the banking business.
    Dr. W. F. Kremer, formerly of Albina, has located at Medford for the practice of his profession and asks a share of the patronage of that place and vicinity. He comes well recommended.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 9, 1884, page 3


MARRIED.
DORAN-CALDWELL.--At the residence of the bride's parents in Medford, August 3, 1884, by Rev. C. H. Hoxie, Lew Doran and Ida Caldwell.
DIED.
JOHNSTON.--In Medford, August 2, 1884, Isaac H. Johnston, aged about 43 years.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 9, 1884, page 3


DR. W. F. KREMER
Physician and Surgeon

MEDFORD, OREGON
Office at Cunningham's Hotel.
Calls attended to promptly, day or night.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 9, 1884 et seq., page 3


    Parties at Medford have petitioned the Grand Master Workman of the A.O.U.W. for a charter to establish a lodge of that order there. They are already assured of a good membership to begin with.
"Local Items," Douglas Independent, Roseburg, August 9, 1884, page 3


A Tramp Shot.
    After the Oregon & California train going south Saturday last had passed Roseburg a short distance, conductor Guthrie was considerably troubled with tramps, who had to be put off the train several times. Finally after passing Gold Hill and stopping to wood up the tramps were again discovered and put off, when they showed fight, and someone without due caution fired his pistol off, and one of the tramps was shot in the thigh, breaking his leg. The train moved on without the conductor's knowledge of any harm having come to anyone. Sunday he was surprised by the arrival of an officer at Ashland for his arrest and taken to Jacksonville, where he was bound over in the sum of $1200, to await the action of the grand jury for the crime of assault with a dangerous weapon. Conductor Guthrie says he was on the engine at the time of the row and heard the shooting, but does not know who did the thing, yet he is compelled to suffer on account of the carelessness of someone, be he brakeman or passenger.
Eugene Guard, August 9, 1884, page 5
 

    C. W. Broback's handsome residence near Medford is nearing completion. A. Childers and sons, three first-class mechanics recently from Portland, did the brickwork.
    H. C. Mulvany of Medford is canvassing for an excellent work called Cram's Family Atlas.
    Angle & Plymale, the enterprising Medford merchants, have invested in a huge safe. They evidently intend to do a big business.
    W. G. Kenney of Medford is lying sick at the residence of his mother in this place. Frank Kasshafer will assist H. H. Wolters at the Gem Saloon during K.'s illness.
    Messrs. Williamson, Kinney, Epps, Adkins, Webb, Rosenthal and others came up from Medford Saturday evening to visit the Odd Fellows' lodge at this place.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1884, page 3


    Every week sees the arrival of new goods at the Farmer's Store of Angle & Plymale at Medford.
    When you are trading in Medford don't forget B. Fisher's place in the brick block. Best goods and lowest prices.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 15, 1884, page 3
 

    SOCIAL VISIT.--Nine Odd Fellows came up from Medford last Saturday night to visit the lodge at this place, all of whom were members in different lodges in the Eastern States. Among the crowd we noticed the two Webb brothers, Messrs. Adkins, Williamson, Epps, Kenney, Rosenthal and Poe. The lodge here extends them a cordial invitation to call again.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 16, 1884, page 3


    Frank Kasshafer officiates at the Gem Saloon at Medford during the illness of W. G. Kenney.
    W. G. Kenney was brought from Medford this week suffering with a severe attack of bilious or intermittent fever and is now at his mother's home in town. His condition was much improved at last accounts.
    Mrs. Wm. Ulrich of Medford has fully recovered from her late illness and again enjoys good health. The report that Wm. Ulrich was sick was all a mistake as he proved to us that he never enjoyed better health in his life.
    The shipping price for wheat from Medford to Portland is 24 cents, and at the price wheat is ruling at in the Portland market that does not leave any margin for our farmers, and it looks as though there was a disposition somewhere to keep our wheat out of the Portland market by such exorbitant rates. There is a reduction promised soon, which it is to be hoped will not be delayed until the market is overstocked from other sections, for we had ought to have at least an even chance with the rest of the state in the sale of Southern Oregon produce.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 16, 1884, page 3


BORN.
WILSON.--In Medford precinct, Aug. 8th, 1884 to Mr. and Mrs. Mac Wilson, a daughter.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 16, 1884, page 3


    WILL THE C.P. LEASE THE O.&C.?--Those who assume to know predict that the Central Pacific will lease the Oregon & California Railroad, and that the recent visit of Henry Villard to Europe was to bring about this end. When Charles Crocker, vice president of the Central Pacific, was in Victoria a few days ago, he remarked to a Portland gentleman that negotiations might be commenced soon for such lease, adding that the Central had tried more than once to secure it, but negotiations were always broken off. Whatever will be done, will be done between Mr. Villard and C. P. Huntington in New York.
----
    THE O.&C. RAILROAD.--As the result of the surrender and cancellation of the lease between the O.&C. and the Oregon & Transcontinental Company, according to a circular recently issued from the president's office, the O.&C. Railroad Company will hereafter be operated by the following officers: H. Villard, president; Chas. E. Bretherton, vice president; R. Koehler, second vice president and manager; Geo. H. Andrews, secretary and treasurer; J. Brandt, superintendent, E. P. Rogers, general freight and passenger agent; Oscar E. Heintz, auditor of freight and ticket accounts; W. T. Bodley, purchasing agent.
Eugene Guard, August 16, 1884, page 5
 

BUSINESS FOR SALE.
The undersigned offers for sale his variety store at Medford, together with the entire stock and good will. It is well established and doing a good business. My presence is needed elsewhere, which is my reason for desiring to sell. Apply soon to                                                            F. B. VOORHIES, Medford, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1884 et seq., page 2


    J. P. True will erect a dwelling house at Medford soon.
    F. B. Voorhies offers his variety store at Medford for sale. Here is an opening for someone. See advertisement.
    John Simmons of Medford has lost a horse, a description of which will be found in our advertising columns. He offers a reward for his recovery.
    Geo. Freeman and family returned from California his week and will locate here again. Mr. F. will resume freighting between this place and Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1884, page 3


STRAYED.
A SHORT TIME SINCE a large, raw-boned horse, dark bay or brown in color, no brands. His right forefoot is what is known as a clubfoot. A suitable reward will be paid for his return to
JOHN SIMMONS, Medford, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1884 et seq., page 3


    Wm. Egan, the Medford livery man, is in town frequently with drummers and other passengers from down the valley.
    J. M. Nye, the horseman who has been coming up from Sacramento to Siskiyou County every year of late to buy horses for the city market, extended his trip to this valley this month, after purchasing some 40 head in Siskiyou. He was in Ashland several days last week and this week and bought 17 horses here, after which he went down to Medford, to open business in that part of the valley. He has with him a number of buggies and hacks which he is selling.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 29, 1884, page 3


    A. L. Johnson of Medford was in town Tuesday and reports everything quiet in that section.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1884, page 3


    CHANGE IN TIME.--A new timetable goes into effect on the O.&C.R.R. tomorrow whereby trains from the south will reach Medford at 9:30 p.m. and from the north at 4 a.m.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 30, 1884, page 3


    A most desirable farm can be rented on good terms by applying to Mrs. S. E. Ish at once. Read the advertisement.
    We acknowledge a pleasant call from Dr. W. F. Kremer of Medford yesterday afternoon. He reports several cases of sickness in his section but none of a serious nature.
    Travel over the Oregon & California Overland Route is increasing rapidly, now that the fare has been reduced and it only costs $30 to Sacramento or $32 to San Francisco from Portland.
    The Ish place near town yielded something over 14,000 bushels of grain this year. Wm. R. Jones is in charge of the place and if any grass grows under his feet he makes hay out of it, which is why this farm always makes such a good showing.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 30, 1884, page 3


Farm for Rent.
    The Little Sticky Ranch, known as the Centre's place, is offered for rent. It contains about 160 acres of good plow land and is situated about six miles from Jacksonville. For particulars, enquire of                                 MRS. S. E. ISH
     Jacksonville, Aug. 30, 1884
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 30, 1884, page 3


    In order to shorten the time of transit between Portland and San Francisco a day, the railroad company has changed time. Hereafter the northbound train will arrive at Medford at 9:22 p.m., and the southbound at 3:25 a.m.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1884, page 2


    F. B. Voorhies of Medford is agent for S. McCallister's natural soda water.
    Medford had its first lawsuit one day this week. Justice Barkdull presided in a creditable manner.
    The Medford school has adjourned, but studies will resume as soon as the new schoolhouse is completed.
    A new wagon has been put on the Jacksonville-Medford express and mail line. It's a beauty and a big improvement on the other.
    Baruch Fisher has moved his goods from Medford to Woodville. He will keep a complete stock, offering excellent inducements to those who may wish to purchase. He has purchased the building formerly occupied by Woodford & Colvig.
    H. F. Wood has been awarded the contract for building a new schoolhouse at Medford for $774. It will be a neat building, 30x50 feet in size, and two stories high.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1884, page 3


    Vrooman & Miller, of Medford, now have as fine an assortment of cook stoves as were ever brought into the county. Call and see the new "Acorn" ranges.
    The advertisement of the Central Hotel, of Medford, appears in this issue. The hotel was opened this week by Mr. A. R. Woods, the new landlord, who has put the house in excellent condition, and is prepared to furnish the best of accommodations to the public. Give him a call when you go to Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 5, 1884, page 3


THE CENTRAL HOTEL
MEDFORD, OR.
A. E. Woods,  -  Proprietor.
    The hotel opened under the management of the new proprietor on the 1st of September.
    The building has been thoroughly renovated and guests will find here
CLEAN BEDS,  GOOD MEALS.
And careful attention, at the lowest reasonable prices.
A. E. WOODS
Ashland Tidings, September 5, 1884 et seq., page 2


MEDFORD NOTES.
    Dr. Kremer, who located here not long since, came from Albina, one of the suburbs of Portland, where he was in practice for some time.
    F. L. Cranfill, who has charge of Henry Smith's lumber yard, is building a new dwelling home near the yard, on the west side of the railroad.
    Dr. Vrooman is preparing to build a dwelling house on his residence lot.
    Dr. Adkins, of the firm of Adkins & Webb, has let the contract for the erection of a dwelling house for himself, which will be one of the finest residences in the town.
    The building for the millinery store of Mrs. Lawton and Mrs. Haskins, near Woolf's store, is about completed, and the ladies will be ready for business there in a short time.
    Carlos Goddard keeps the meat market, and is a popular butcher--knows how to keep his shop neat, and isn't too lazy to do it.
    A man recently arrived here intends to open a cooper shop in the northern part of town.
    C. W. Broback's brick house is rapidly approaching completion. It is one of the few brick dwelling houses of the county, and will be finished in good style and add greatly to the appearance of the town. It is situated about halfway between the depot and his former residence.
    Many of our citizens are intending to set out fruit and shade trees during the coming planting season.
    Dr. Kremer and family now occupy Dr. Geary's handsome cottage.
    Mr. Barnum, who bought the Broback farm, is expecting his family to arrive from New York this week. His son is bringing the machinery for a planing mill which is to be established here, either in or near the town.
Ashland Tidings, September 5, 1884, page 3
 

    A.O.U.W.--Arrangements have been perfected for the organization of a lodge A.O.U.W. at Medford. Dr. E. P. Geary, a physician of excellent reputation, has been selected to make the examinations and when preliminaries are completed W. J. Plymale, under authority of the G.M.W. together with a large delegation of [Jacksonville's] Banner Lodge will visit Medford and start the lodge in first-class order. A pressing invitation will be extended to the Brothers of Ashland Lodge to be present and assist in the ceremonies, which will be instructive and highly interesting to those who are fortunate enough to be present on that occasion. All will be fully advised as to the time.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 6, 1884, page 3


    The railroad timetable has been changed so that passenger trains leave Medford going north at 9:37 p.m. and going south at 3:46 a.m. There have been 40,035 pounds of freight forwarded and 415,507 received at Medford during the last month.
    Baruch Fisher has moved his goods from Medford to Woodville. He will keep a complete stock, offering excellent inducements to those who may wish to purchase. He has purchased the building formerly occupied by Woodford & Colvig.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 6, 1884, page 3


    Doctors Vrooman and Adkins will each build neat dwelling houses at Medford.
    C. W. Broback's fine brick residence at Medford will soon be ready for occupancy.
    F. L. Cranfill is building a dwelling house near Henry Smith's lumber yard at Medford, of which he has charge.
    Forty thousand pounds of freight were forwarded from Medford station in August and 415,507 lbs. were received there during the same time.
    Mrs. G. H. Haskins has opened a millinery and notion store at Medford. Ladies will do well to call on her before purchasing elsewhere.
    W. G. Kenney, having recovered from his recent sickness, is on duty again at the Gem Saloon in Medford. Frank Kasshafer has returned home.
    A lodge of the A.O.U.W. will be organized at Medford before long. Dr. E. P. Geary has been selected as medical examiner and the preliminaries are well under way. W. J. Plymale will officiate as organizing officer, and will be assisted by members of Banner Lodge of this place.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1884, page 3
 

    Mr. West and family, lately of California, has located at Medford. He says that this is the finest valley he ever saw.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1884, page 3


    The railroad is assessed at $2,500 a mile in Jackson County--a low valuation.
    H. F. Wood has been awarded the contract for building a new schoolhouse at Medford for $774. The building will be 30x40 feet, two stories.
    Baruch Fisher has moved his goods from Medford to Woodville. He has purchased the building formerly occupied by Woodford & Colvig.
    The gravel train has been running this week, and Commissioner Lyttleton has been spreading the gravel upon the stick roadway across the [Ashland] railroad tract.
    A lodge of Good Templars will be organized at Medford by Grand Lecturer King, on his return from Klamath County. He started for Linkville on this morning's stage.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 12, 1884, page 3


    E. E. Redfield, who was in the jewelry business here some months since, returned to Ashland last week.
    Walter S. Gore and wife have returned from Eugene City, and are now at Rev. M. A. Williams' place near Medford.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, September 12, 1884, page 3
 

    The new lodge of A.O.U.W. at Medford will soon be organized by W. J. Plymale.
    Mrs. G. H. Haskins has opened a millinery and notion store at Medford. Ladies will do well to call on her before purchasing elsewhere.
    The new residences of Merritt Bellinger near town and that of C. W. Broback's [sic] at Medford are nearing completion. Both will make fine homes.
    George Freeman has rigged up a new wagon for hauling freight between here and Medford and will always be found ready and accommodating.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 13, 1884, page 3


    C. S. Ferguson of Grants Pass, Noland & Ulrich of Medford and M. L. Stanley of Woodville were granted license to sell liquor.

"Commissioner's Court," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 13, 1884, page 3



    Medford will soon have a lodge of Good Templars.
    Mrs. A. Merriman is having a building put up at Medford.
Byers & Guerin of Medford have shipped 20,000 excellent brick to Fort Klamath.
    S. B. Hadley, formerly of Medford, is now a resident of Myrtle Creek, to which point he has moved his excellent stock of goods.
    The railroad company offers lots in the different towns along their line in this county for sale. See advertisement for further particulars.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1884, page 3
 

    Hon. J. H. Stewart, a prominent fruit grower of Adams County, Illinois, has been in the valley for several days, and may locate, as the country seems to suit him. He is a nephew of Alex Stewart of Medford precinct.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1884, page 3


    Geo. Love had a mishap at Medford Tuesday evening. He was turning his team in the vicinity of Kenney & Wolters' saloon, when the vehicle struck a stump hid by the darkness and threw George violently to the ground, bruising him somewhat. He held to the lines, however, and succeeded in stopping the horses before much harm resulted. The tongue was broken from the wagon, but no other damage was done.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1884, page 3
 

NEW TOWN OF MEDFORD!
-------------
    Lots for sale at low prices and on easy terms.
    Apply to J. S. HOWARD, Agent, at Medford.
    Also, in the Railroad Addition to the town of
ASHLAND
    Apply to M. L. McCall, Agent, Ashland.
PHOENIX.
    Apply to M. V. B. SOULE, Agent Phoenix.
GOLD HILL.
    Apply to M. E. POGUE, Agent, Gold Hill.
GRANTS PASS.
    Apply to S. M. WILCOX, Agent Grant's Pass.
GEO. H. ANDREWS,
O.&C.R.R. Co., Portland Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1884 et seq., page 3
also Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 20, 1884 et seq., page 3
 

    The railroad company now offer town lots for sale in their tracts at Ashland, Phoenix, Medford, Gold Hill and Grants Pass. Their advertisement appears in this issue.
    Mrs. G. H. Haskins has opened a millinery store in Medford, having received direct from San Francisco a full line of millinery goods, notions, etc. The ladies of Jackson County are respectfully invited to call and examine stock and prices.
    Mr. R. T. Lawton, of Medford, has recently opened a real estate office at that place, and is prepared to attend to all business in the line of buying and selling town property, placing loans, etc. He is a notary public, also, and will attend to all business requiring a notarial seal, as well as conveyancing, collecting and the like. Give him a call.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 19, 1884, page 3


TOWN PROPERTY!
FOR SALE.

----
Railroad Addition to Ashland.
Lots For Sale at Greatly Reduced Prices!
AND ON EASY TERMS.
        Apply to M. L. McCALL, Agent, Ashland.                            
Also, in the New Railroad Towns of
MEDFORD.

        Apply to J. S. HOWARD, Agent, Medford.
GOLD HILL.
        Apply to M. E. POGUE, Agent, Gold Hill.
PHOENIX.
        Apply to M. V. B. SOULE, Agent, Phoenix.
GRANTS PASS.
        Apply to S. M. WILCOX, Agent, Grants Pass.
Or to GEO. H. ANDREWS
O.&C.R.R., Portland, Oregon.
Ashland Tidings, September 19, 1884 et seq., page 4
 

    C. W. Broback has moved into his new brick house at Medford.
    S. B. Hadley, who sold out his store at Medford, has removed to Myrtle Creek, and opened a store at that place.
    A number of the railroad company's lots have been sold in Ashland, Medford and other places since the advertisement appeared in the Tidings.
    Wm. Angle, of the Farmers' Store, Medford, went to Portland with the excursion and will combine business with pleasure, by choosing more new stock for the fall trade.
    The machinery for the planing mill of Mr. Barnum at Medford has arrived, and will be placed in a building near the bank of the creek, at the east end of Main Street, in that town.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 26, 1884, page 3


    Rev. M. A. Williams and bride came in from Klamath County last Saturday, and are now at their home near Medford. They both have hosts of friends who are congratulating them upon their union, and wishing for them both many years of happiness, health and usefulness on earth.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, September 26, 1884, page 3
 

    J. Cunningham, of the O.&C.R.R. at Medford, has been sick for several days past.
    Dr. Vrooman has moved his family to Medford where he is engaged in business and will permanently reside there.
    William Egan of Medford has sold out his livery stable to parties from the East for $3,000 and will retire from the business.
    Mrs. G. H. Haskins has opened a millinery and notion store at Medford. Ladies will do well to call on her before patronizing elsewhere.
    Several new buildings are going up in Medford and the place is rapidly assuming the appearance of a town. Its growth will be permanent in the future as there will only be such building done as the increasing business of the place demands.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 27, 1884, page 3


    The Times reports that Carlos Goddard has sold his butcher shop at Medford to W. H. Barr & Co., lately from Illinois, and will engage in stockraising hereafter.
    The Farmers' Store at Medford keeps a full assortment of carefully selected general merchandise--and prices are down at the bottom. Call and be convinced.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 3, 1884, page 3
 

    Dr. Kremer of Medford has moved to Sams Valley, succeeding Dr. A. C. Stanley, who retires from practice.
    The new lodge of A.O.U.W. at Medford will soon be put in working order. The medical examinations have been made by Dr. Geary.
    The Medford Livery Stable has been purchased by Wm. Ryan, lately from Nebraska. Mr. Egan will go east of the mountains to go into the stock business.
    A steam flouring mill is the latest improvement promised at Medford. The party proposing to start in this enterprise is now negotiating for land on the Beekman tract. So we are informed by Wm. Ulrich.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 4, 1884, page 3


   G. S. Butler has sold the old home place near Medford (A. Butler donation claim of 320 acres) to Mr. S. L. Bennett, recently from California; consideration, $7,000. Mrs. Bennett was formerly Miss Maria Merriman, of this county.
    Saml. B. Colver has taken the stump for the National Prohibition ticket, making his first speech Wednesday evening at Medford. Last night he spoke at Grants Pass, whence he was going northward.
    A steam flouring mill is one of the new enterprises projected at Medford. The citizens of that place have been anxious for someone to build them a mill, and it is reported that a gentleman from the East is now there investigating the outlook. The planing mill is being set up near the bank of Bear Creek, in the eastern part of the town.
    T. J. Russell was arrested at Medford recently, charged with having stolen a buggy from G. Carson. After an examination before Justice Foudray at Jacksonville, he was held under $200 bail to appear before the next grand jury. He furnished bail.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 10, 1884, page 3


    Sam Hadley, formerly of Medford, has opened a general merchandise store at Myrtle Creek and is doing a good business.
    Geo. M. Love of his place and Chas. Strang of Medford have gone to Portland. R. H. Klippel accompanied them and will remain.
    When at Medford call on Angle and Plymale for bargains. Enquire prices, even if you should not want to buy anything, and they will convince you that you need something.
    Two propositions for a new road between Jacksonville and Medford were considered by the Commissioners this week and viewers appointed. The shortest route possible is what we want and we hope the county court will order it opened as soon as possible.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 11, 1884, page 3


    Owings Bros. intend to open a photograph gallery in Medford before long.
    Senator Slater speaks at Medford [at Byers' hall] on the 24th and at this place on the 25th. He is an able speaker and far the superior of Senator Dolph as an orator. Everybody should turn out and hear him.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1884, page 3


    In the matter of a county road leading from Medford to intersect with the Butte Creek and Phoenix road, J. H. Wrisley, W. Plymire and E. F. Walker appointed viewers--and Jas. Jeffrey surveyor.
"County Commissioners' Court," excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1884, page 3


    Medford and Jacksonville people want a straight road between their towns.
    Building continues at Medford, and a number of families are preparing to have dwellings built between now and winter.
    Wm. Egan, of Medford, has sold his livery stables in that place to Messrs. Llewellyn & Lynch, who recently came out from Kansas, receiving for the real estate and entire livery outfit $3,000. Mr. Egan is now in Ashland, and may possibly conclude to locate here.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 17, 1884, page 3
 

    Rev. M. A. Williams and wife intend to reside in the town of Medford, and Mr. W. S. Gore will take charge of Mr. Williams' place, south of that town.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, October 17, 1884, page 3
 

    WATCHMAKING.--E. E. Redfield, of the firm of E. E. & H. S. Redfield, who were formerly in the jewelry business here, has returned to town and opened a shop again in Nutley's building, near the bridge, where he is prepared to do all kinds of repairing of watches, clocks and jewelry.
Ashland Tidings, October 17, 1884, page 3
 

    Conrad Mingus of Heber Grove, one of our most enterprising farmers, has this year raised some of the largest and finest potatoes we ever saw. Some of them were perfect monsters. He has our thanks for a quantity of them.
"Thanks," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1884, page 3


    A. G. Epps has purchased John Robinson's property at Medford, paying $250 for the same.
    Hon. A. C. Jones [Democratic candidate for presidential elector] will speak at Ashland, Grants Pass and Medford next week. For further particulars see posters.
    Senator Slater speaks at Medford this evening and the Democracy of that place will give him a rousing reception. Great preparations are being made for the event.
    Surveyors Jeffrey and Howard have been surveying two straight roads between this place and Medford, one of which will probably be adopted by the county commissioners.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1884, page 3
 

    Wm. Egan is now the proprietor of a six-mule team, which is freighting on the Linkville road.
    Rev. M. A. Williams and wife will reside at Medford, while Walter S. Gore will manage the home place.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1884, page 3


    Medford people are preparing for winter by graveling their sidewalks.
    The locomotive struck and killed a deer this side of Grants Pass, coming south, last Saturday morning, and Engineer McCarty secured some choice venison steaks in consequence.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 24, 1884, page 3
 

    STRAIGHT ROAD.--The viewers appointed at the last term of County Court [of Commissioners] will make a favorable report for a straight road between here and Medford, making their start from the gate in front of the Ish farm and ending on the main street in Medford. John Tice is the only farmer injured by the new road, as with the others it goes with division lines and does no damage. We hope the Commissioners will adopt this route but the old road should also be kept open as it accommodates a large portion of the country.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 25, 1884, page 3
 

    A. G. Epps has rented Byers & Co.'s hall at Medford, and will turn it into a hotel.
    John Slagle, constable of Medford precinct, was at the county seat Wednesday on business.
    Hon. J. H. Slater being unable to fill his appointment at Medford, it was filled by J. R. Neil and W. M. Colvig. A large audience was present and listened to the excellent speeches made with marked attention.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1884, page 3
 

    A Eugene city correspondent of the Oregonian says: "Dr. E. P. Geary of Medford and Miss Agnes McCornack were married at the bride's home in this city on the 22d and immediately took their departure for their new home in Medford. They both hold honored places among the alumni of the State University, as well as in the hearts of the people of this vicinity, and carry with them our most sincere wishes that their wedded life may be prolonged and happy." The Doctor's many friends in southern Oregon also offer their congratulations and best wishes.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1884, page 3
 

   Engine No. 21, which McCarty has been running between here and Grants Pass, is in the shop now for repairs, and No. 19 is running in her place.
   The viewers appointed to consider the location of a new road between Medford and Jacksonville will make a favorable report for a straight route between the two places, beginning at the gate in front of the Ish farm and making a bee line, or practically so to a point in the main street of Medford.
The School Moderator, May 21, 1885, page 738
   The directors of the Medford school have ordered of Mr. Beebe $400 worth of the handsome "Victor" desks for their new school house, which will soon be completed. The desks will accommodate eighty-eight pupils. They are of the same pattern as those ordered for the new Ashland schoolhouse.
   Miss Melle Wrisley has engaged in the dressmaking business in Medford, and will receive orders at the residence of Carlos Goddard. Her announcement will appear in [the] next issue.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 31, 1884, page 3
 

    A.O.U.W.--A new lodge of this order will be instituted at Medford next Saturday night with twenty-six charter members. W. J. Plymale, District Deputy, will officiate, assisted by a number of the members from the lodges here and at Ashland.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 1, 1884, page 3


    The following is the freight shipment and receipts at Medford station for the month of October: Received, 486,880 pounds; sent 162,690 pounds.
    Dr. E. P. Geary of Medford visited his old home at Eugene City this week but has since returned accompanied by his bride. We congratulate and wish them all the happiness and prosperity possible.
    Lewellen & Lynch, the new proprietors of the Medford livery stable, are doing a good business and one of them can be seen on the streets every day while taking drummers and other parties to different parts of the country.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 1, 1884, page 3


MARRIED.
RUSSELL-JOHNSON--In Medford precinct Oct. 21st, 1884, by Rev. M. A. Williams, T. J. Russell and Miss Eva C. Johnson.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 1, 1884, page 3


    The "Jubilee Singers" performed at Medford Monday evening and at Phoenix Tuesday evening.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 7, 1884, page 3
 

    "JUBILEE SINGERS."--A colored troupe calling themselves the "Tennessee Jubilee Singers" gave two performances in Ashland this week. Whether they are from Tennessee or not we don't know, but of one thing there is no room for doubt--their performance is the poorest of the kind yet given in Ashland. It consists in a large degree of an attempt at minstrel fun--with the oldest and stalest of minstrel jokes as the chief stock in trade. The singing is far inferior to that of the Ainsley Scott jubilee troupe through here some two years ago.
Ashland Tidings, November 7, 1884, page 3
 

    The following is the freight shipment and receipts at Medford station for the month of October: Received, 486,880 pounds; sent 162,690 pounds.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, November 7, 1884, page 3
 

To the Ladies
-- OF --
M E D F O R D
And vicinity; I am prepared to do
Dress Making
In the most approved styles, and respectfully
solicit a share of public patronage.
MELLE WRISLEY
Will receive orders at the residence of
Carlos Goddard.
Ashland Tidings, November 7, 1884 et seq., page 3


    THE STRAIGHT ROAD.-- County Commissioners appointed viewers to assess damages on the proposed new road to Medford to report next term. Two different roads are proposed and the one proving best and cheapest will probably be established.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 8, 1884, page 3

 
    Medford is building a new schoolhouse.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 8, 1884, page 3


A Bold Thief.
    At Medford last Sunday evening, at about half-past six o'clock, was enacted the boldest robber that has taken place in this section for a long time. It seems that Jas. Cunningham, the railroad agent, had just returned from supper and was sitting at his desk in the office, when some unknown person, disguised with a mask, walked up behind him unawares and at the point of a pistol ordered him to unlock the safe that stood nearby. Jim hesitated at first, but, as the robber meant business, he thought discretion the better part of valor and complied with the request. Over $600 were taken, of which $365 belonged to the railroad company, $200 to Kenney & Wolters, $6 to the W. U. Tel. Co. and $60 to Mr. C. himself. The thief soon decamped and the alarm was given. Up to this time no clue has been found, though some parties are suspected. The railroad company offers a reward of $300 to anyone who will furnish such evidence as will lead to the arrest and conviction of the party who committed the robbery.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1884, page 3


    H. F. Wood has completed the Medford school house and returned to Pleasant Creek.
    A. L. Johnson of Medford is proprietor of the hearse formerly owned by the late M. Colwell.
    Bud Lacy, son of John Lacy of Medford precinct, is dangerously ill with typhoid fever.
    Wm. Churchman has purchased Thos. E. Stanley's building at Medford and will conduct a first-class saloon.
    W. J. Plymale, D.D.G.M., assisted by member of the Jacksonville and Ashland lodges organized a lodge of the A.O.U.W. at Medford last Saturday night, with over twenty charter members. We have not been furnished a list of officers, but will give them in our next issue. The lodge has flattering prospects.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1884, page 3
 

    In the matter of the location of a certain county road between Jacksonville and Medford, C. Mingus claiming $1,000 damages, it was ordered that C. C. Beekman, G. W. Fordyce and C. Magruder be appointed viewers of damages.
    In the matter of the location of a road from Medford to connect with the Butte Creek and Phoenix roads. Report of viewers accepted and said road ordered established.
    In the matter of a county road between Jacksonville and Medford. J. R. Tice, I. W. Thomas and Mary Davison claiming that they would be damaged in the sum of $572, $50 and $200 respectively, C. C. Beekman, G. W. Fordyce and C. Magruder were appointed viewers of damages.
"County Commissioners' Court," excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1884, page 3
 

    A.O.U.W. LODGE.--Medford Lodge No.---, Ancient Order of United Workmen was established last Saturday evening by Deputy Grand Master Workman, W. J. Plymale. Nineteen members were initiated, and six others will come in hereafter, as charter members, not being able to attend upon that evening. Following is a list of the officers installed for the ensuing term: G. W. Williams, P.M.W.; A. L. Johnson, M.W.; W. H. Barr, Gen. Foreman; M. Rodgers, Overseer; Isaac Woolf, Recorder; D. H. Miller, Receiver; C. Strang, Financier; F. B. Voorhies, Guide; A. S. Johnson, I.W.; P. O. Wilson, O.W. There were present six members of Ashland Lodge and five from Banner Lodge, at Jacksonville, and after the business of the occasion had been disposed of the visitors were invited to join the members of the new lodge in the discussion of an elegant supper at the Central Hotel. Being one of the fortunate guests, the writer can testify that the generous hospitality of the new lodge was well matched by the efforts of the proprietor of the hotel, and the result was as fine a supper as anybody in Oregon could have desired. The new lodge starts out with good, reliable men as its members, and will ably assist in furthering the beneficent work of the charitable order of which it is the latest offspring.
    ROBBERY AT MEDFORD.--A most daring robbery is reported at Medford last Sunday evening. About seven o'clock, just after dark, when the station agent, J. Cunningham, was in his office alone, a masked man appeared at the window and, covering Cunningham with his revolver, ordered him to open the safe and give out what money it contained. This was done, according to directions, and the robber made off safely with about $720. The O.&C.R.R. Co. offer a reward of $200 for information which will lead to the arrest and conviction of the robber or robbers.
Ashland Tidings, November 14, 1884, page 3
 

    The new schoolhouse at Medford, which is about finished, is a good-sized building with a large anteroom. It is situated west of the town.
    The County Commissioners appointed viewers to assess damages to the proposed new road to Medford, to report next term. Two different roads are proposed and the one proving best and cheapest will probably be established.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 14, 1884, page 3
 

    BOLD ROBBERY.--Last Sunday evening about 6:30 P.M. some unknown party with a mask over his face entered the railroad office at Medford and with cocked revolver in hand demanded of agent Cunningham the contents of the safe. The request was complied with, as Mr. C. says he did not know what else to do, when the robber departed with about $680 in gold and silver coin. About $300 of this amount belonged to Kenney & Wolters, who kept it there on deposit, while the balance belonged to the railroad company and to Cunningham individually. A reward of $300 is offered for the capture of the thief by the railroad company and officers are on the watch for suspected parties. It was a bold piece of work to say the least and was no doubt done by someone acquainted around the premises and surroundings.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 15, 1884, page 3


    In the matter of the location of a certain county road between Jacksonville and Medford. C. Mingus claiming $1,000 damages, it was ordered that C. C. Beekman, G. W. Fordyce and C. Magruder be appointed viewers of damages. . . . In the matter of the location of a road from Medford to connect with the Butte Creek and Phoenix roads. Report of viewers accepted and said road ordered established. . . . In the matter of a county road between Jacksonville and Medford. J. R. Tice, I. W. Thomas and May Davinson claiming that they would be damaged in the sum of $572, $50 and $200 respectively, C. C. Beekman, G. W. Fordyce and C. Magruder were appointed viewers of damages.

"Commissioners' Court," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 15, 1884, page 3


    SAFE ROBBERY.--Last Sunday night, James Cunningham, agent for the O. & C. Railroad at Medford, Jackson County, had just lighted the lamps in the office at that place when he was confronted by a tall man with a mask over the upper portion of his face, and long whiskers, supposed to be false, who presented a pistol and demanded that he open the safe and deliver over the contents. The manner of the strange visiting was so persuasive that Mr. Cunningham was forced to obey, which he did, handing over to the thief some six hundred dollars. The robber then backed to the door and made good his escape. The railroad company have offered a reward of $300 for the arrest and conviction of the thief.

Douglas Independent, Roseburg, November 15, 1884, page 3

 

    C. Mingus wants $1,000 damages for the right of way of the proposed new road between Jacksonville and Medford across his land. C. C. Beekman, G. W. Fordyce and C. Magruder were appointed viewers to assess the damages. The same gentlemen were reported to assess damages to R. Tice, I. W. Thomas and M. Davison by [the] proposed new road.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 21, 1884, page 3


    Medford Democrats celebrated [the election of Grover Cleveland] last Monday night. The shooting was plainly heard at this place.
    The Gem Saloon at Medford, Kenney & Wolters proprietors, is the boss place. A club room, fine billiard table and all the late papers of the day can be found at this place.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 22, 1884, page 3


DIED.
DARNELL--At Medford, Nov. 8, 1884; Ida, daughter of J. K. Darnell, aged 14 years, 4 months and 25 days.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 22, 1884, page 3


    Only the best brands of wines, liquors and cigars are kept at the Gem Saloon, Medford.
    One of Brunswick, Balke & Co.'s celebrated billiard tables is kept at the Gem Saloon at Medford.
    When you are at Medford give Kenney & Wolters a call. Their saloon is one of the neatest and best in the State.
    Geo. W. Williams, the enterprising contractor of Medford, intends to commence the construction of a fine, two-story building opposite the Central Hotel in a few days. The upper story will be used by different secret societies, while the first floor will be cut up into business places.
    A ball will be given at Medford on Christmas night to liquidate a portion of the indebtedness incurred in building the schoolhouse at that place. The best of music and supper will be provided and no pains spared to make the event an unqualified success. The object in view is a worthy one, and we hope to see it succeed.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1884, page 3


    H. C. Mulvany of Medford, an excellent carpenter, has a number of contracts to complete.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1884, page 3


Medford Correspondence.
MEDFORD, (Or.) Nov. 20, 1884
    Editor Tidings:--Our town continues to improve as time goes on, several new dwellings being now about ready for occupancy.
    Our enterprising neighbor, Mr. Barnum, has his planing mill nearly ready for operation. He also has a turning lathe for iron work.
    We notice strangers on our streets every day--some looking for town locations and some in search of farms.
    No arrests have been made yet that I can learn for the robbery of the R.R. Co.'s safe some time ago.
    Edgar, a 10-year-old son of W. H. Barr, of this place, died on the 23d inst., of some throat disease that somewhat puzzles our M.D.s.
    One week from today I suppose we shall hear something definite about our roads from here to Jacksonville. We shall see which our county commissioners will work for, the farmers and the community in general or the old Jacksonville ring and a few of their allies in this place; for one petition was signed by a large number of men in this place, and the other petition was endorsed exclusively by men in this town and Jacksonville.
Yours Truly,
SUBSCRIBER
Ashland Tidings, November 28, 1884, page 2


CHRISTMAS BALL.--The residents of Medford have just completed a fine schoolhouse and being somewhat behind yet a benefit ball will be given in Byers' hall on Christmas night. All friends of the school and popular education should come to the front and buy a ticket for $2.50 whether they attend in person or not and they need never regret giving their money for such a cause. The floor managers are Messrs. D. H. Miller, John Griffin and Carlos Goddard, and all who come may rest assured that they got the best there is in the house.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 29, 1884, page 3


    Everybody calls on Kenney & Wolters when at Medford.
    George W. Williams is the architect and builder of the new school house at Medford, which is one of the finest buildings of that kind in the county.

    A Medford correspondent of the Tidings delivers himself of the following in yesterday's issue: One week from today I suppose we shall hear something definite about our roads from here to Jacksonville. We shall see which [of] our county commissioners will work for the farmers and the community in general or the old Jacksonville ring and a few of their allies in this place; for one petition was signed by a large number of farmers in the road district and a number of men [of] this place and the other petition was endorsed exclusively by the men in this town and Jacksonville.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 29, 1884, page 3


DISHONEST RAILROAD AGENT.
James Cunningham Confesses to Having Robbed the Medford Station.
    JACKSONVILLE, Nov. 30.--(Special.)--F. P. Hogan of Roseburg, who has already gained distinction as a detective, today added to his reputation in arresting the perpetrator of the recent robbery of Medford station. He left Jacksonville this morning to look into the matter and called on James Cunningham, the station agent, for particulars, who proceeded to give him a full account, and also a description of the supposed robber. Hogan, in a roundabout way, charged Cunningham with being the guilty person, and with burying his plunder; also advising him to make a full confession as a means of mitigating his crime. This proved to be the true theory of the affair, and completely threw Cunningham off his guard, so that he confessed and also divulged the hiding place of the money. He was brought here and is now confined in the county jail. Nearly all of the money was recovered. Hogan secured the reward of $300 offered by the railroad company.
Oregonian, Portland, December 1, 1884, page 1


A Story That Was Too Thin.
Special to Tribune ]
    ST. PAUL, Dec. 8.—Two weeks ago James Cunningham, agent for the Oregon and California Railroad Company at Medford Station, Oregon, told his employers a clever falsehood about how the office had been robbed of $1,200 by three masked men, who suddenly came into the office while he was alone, presented cocked pistols, and made him open the safe and haul out all the money. The story was very plausible, but the Company had suspicions of Cunningham. They employed a detective, who traced the crime to him, and yesterday he confessed. He said, too, he took the money and buried it, and then invented the story. All the missing money has been recovered. Cunningham is in jail. His reputation has been good, and he has enjoyed the full confidence of the Company.
Salt Lake Tribune, Utah, December 4, 1884, page 1


    CONFESSED THE ROBBERY.--James Cunningham, the station agent at Medford, has confessed to the recent robbery of the safe in the office of the depot at that place. The peculiar circumstances of the affair--the fact that there were men near the depot, within easy call, at the time, and that Cunningham did not summon them in great haste, together with other little pointers, turned suspicion upon him at first. Hogan, of Douglas County, the successful and lucky detective, looked up the case and finally, in talking with Cunningham last Sunday, charged him with the robbery and with having buried the money. This happened to be a lucky guess of Hogan's, and Cunningham, completely surprised, supposed the other had somehow learned all about the affair, and at once made a confession. He told where he had buried the money, near the depot, and there it was found, all but a small portion which he had used. Cunningham was at once arrested and lodged in the jail at Jacksonville. His disgrace will be a surprise to many. Gambling is said to have led to it. Hogan received the $300 reward offered by the railroad company.
Ashland Tidings, December 5, 1884, page 3


    A grand ball will be given at Medford on Christmas night, the proceeds of which are for the benefit of the public school. There should be a large attendance.
    The father of James Cunningham, the young man who robbed the safe at Medford, came up from his home in Linn County to Jacksonville Tuesday to give bail for the young man. He feels the disgrace of his son very deeply, and the recklessness of the young man will bring many days of heavy sorrow to a worthy and respectable family.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 5, 1884, page 3


W. F. WILLIAMSON,
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR-AT-LAW
Medford, Oregon.
All business in my line will receive prompt attention.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 6, 1884 et seq., page 2


     CONFESSED HIS GUILT.--Readers of the Sentinel will remember reading the account of the robbery of Medford railroad station not long since, James Cunningham, the agent, stating that he was forced to open the safe and deliver its contents to a masked man with cocked revolver in hand. Suspicion has rested on Mr. Cunningham ever since but not until last Sunday when F. P. Hogan approached him and accused him of the crime did he give way. After being informed that proof could be found to convict him he made a full confession stating that he done the work alone and then led the detective to a point about fifty yards from the station where he dug up the remainder of the money stolen and delivered it to Mr. Hogan. The amount was something over $100 short which Cunningham claims to have spent since the robbery. The young man was brought to Jacksonville at once and waiving an examination he was locked in jail with bonds placed at $800. On Wednesday of this week Cunningham's father arrived from Halsey, Oregon, and by depositing the required security secured his son's release. Mr. Cunningham stood high in the estimation of all who knew him and everyone was surprised when they heard of his confession. He has a sufficient amount due him from the railroad company as salary to make up the deficiency and by straightening up the account we doubt if a vigorous prosecution will be made by the company.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 6, 1884, page 3


    W. G. Kenney has leased a residence at Medford. Who's who, Bill?
    Don't fail to give Kenney & Wolters a call when you visit Medford. The boys will treat you well.
    The Christmas ball to be given at Medford for the benefit of the district school will be held in Byers' brick hall. An immense crowd is expected.
    J. M. Childers was appointed Justice of the Peace for Table Rock precinct and J. C. Slagle Constable for Medford at the last term of County Court.
    The professional card of W. F. Williamson will be found in this issue. His office will be at Medford but he will attend to any practice before the different courts of the State.
    C. K. Fronk, formerly railroad operator at Oakland, Oregon, is now in charge of the railroad station at Medford to succeed James Cunningham. W. T. Moore filled the place temporarily until the new agent arrived.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 6, 1884, page 3


MARRIED
PELTON-GANIARD--At the residence of the officiating Minister in Medford, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Dec. 3, 1884, John E. Pelton and Miss Lottie L. Ganiard.
FARRA-DEAN--In Medford, Dec. 4, 1884, by Rev. M. A. Williams, E. L. Farra and Miss Clara E. Dean.
DIED
BARR--At Medford, Nov. 23, 1884, Edgar G., son of W. H. and Nannie Barr, aged 10 years and 1 day.
Oregon Sentinel, December 6, 1884, page 3


Notice.
    A stray hog came into my enclosure some two months ago. Anyone, by paying charges and proving property, can recover it by coming to Jas. H. Barnum, Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1884, page 3


    Mrs. E. Kenny has removed to Medford.
    The Gem Saloon at Medford is second to none.
    The finest brands of wines, liquors and cigars always kept on hand at the Gem Saloon at Medford. One of the best billiard tables may also be found there. K. & W. will always give you a hearty welcome.
    Great preparations are being made for the Christmas ball at Medford, and it will no doubt be much of a success.
    Everybody gives Kenney & Wolters a call when in Medford, for they keep one of the neatest places in the State.
    Parties desiring to engage in a shooting match can be accommodated in any sum by calling at Medford for further particulars.
    Jas. Cunningham, ex-railroad agent, left for the Willamette Valley Sunday evening with his father. Many think that he will never return, but forfeit his bail and leave the State. His conduct since his release is severely criticized by the people of Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1884, page 3


DIED.
BARR--At Medford, Nov. 22d, Edgar G., son of W. H. and Nannie Barr, aged 10 years and 1 day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1884, page 3


A Bilk on His Travels.
    A fellow sailing under the name of Cannon has been bilking the citizens of Ashland and Medford. He represented himself as a land buyer, but turned out a horse thief, as he rode off one of Lewellen & Lynch's horses under false pretenses. He was subsequently stopped at Henley on a telegram from J. Houck of Ashland, to whom he owned a considerable board bill. The horse was recovered at Mr. H.'s place, where Cannon put up for the night, the man in charge having been posted. As yet the swindler has not been brought back, and may escape entirely through the law's delay.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1884, page 3


    WANT TO BUY WHEAT.--Messrs. Angle & Plymale, of Medford, are agents for Portland grain merchants who want to buy a quantity of Rogue River wheat for milling purposes, and who offer better prices than are paid at some points in the upper Willamette Valley. During this week Angle & Plymale will pay 52½ cts a bushel for good merchantable wheat, sacked and delivered on board the cars at any sidetrack in the valley. Whether the prices will hold good after this week is not yet announced.
Ashland Tidings, December 12, 1884, page 3


    C. K. Fronk, formerly at the Oakland station, is in charge of the railroad office at Medford.
    Cannon, the bilk who undertook to ride one of the Medford livery horses out of the state, escaped the clutches of the law. A Siskiyou County officer offered to bring him to the state line for $100, but no one wanted to pay so much for him, and he was allowed to escape.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 12, 1884, page 3


    Rev. E. R. Geary of Eugene City paid his son, Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, a brief visit last week. He is a brother of ex-Governor Geary of Pennsylvania and one of the ablest and most cultured divines in the state.

Ashland House hotel, circa 1880, J. W. Riggs
The Ashland House hotel, circa 1880.
    Mr. John Pelton and Miss Lottie Ganiard, of Sams Valley, were married at Medford on Wednesday of last week, and were in Ashland the next day for a short time, taking dinner at the Ashland House. They are both well known over the valley and have many friends to wish them a happy and prosperous future. On the same day another bridal couple from down the valley, Mr. E. L. Farra and bride, also took dinner at Houck's.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 12, 1884, page 3


    F. P. Hogan of Roseburg has secured the man who robbed Medford station, Jackson County. He talked with Cunningham, the station agent, charged him with the theft and made him own up to it and dig up the money. Hogan gets $300 of the railroad company.

Willamette Farmer, Salem, December 12, 1884, page 6



    Mrs. Elizabeth Kenny is now a resident of Medford.
    The benefit ball for the district school at Medford promises to be a grand affair and everybody is going.
    The Gem Saloon at Medford, Kenney & Wolters proprietors, is the boss place. A club room, fine billiard table and all the late papers of the day can be found at this place.
    The Medford Aid Society will give their first social Tuesday evening. Dec. 16, at Byers Hall. Literary exercises, refreshments and a pleasant time generally may be expected. All are cordially invited.
    The railroad company have granted Southern Oregon a favor by running freight trains through to Ashland three times each week--an increase of one trip per week. The schedule has not yet been announced, but it is likely that the freight from Portland will be due at Medford on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 13, 1884, page 3


Sorrow of Cunningham's Parents.
HALSEY, December 12.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE OREGONIAN:
    It is to be hoped that the readers of the communication from your correspondent in relation to the arrest of James Cunningham for robbery at Medford may not draw the inference that the crime was due to improper parental training. Such a conclusion would be erroneous, for here, where the parents of young Cunningham reside, they are held in the highest esteem for unimpeachable honesty and virtue; and their efforts to raise their children with the same regard for strict probity was considered assured until this misfortune occurred. James was always dutiful and affectionate to this father and mother, and looked upon by his acquaintances as a young man of inflexible integrity. He is now here, having been released from imprisonment on bonds, and manifests much contrition for having yielded to the temptation to commit a breach of confidence. The family is overwhelmed by the calamity, especially the mother, whose grief is most poignant. They are commiserated by this entire community.
    Yours truly,                                                                                 J. T. WOLFE.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1884, page 2


Settle Up.
    This is to notify all persons indebted to the undersigned, either by note or book account, that a settlement must be had by Dec. 25, 1884, without fail. I mean business.
C. W. BROBACK
    Medford, Dec. 1, 1884.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1884, page 2


Trains Delayed.
    The late storms seem to have been more severe in the Willamette and Umpqua valleys than here and did some damage there. A few feet of snow is said to have fallen in different portions of the country north of Roseburg, and was washed off by a heavy rain, producing a great deal of water. No trains have run south of Oakland since Sunday, though one passed there yesterday at about noon and was expected to arrive at Medford late last night. As considerable damage was done to the railroad track, should we have a wetter winter than those during the past few years, frequent interruption of the passenger and mail service may be looked for. Of all the poorly constructed roads in the United States the O.&C. is one of the worst.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1884, page 3


    Barnum & Co. of Medford have got their steam planing mill in running order.
    Christmas goods in large quantities at F. B. Voorhies' variety store in Medford.
    G. W. Williams has commenced building his proposed two-story house at Medford.
    The Corvallis Gazette says James Cunningham, former O.&C. station agent at Medford, "will not be prosecuted very hard."
    The Gem at Medford has no superior among the saloons of southern Oregon. Only the best wines, liquors and cigars kept there.
    An owner was soon found for the stray animal advertised in last week's Times by Jas. H. Barnum of Medford. There is nothing like advertising.
    Why is the Gem Saloon the most popular place in Medford? Because everybody who visits that place calls there when in quest of liquid refreshments.
    J. S. Howard of Medford went to Ashland on Tuesday's freight train and brought down the mail from California which had accumulated there.
    The Medford Aid Society held its first social at Byers' hall last Tuesday evening. An interesting program was presented and quite a number partook of the excellent refreshments served.
    A. L. Johnson of Medford informs us that a Mr. Baker, lately from Los Angeles, Cal., has bought the lot north of Noland & Ulrich's saloon and will soon erect a large hotel at that place.
    There will be some Christmas sports at Medford, including a grand ball in the evening for the benefit of the schoolhouse. Everything will be done to ensure a first-class time at the party.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1884, page 3
 

Medford Correspondence.
MEDFORD, Or., Dec. 16, 1884
    Mr. Editor.--Allow me to say that the long needed rain has come at last, and along with it has come Medford's second lawsuit. Wm. Edwards plaintiff, Riley Cummings defendant; cause, failure of defendant to pay rent and heading and threshing bill. Court is in session at the present time with Esq. Barkdull on the bench. W. F. Williams is attorney for plaintiff, A. L. Johnson for defendant. Lively skirmishing this forenoon between the two representatives of the law.
    The residence of J. R. Tice had a narrow escape from fire a few days ago. The flames were extinguished with considerable difficulty by the family.
    No road to Jacksonville yet. There are two or three men in this place that have just sense enough to think that we should build two miles of new road chiefly for the benefit of Mr. Beekman and Mr. Mingus, while there are quite a number in the road district who haven't any more sense than to think that by building five-eighths of a mile of new road and making the distance only about three hundred yards farther from here to Jacksonville the county would accommodate a large number of farmers and the road would answer every purpose; would be much cheaper and take less labor. Consequently there is considerable sparring between the two factions. After the appraisers made their report, which allowed $540 on the two-mile line and $650 on the five-eighths of a mile line, those who were in favor of the shortest new line and least expense filed a motion to set the report aside, claiming it was entirely a one-sided thing. Court refused to take action on said motion until the January term. However we shall see what we shall see when the right time comes.
           Yours truly,
SUBSCRIBER
Ashland Tidings, December 19, 1884, page 2
 

    Business is exceedingly dull with the O.&C.R.R. just now, and the managers are cutting down expenses in every possible way, the force of employees being reduced to some extent. At the Ashland depot Mr. Kane has the privilege of transacting all the business, Mr. Rice being out for the present.
    The regular freight train on the O.&C.R.R. is run now as follows: On every alternate week but one train runs each way, arriving in Ashland on Wednesday, and starting northward again at 6 a.m. Thursday morning. The next week two trains are run--one arriving here on Tuesday, the other on Friday, and thus each alternate week.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 19, 1884, page 3


    Last week it was stated that "Mr. D. Lawton of Medford" has removed to San Francisco. It should have read D. Lawton, of Yreka. Mr. R. T. Lawton of Medford, the real estate agent, has no intention of leaving that place.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 19, 1884, page 3


    In the matter of the petition of C. W. Broback and others for a road between Jacksonville and Medford. Consideration of motion is set aside, the viewers of damages set for the January term. . . . In the matter of I. Woolf and others for a road between Jacksonville and Medford. Same as above. . . .

"County Commissioners' Court," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 20, 1884, page 3



    Kenney & Wolters are going to give a fine lunch at their saloon in Medford Christmas eve. Don't be afraid to call because there will be enough for all.
    Several from here will attend the Christmas ball at Medford next Thursday night, to be given as a benefit for their district school. Good music and supper will be furnished with tickets at $2.50 each.
    J. S. Howard of Medford done the people of this place a kindly act by going to Ashland on the freight train and bringing back the accumulated mail that had been gathered there during the blockade.
    Fifteen thousand pounds of flour was shipped to Medford from Karewski's mill yesterday and another large lot went to Redding this week. This flour is the best in the market and commands a ready sale.
    Angle & Plymale of Medford are offering 52½ cents per bushel for good merchantable wheat delivered at any place in the valley where it can be loaded on the cars. They are also selling goods as cheap as ever.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 20, 1884, page 3


    C. B. Tuttle of Medford has been at Portland.
    The residence of J. R. Tice, near Medford, had a narrow escape from fire a few days ago. The flames were extinguished with considerable difficulty by the family.
    We learn that Wm. G. Kenney of Medford was married to Miss Mollie Snider of Roseburg this week. We congratulate them and wish them a long and prosperous life.
    Cannon, the bilk who undertook to ride one of the Medford livery horses out of the State, escaped the clutches of the law. A Siskiyou officer offered to bring him to the State line for $100, but no one wanted to pay so much.
    A. L. Johnson, land agent at Medford, has sold 73 acres of land near that place for C. C. Beekman to a newcomer named Galloway at $15 an acre. He also sold W. H. Jacks' place on Sticky to the same party for $2,500, also seven acres for C. C. Beekman to M. E. Dougherty for $250.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1884, page 3


    Barney O'Neil of Medford precinct made us a call Saturday. He is one of the most enterprising farmers in the valley.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1884, page 3
 

    Mrs. E. Kenny has removed from Jacksonville to Medford.
    Wm. Kinney, of Medford, was married at Roseburg last Tuesday to Miss Mollie Ryder, of that place. They came south to Medford on the train the same day.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 26, 1884, page 3
 

Medford Correspondence
(Delayed correspondence of last week.)
    The new planing mill has been running about ten days.
    From one to three carloads of hogs per week are shipped from this place.
    Quite a number of farmers are selling wheat to a party who is shipping to Portland; 52½ cts. is the price paid.
    Mr. Thos. McAndrew has let the contract for a new business building opposite Lynch & Llewellyn's livery barn. Charles Skeel is the builder.
    The sociable was well attended, considering the rainy weather, and all present appeared to enjoy the event.
    There will be a Christmas tree at Byar's Hall Christmas Eve. A good time is expected and all are cordially invited to attend.
    G. W. Williams has the foundation laid for a business house and hall on Main Street; dimension 50x90. Mr. Williams is an energetic businessman and will have a good building when completed.
    We are frequently asked: "How old is Medford?" When told it is one year, people are much surprised. We do not wonder at them, for on looking over the new town we find more than one hundred and ten business and dwelling houses completed, and more under construction, while the number of inhabitants is 400.
                  X.
Ashland Tidings, December 26, 1884, page 3


     HYMENEAL.--W. G. Kenney of Medford and Miss Mollie Snider of Roseburg were married at the bride's residence at the last mentioned place on Tuesday of this week. They are now at Medford where Mr. Kenney is engaged in business where they will make their permanent home. We wish them good luck and happiness.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 27, 1884, page 3


    Drinks are free at the Gem Saloon at Medford. Congratulate Kenney and he don't care for expenses.
    A. L. Johnson land agent at Medford has sold considerable farming property within the last week and says there is a good demand for farms at all times.
    Angle & Plymale of Medford are enlarging their merchandise business and also shipping grain and produce of all kinds to the Portland market. They are enterprising men, and are meeting with deserved success.
    Medford is going to start a newspaper in a short time which will probably be the long talked-of organ of the disaffected democracy or independent in politics. The proprietors are the substantial moneyed men of the interior of the valley and they will undoubtedly make a success of it. The more the merrier.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 27, 1884, page 3



Last revised July 8, 2016
For more complete names of persons identified by initials, see the Index.