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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Medford News: 1885

Only two issues of a Medford newspaper from 1885 survive. Below are Medford-related news items from 1885, mostly gleaned from other towns' papers. Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.



    Medford is a new railroad town near the center of the valley. Although only a year old it has a population of about 400, and considerable trade.
The Rogue River Valley [and] Southern Oregon, brochure, Ashland Tidings and Newspaper Job Printing Office, 1885


Ahead of All Others.
    The Christmas party at Medford was the most successful given in the county during the holidays. Nearly ninety tickets were sold, and the schoolhouse building fund, for the benefit of which it was given, was enriched by a neat sum. Excellent music was furnished by Wilson's string band, and the supper provided by J. W. Cunningham of the Empire Hotel could not have been surpassed. Everything passed off finely. The managers are to be congratulated on their success.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1885, page 3


    Medford claims to have over 100 buildings and about 400 inhabitants.
    Medford had its Christmas tree festivities, which passed off in fine style.
    Chas. Skeel has taken the contract to build a business place for Thos. McAndrew at Medford.
    The citizens of Medford, at a meeting held Tuesday evening, decided to have their town incorporate. This is a good idea.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1885, page 3


    Geo. W. Fordyce of Medford precinct is again suffering with a malignant tumor in his throat.
    R. G. Scroggs, Jr., formerly of this place, is in the valley on a visit. He is residing at Roseburg at present.
    C. Mingus, one of the most substantial and enterprising farmers in the valley, made us a call Monday. He has been a subscriber to the Times since it started fourteen years ago, and when it was only half its present size.
    From J. S. Howard, postmaster of Medford, we learn that the mails from California come by steamer, via Portland, at present, an immense slide on the Central Pacific having blockaded transportation on a portion of that road for several days past. Six tons of mail came that way on the last steamer.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1885, page 3


Look Out for Him.
    T. Shattuck, Esq., well-known magician and ventriloquist, will give one of his interesting performances at Medford on the evening of the 9th and at this place on the 10th. The many who have seen Prof. Shattuck's performances agree that they are second to none ever given in southern Oregon. Those who desire to attend a first-class entertainment should not fail to see him.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1885, page 3


BORN.
CUMMONS--In Medford precinct, Dec. 22, 1884, to Mrs. and Mrs. W. R. Cummons, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1885, page 3


THE PAST YEAR.
    The year just ended has brought many changes to the Rogue River Valley, and especially to the town of Ashland. On the 1st of January, 1884, the town contained about a thousand inhabitants. It had then a record of quiet, steady growth and progressive spirit (for an Oregon town), but the twelvemonth which has elapsed since that time has been one of such rapid development that it makes the previous years appear sleepy and slow in contrast. The awakening came with the railroad. The work of its construction, and the business appertaining to the operating terminus of the railroad, brought many people hither, some of them to stay. The money expended in our community by the railroad company has greatly stimulated enterprise and aided improvement. Some of the rush of business and the opportunities for community profit involved in this may, it is true, be considered temporary. The teaming from the southward accessory to the location here of the terminus will be discontinued upon the completion of the railroad to a junction with the line from San Francisco, and when construction work is entirely completed a profitable home market for the labor and produce of our valley, enjoyed during the past two years, will be closed. But, without losing sight of these facts, we can seen an incalculable gain, solid and permanent, to our town and valley, from the advent of the railroad. The railroad opens new avenues of business and opportunity for the support of a much larger population in our county, and at the same time increases proportionately the attraction for immigration. Oregon's population will receive large additions from the eastern states during the next decade, and the Rogue River Valley is now prepared to secure its due proportion of the increase. Many of the improvements in our town and in other parts of the county within the past year are directly the work of enterprising new settlers who have come with the railroad. We have room in Southern Oregon for many of these people, and are glad to chronicle as one of the most encouraging improvements during 1884 the spirit of enterprise and progress which have come with the newcomers. It is encouraging to older residents to find that the railroad has brought us a good class of settlers, with enterprise and capital, and the fact of such people coming here to cast their lot among us strengthens our faith in the resources and prospects of the valley which we have all found to be so pleasant and comfortable a corner of the world for a home.
    Within the year we have seen what is practically the inauguration of a most important industry in Jackson County, and may in time become the leading industry, viz: the raising of fruit for exportation. Since the settlement of Southern Oregon the Rogue River Valley has been noted for its fine fruit, and has sold some of its apples and pears and peaches to the people of the sagebrush country just across the mountains. An insignificant quantity of dried apples and pears (mostly sun-dried) has been annually sent out of the county, also, for a number of years, but the idea of making a business of fruit raising exclusively was not entertained here at all until the extension of the railroad opened an avenue to a larger market. What little surplus of peaches there was from the old orchards last summer found a ready sale at good prices, and the shipping of green fruit from our valley to the Willamette market was thus first begun in this eventful year. The drying of fruits has also been begun upon a larger scale than ever before, and at Phoenix we have a cider and jelly factory, opened a few months ago, which has made use of a considerable quantity of the orchard waste that always excites comment from strangers. Within the past two seasons thousands of fruit trees have been planted in the valley, and in the vicinity of Ashland a number of five- and ten-acre tracts are being turned from brush patches into fruit farms, so that within two years more, when the young trees begin to yield, the exportation of peaches alone will be a source of no inconsiderable income to Jackson County. One gentleman who watched the business carefully last summer discovered that the sale of peaches during the best ripening season brought into Ashland at least sixty dollars a day. This when it seemed as if there were almost none at all to sell.
    In the farming industry an improvement is remarked by many in the direction of diversification of crops. The tendency in some localities is toward mixed farming and a better utilization of the resources of small tracts of land. Good crops of hay and grain were harvested, but low prices induced many farmers to feed rather than sell to the millers, and the result is a much larger exportation of live hogs and bacon than ever before--a prospect of at least supplying the home demand for bacon. There is no reason why Rogue River Valley should not export large quantities of No. 1 bacon every year, and it is to be hoped that this year's experience will be but the beginning of a large trade in this line. The first exportation of wheat may be mentioned, also, as one of the events of the year. Agents of Portland millers have bought several carloads of Rogue River wheat for extra-fine flour, and pronounce it worth a little more for some uses than the famed Willamette wheat. (Neither is worth very much per bushel this year.)
    It is a safe estimate that the population of Jackson County has increased one-fourth during the past year. In June, 1882, it was a little over 8000, figuring five persons to the voter, and by the vote in November last we find it to have reached 11,400, estimated from the same basis, and there were undoubtedly many newcomers this fall who had not been in the state long enough to entitle them to vote here on last election day. By far the greater portion of this increase of over 3000 has been attained within the year 1884, so we are in no danger of an overestimate in calling the gain in population since Jan. 1, 1884, at least one-fourth of the number here at that time. Nearly every part of the county has felt the benefit of this immigration. Farms have been divided and improvements increased upon every hand. New towns and villages have grown to respectable proportions, and the older places have generally increased in size and prosperity.

    In the center of the valley the town of Medford, which began its growth in the early spring, has now, it is claimed, 400 inhabitants. The town was laid off on land owned by Messrs. C. C. Beekman, C. W. Broback, [I.] J. Phipps and C. Mingus, and, in consideration of the location of the central depot for the valley, the O.&C.R.R. Co. was given a deed to one-half the town site. The place has grown constantly and rapidly since it was first surveyed, and its record of over a hundred buildings erected within less than a year is something of which its citizens may well feel proud.
    Grants Pass (the new town) in the extreme northern part of the county, is also a railroad product. It is the end of one division of the railroad, and has the repair shops and a roundhouse. It is the railroad depot for Josephine County, and is already an important business point. Within the past three or four months some thirty or forty dwellings have been erected there, and these, added to the other dwellings and the business houses, make a town of considerable size. Gold Hill and Talent, both on the railroad, have also made a good start for business points. Phoenix records some improvement, and Eagle Point has kept pace in advancement with the settlement of the Butte Creek Valley, of which it is the thriving business center.
Ashland Tidings, January 2, 1885, page 1


W. F. WILLIAMSON
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR-AT-LAW
MEDFORD, OREGON.
All business in my line will receive prompt attention.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 3, 1885 et seq., page 1


A. L. JOHNSON
Notary Public, Real Estate Agent and Collector
Medford, O.
    I make conveyancing and furnishing abstracts of land titles a specialty. Loans negotiated and collections made. All business entrusted to my care will receive prompt and careful attention.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 3, 1885 et seq., page 1


E. P. GEARY, M.D.
Physician & Surgeon.
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Office in A. L. Johnson's building.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 3, 1885 et seq., page 1


MARTIN VROOMAN, M.D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Calls promptly attended to at all hours.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 3, 1885 et seq., page 1


    Thos. McAndrew talks of going into business at Medford. Success to him.
    A newspaper is soon to be started at Medford with R. G. Scroggs in charge. It will be independent in politics and we wish it success.
    Medford will apply to the Legislature to be incorporated as a city at the coming session of that body. They claim over 400 inhabitants now and their wishes should be granted.
    James T. Guerin and Wm. Huggins returned from Crescent City Thursday night, having completed the plastering on the new courthouse for Del Norte County. Mr. Byers will also return in a few days.
    Residents of Medford hung up purses for horse races on New Year's Day. Several fast nags were catered for the different races, and each horse was made to do his best. Several from here attended.
    The finest brands of wines, liquors and cigars always kept on hand at the Gem Saloon at Medford. One of the best billiard tables may also be found there. K. & W. will always give you a hearty welcome.
    Ninety tickets were sold at the Christmas ball at Medford for the benefit of the district school. The object was a worthy one, and those who had the management deserve praise for the success they made of it.
    W. G. Kenney and wife came up from Medford Tuesday night, and this being their first visit to Jacksonville since their marriage the Jacksonville Silver Cornet Band gave them a serenade at the residence of Thos. J. Kenney.
    Our genial friend W. G. Kenney of Medford and his handsome bride paid Jacksonville a visit on Tuesday evening last, and were tendered an impromptu reception at the residence of his brother T. J. Kenney where a large number of his old-time friends called to extend congratulations and to greet for the first time the fair bride, who had so successfully laid siege to the hitherto unsusceptible heart of the gallant William. The Silver Cornet Band tendered them a serenade during the evening and all were invited to partake of delicious refreshments. Mr. Kenney was at his best, his face beaming with smiles, but united with the air of the conscious conqueror you could plainly see the subdued weakness of the willing captive, and we join with a host of friends in wishing the happy couple a long and prosperous voyage on the blissful sea of matrimony and that the captain and his mate may guide their ship, freighted with a lifetime of weal or woe, into a calm and peaceful haven.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 3, 1885, page 3


    BORN
CUMMONS--In Medford precinct, Dec. 22, 1884, to Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Cummons, a daughter.
Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, January 3, 1885, page 3


    We learn that a grist mill will be started at Medford during the coming summer.
    A shooting match for a purse of $25 will take place at Medford today. Excellent sport is promised.
    G. Karewski recently shipped a large quantity of his superior flour to Medford, where it has a good sale.
    The county commissioners' court this week granted liquor licenses to Kenney & Wolters of Medford and M. Hershberger of Central Point.   
    G. W. Hoover will leave Phoenix soon and locate at Medford. He is an excellent tinner and will carry a good stock of articles in his line.
    The New Year's races at Medford were fairly attended and resulted in a victory for Thos. Miles' "Scamperdown" mare and sorrel horse, they winning all the purses.
    Robt. G. Scroggs, Jr., of Roseburg intends to commence the publication of a paper at Medford in the near future. "The more the merrier," and we extend our [hand] to the new candidate, hoping that his hopes may be realized.
    Considerable opposition to the incorporation of Medford is manifested by some of its residents. These . . . claim to incorporate the town would injure instead of benefit it, and they expect that the legislature will kill this incorporation scheme.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1885, page 3


Medford Items.
MEDFORD, Or., Jan. 5th, 1885.       
    Mr. EDITOR:--
    The holidays have come and gone, and we have settled down to our everyday business, after having lots of good times.
    First in order was the Christmas tree at Byers' hall on Christmas Eve. It was well attended, the hall being literally packed. The programme was good and well carried out, and the trees (two in number) were loaded down with valuable and useful presents. Santa Claus made his appearance, to the great delight of the little folks, who each and every one got a package of candy, if nothing more.
    On Christmas night a ball was given at Byers' Hall for the benefit of our new school house. Between 80 and 90 tickets were sold. Music was furnished by Wilson's quadrille band, and supper by A. E. Woods, of the Central Hotel. Take it all round, it was one of the most enjoyable and best conducted affairs that your correspondent ever witnessed.
    On New Year's Eve the young folks gave R. Worth a surprise party and danced for several hours. All enjoyed themselves, and none more so than our host.
    On New Year's Day we had two horse races; the first prize in each race was carried off by Mr. Miles.
    But all these things are eclipsed by the excitement caused by the citizens of this place making an effort to incorporate the town. There has been a petition circulated here for that purpose and a large number of subscribers procured. In fact nearly all of our best, law-abiding and good-order-loving citizens have signed the petition. Of course, there is a remonstrance.
        Respectfully Yours,
                SUBSCRIBER.
Ashland Tidings, January 9, 1885, page 3


BORN
CUMMONS--In Medford precinct, Dec. 22, 1884, to Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Cummons, a daughter.
Ashland Tidings, January 9, 1885


    THAT STRAIGHT ROAD.--For some time past citizens of Medford have been making efforts to get a straight road to Jacksonville whereby the distance between the two places would be considerably shortened. It seems, however, that different parties want different routes and for this reason the county court again postponed the matter for the second time, appointing a new board of viewers to assess damages as follows: W. B. Kincaid, Fred Barneburg and M. Peterson. They will report at the February term when some action will probably be taken. Our idea, personally speaking, would be to leave the old road as it is to a point beyond the Ish bridge and from there build a new road in an air line to Medford. The road from here to the Ish bridge is one of the best in the country at all seasons of the year and to change it to a quagmire of black sticky seems to us ridiculous. A good road could be made from the point mentioned to Medford at small cost and with the good road on this end and in the winter or any other season of the year a team could make the trip between the two places in less time than by any other "straight road." We hope the viewers and the county court will fully investigate this before deciding.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 10, 1885, page 3


    We are under obligation to Prof. McGinnis for the report of the Teacher's Institute.
    Mrs. Ulrich has gone to Medford to remain a short time, thinking a change might benefit her failing health.
    M. Hershberger of Central Point and Kenney & Wolters of Medford received county license to sell liquors this week.
    George W. Fordyce, an old resident of this valley, died at his home near Medford yesterday afternoon after a lingering illness.
     Dr. Will Jackson will go to Medford today to remain ten days. Anyone needing dental work should give him a call as he is a first-class workman.
    A meeting of the citizens of Medford was held at that place one night this week to take preliminary steps for incorporating the town. The residents are divided on this point and when a vote was taken those opposed to incorporating carried the day by a small majority. Most of the substantial businessmen there are said to be opposed to incorporating but for what reason we have not yet learned. As things now appear the whole matter will be dropped.
    Two of the Redfield brothers took the first two prizes at the shooting match held at Medford yesterday. A large crowd was in attendance and considerable interest was manifested by all present.
    A shooting affray occurred at Medford about twelve o'clock last night when Wm. G. Kenney shot and seriously wounded a man named Walker. Our informant states that Kenney put Walker out of his saloon for being disorderly when the latter returned with a knife in hand and the above is the result. Before this Walker had a row with Wm. Heffron in which he chawed off the latter's finger and bit a piece out of his cheek.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 10, 1885, page 3


    Medford, the rising town of Southern Oregon, will make application to the legislature to be incorporated as a city.
"Brief Mention," Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 14, 1885, page 3


No Shooting Done.
    Last Friday night there was a free fight at Medford, which resulted in several of the combatants being knocked out. A carpenter named Walker was the victor, until he undertook to demolish one of the proprietors of the Gem Saloon, who was acting in the role of peacemaker. He received an ugly wound in the head at the hands of W. G. [Kenney], who struck him with a self-cocking pistol that went off at the same time. Wm. Heffron of Roseburg, one of the combatants, had the index finger of his right hand so badly bitten by Walker that Dr. Geary was compelled to amputate it, and his cheek also suffered the loss of a piece of flesh. At last accounts Walker was at work at his trade, but little the worse for his exploits.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1885, page 3


Another Pioneer Gone.
    We are sorry to announce the death of Geo. W. Fordyce, a respected pioneer of southern Oregon, which took place at his residence near Medford last Friday. For some time past he has been suffering with a tumor in his throat, which was operated on several months ago, but finally resulted fatally. Mr. Fordyce was an upright, enterprising citizen, whose demise will be generally regretted. He leaves a family and a large circle of friends.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1885, page 3


    Winter fights are in full blossom everywhere.
    The tramp nuisance is becoming intolerable. Look out for those fellows.
    F. B. Voorhies of Medford has sold his variety store to Mr. Dougherty, lately from Polk County.
    The shooting match at Medford last Friday attracted a fair attendance. Two of the Redfield brothers carried off the principal prizes.
    A fine invoice lot of Royal St. John and New Home sewing machines at Johnson's land office in Medford. Will exchange for hay, grain or $20 pieces.
    A number of schoolboys are playing truant here of late. Some of them were seen at Medford during school hours.--Their cases should be attended to at once.
    Prof. Shattuck, the well-known magician and ventriloquist, performed at Grants Pass and Medford last week to good houses. He will appear at Ashland, Phoenix, Sams Valley and Eagle Point during the present month. He should be greeted by large audiences, as his entertainments merit liberal patronage.
    A number of drunken rowdies sought to raise a disturbance at the entertainment given at Medford by Prof. Shattuck last Friday evening, but they saw such rough treatment in store for them that they desisted after having nearly broken down the door of the building. They should be arrested for this disturbance of the peace and may be yet.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1885, page 3


DIED.
FORDYCE--Near Medford, Jan. 9th, George W. Fordyce; aged about 45 years.
JOHNSTON--At Medford, Jan. 8th, Miss Johnston, daughter of the late I. H. Johnston; aged about 15 years.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1885, page 3


DIED
FORDYCE--At his home in Medford precinct, Jan. 8th, 1885, George W. Fordyce, aged 44 years and ten months.
Ashland Tidings, January 16, 1885


    THE MEDFORD ROAD.--The Sentinel of last week had the following concerning the road wanted between Medford and Jacksonville: "For some time past citizens of Medford have been making efforts to get a straight road to Jacksonville whereby the distance between the two places would be considerably shortened. It seems, however, that different parties want different routes, and for this reason the county court again postponed the matter for the second time, appointing a new board of viewers to assess damages as follows: W. B. Kincaid, Fred Barneburg and M. Peterson. They will report at the February term, when some action will probably be taken. Our idea, personally speaking, would be to leave the old road as it is to a point beyond the Ish bridge and from there build a new road in an air line to Medford. The road from here to the Ish bridge is one of the best in the county at all seasons of the year, and to change it to a quagmire of black sticky seems to us ridiculous. A good road could be made from the point mentioned to Medford at small cost, and with the good road on this end and in the winter or any other season of the year a team could make the trip between the two places in less time than by any other 'straight road.' We hope the viewers and the county court will fully investigate this before deciding."
Ashland Tidings, January 16, 1885, page 3


    A GOOD MAN GONE.--George W. Fordyce, an early pioneer and one of the most respected citizens of the valley, died last Thursday evening at his home in Medford precinct. For a number of weeks he had suffered intensely from the cancerous tumor which destroyed his life, and, knowing there was no hope of cure, or even relief, he had more than once expressed a wish for the end to come, when he would be sure of rest and release from pain. It is more than a year since the tumor in his neck first began to increase in size rapidly, but it soon reached such a state that he decided to have it removed, if possible. The best surgical skill of the valley was summoned, and the operation performed, but it was found that the tumor was a sycoma too deeply seated to admit of entire removal. The surgeons gave temporary relief, but could give no hope of cure, knowing that its malignant growth would continue. Soon its alarming increase in size reappeared, and about three weeks prior to the end, the effects of the tumor appeared in the interior of the throat and caused severe and constant pain. It next became impossible for him to take nourishment, and the strength and vitality of his powerful constitution were finally exhausted. His mind was clear to within a short time of the end, and, after the great suffering, death came quietly at last. The funeral was on Saturday afternoon, the burial being at the Hargadine graveyard, north of Ashland. The services were conducted by Rev. J. V. Milligan, of Ashland, and large numbers of old friends and neighbors of this place, as well as from other parts of the valley, gathered to pay their last tribute of respect to the departed.
    George W. Fordyce was born in VanBuren County, Iowa, in March, 1840, and when twelve years of age made the journey across the plains with his parents, arriving in this valley about the middle of August, 1853. His introduction to Oregon life was characteristic of pioneer adventure. At daylight on the morning after the first night's camp in Rogue River Valley, he saw his father shot twice and two traveling companions killed by the Rogue River Indians in the memorable episode at the fort on the Smith and Dunn claims. His father recovered from the wounds and settled upon the place south of Ashland which is still in his name. Here George remained most of the time till the year 1867 or '68, when he located on the stock ranch at the Cove, in the Cascade Mountains, where he lived and prospered until about three years ago, when he disposed of the ranch in order to remove his family to some place less isolated from society and more convenient to school advantages. After looking through the Willamette Valley and other parts of the state, he concluded he could find no better place for a home than this valley, and purchased the farm in Medford precinct where he has since resided. When 23 years of age he wedded Miss Ann Mickelson, who, with their three children, a daughter and two sons, is left to bear the burden of the heaviest affliction life can yield.
    The loss of an honest, honorable, industrious and useful citizen, such as Mr. Fordyce was, is a misfortune to the community, and his untimely end, in the prime and vigor of an active life, is keenly mourned by hosts of friends outside of the home circle so sadly bereft of his kindly presence and watchful care. He leaves a record of a well-spent life, which should entitle him to the best which the unknown future has in store for the "faithful servant."
Ashland Tidings, January 16, 1885


    A MISTAKE.--The report that W. G. Kenney had shot a man at Medford last week was all a mistake. A general row had taken place between several parties that evening when Kenney was called from his bed to quell the disturbance and with the force required he put the disturbing party out of the house. Wm. Heffron had to have a portion of a finger amputated--the result of a fight a short time before with the same party--but is now doing well. The whole trouble was caused by "too much benzine."
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 17, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Will Jackson is still at Medford.
    Tramps are numerous; so are muddy roads.
    Medford began school last Monday in its new school house with a good attendance. W. S. Gore is teacher.
    Mr. Williams of Medford will build a brick building instead of the frame one he began there and it will be same size as frame--50x90.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 17, 1885, page 3


    The new Medford paper will be called the Mirror.
    George W. Fordyce, an Oregon pioneer of 1853, died at Medford January 8.
    William Taylor, son of Clark Taylor of Eden precinct, Jackson County, killed an immense gray eagle on his father's place one day last week. It measured eight feet and six inches between the tips of its extended wings.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, January 20, 1885, page 4


    M. A. McGinnis and others paid the Schumpf ledge in Willow Springs precinct a visit last Tuesday. Mr. M. is of the opinion that a well-defined ledge of considerable size exists, but how rich the quartz is must be determined by a practical test.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, January 23, 1885, page 2


For Sale.
    Superior brick in quantities to suit. For further particulars enquire of J. S. Howard, postmaster, or the undersigned.
BYERS & GUERIN, Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1885, page 3


    Fish are running up Bear Creek and are in fine condition.
    G. W. Hoover has moved his stock of tinware, etc., to Medford.
    The Medford planing mill is receiving considerable lumber from Parks' sawmill.
    A. L. Johnson has opened a livery stable at Medford and expects to do an extensive business.
    Studies were commenced in the new schoolhouse at Medford last week with Walter Gore in charge.
    The Medford A.O.U.W. lodge meets every other Saturday. It is steadily increasing in membership.
    G. W. Williams of Medford will not erect his large building until spring, and may use brick instead of lumber.
    We are informed that the proprietors of the Oakland, Or. foundry will move it to Medford in a short time.
    Jas. Priddy, of Medford precinct, who has been quite sick, has sufficiently recovered to pay Jacksonville a visit.
    Mrs. F. Ball, residing on the old Justus place, near Medford, lost one of her younger children last Friday by diphtheria.
    The movement to incorporate Medford is growing in favor, we are informed, and application may yet be made to the legislature for an incorporation act.
    T. J. Kenney and Ed. Helms have purchased M. Rodgers' stock of saddles, harness, etc., at Medford, and took possession this week. The latter will be in charge of the new stand, Tom remaining in Jacksonville.
    A Chinese row took place at Medford Wednesday, and one of the contestants was cut about the throat. He had the other arrested and brought before Justice Barkdull, who discharged him after hearing the evidence.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1885, page 3


    F. B. Voorhies and family, lately of Medford, have returned to San Francisco.
    R. G. Scroggs, Jr., proposes to commence the publication of the Medford Mirror in a short time.
    F. L. Cranfill is in charge of Henry Smith's store and lumber yard at Medford and is proving a popular manager thereof.
    Jesse Richardson of Medford precinct, who has been paying the old folks in Missouri a visit, has returned home well pleased with his trip.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1885, page 3


    MEDFORD ITEMS.--Isaac Woolf, of Medford, was in town Wednesday and favored us with the following items of news from that place:
    Building still continues, and the people are expecting a large increase in the population of the town during the present year.
    Barnum & Sons are putting up three dwelling houses for rent, opposite their planing mill in the eastern part of town.
    Hoover Bros., who are preparing to move their tinning business from Phoenix, are building a shop on Main Street near the livery stable.
    A gentleman named Baker, recently from Los Angeles, Cal., is putting up a dwelling house north of the Central Hotel.
    Another gentleman, named Maule, a painter, a new arrival from Cleveland, Ohio, is building a dwelling house on 6th Street.
    F. B. Voorhies has sold his variety and notion store to Dougherty & Churchman, and has removed with his family to San Francisco.
    Thos. Kenney, of Jacksonville, has bought the harness and saddlery business of Mr. Rodgers, and Ed. Helms now has charge of the shop for him.
    There are 160 children of school age in Medford district. School has opened in the new school house with Mr. W. S. Gore as principal and Miss May Crain, assistant teacher.
    The proprietors of the Oakland Iron Foundry talk of removing their business to Medford.
    An effort will be made by a number of citizens who own adjacent lots to unite in building a block of brick stores during the coming season.
Ashland Tidings, January 23, 1885, page 3


    NEW FIRM.--Thos. J. Kenney and Ed. Helms have formed a partnership and bought out Rodgers' harness and saddler shop at Medford, taking charge this week. Mr. Helms runs the Medford stand, Kenney remaining here.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 24, 1885, page 3


    The Medford Mirror, a new paper in our neighboring town, will make its appearance soon with R. G. Scroggs in charge.
    Madison Rodgers of Medford made us a pleasant call on Wednesday. He has quite the saddlery business at Medford and thinks of leaving the country soon.
    The report that Wm. Ulrich had sold out his interest in the saloon business at Medford proved a mistake and he can still be found at that popular resort.
    M. A. McGinnis has examined the Schumpf mine and declares the same to be a quartz ledge of considerable extent. He gives as his reasons several geological facts, the strongest of which is the dissimilarity of the walls that enclose the quartz.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 24, 1885, page 3


    There are 100 children of school age in Medford district. School has opened in the new schoolhouse, with Mr. W. S. Gore as principal and Miss May Crain assistant teacher.
"News of the Northwest," Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 26, 1885, page 4


Road to Medford.
    There is a petition before the county commissioners' court, signed by sixty or seventy taxpayers, praying for the location of a county road beginning at the bridge on Griffin Creek and running thence along the section line to Medford. This road is one that is needed badly, as it will shorten the distance between Jacksonville and Medford at least two miles, as compared with the present route. While it will cost the county some four or five hundred dollars for the right of way, still on account of the public necessity of a straight road between the two places, we hope the commissioners at their next session will order the award of damages paid and the road opened at once. We are informed by many that this is undoubtedly the cheapest, shortest and best route for a road that can be had, and therefore we favor its establishment.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1885, page 3


    Building still continues at Medford.
    J. M. LaPorte has returned to his place near Waldo, and Medford has a new barber.
    Some newcomers who have invested in property in Medford and vicinity arrived during the past week.
    Barnum & Sons of Medford are putting up three dwelling houses for rent. They are situated opposite their planing mill.
    The Central Hotel at Medford continues under the management of A. E. Woods, who is giving satisfaction. He is well patronized.
    Dougherty & Churchman are now in charge of Voorhies' former variety store at Medford and keep a good stock of everything in their line.
    A number of residents of Medford held a meeting one evening last week and signed a remonstrance against the annexation of Josephine County.
    The upper story of the Medford schoolhouse will soon be fitted up for occupancy, the lower story being unable to accommodate the pupils now in attendance.
    A fine barn and smokehouse have been completed recently on the farm of John Cummons of Medford precinct, who has also set out a number of fruit trees.
    W. H. Jacks has bought fifteen acres, including a house and barn, of Rev. C. H. Hoxie of Medford precinct, paying $1,000 therefor. The sale was made through A. L. Johnson.
    Merriman & Redfield of Medford are manufacturing Merriman's celebrated iron-tooth harrow, which has been used quite extensively in Douglas County and always gave satisfaction. They are also prepared to do all kinds of blacksmithing in superior manner and at low rates. See their advertisement elsewhere.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1885, page 3


ATTENTION, FARMERS!
TRY MERRIMAN'S
IRON-TOOTH HARROW!
AND YOU WILL
USE NO OTHER.
    The undersigned, who have located permanently at Medford, take pleasure in informing the public that they are now manufacturing Merriman's celebrated Iron-Tooth Harrow, which has been extensively used in Douglas County, and given perfect satisfaction elsewhere. Give them a trial and judge for yourself.
    We are also prepared to do all kinds of
BLACKSMITHING
In the best style and at low rates.
HORSESHOEING A SPECIALTY.
For further particulars call on
MERRIMAN & REDFIELD
Medford, Jan. 23, 1885.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1885, page 3


For Sale.
    Superior brick in quantities to suit. For further particulars enquire of J. S. Howard, postmaster, or the undersigned.
BYERS & GUERIN, Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1885, page 3


    We received a call last week from M. Rodgers of Medford. Having disposed of his shop there he expects to leave this valley soon.
    R. G. Scroggs, Jr., not having put in appearance as yet, M. A. McGinnis of this place will attempt the feat of establishing a newspaper at Medford, to be called the Journal. We wish Mr. M. success, but nevertheless cannot help predicting that he will soon find out that Rogue River Valley already has all the newspapers it can sustain for some years to come.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1885, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary came up from Medford Tuesday to operate upon the eyes of James Porter, fireman on McCarty's engine. Porter's eyes had been rendered almost sightless by the singeing of the lashes, the stubs of hairs having been turned inward upon the eye, causing great irritation and pain. Dr. Geary removed the small portion of the lid upon which these hairs were growing, and this will, of course, prevent the recurrence of the trouble. But one eye was operated upon, the other being left till the recovery of the first.
    The Medford Journal is to be the name of the new paper, instead of the Mirror, and the publisher will be Prof. McGinnis. Mr. Scroggs, who intended to launch the Mirror, failed to come to time, and Mr. McGinnis was waiting for the opportunity and at once stepped to the fore. He expects to receive his office outfit next week, and will issue the first number of the Journal as soon as it can be printed.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 30, 1885, page 3


    A little child of Mrs. [Addison] Ball, who lives on the Justus place in Medford precinct, died recently of diphtheria. We have heard of no other cases in the valley.
Ashland Tidings, January 30, 1885, page 3


    The Medford Journal will appear next week.
    Medford is still improving and we noticed at least five new buildings that were in course of construction this week. It is now a town of some pretensions and can put on city airs whenever it wants to.
    Mr. McGinnis will soon commence the publication of a paper at Medford. We do not agree with the Times in the certainty of its proving a failure. Mr. McGinnis is a gentleman of ability and we think is eminently qualified to make a success of his new enterprise and we think the Medford people understand themselves in starting a paper and we have no doubt it will succeed. Simply because some ill-natured and selfish person hopes to see it fail is not going to kill it. Success to the new enterprise.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 31, 1885, page 3


Communicated.
    The following is a report of a public meeting held at Medford one evening last week, and the proceedings are furnished by the secretary. The meeting was held for the purpose of deciding on what steps should be taken in regard to Senator Miller's bill to give Josephine County four townships now belonging to Jackson County:
    EDITOR, SENTINEL: Meeting called to order by calling Gen. John E. Ross to the chair, and W. G. Kenney was chosen secretary.
    Mr. Bowditch in this remarks favors the cutting off of the four townships as provided in Miller's bill in order to head off Cameron's bill to annex Josephine to Jackson County. He thinks Grants Pass don't amount to anything anyway, to let them go and thrice welcome.
    Mr. Johnson follows in much the same strain and makes a vehement attack on Prim's integrity.
    Mr. Howard agrees exactly with Mr. Bowditch and warmly eulogizes the delegation from Ashland and moves the immediate circulation of a petition favoring the views of Senator Miller from Josephine County.
    Secretary was called upon to read a telegram from Hon. P. P. Prim which shows there is no danger in Cameron's bill being made a law.
    Mr. Bowditch again reviews the situation and ignores Prim's telegram, followed by Howard, Johnson and Lawton, who makes a general assault on all our representatives and favors a remonstrance for Senator Miller to bat our representatives over the head with.
    Hon. C. W. Broback delivers a scathing rebuke to the other side for the villainous attack made on our representatives and with all the fire of his eloquence was willing to stake his life on the honor and manhood of Senator Prim and was astonished at the ease [with which] the other side falls into the net of Miller's to disarm our representatives of the power vested in them, and warned the people not to be led away into captivity by the nice laid schemes of Miller's cunning.
    Chairman Ross made a stirring appeal to the good sense of the people and stripped the covering from Miller's carcass and held him up to the gaze of the curious, and favored no compromise of any kind--give them nothing and take nothing.
    B. W. Powell closes and was sorry that the gentleman from the rural districts of Ashland had become the willing dupes of Miller and had failed to see the trick till they had arrived at Medford, and that the telegram just received by Ross, Kenney and Broback exposed Miller's scheme, and showed his pity and contempt that there were men in the proud city of Medford ignorant enough to fold the nightgown of injured innocence about their delicate frames and cry pathetically "Miller's got us, let him have the four townships quick."
    Howard's motion was then stated by the chair and carried.
    Howard then moved that Miller and Lawton be appointed to circulate remonstrance. Carried.
    Meeting adjourned.
W. G. KENNEY, Sec.
COL. ROSS, Chairman.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 31, 1885, page 3


    A LIVELY TOWN.--Medford, Or., in Rogue River Valley, a town only fifteen months old, boasts of 126 houses. They are also building a two-story brick hotel and a block of brick business houses 100 feet front. Corner lots are bringing $600, and fairly located lots, 25x100 feet, for dwellings, $75 to $150 each. A paper will be started this week, and it is reported that the Jacksonville distillery soon will be moved there, likewise the foundry from Roseburg.
"Local and General," Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 2, 1885, page 3


A Grievous Error.
    Some poorly informed correspondent has been writing to the Oregonian from this valley and commits a number of blunders. Chief among them is that announcing the removal of the Rogue River Distilling Co.'s works to Medford. This company has no intention whatever of leaving Jacksonville; but, on the contrary, is making a number of substantial improvements here. Such prevarication is hardly edifying.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1885, page 3


Road Established.
    The county commissioners this week ordered what is known as the straight road between Jacksonville and Medford established, and also awarded damages in accordance with the report of the viewers appointed at their last meeting. This is eminently proper, as it has been clearly demonstrated that this road is the shortest and best that could be established.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1885, page 3


    Steel nails are being introduced into Southern Oregon.
    A large number of fine salmon trout have been speared in Bear Creek recently.
    $5,000 to loan in $1,000 lots on good real estate security, at Johnson's land office in Medford.
    Exchange on Portland and San Francisco for sale at A. L. Johnson's land office in Medford.
    Mensor Bros. have bought a lot in Medford and expect to open a store there in the near future.
    Carlos Goddard has traded his house and lot in Medford to Riley Morrison of Little Butte. Consideration, $700.
    Isaac Merriman of Medford precinct has gone to Montana Territory to engage in stockraising. He has relatives there.
    Frank Lewellen of Medford, the well-known stablekeeper, was in Jacksonville Wednesday. He is kept busy, as he gives satisfaction.
    The Plaindealer says that Mrs. Wm. Heffron and family will remove to Rogue River Valley shortly, and probably locate at Medford, where her husband now is.
    There was a party at Byers' Hall in Medford Friday evening, which passed off pleasantly and was well conducted. A number of residents of Ashland were in attendance.
    Medford will no doubt be incorporated soon. A bill to that effect has been introduced by Senator Prim and Representative Cameron, and has probably passed by this time.
    M. A. McGinnis has ordered the press and material for his new paper at Medford from Portland and expects to issue the initial number in a short time. We learn that Henry Mensor will act as foreman.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Vrooman of Medford is quite unwell, we are sorry to say.
    Dr. Geary of Medford, who is also a skillful oculist, performed a successful operation on the eyes of Jas. Porter, a fireman for the railroad, at Ashland lately.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1885, page 3


    The second story of the new school house at Medford is to be finished soon, as the large room on the first floor is too cramped for the growing size of the school.
    A correspondent writes to the Oregonian that Medford expects to have a distillery and an iron foundry. After the distillery, "then comes the ironworks."
    The Farmers' Store at Medford keeps a full assortment of carefully selected general merchandise, and prices are down at the bottom. Call and be convinced.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 6, 1885, page 3


    A note from Prof. McGinnis states that the Medford Journal will not be issued before Friday, the 20th inst. It will take that long to get things in shape.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 7, 1885, page 3


    Prof. McGinnis and family moved to Medford this week where they will make their future home.
    The bill to incorporate Medford has passed one body of the Legislature and will likely become a law.
    Mensor Brothers have purchased real estate in Medford and propose opening a store there soon.
    The mechanical department of the Medford Journal will be in charge of Henry Mensor of this place.
    Mrs. Wm. Heffron will soon come from Roseburg to join her husband at Medford where they propose locating.
    The Commissioners did well this session in ordering the "straight road" to Medford and the construction of a bridge across Rogue River.
    A report has been in circulation for some time past that P. W. Olwell was going to move his flouring mill from Phoenix to Medford but in an interview yesterday he denied that such was the case. He says that he runs his mill eighteen hours a day, finds a ready sale for his flour and has not the least trouble in disposing of his hogs in his present location and wants to know where the necessity of a change comes in. The report that the Jacksonville distillery would be moved to Medford is equally without foundation.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 7, 1885, page 3


    RICE AND COTTON IN OREGON.--Secretary Carlisle, of the Portland immigration bureau, yesterday ticketed eleven people, all intending settlers, to various places in southern Oregon. Two of these were Mr. B. A. Stannard and wife, recently from Texas. For a number of year Mr. Stannard has been engaged in the experimental as well as the practical culture of rice and cotton and believes that these will thrive best in what might be called semi-southern climates. Of late he has been studying the climate of southern Oregon, and he believes that around Medford is land excellently suited to the growth of rice, especially of a certain variety, which he had great success in raising in Texas. Mr. Stannard is a quiet, pleasant and intelligent man who asks no aid from anyone in his plans, but with money enough to carry them out proposes to give both rice and cotton a fair trial near Medford.
"Local and General," Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 10, 1885, page 3


Should Be a Good Road.
    The straight road between this place and Medford having been established, it will be opened as soon as the weather will permit, which is a few weeks hence. We hope that the supervisor of that road district will see that that thoroughfare is made such a one as its importance merits. There will be a great deal of travel on it at all times of the year, and it ought to be a first-class road in every particular. The county commissioners awarded damages to the amount of $475 to parties whose lands it will run through, viz: John Tice, $400; Mrs. M. A. Davison, $50; I. W. Thomas, $25.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1885, page 3


Be on Hand.
    The Fruit-Growers Association of Southern Oregon will hold its next meeting at Medford on the 28th inst. We hope that everybody interested in fruitgrowing will attend. The objects of the association are quite important and affect nearly every resident in this section, either directly or indirectly.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1885, page 3


    A party is announced to take place at Medford on the 20th inst.
    The press and material of the proposed Medford Journal arrived last Tuesday.
    It is the general opinion that James Cunningham, ex-railroad agent at Medford, will not appear for trial and that the bail will be forfeited. The same is the case with Geo. Waller.
    Wm. Egan and Mr. Skeel have rented Thos. McAndrew's building in Medford and will open a saloon there soon.
    J. B. Montgomery of Medford was in town during the week. He says that the place is improving, and he expects to be its first marshal.
    R. M. Shely and John Jacobs, stone and marble workers, have formed a partnership and will engage in business at Medford. They are both good mechanics and we hope to see them succeed.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1885, page 3


    M. A. McGinnis, who intends to commence the publication of the Medford Journal in a short time, left Jacksonville for his new home a few days ago. Success to him.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1885, page 3


    Mensor Bros. will open a store in Medford.
    Medford, also, will be an incorporated town.
    The straight road wins between Medford and Jacksonville.
    Henry Mensor will be the foreman of the Medford Journal.
   
Wm. Heffron, recently from Roseburg, has bought of A. E. Woods the Central Hotel in Medford, and the hotel is now conducted by him. Mr. Woods is still in Medford.
    Roberts & O'Neil have let the contract for building a brick store in Medford. Mr. Childers has the job. J. T. Guerin has ordered a neat dwelling house built, and will probably keep "bachelor's hall" there.
    The material for the Medford Journal was on the wrecked freight train, it is reported. Prof. McGinnis intended to have the first issue out by next Friday, but it will most likely be delayed by this accident.
    Of the two routes proposed for the new county road between Medford and Jacksonville, the straight road was chosen and ordered established by the County Commissioners' Court last week. The damages awarded were as follows: John Tice, $400; I. W. Thomas, $25; Mrs. M. A. Davison, $50.
    An amendment to Senator Miller's bill changing the boundary lines between Jackson and Josephine counties makes Josephine County assume with the four townships it acquires from Jackson their due proportion of the present debt of this county. This is just, and meets a demand by many people in this county who under other conditions were averse to seeing the four townships cut off.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 13, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Geary, of Medford, was in town yesterday and reports improvements still in progress at that place.

"Personal," Ashland Tidings, February 13, 1885, page 3


    For good merchantable wheat, delivered either at Ashland or Medford 59½ cts. will be paid. At Medford apply to Angle & Plymale, and at Ashland to P. B. Whitney.
    The Farmers' Store at Medford keeps a full assortment of carefully selected general merchandise, and prices are down at the bottom. Call and be convinced.
Ashland Tidings, February 13, 1885, page 3


    Wm. Egan and C. W. Skeel will open another saloon at Medford in a few days.
    A social dance and supper will be given at Medford on the night of the 20th inst. A good time is promised.
    The press and material for the Medford Journal have arrived and the publisher expects to have the first issue out next Friday.
    James Cunningham has not yet showed up for trial on the charge of robbing the O.&C.R.R. and his bondsmen will be called on to liquidate.
    A number of friends of W. J. Plymale called at that gentleman's residence last Monday night to congratulate him on his 48th birthday. The Jacksonville Silver Cornet Band was also present enlivening the occasion with music. Refreshments were served and an enjoyable evening spent by all present. May you live 48 years more, Tip, and may they all be as happy as the birthday just spent.
    Secretary Carlisle, of the Portland immigration bureau, of the 9th inst., ticketed eleven people, all intending settlers, to various points in Southern Oregon. Two of these were Mr. B. A. Stannard and wife, recently from Texas. For a number of years Mr. Stannard has been engaged in the experimental as well as the practical culture of rice and cotton, and believes that these will thrive best in what might be called semi-southern climates. Of late he has been studying the climate of Southern Oregon, and he believes that around Medford is land excellently suited to the growth of rice, especially of a certain variety, which he had great success in raising in Texas. Mr. Stannard is a quiet, pleasant and intelligent man who asks no aid from anyone in his plans, but with money enough to carry them out proposes to give both rice and cotton a fair trial near Medford.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 14, 1885, page 3


    The new paper for Medford will be in operation in a few days, the material having been ordered.
"Oregon," Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 16, 1885, page 1


New Marble Works.
    Shely & Jacobs have located at Medford, and are now ready to contract for the erection of monuments, tombstones, tablets, etc., at the very lowest prices, and will guarantee satisfaction. R. M. Shely, who is well and favorably known in Jacksonville, will attend to the marble cutting and carving, and as he is a fine workman, we predict that the new firm will have its share of the public patronage. Be sure and call and see their new and beautiful designs before ordering work.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1885, page 3


    The Medford Monitor is expected to make its appearance this week.
    Rumor says that Jas. T. Guerin will soon have a neat dwelling house built at Medford.
    Mr. Childers has taken a contract to build a brick store at Medford for Roberts & O'Neil.
    O. F. Lewis, a scientific painter, has returned to Butte Creek and intends locating at Medford.
    Spring fights have already blossomed at Medford. One was the outgrowth of the incorporation question.
    Representative Cameron's bill to incorporate Medford has passed and will be a law as soon as the Governor signs it.
    A. L. Johnson has sold M. E. Dougherty's land (consisting of seven acres) near Medford to a newcomer named Wansner for $400.
    The fruitgrowers' association will meet at Medford on the 28th. Everybody interested in the fruitgrowing industry should attend.
    Wm. Egan and C. W. Skeel have purchased Wm. Churchman's stock of liquors etc. at Medford and placed them in McAndrew's new building.
    Byers & Jacobs have rented their small brick building at Medford to a gentleman from the Willamette Valley, who proposes opening a book and music store there.
    Wm. Heffron, lately of Roseburg, has leased the Central Hotel at Medford. Mrs. Heffron will soon join him, and together they will undoubtedly conduct a popular house.
    The youngest son of N. K. Lytle, while at Medford several days ago, had one of his arms broken. He was sitting on a fence, holding his horse by a rope, when the animal started up and pulled him off, with the above result.
    There is considerable talk of building a tramway between this place and Medford, which would be the next best thing to a railroad. We hope that such an enterprise will be inaugurated in the near future. Our citizens should encourage it to the fullest extent.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1885, page 3

D. M. Osborne Catalog 1890

    F. Hubbard, the popular agent for D. M. Osborne & Co. at Medford, was in town Tuesday.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1885, page 3

D. M. Osborne Catalog 1890

MARRIED.
GUERIN-BROWN--At the residence of the bride's parents in this city, March 31st, by Rev. A. R. Bickenbach, James T. Guerin and Miss Sarah A. Brown.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1885, page 3


    NEW MARBLE WORKS.--Shely & Jacobs is the name of a new firm, who have made arrangements to go into the marble business in this county, and have located in Medford. Mr. R. M. Shely has been working in Jacksonville for some time and is a fine marble cutter and carver, as his work in the Jacksonville cemetery and cemeteries of the county will attest. They are now ready for business and will contract for the erection of monuments, tombstones, tablets, etc., and all kinds of cemetery work, at bottom prices. Don't fail to call and see their neat and elegant designs before ordering work.
Ashland Tidings, February 20, 1885, page 3


    The Medford town charter bill has passed both houses of the legislature.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 20, 1885, page 3


DIED
    Mrs. Martha King, mother of Mrs. Wm. K. Ish and mother of Jerome King, died on Sunday of last week at the residence of Mrs. S. E. Ish, in Jacksonville.
Ashland Tidings, February 20, 1885


    NEW MARBLE WORKS.--Robt. M. Shely and J. W. Jacobs have formed a co-partnership, and have located in Medford to engage in the marble business. They will do their own work and are now ready for business and will contract for the erection of monuments, tombstones, tablets, etc., at bedrock prices. Call and see their designs, and price their work, if you need anything in their line.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 21, 1885, page 3


    Egan & Skeel opened their new saloon at Medford this week.
    The Medford lodge of A.O.U.W. did not come up last night as expected--bad roads being the cause.
    A son of N. K. Lytle of this place had an arm broken at Medford the other day by falling from a fence.
    The different charter bills for Jacksonville, Ashland and Medford have all passed the two houses of the legislature and after the signature of the Governor will become law.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 21, 1885, page 3


Another Richmond.
    The Medford Monitor has made its appearance and the world still moves. Its editor, who is a carpetbagger fresh from the cranberry marshes of Wisconsin, Atlas-like seems to have taken the whole of Jackson County upon his shoulders. He evidently thinks that his mission is the demolition of Jacksonville and her business people, judging from the manner in which he slurs and misrepresents them. This exhibition of temper is not only uncalled for, but at the same time, shows his lack of good breeding. His economy with the truth would do honor to [humorist] Eli Perkins or some other veteran prevaricator. If the Times should attack Medford and its people in the same style, they would certainly take exceptions thereto; and rightly, too. Honorable competition is legitimate and admissible under all circumstances, but slandering and belittling one's rivals is detestable and of no avail. The Monitor can never benefit Medford by slurring and lying about Jacksonville. Let it keep that prominently in view.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1885, page 3


    Prof. North is teaching a private school at Medford.
    Mensor Bros. expect to build a brick store at Medford soon.
    Wilcox Bros., lately of Medford, will move to Jacksonville.
    The party given at Medford last Friday night was well attended.
    A boy in Medford had his arm broken a few days ago by falling from a pair of stilts.
    The Davison farm in Medford precinct was sold at sheriff's sale last Saturday and bid in by Max Muller for other parties. It brought $7,061.
    The Roseburg Plaindealer denies that the foundry at that place will be removed to Medford or anywhere else. It is now running on full time.
    Mr. Wansner has sold an acre of ground to Wm. H. Barr of Medford for $100, and Mrs. M. A. Davison has sold ten acres to the same gentleman for $300.
    Thos. Teeson, the expert builder and contractor, has just completed a neat dwelling house for Mr. Galloway, who lately purchased the Beekman tract near Medford.
    Some of the young bloods who attended the party at Medford last Friday evening undertook to take the town next morning and created considerable of a disturbance.
    The report that Wm. Heffron had leased the Central Hotel at Medford turns out to be incorrect, he having returned to Roseburg. O. Gilbert and wife are in charge of that house and are well patronized.
    C. Wilcox of Medford was in town Wednesday and informed us that Bear Creek was so high lately that the McAndrew ford has been washed out, being dangerous in places. Strangers should not attempt to cross there.
    A. J. Wilcox of Medford, a first-class workman, is prepared to do all kinds of plastering, kalsomining, etc., in the highest style of the art and at reasonable prices. He guarantees satisfaction in every instance. For further particulars enquire of Wilcox Bros., at their residence near Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1885, page 3


New Marble Works.
    Shely & Jacobs have located at Medford, and are now ready to contract for the erection of monuments, tombstones, tablets, etc., at the very lowest prices, and will guarantee satisfaction. R. M. Shely, who is well and favorably known in Jacksonville, will attend to the marble cutting and carving, and as he is a fine workman, we predict that the new firm will have its share of the public patronage. Be sure and call and see their new and beautiful designs before ordering work.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1885 et seq., page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Adams County, Ills., who paid this valley a visit last summer, has returned with the intention of remaining. He was one of the prominent nurserymen of that portion of the Sucker State. He will probably engage in the same business here.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1885, page 3


    The Medford Monitor made its appearance last Monday. It is a twenty-eight column paper, and has a good display of home advertising patronage, showing the business men of Medford to be wide awake. The paper is to be independent politically, and the first number started out briskly to "boom the town." The Tidings welcomes the new associate in the local journalistic field with good wishes for its future. Mr. M. A. McGinnis is the editor and publisher of the Monitor. Its day of publication is Friday.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 27, 1885, page 3


    No. 151, by Cameron, Medford charter.

"Bills Passed--House Bills," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 28, 1885, page 2



    The proprietors of the Roseburg foundry deny having any intention of moving their shop to Medford, so the Plaindealer says.
    Wm. Angle and C. W. Broback of Medford have been serving their country as jurors for three weeks past. Both seem to be happy still, probably on account of being exempt for the rest of the year if they should get their discharge before its close.
    Brother Nickell essays to extinguish the Medford Monitor by an outburst of sarcasm and misrepresentation, in which he calls the editor a carpetbagger. Chawles, haven't you forgotten that it has only been a few years since you came across the California line with your carpetbag to take charge of the paper that you now claim has the largest circulation of any south of Portland? Why not estimate our neighbor's chances by what you claim to have accomplished yourself? You have run the "only Democratic paper" so successfully in your own interests that you have but few friends left in your party, and you ought to be generous enough to give the Monitor a chance with your "immense" success to cheer him on.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 28, 1885, page 3


    The initial number of the Medford Monitor made its appearance Friday of last week. It launches out boldly on the great sea of journalism, advocating the local interests of Medford, and the general interests of this part of the state. It lays down a broad platform in its editorial column in which the desire to advance the interests of humanity is its predominating purpose. We could not gather any indication of its political complexion and therefore infer that the Monitor will be independent in politics. The first number, although issued under great disadvantages, is a very creditable one, and we cordially extend a [hand] to Brother McGinnis and wish him unbounded success in his new field of labor.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 28, 1885, page 3


    NEW MARBLE WORKS.--Robt. M. Shely and J. W. Jacobs have formed a co-partnership, and have located in Medford to engage in the marble business. They will do their own work and are now ready for business and will contract for the erection of monuments, tombstones, tablets, etc., at bedrock prices. Come and see their designs, and price their work, if you need anything in their line.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, February 28, 1885, page 3



MARRIED.
JUSTUS-JOHNSON--In Medford, Feb. 20th, 1885, at the residence of L. J. Crenshaw, by C. H. Barkdull, J.P., O. H. Johnson and Miss Anna Justus.
DIED.
BALL--In Medford precinct, Jan. 16th, Freddie Ball, son of Mrs. Martha Ball; aged 4 years and 8 months.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 28, 1885, page 3


    FLEEING TO SOUTHERN OREGON.--A correspondent at Ashland writes: A good many strangers are arriving on every train from the East, fleeing from the severe winters experienced there. A letter received here from a citizen in southeastern Iowa states that the winter there has been more severe than ever known since the settlement by the whites, the mercury at one time going down to 44° below zero, and four feet of snow on the level.--Oregonian.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1885, page 3


    Frank Lewellen is driving the stage running between this place and Medford for a few days, Geo. W. Brown having gone to Roseburg.
    We learn that M. E. Pogue of Gold Hill has gone to Illinois. He has not absconded with $800 of the railroad company's money, as wrongly stated in the Medford paper.
    R. T. Lawton and J. S. Howard were elected directors of Medford school district. Wm. Angle is the remaining member of the old board. Chas. Strang was elected clerk.
    C. W. Broback during the past week sold all of his Medford property to G. W. Howard, lately from the Willamette Valley. He will leave for California with his family as soon as spring opens, for the benefit of his health.
    The proposition of a tramway between this place and some point on the railroad is being discussed and such an enterprise may be favorably acted upon very soon. The new [Jacksonville] board of trustees will probably consider the matter at an early day.
    The people of Medford will soon vote on the question of incorporation, and quite a contest is promised. The legislature passed an act permitting the incorporation of the town, but a majority of its residents must first decide that they favor such a scheme.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1885, page 3


    Wm. Egan and Wm. Ulrich were up from Medford Wednesday to secure liquor licenses for their respective places of business. They succeeded.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1885, page 3


    It is reported that C. W. Broback has sold his entire interest in the town site of Medford to a company of capitalists, of whom Mr. G. W. Howard, who has been living at Phoenix recently, is the representative. The consideration is not made public.
    We are reliably informed that Mr. J. Nasby, living about three miles east of Medford, has found a good prospect for a vein of good coal on his place. Where the vein has been prospected, it is about five and one-half feet thick, and is of a fine quality of bituminous coal. We hope that this discovery may be followed up to [sic] rapid development. A good coal bank would be of inestimable value to the community in general, and a fortune to its owner, in particular.--[Monitor.
"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, March 6, 1885, page 3


DIED
    BALL--In Medford precinct, Jan. 16, Freddie Ball, son of Mrs. Martha Ball; aged 4 years and 3 months.
Ashland Tidings, March 6, 1885


    The Medford Monitor has made its appearance.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, March 12, 1885, page 1


Not Very Reliable.
    E. P. Branch of Ashland, who has been a resident of this valley for a short time, and who, of course, knows more about it than all our old residents, has written a so-called description of this section and issued it in pamphlet form for distribution among those who intend settling in southern Oregon. We have not perused this great and miserably printed work, but are informed that it does justice to no place excepting Ashland, all the notice that such insignificant towns as Jacksonville, Medford, Grants Pass, &c., get being embodied in less than a dozen lines, taken altogether. According to its story Crater Lake, Rogue River Falls and all other scenery and good land southern Oregon afford is situated nearer Ashland than anywhere else. While the people of our sister town naturally desire to attract all the immigration to their place and its vicinity that they honorably can, we are quite certain that they will not certify to the accuracy of Mr. Branch's circular, nor endorse it as a whole.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1885, page 3


Apples for California.
    W. H. Bostwick of Uniontown precinct, who now owns the well-known Chappel farm and orchard on the Applegate, has been hauling a large quantity of his superior apples to the railroad depot at Medford for shipment to San Francisco, via Portland. They have been neatly boxed and are consigned to Lusk & Son, the enterprising fruit dealers. The freight on them is $10.50 a ton, the railroad company's rates being $8, or more than three times what the steamship charges. Mr. B. will realize a reasonable profit on his fruit, but not so large a one as if there was an overland railroad and freights were as low as they ought to be to encourage fruitgrowers. If our farmers will devote less soil and time to growing grain and plant the right kind of trees they will have no occasion to complain of hard times in the future. Choice fruits always command a remunerative price.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1885, page 3


    A. E. Woods has purchased an interest in the Medford butcher shop of W. H. Barr.
    The Medford [Ladies'] Aid Society will hold a sociable this evening for the benefit of the Sunday school.
    E. G. Hurt of Medford is engaged in filling a number of contracts, being an excellent mechanic.
    W. H. Barr of Medford is building himself a neat residence which will be an ornament to that town.
    A new racetrack is being built near Medford, and several horses are in training for the races commencing May 5th. Excellent contests of speed are promised.
    Wm. Egan has leased A. L. Johnson's livery stable at Medford and will add a number of new vehicles and teams at once.
    The partnership heretofore existing between John Slagle and J. W. Frazier, blacksmiths at Medford, has been dissolved, the latter retiring.
    Rev. M. A. Williams, assisted by Revs. A. R. Bickenbach and J. V. Milligan of Ashland, will institute a Presbyterian church at Medford in the near future. Mr. Williams will be the pastor in charge.
    Jacksonville holds its own remarkably well, and is gaining instead of losing ground, as generally predicted. We confidently expect it to remain one of the leading and most prominent towns in Oregon.
    The people of Medford voted on the incorporation of their town and the adoption of a charter last Wednesday. The election was almost unanimously in favor of the project, very few votes being cast in the negative.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1885, page 3


    A. W. Carey, having purchased Wm. Egan's interest in the saloon business at Medford, will remove there with his family in a short time.
    F. Hubbard of Medford has taken the agency of the Norwegian Plow Company, a heavy and well-known manufacturer of agricultural implements and machinery, and will soon receive a carload of goods direct from Minnesota.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1885, page 3


Races.
    There will be four days' racing at Medford, commencing May 5th. The following is the speed programme: First day, running race, half-mile dash, for purse of $100; second day, running race, three-fourths of a mile and repeat, for purse of $100; third day, running race, half-mile and repeat, for purse of $100; fourth day, running race, mile dash, free for all, for purse of $150, first horse to receive $100 and second horse $50. There will also be a novelty race for graded horses. For further particulars see posters printed at the Times office.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1885, page 3


    The Times says there is talk of building a tramway between Medford and the county seat. It looks rather impracticable--too much expense for the slight advantage to be gained over ordinary teaming. A good, hard level wagon road is about as desirable as a tramway.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 13, 1885, page 3


    THE JACKSONVILLE SHORT LINE.--A number of our citizens got considerably agitated this week over a proposition to build a narrow-gauge railroad from Jacksonville to connect with the main line either at Medford or Central Point. All the material required, including engine, cars, etc., can be bought at a low figure of a company that formerly operated a short line running into Visalia, California, and then the whole cost is estimated at less than $15,000. Several of the wealthy residents of Central Point precinct have declared their willingness to take more than one-half of the stock, and the matter may yet be brought into a shape so that the road will be built. Either Central Point or Medford could well afford to build the road alone for the benefits that would result to their towns after its completion, and we further believe that the road would pay a fair interest on the investment.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 14, 1885, page 3


    MEDFORD CHARTER.--A bill passed the Legislature last session granting the town of Medford a charter and on Wednesday last the citizens of that precinct voted on its approval resulting in a favor of 76 in favor of its adoption and 2 against. An election for town officers will be held in ten days after the last election--Saturday, March 21st, when five Trustees, Recorder, Marshal, Treasurer and Street Commissioner will be elected. At a former meeting of the citizens of that place a majority declared their opposition to being incorporated as a town but the opposition must have changed their mind as the vote in favor is almost unanimous at this time. The promise to hold liquor license down to $200 per year for four years is said to have brought that element over to the support of the charter, but our guess is that those who made the promise will find out that it will take $1,000 lacking $500 to sell spirituous liquors in less quantities than one gallon after its new law takes effect.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 14, 1885, page 3


    Residents of Medford have built a race track near that place.
    Jacksonville is to have a railroad of its own according to public talk.
    Brother McGinnis is making a red-hot paper out of the Medford Monitor.
    Angle & Plymale continue doing a rushing business at their store in Medford on account of the low prices asked for goods.
    Wm. Egan is again in the field as keeper of a livery stable in Medford, having rented A. L. Johnson's stand at that place. Bill is popular with all and will no doubt do well.
    Ed. Caton and Al Carey negotiated for the purchase of certain saloon property at Medford this week but have since changed their minds and will remain here.
    Like Prince Bismark and the American hog the Medford Monitor and the Jacksonville Times do not speak as they pass by. Personal journalism is no good thing.
    The Ladies' Aid Society gave an entertainment at Medford Thursday night, and tickets for all the seating capacity of the hall were sold before the performance began. An excellent entertainment was given by local talent.
    A number of the prominent residents of Medford were in town Thursday. We asked one of the party what they were doing here when we were informed that the Medford post office was still in doubt, since the commencement of Democratic rule, and that outside assistance was required to locate it. Our advice would be to let well enough alone and keep Max Muller and J. S. Howard as postmasters in their respective towns.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 14, 1885, page 3


    The greatest drawback to the settlement and prosperity of Jackson County is the one-horse railroad system with which the people are afflicted. It will not be until a connection is made between the O.&C. and C.P. railroad that southern Oregon will develop and prove the country it is. We have the best climate in the world, and our many other advantages are not to be sneezed at. It is hard to tell when the ultimatum will present itself, but it cannot be far off.
Editorial, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1885, page 2


Olla Podrida.
[Miscellany--from the Spanish for "rotten pot"--a type of stew.]
    O. H. Johnson is Medford's watchmaker and jeweler.
    Jackson County is not the only place where dull times prevail.
    The first boy born in Medford arrived at the house of G. W. Crystal recently.
    A considerable amount of lumber is being hauled from the Sterling mill to Medford.
    A pleasant sociable was given a few evenings since by the Ladies' Aid Society of Medford.
    Medford will elect five trustees, a recorder, treasurer, marshal and street commissioner tomorrow. At the recent charter election 78 votes were cast.
    Messrs. Cunningham, Dougherty and other residents of Medford recently returned from a twelve days' prospecting trip in Jump-off Joe mining district: They think that they have found excellent prospects.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1885, page 2


    J. Nasby of Medford precinct has struck a vein of coal, which prospects well.
    A. L. Johnson of Medford has purchased O. Ganiard's fine stallion "Arabian Night."
    The Justus place in Medford precinct will soon be offered for sale by the administrator, Jas. R. Neil.
    Medford boasts of a fine, two-story schoolhouse and an excellent school under the management of Prof. W. S. Gore and Miss May Crain.
    Frank Langell, who is working at the printing business in Medford, is here on a visit, until more work looms up in the office where he is employed.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart will start for his home near Quincy, Ill., next Sunday, for the purpose of closing his business there and removing to this country. His family will accompany him.
    Jesse H. Wilson of Medford precinct lately received a large number of Muscat and Alexandria grape cuttings, which he is setting out. They were sent to him from California and are an excellent raisin grape.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1885, page 3


    T. Shattuck, the well-known magician and ventriloquist, has disposed of his interests on Applegate and will leave for other climes before long.
    Henry C. Howard of Eden precinct has sold his fine farm to Hon. J. H. Stewart, now of Adams County, Ill., for the sum of $5,400. Mr. S. is a fruitgrower of much experience and a gentleman of enterprise and intelligence, and we welcome him in our midst.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1885, page 3


    Medford will have a horse racing picnic of four days, on its new track, beginning May 5th. Following is the speed programme: First day, running race, half-mile dash, for purse of $100; second day, running race, three-fourths of a mile and repeat, for purse of $100; third day, running race, half-mile and repeat, for purse of $100; fourth day, running race, mile dash, free for all, for purse of $150, first horse to receive $100 and second horse $50. There will also be a novelty race for graded horses.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 20, 1885, page 3


MARRIED
    CARTER-HUMPHREY--At the residence of the officiating minister in Medford, on Sunday, March 15, 1885, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Mr. Ernest Carter and Miss Mabell Humphrey, both of Ashland.
Ashland Tidings, March 20, 1885


    The wife of George W. Crystal presented him with a bouncing baby boy not long since, the first born in Medford.
    Medford residents will indulge in four days' racing commencing April 3rd. Liberal purses are offered, and a lively time is promised.
    Voters of Medford will elect town officers on Wednesday next. We learn that there are numerous candidates for the different positions, the big contest coming in for the office of City Marshal.
    The new straight road between here and Medford is being put in order by D. H. Miller, supervisor of that [road] district. It promises to take a large sum of money to make it a passable thoroughfare during the winter months.
    Report says that Sol Abrahams will build the proposed warehouse at Central Point and will also have a store with a large stock of goods at the same point. Sol never does things by halves and if he once starts in he may build us a railroad before he quits.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 21, 1885, page 3


Olla Podrida.
    Milton Maule, late of Cleveland Ohio, a scientific painter, has done some fine work in Medford and vicinity lately.
    Cummons Bros. of Medford precinct sold a large quantity of excellent corn to G. Karewski of this place last week.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1885, page 2


Another Excursion.
    Since the railroad has been completed to Jackson County, the people of southern Oregon have become more neighborly. Within the past six months there has been an excursion to Jacksonville and one in return to Roseburg. We are informed that the order of Red Men of Jacksonville will have a grand jubilee on May 12th, to be participated in by the Yreka lodge. Excursion rates are to be secured from the north over the railroad, so all will have another opportunity to visit our sister city.--[Roseburg] Plaindealer.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1885, page 3


Medford Election.
    The citizens of Medford held an election for town officers last Wednesday, under the provisions of their new charter. Considerable interest was taken, there being a number of candidates for some of the offices. The following officers were chosen: Trustees, Dr. Geary, J. S. Howard, I. J. Phipps, W. H. Barr, A. R. Childers; marshal, J. H. Redfield; treasurer, Chas. Strang; recorder, R. T. Lawton; street commissioner, E. G. Hurt.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, March 27, 1885, page 3


    The Sabbath School Association for Jackson County will meet in Byers' Hall at Medford tomorrow for the transaction of important business to Sabbath schools.
    A Presbyterian Church will be organized at Medford tomorrow (Saturday) by Reverends Williams, Bickenbach and Milligan. The first-named gentleman will be pastor in charge.
    The O.&C.R.R. company are curtailing expenses continually. During the past week they have dispensed with the services of one brakeman on each passenger and freight train.
    Immigrants continue to arrive in southern Oregon in considerable numbers. They are attracted hither by the advantages this section offers, chief among which is our unequaled climate.
    "Leoni," the tight-rope walker, who gave exhibitions here some time since, fell from a rope at Stockton, California, a few days ago and broke his neck. He was 34 years old and had been a showman for twenty years.  
 
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1885, page 3


    Mr. Fronk, depot agent at Medford, made this place a visit Tuesday.
    The health of Dr. Vrooman of Medford is quite poor, we are sorry to say.
    Thos. Teeson and wife of Medford intend to leave for the western slope of California in a few days. Mr. T. goes for the benefit of his health.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart, who purchased H. C. Howard's place in Eden precinct, started for his home in Illinois Sunday evening. He will return with his family as soon as he disposes of his large interests there. Mr. S. will plant several thousand apple and pear trees and several acres of strawberries as soon as he takes possession of his new farm.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1885, page 3


    Mr. J. H. Stewart, whom we mentioned last week as intending to set out an extensive pear orchard on the farm recently purchased by him between Phoenix and Medford, has discovered a large deposit of chalk or gypsum on the farm which he thinks will be a profitable item of export. He has gone back to his old home in Illinois to sell out his property and settle up his business there preparatory to coming out there to live, and expects to return here in time to set out a large number of fruit trees next fall.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 27, 1885, page 3


    No vacant residences in Jacksonville.
    Even the doctors in Jacksonville complain of the hard times.
    Residents of Medford will organize a Presbyterian Church at Medford tomorrow. Rev. M. A. Williams will be the pastor in charge.
    Many newcomers are daily seeking information about Oregon at the rooms of the Oregon Immigration Board. They are mostly from the Western states, Illinois, Nebraska, Ohio leading. About seventy percent of the enquirers come with Southern Oregon as an objective point.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 28, 1885, page 3


    MEDFORD ELECTION.--At the election for town officers for Medford the following proved the successful candidates: For Trustees, J. S. Howard, I. J. Phipps, Dr. E. P. Geary, Wm. Barr and A. Childers. Marshal, J. H. Redfield. Recorder, R. T. Lawton. Treasurer, Chas. Strang. Street Commissioner, E. G. Hurt. 98 votes were cast at the election.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 28, 1885, page 3


    Improvements of the value of nearly $10,000 were made in the new town of Medford, Or., during February.
"Pacific Coast Items," Sacramento Daily Record-Union, April 2, 1885, page 2


    A CHANGE.--J. B. Riddle has leased Byers and Jacobs' brick hotel at Medford and will have it ready for the public three weeks hence. W. G. Kenney has sold his interest in the saloon to his partner, H. H. Wolters, and bought Mr. Lynch's interest in the livery stable there.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 3, 1886, page 3


    Someone, who is either a ranting maniac or in the last stages of delirium tremens, delivered himself of a sickly mess of nonsense in the last issue of an insignificant little sheet published in Medford, attempting to fashion it after Washington Irving's Legend of Sleepy Hollow. The fellow who would thus deliberately and publicly write himself an ass should not be at large and is a fit subject for the insane asylum. We recommend that the county court look after him at once before he performs another like abortion.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1885, page 2


Olla Podrida.
    A report was in circulation yesterday to to the effect that Dr. Vrooman of Medford had died, but proved to be unfounded. He is very sick and in a dangerous condition, however.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1885, page 2


    The new town officers of Medford took their seats this week.
    B. W. Powell of Medford is fitting up a neat office in the Central Hotel.
    Roberts & O'Neil have commenced breaking ground for their new brick building at Medford.
    Considerable work is being done on the road between Jacksonville and Medford. It ought to be macadamized.
    The Sabbath School Association held a meeting at Medford last Saturday, which was well attended. Services were also held in the evening.
    A Presbyterian Church was organized at Medford last Saturday by Reverends A. R. Bickenbach, M. A. Williams and J. V. Milligan.
    Several horses are in training for the races at Medford next month. Some horses from outside of the county are also expected to participate.
    The O.&C.R.R. Co. now runs only one passenger coach to Ashland, having taken off the smoking car as a matter of economy. Our railroad system is truly becoming one-horse in every particular.
    A lawsuit, in which C. W. Broback was plaintiff and J. S. Howard defendant, was tried in Justice Foudray's court this week. The plaintiff was awarded a judgment for $103.25, but the defendant proposes appealing to the circuit court, we learn.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1885, page 3


    Thos. Teeson and wife, lately of Medford, started for Arcata, Humboldt County, Cal., this week. Mr. T. was one of the O.&C.R.R. Co.'s boss carpenters during the extension of their line toward California and built the Grants Pass, Woodville and other depots. He is a first-class mechanic and a worthy gentleman and carries the best wishes of his many friends here and elsewhere with him.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1885, page 3


    WITH THE MAJORITY.--The many friends of Jas. T. Guerin, the well-known contractor, will be pleased to learn that he is now with the great and respectable majority in the social world. On Tuesday evening of last week he was united in marriage with Miss Sarah A. Brown, of Jacksonville. The fair bride is the daughter of George Brown, of Jacksonville, one of the old and respected residents of the valley, and has hosts of friends in the county who will extend hearty wishes for her happiness in the new life. The wedding occurred at the residence of the bride's parents, Rev. Mr. Bickenbach, of the Presbyterian church, officiating. The bride and groom drove over to Medford the same evening, and will reside there, at least for a time.
Ashland Tidings, April 3, 1885, page 3


    Medford people have set out a number of fruit and shade trees. Dr. Geary has planted sixteen fruit trees of different kinds in his lot, and reports all of them growing thriftily without any irrigation whatever so far. He has had the ground about them well cultivated.
    Angle & Plymale are shipping wheat from Medford on every freight train. They are agents for Sibson & Church, of Portland. A large amount of last season's wheat crop still remains in the bins of the farmers of this valley. At the Ish farm some 6000 bushels are still held to await a rise in price.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 3, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Vrooman, of Medford, is very ill with consumption, and his friends fear he has a very short lease of life remaining.
Ashland Tidings, April 3, 1885, page 3


    MEDFORD ELECTION.--At the election for town officers for Medford the following proved the successful candidates: For Trustees, J. S. Howard, I. J. Phipps, Dr. E. P. Geary, W. H. Barr and A. Childers. Marshal, J. H. Redfield. Recorder, R. T. Lawton. Treasurer, Chas. Strang. Street Commissioner, E. G. Hurt. 98 votes were cast at the election.
Ashland Tidings, April 3, 1885, page 3


    The question of building a narrow gauge railroad to connect Jacksonville with the O.&C. Railroad at Medford or Eagle Point is being favorably discussed by the business men of Jacksonville.
"Local News," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 3, 1885, page 3



    A number of fast horses are in training for the Medford races commencing May 5th.
    The fast-running horse Creedmore, formerly of Crescent City, is now at this place in training for the Medford races which commence the 5th of May.
    Brother McGinnis is making the Monitor an interesting paper and is driving the quill with the skill of a man who had come with his "carpetbag" to stay. That's the kind of citizens this country wants.
    The case of C. W. Broback vs. J. S. Howard was tried in Justice Foudray's court this week resulting in a verdict for plaintiff for $101.25 and costs. A large number of witnesses were summoned from Medford and Ashland.
    Dr. M. Vrooman of Medford, who was for a number of years a resident of Jacksonville, is seriously sick, and his recovery is considered extremely doubtful. He united with the Presbyterian Church organized there last Sunday. The Dr.'s many friends in Jacksonville hope to hear of his speedy restoration to health.
    Last Sunday a Presbyterian Church was organized at Medford.  A large concourse of people were present and the ceremonies which included the communion services were very solemn and impressive. It started with a good membership, and the venerable friend Rev. M. A. Williams will be the pastor.
    Brother McGinnis has launched out in fiction, giving his first production "The Modern Rip Van Winkle" to the public in his last edition. His characters are taken from real life, the plot is laid in this valley, and the story ends with a moral. Go ahead, Bro. M., for if you can find literary inspiration in that subject your success in the newspaper line is assured.
    George H. Chick, a Portland real estate agent representing a large amount of capital, was here this week negotiating for the purchase of the Schumpf quartz ledge near Willow Springs, and terms have been agreed upon whereby the former agrees to put up a ten-stamp mill at once to crush the ore now on the dump. The purchasing parties say the regular run of rock assays $22 per ton and they look for big returns.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 4, 1885, page 3


Medford Marble Works.
    Shely & Jacobs are busy at work at their marble works in Medford, and are turning out some fine specimens of their work. They are receiving many orders and giving satisfaction in every particular. As they are not "overrun with orders," you will always find them ready and willing to show you their large assortment of designs, and contract for the erection of monuments, tombstones, tablets, etc., at bedrock prices. Remember they do their own work, have no agent to solicit for them, and can sell as cheap as any house on the coast. Call and see them at their place of business in Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1885, page 1


    A Presbyterian Church will be built at Medford soon.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jas. T. Guerin are residing at Medford for the present.
    W. S. Gore has closed his term of school at Medford, having given the fullest satisfaction. He was efficiently assisted by Miss May Crain.
    Clarence Hoover, son of Dr. G. W. Hoover of Roseburg, has gone to Medford, where his two brothers are engaging in the hardware business.
    Angle & Plymale of Medford are agents for Sibson, Church & Co., of Portland, and have been shipping considerable wheat from this valley.
    A. L. Johnson has sold the livery stable and its contents in Medford to David Payne, who has already taken charge thereof. Mr. Johnson, in turn, purchased Mr. P.'s farm in Eden precinct, paying $3,000 for it.
    G. W. Isaacs has sold 30 head of cattle to John Williams of Antelope. Thos. E. Nichols has also sold 60 head of beeves to W. H. Barr of Medford for five cents a pound on foot.
    Rogue River Valley is the immigrants' paradise. They will find this valley to possess a more genial climate and more prolific soil than any other portion of the northwest coast.
    Dugan & Herely will run a daily express line between this place and Eagle Point, via Medford and Sams Valley after May 1st. They will attend to all business in their line promptly and at reasonable rates.
    A. L. Johnson of Medford has Fred Walpole engaged in making a number of sketches for his forthcoming work on Jackson County. A view of all the towns in the valley will be presented, as also our public buildings, besides other illustrations.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1885, page 3


    Gaylord Bell and wife of Medford have gone to Jacksonville to locate, being pleased with our town.
    D. H. Miller was up from Medford this week. He informs us that the health of our old friend Dr. Vrooman is precarious.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1885, page 3


A Case of Tracheotomy.
    Mrs. L. A. Rose of Phoenix has been quite ill with diphtheria, but we are glad to learn that there are favorable symptoms for her ultimate recovery. Dr. Geary of Medford, a skillful physician, found it necessary to practice tracheotomy in her case, a new medical process which consists in inserting a tube in the windpipe, through which the patients breathe, when otherwise it would be impossible to do so at all and death would necessarily ensue. Through the unremitting care of Dr. Geary Mrs. Rose will owe her life, if she recovers.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1885, page 3


    MEDFORD RACES.--The purses offered by the citizens of Medford have drawn together a good lot of fast nags and we have heard of the following that are now in training at that place: Nebeker's stable--bay gelding Jim Lick, bay filly Alice B. A. Zevely's stable--sorrel gelding Blue Mountain King. Jack Montgomery's stable--bay gelding Col. R. W. G. Kenney's stable--bay filly Lady R. C. J. Tolman's stable--bay mare Peggie Winters, bay gelding Dave C. Tom Miles stable--bay mare Dolly, bay mare Manda, sorrel gelding Brick Pomeroy. All of these with numerous other small fry.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 11, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Vrooman of Medford is still quite low.
    We are informed that the Portland Board of Immigration are in the employ of the railroad company and urge all to go to Jackson County to locate. How true this is we do not know, but the actions of the members of the board would say that it is true.--Oregon City Enterprise.
    Jackson County has room for a much larger population and even if the above charge be true we doubt if the newcomers could be sent to a more favored locality where they can secure homes. Send them along.
    A slight change in the timetable of the O.&C.R.R. will go into effect on Sunday next. The change will not affect the north end of the line but the train going south will arrive at Ashland half an hour earlier and leave there three-quarters of an hour later than at present, in order to give the coaches of the California stage line more time to make the connection. Trains will arrive at Ashland at 4:15 A.M. and leave there at 9:30 P.M. By this arrangement trains from the south will be due at Medford at 10:11 P.M. and from the north at 3:25 A.M.
    A crowd of forty-six immigrants filed into the office of the Oregon Immigration Board yesterday forenoon, and pounced on Secretary Carlisle for information descriptive of Oregon. The states of Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri and California were well represented by sturdy farmers, stockmen, dairymen, etc. Mr. Carlisle saw the uselessness of setting forth the advantages of the country individually to every person, and hit upon the idea of addressing the crowd collectively. In a few minutes all had concluded to settle in Oregon. Twenty-three tickets were issued to Southern Oregon, of which seven were for the round trip. One-half of the people will leave for their destination today. Quite a number will remain here in the city. When the audience dispersed, forty-six copies of "Oregon As It Is" were ready for the postman, mailed to eastern parties.--Portland News.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 11, 1885, page 3


    A new Presbyterian Church is to be built at Medford, Or. this summer..
"Pacific Coast Items," Sacramento Daily Record-Union, April 17, 1885, page 4



    There will be a party at Medford on May 8th.
    H. H. Rice has put up a photograph gallery at Medford.
    Geo. S. Howard is employed at Cook & Mailer's mill on Forest Creek as fireman.
    Passenger travel on the O.&C.R.R. is rapidly increasing since spring has opened.
    H. H. Richardson and Al. Bell of Medford precinct leave for Pendleton before long.
    B. Fisher, the Woodville merchant, paid us a visit this week. So did Wm. Wiley of Datie Creek.
    Dr. Vrooman of Medford is growing weaker and little or no hopes are entertained of his recovery from his illness, we are sorry to state.
    C. W. Skeel of Medford, a first-class mechanic, is building a neat residence for Mrs. G. W. Fordyce.
    J. W. Cowles of Medford has purchased 40 acres of the Crane place in Eden precinct for a fruit farm.
    The Heber Grove schoolhouse will be sold at sheriff's sale on April 24th to satisfy a mechanic's lien.
    David Payne of the Excelsior Stable at Medford is doing a lively business. His vehicles are new and his horses first-class.
    Mrs. M. A. Davison has sold her land near Medford to a Mr. Hawley, lately from New York, for about $2,000. There is nearly 100 acres in the place.
    We are pleased to state that Dr. Geary of Medford, who has been suffering from an attack of diphtheria, has so far recovered as to be able to be about again.
    Mrs. S. E. Ish elsewhere gives notice that she has a house and garden near Medford to rent; also that she has 500 head of good, healthy stock sheep for sale.
    Shely & Jacobs, of the Medford Marble Works, this week erected in our cemetery for Owen Keegan of this place a beautiful headstone over the grave of his little son Johnny. It is another fine specimen of their work, and reflects much credit on them as superior workmen.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1885, page 3


    Jesse Wilson, Sr., of Medford precinct has recovered sufficiently to visit this place.
    W. F. Williamson is teaching the school in the Barneburg district with success. He was in town Saturday.
    Geo. H. Chick, of Portland, a quartz expert, has been in town on business. He speaks quite favorably of the Schumpf and other ledges.
    Fred. Walpole is taking views of different portions of the county for A. L. Johnson's descriptive pamphlet of Jackson County. He is accompanied by Mr. Smith.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1885, page 3


    The Medford school has been closed this week in order to prevent any danger from diphtheria, considerable alarm having been caused in town by the cases at Phoenix and the illness of Dr. Geary. No cases have appeared in that neighborhood, however, and the school will likely reopen next Monday.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 17, 1885, page 3


The Medford Races.
    Following is a list of the horses in training for the Medford races, to commence May 5th and last four days:
    W. G. Kinney's stable--bay filly named Lady R.
    Jack Montgomery's stable--bay gelding, Col. R.
    Alex. Zevely's stable--sorrel gelding, Blue Mountain King.
    J. R. Nebeker's stable--bay filly, Alice B. and bay gelding (the noted flyer) Jim Lick.
    Crit. Tolman's stable--bay mare, Peggy Winters, and bay gelding, Patsie Duffie Jr.
    Tom Miles' stable--bay mare, Dolly C., brown mare, Mauely C., and bay gelding, Brick Pomeroy.
    "Silver Tail" and "Maplewood" are expected from Roseburg, also "Clipper" and another horse from Smith River, in fact "the woods" about Medford is alive with race horses. The circle mile track, with a little more work, will be in fine condition, and fast time is expected from both Jim Lick and his rival, Blue Mtn. King, in the half-mile dash and half-mile heats. A large attendance is expected at the races.
X. X. X.       
Ashland Tidings, April 17, 1885, page 3


Races at Medford.
    Several days' racing will take place at Medford week after next, and as liberal purses will be put up, some excellent speed contests are promised. A correspondent informs us that Nebeker & Tolman are training Jim Lick, Peggy Winters, Alice R. and Patsy Daily, Jr.; Thos. Miles has Dolly C., Brick Pomeroy and a brown mare in his stable; while W. G. Kenney, Jack Montgomery and Alex. Zevely each have a fast nag in training. Other fleet-footed animals from abroad are expected to participate.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1885, page 3


Olla Podrida.
    The Medford school suspended on account of the diphtheria scare, but will be in season soon again.
    Hon. C. W. Broback of Medford, one of the best citizens of our valley, was in this place this week. A few spiteful persons are persecuting him, but to no avail, as public sentiment is with Mr. B.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1885, page 3



CARD FROM MR. BROBACK.
MEDFORD, Oregon, April 8, 1885
    MR. BROBACK--I take my pen in hand to plead for my fatherless [omission]--not myself. With my own work I can support myself; but I want to raise my children decently and give them a common education. I put my claim at $1,000. If you will compromise with that amount I will not prosecute you. I will give you till tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock to make up your mind. If you don't compromise with that amount I will prosecute to the extent of the law.
MRS. CALDWELL

    In reply to the above I have to state that if I am indebted to you on account of the death of your husband then I am a criminal, and your offer to compromise your husband's blood and honor and allow the perpetrator of such a crime to go free, and your husband's blood unrequited, ought to bring the blush of shame upon the cheeks of your advisers if not upon yourself.
    In the declaration contained in your letter to "compromise" crime for money, you hold up the character of yourself and the blackmailing villains to public infamy, thus warning all men not to credit them. A perfidy so notorious cannot be hid. It stands open to the public gaze. To accept your offer would be like a foolish dotard taking to his arms the bride that despises him, or who has placed on his head the ensigns of her disgust. It is kissing the hand that boxes his ears, and proposes to renew the exchange.
    A due sense of honor to myself and family and the community forbids me accepting the terms you propose.
C. W. BROBACK
Medford, April 21, 1885
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1885, page 3


DIED
VROOMAN--In Medford, April 17th, of bronchial consumption, Dr. Martin Vrooman; aged 66 years, 8 months and 26 days. (Obituary next week.)
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1885, page 3


    WORK COMMENCED.--The work of building the side track at Central Point was commenced this week and it will not take long to finish it. The warehouse will also be put up at once, and local speculators have already commenced figuring on the price of town lots in Beallview. It will be a station for side-tracking freight cars, not a stopping place for passenger trains, so we are informed.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 25, 1885, page 3


    OUR IMPORTS.--To gain some information on the subject of how much freight is brought to Jacksonville we this week examined the freight bills of Geo. Freeman, our main freighter between here and Medford, when we found that he had hauled up 578,811 pounds and the railroad charges on the same were $8,925.78. Karewski and several other of our substantial merchants do their own hauling and the above figures only include what Mr. Freeman has brought here himself, dating from the first of September of last year to this date. Apparently some business is still being done in Jacksonville.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 25, 1885, page 3


    Races commence at Medford next Tuesday to last four days.
    A social dance will be held at Medford next Friday night in the building adjoining Payne's livery stable.
    The Medford races commence on May 5th. Eight race horses are in training and a lively time is anticipated.
    The funeral of Dr. Vrooman last Sunday brought a large number here from Medford, and the procession was one of the longest we have seen here for some time past.
    Angle & Plymale yesterday purchased 10,000 bushels of wheat of G. Karewski of this place to be delivered on the cars at Medford. Times are brightening up in this line.
    The frosts of this week nipped nearly all the small fruits in this section, and over in the Applegate country there will be no fruit of any kind, so we are informed by several residents of that locality.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 25, 1885, page 3


F.   H U B B A R D,
MEDFORD, OREGON,
Mfg. Agent for the
NORWEGIAN
PLOW COMPANY
OF DUBUQUE, IOWA
PLOWS,                                      
HARROWS,
                                  SULKY PLOWS.
Riding and Walking
CULTIVATORS
Manufactured
EXPRESSLY FOR THE COAST TRADE
    These are the finest implements ever brought to this market.
    Also agent for Russell & Co.'s Engines, Threshers and Saw Mills, and the celebrated
MITCHELL WAGON
And Gale Seeder; also, the
Empire Cutting Machinery!
Call and see me before purchasing elsewhere.
F. HUBBARD.
Medford, April 25, 1885.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1885 et seq., page 1


PORTLAND, Or., April 8, 1885.
Messrs. T. F. Beall and C. Magruder, Central Point, Oregon:
    GENTLEMEN--Referring to the conversation had with you in my office a few days ago in regard to a switch at Central Point, I beg now to say to you in writing:
    While I doubt the validity of the act passed during the last session of the legislature of the State of Oregon, making it compulsory for the railroad company to furnish the rails and lay sidetracks upon certain conditions as contained in said act being first complied with by the applicant for such a sidetrack, I do not deem it convenient at this very moment to test this matter in the courts, and I am therefore willing to act upon your application in the following manner and under the following conditions, to wit:
    I will furnish the rails and fastenings for the sidetrack at Central Point as now staked out, and lay the track when graded and ties furnished by you and after your warehouse is built, and after reasonable and satisfactory evidence is given that at least three hundred (300) tons of freight will be shipped from said warehouse within one month of the date when said track shall have been completed.
    The right is reserved to take up said track at any time if said three hundred (300) tons of freight have not been shipped within a month from the date when said track shall have been completed, or if said three hundred (300) tons have been shipped. But when another lot of three hundred tons shall have accumulated in said warehouse, I agree to again put down the rails.
    No agency [shall] be established at said switch, nor shall the railroad be bound to stop its trains at such switch, except for the purpose of receiving freight stored in said house. In case freight is delivered by the railroad at said point it will be done only upon the prepayment of freight charges at the forwarding station, as is customary.
    This agreement is made by me as receiver, and will hold good only during my receivership, as I have no right to bind the Oregon & California Railroad Company beyond the term of my office as such receiver.
    Inasmuch as the probable construction of this sidetrack has already created considerable anxiety amongst parties who, in good faith, have bought property at Medford, and who now fear the establishing of a rival town in close proximity with the aid of the railroad company, I deem it my duty to publicly declare that this switch is considered by me as a private switch, merely built for the accommodation of yourself and others in your immediate vicinity, and that it will receive the same consideration as other stub switches along the line.
    I shall furnish a copy of this letter to our agent at Medford for publication.
    Please reply whether you accept the terms.
Yours truly,
                                      R. KOEHLER, Receiver.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1885, page 1


Very True.
    Jacksonville, the county seat and the most important town of Jackson County, unless, perhaps, it may now have a rival in Ashland, was left to one side by the railroad. It was passed, not from an arbitrary motive, but because it was not easy to build the road to it. The town was located as a mining camp and for the convenience of miners and quiet without consideration of it possible future as a commercial town. The railroad passes it five miles to the east. The town has unquestionably suffered, but it is by no means dead or in the way of dying. It still has the large local trade it has always had, and will retain it. The new town of Medford, situated on the railroad at the point nearest Jacksonville, has grown in a few months to be a thriving place of about a hundred houses, but it has not, as many expected, robbed Jacksonville of its trade or of its importance as a general center.--Oregonian.
    It seems to be the impression now that the railroad would have run near to Jacksonville, had her people approached, in an irresistible manner, a certain division engineer, who, for some unaccountable reason, always made this place his headquarters.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1885, page 3


Wheat Sales.
    There is some activity in the grain market, consequent upon war rumors from Europe, and much wheat has changed hands at an advanced figure. G. Karewski sold 10,000 bushels last week to Plymale & Angle of Medford, for the Salem flouring mills, and we learn that P. W. Olwell of Phoenix has also sold a large quantity. The rate paid was 60 cents a bushel, sacked and delivered at the railroad. This is not a big price, but more satisfactory than that offered for several months past, even if buyers do require the train to be free from all kinds of rubbish. As long as the railroad company maintains its exorbitant freight charges, grain cannot be raised with much profit in southern Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1885, page 3


    The Heber Grove schoolhouse was sold last Saturday by Sheriff Jacobs and bid in by W. R. Jones for $100.
    The Medford races take place next week. Several liberal purses will be run for and quite a number of racers will participate.
    Harry Lambert, an experienced hotel man, has taken charge of the Medford House and will give the supper for the party on the 8th.
    Work on Roberts & O'Neil's brick building at Medford is progressing rapidly. They will put a large stock of goods into it when it is completed.
    A Chinaman was arrested this week for attempting to commit burglary at Cunningham's hotel at Medford. He had an examination in Justice Barkdull's court and was sent to jail in default of bail.
    Having only one freight train a week from Portland is proving quite an inconvenience to our merchants. Wells, Fargo & Co., however, are well pleased with the new arrangement.
    Mrs. M. Caldwell of Medford, as administratrix of the estate of Wm. S. Caldwell, deceased, has commenced suit against C. W. Broback for damages, on account of killing her husband, which she places at $5,000. As it was proved that Mr. Broback acted in self-defense, it seems as if Mrs. C. was being imposed upon by some enemies of this gentleman.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1885, page 3


J. P. WELCH, M.D.
P H Y S I C I A N   &   S U R G E O N
Medford, Oregon.
Special attention given to Diseases of Females and Children, and all chronic diseases; also Surgery in all its branches.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1885 et seq., page 1


    Dr. J. P. Welch, who comes well recommended, has located at Medford for the practice of his profession. See his card elsewhere.

    J. C. Cowles, dealer in musical instruments, etc., at Medford, went down to Delta, Cal., to meet his wife, who has been giving lessons in painting at San Francisco, Cal. They paid Jacksonville a visit.
    Our old friend F. Hubbard of Medford has been appointed agent for the Norwegian Manufacturing Co. of Iowa, and received a carload of superior agricultural machinery etc., from them not long since.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1885, page 3


    BURGLARY AT MEDFORD.--There was an exciting time at Cunningham's hotel in Medford last Sunday night. After everyone in the house had retired the alarm of "burglary!" shattered the stillness of the night, and several men turned out quickly enough to see a Chinaman [hastily] leaving the premises. The Chinaman was at once pursued, and after dodging about among the buildings in that part of town for some time to escape the bullets from a number of pistol shots that were fired at him, he was finally captured as he was crawling under a house. It proved to be a Celestial named "Jim," who has been about Medford for some time. On Monday he had a hearing before Justice Lawton, and was committed to jail in Jacksonville to await the meeting of the grand jury.
Ashland Tidings, May 1, 1885, page 3


    Mrs. Margaret Caldwell, widow of the late Wm. Caldwell who was killed at Medford, has brought suit against Mr. Broback for $5,000 damages. S. B. Galey, Esq., of Ashland, is retained by Mrs. Caldwell to manage the suit.
    Strangers must be greatly impressed with the urban proportions of the towns in this country. A short time ago the Medford paper gravely mentioned that the post office in that place "is within five minutes' walk of any part of the city," and now the News, of Scott Valley, Siskiyou County, comes to the fore with the announcement that its office is in telegraphic communication with "both ends of the city."
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 1, 1885, page 3


    The Medford races commence next Tuesday and lots of fun is promised.
    M. A. McGinnis, editor of the Medford Monitor, called this week and says times are about average in his section.
    The following are the horses entered for the Medford races to take place on the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th of this month: "Dolly C," "Colonel R," "Blue Mountain King," "Jim Lick," "Peggy Winters," "May Queen," " Jenny T," "Stranger" and "Lady R," all of which are in good order. The track is in first-class shape and a big time is anticipated.
    When ready for start for Lake County, Cal., this week, C. W. Broback of Medford was informed that a suit for $5,000 damages had been entered against him by the widow of William Caldwell for the killing of her husband not long since. While Mr. Broback did shoot and kill Mr. Caldwell, a judicial investigation declared him not guilty of any crime and he was discharged in consequence, the community in which he lived approving of the verdict. The case will come up for trial at the next term of court, and Mr. B. has set the date of his departure at a time after its close.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 2, 1885, page 3


BORN.
GODDARD--In Medford, Tuesday, April 28th, 1885, to Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Goddard, a daughter.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 2, 1885, page 3


    The informal organization of Myrtle Creek and Medford churches were approved and pastors thereof instructed to complete the organization by the ordination of duly elected elders.
"Oregon Presbytery,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 2, 1885, page 4


    Tolman & Nebeker of Medford, Jackson County, say in the Gold Beach Gazette that they have a gelding that they will run against R. D. Hume's Maplewood or Nimbus a quarter, a half, three-quarters, or a mile dash, or half-mile heats, for from $1000 to $5000, and that they have the silver and the sand to put it up. Hume is to hear from.
The Coast Mail, Marshfield (Coos Bay), May 7, 1885, page 2


REWARD OF INDUSTRY
    It is with genuine pleasure that we copy the following from the Monitor, of Medford, Oregon:
    "Notice is hereby given that M. A. McGinnis and Wilfred Lewis have, this 24th day of April, 1885, formed a copartnership under the firm name of McGinnis & Lewis, for the purpose of carrying on the publication of the Medford Monitor, and the execution of job work.
    "We will soon open a job office, material for the same being already ordered, and will also favor our readers with more valuable local and editorial news, as we will print both sides of our paper at home.
    "Mr. Lewis is one of the very best job printers on this coast, and he will have exclusive control and management of the mechanical department of the paper and all job work.
    "M. A. McGinnis will be editor-in-chief, will keep the books and do the soliciting."
    Under the former proprietorship, Mr. Lewis grew up in The Ledger office. He is known in Warren as a young man of more than usual executive ability and mechanical ingenuity.
    His knowledge of the printing business is extensive and varied, and is of such a character as to make the executive department of the Monitor a success. We trust that he may still continue to advance as his capabilities are more fully tested. We wish the Monitor long life and prosperity.
The Ledger, Warren, Pennsylvania, May 8, 1885, page 4


A. L. Johnson to David Payne, livery stable in Medford; consideration, $2,000.
David Payne to Lizzie Johnson, 84 acres of land in Eden precinct; $3,000.
I. J. Phipps to J. C. Cowles, lots in Medford; $150.
C. W. Broback to Granville Naylor, lots in Medford; $135.
C. W. Broback to G. W. Howard, all his lots in Medford and 7 acres adjoining; $3,800.
C. W. Broback to Andrew Frakes, lot in Medford; $100.
I. J. Phipps to A. S. Johnson, lots in Medford; $175.
C. W. Broback to Harlow Kinney, lot in Medford; $250.
S. T. Jones to L. Buensow, lot in Medford; $50.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1885, page 1



    The Oregon and California Railroad has shortened up the time between Portland and San Francisco to two and a half days. The train which leaves Portland at 7:30 a.m. reaches Ashland at 4:15 next morning for breakfast. At 5 the stage starts south, reaching Delta twenty-four hours later. The train leaves at 6:40 a.m. and reaches San Francisco at 6:40 p.m., less than sixty hours from Portland, which is pretty fast traveling. Mails, of course, will go overland.
Editorial, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1885, page 2


    THE RACES. --Four day's races
were held at Medford this week, commencing Tuesday and ending last night. Considerable of a crowd was present, but very little money changed hands. A half-mile dash on the first day was won by "Jim Lick," beating "Ketchikan" and "Dolly C." A three-quarter[-mile] race on the second day between "Dollie C.," "Peggy Winters" and "Col. R.," which was won by the former, with "Col. R." a good second. On Thursday there were two entries for the half mile and repeat race, "Dollie C." and the Nebeker mare. The first heat was declared a dead heat, causing much dissatisfaction, when the Nebeker mare was withdrawn and "Dollie C." galloped around the second time and was given the race without further contest. The last day's races was between "Jim Lick" and "Peggy Winters," the latter getting shut out on the first heat.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 9, 1885, page 3


    Grasshoppers are said to have become numerous on the other side of Bear Creek.
    Signor Julian, the well-known wizard, is now at Medford and will probably show here next week.
    Early summer fights began in Jacksonville and Medford this week, but they did not amount to enough to make a decent item.
    The city authorities at Medford had a calaboose built there last week, thinking probably that it would prove beneficial during the races ending last night.
    The overland time on the O.&C.R.R., between Portland and San Francisco, is now two days and a half. Fare to San Francisco $32; to Sacramento $30.
    Pat McMahon is the successful bidder for the following mail routes advertised not long since: From Jacksonville to Wilderville; from Medford to Table Rock P.O.; from Crescent City to Gasquet's.
    When at Medford this week we seen Mr. Reed's fine mare known as the "Oregon Beauty." Her tail drags on the ground, and her mane and foretop is seven feet long. She will probably be brought here for exhibition today.
    The medical fraternity from other portions of the county was well represented in Jacksonville last Thursday with the following list: Dr. Parsons of Ashland, Dr. Stanley at Sams Valley, Dr. Kramer of Sams Valley, Dr. DeVis of Phoenix, and Dr. Geary of Medford. One of them informed us that they had come here to hold an inquest on the town, but after an examination they concluded that it was the liveliest corpse they had seen for some time. The inquest was in consequence indefinitely postponed.
    The foundations for two new brick buildings in Medford has been started. George W. Williams is building one and Roberts & O'Neil the other. Mr. Williams will arrange the upper story of his building so that it can be used for lodge purposes, with the two rooms in front for offices.
    The three conductors on the passenger trains of the O.&C.R.R., west side, have all been discharged suddenly, without explanation from the company. It is removed that a trap was set for them and they fell. C. H. Kline, formerly mail agent running to Ashland, has been appointed to fill one of the vacancies. One of the discharged conductors was "Pap" Stroud, who was formerly on the east side. All three of the discharged men had been in the service for many years.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 9, 1885, page 3


BORN.
SHELY--In Medford, May 1, 1885, to Mr. and Mrs. R. M.  Shely, a daughter.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 9, 1885, page 3


Oregon's Future.
    The tide of immigration now setting toward Oregon is only the vanguard of a great multitude a little way behind. From every quarter of the union comes the intelligence that people are getting ready to immigrate to the west. The drought in California this year will send thousands of newcomers to us and to Washington Territory. Immigration coming to this coast all over the central routes this season will give California the go-by unless they have friends or relatives to cause them to tarry. The completion of the Northern Pacific and the Oregon Short Line has lent such additional facilities to travel and so cheapened rates that many heretofore unable to come are now coming or contemplate coming in the near future.
    One great drawback to a heavy immigration is the difficulty of disposing the property in the East and middle-western states. Property has greatly depreciated there. If people could sell out in these localities without too much sacrifice, there would be a regular stampede for the golden shores of the Far West. As it is they are coming as fast as they can get away. The terrible storms experienced in many of the western and southwestern states [what we call today the Midwest] preclude the possibility of their ever becoming desirable places for residence. Cities [sic] of refuge, a hole dug in the ground, into which families can flee in times of storms, is the local accompaniment of thousands of dwellings in some of the western states. Who would like to live in a country where the hard earnings of a lifetime are liable to be swept away in a moment of time, dashed to pieces and destroyed? Where life is not safe for one moment! Rather live in the Willamette Valley, the Eden of the Far West, where the heaviest winds do comparatively no damage, and cyclones and the battling of the elements are unknown.
    If we were gifted with the spirit of prophecy we would prophesy a brilliant future for Oregon. That it will in a few years have a large population of worthy and happy citizens. That the Willamette Valley will one day be to Oregon what the Mohawk Valley is to New York--a rich beehive of human industry. A beautiful garden, exalted to the highest standard of cultured excellence, and becoming in vernal beauty and unexcelled productions.--Albany Bulletin.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 16, 1885, page 1


    The leading citizens and business men of Jackson County ought at once to organize an immigration board, and have full statistical information on hand, so that persons coming here could apply at once to the board and get all needed information in reference to our county. By this means many could be detained, but as it is, they apply to everyone, and no one seems to be well informed on the subject that would interest our eastern friends when they arrive. Other counties are wide awake to these interests, and should no longer be neglected by us. The greatest immigration that ever came to Oregon is now upon us, and are mostly of the better class, just such as we need to build up a county. We learned some important facts last week in Portland in regard to this opportunity, which we should embrace.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 16, 1885, page 1


Immigration News.
    Immigrants by steamers from California are put into possession of Oregon State Board literature at Astoria, says the Oregonian, and by this means are guided where they can find accurate and interesting information.
    The immigrants who visited the rooms of the state board on Saturday, and were ticketed to points in this state, brought more than $40,000 with them in cash or bank notes.
    Thirty-eight immigrants visited the rooms of the State Board of Immigration yesterday. The secretary ticketed most of them to  points in [the] central region. A party of Germans went to Lebanon.
    At the rooms of the State Board of Immigration there is an unusually great demand for farming property located in western Oregon. It will be a great assistance to the secretary of the board, Mr. Carlisle, if those having farms for sale in this or any other section of the state will make a short record of the land and send it in. The work performed by the board is wholly gratuitous. In a short time the secretary will issue another list of farms for sale for distribution, and those who send now will have the advantage of this wide-reaching advertisement.
    Among the Germans arriving by the train from St. Paul yesterday was Jacob Bors, who, through Elder Bowersox of Salem bought and paid for a fine farm near Lebanon, Linn County, before he left his native soil. A great many families will follow Mr. Bors from his part of the German empire.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 16, 1885, page 2


    Ben Lohr has been removed as conductor on the O.&C.R.R., on the run between Ashland and Roseburg.
    The proceedings of the Jackson County Board of Immigration are unavoidably crowded out this week, having reached us too late. The next meeting of the board will be held at Medford next Saturday when propositions for the location of permanent headquarters will be received and the question of issuing pamphlets will also be decided.
"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 16, 1885, page 3


    MARSHAL ARRESTED.--John Redfield, City Marshal of Medford, was arrested this week on a charge of assault and battery on a young man named McCarty and brought here for trial before Justice Foudray. A large number of Medford witnesses appeared at the trial when defendant was found guilty and sentenced to pay a fine of $10 and costs--amounting to about $91 in all. The Marshal was charged with beating McCarty over the head with a heavy kingbolt, inflicting bruises that were not necessary in making the arrest. Redfield paid the fine, but the costs remain unpaid and stand against him as judgment.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 23, 1885, page 3


    The Board of Immigration meets at Medford today.
    John Roloson has gone to Uniontown with a force of carpenters to build a new barn for Robert Cameron.
    Mr. C. C. Beekman recently presented two lots to the trustees of the Presbyterian Church at Medford. J. S. Howard, A. L. Johnson and Dr. E. P. Geary are the trustees.
    George T. Rogers, a former resident of Jacksonville, returned from Smith River, Cala. this week, and we learn that he intends opening a barber shop at Medford.
    Dr. Pryce, after a trip to the eastern states, has located at Medford for the practice of his profession and asks a share of patronage when in need of medical skill. Read his card.
    We visited Medford last Sunday and attended Sunday school and the quarterly meeting of the M.E. Church. Medford society is forming on the highest moral, social and religious plane, having already a well-attended Sunday school, an organized church, and regular services by every religious denomination in the valley. The people intend building a fine church there this summer.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 23, 1885, page 3


MARRIED.
LEWIS-SIMPKINS--In Medford precinct April 28th, 1885, by Rev. M. A. Williams, John W. Lewis and Miss Phoebe Simpkins.
Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, May 23, 1885, page 3


    LOCATED.--Editor, Sentinel:--Please say in your columns that the office of the County Board of Immigration for Jackson County, Oregon is in the Town Hall of Medford, one door north of A. L. Johnson's land office. Those having real or personal property for sale, and those wishing to purchase the same, will do well by calling at our office. We also wish samples of the products of the county brought to our office, to be placed on exhibition, and we wish those who want help to send us word that we may find employment for those seeking for honest labor in our midst. Correspondence solicited.
    Address MARTIN PETERSON, Secretary of Board of Immigration.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 30, 1885, page 3


    Wm. Egan, formerly saloon keeper at Medford, has gone to Lakeview to locate. He thinks of going into the stock business again.
    The firm of McGinnis & Lewis as publishers of the Medford Monitor has been dissolved, the former continuing the business alone.
    The man drowned in Klamath River last week was a tramp printer that worked in the Medford Monitor office a few days before the accident.
    The Caldwell-Broback damage suit has been postponed until next term of court, and the latter will move to Lake County [California] in a short time, expecting to return at the next term.
    Grasshoppers are doing considerable damage to growing crops on the other side of Bear Creek, so we are informed by John Hockenjos. This is the first instance that Jackson County has been attacked with a pest of this kind.  [There were grasshopper plagues in 1855 and 1856.]
    Mr. R. A. Jones, who has had charge of the railroad company's interests at Buck Rock Tunnel since the suspension of contract work, has resigned his position there and will soon go down to his ranch in Douglas County. Col. C. F. Frizell takes charge of the tunnel and all supplies stored there.--Tidings.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 30, 1885, page 3


Immigration Board.
    The county board of immigration for Jackson County, Oregon met in Byar's hall at 1 o'clock p.m. in Medford, May 23, 1885. President J. B. Wrisley, J. H. Griffis, P. Pickens, G. F. Pennebaker, A. J. Daley and M. Peterson. Moved and carried that we resolve ourselves into a committee of the whole to consider upon the adoption of a set of rules for the board. The president, J. B. Wrisley, then called the house to order, and the following preamble, resolutions and rules were adopted.
    WHEREAS; The County Commissioners of Jackson County, Oregon, in their wisdom, have seen fit to appoint a county board of immigration for said county of nine members, representing the principal districts of the county, And
    WHEREAS; The County Commissioners have appropriated a certain sum of money to be used by the board for the purpose of diffusing the knowledge of the resources of said county among immigrants; Therefore be it
    RESOLVED; That we, the members of said county board of immigration, feeling the great responsibility placed on our hands, in order that we may use said appropriation in a way that will most greatly benefit our county, do hereby establish the following rules, by which we shall be governed, to wit: 1. The officers of the board shall consist of a Chairman and a Secretary. 2. It shall be the duty of the Chairman to preside at all meetings of the boards; to discharge all the duties of a presiding officer, and to call the members of the board together whenever there is important business to require their attendance. 3. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to keep a record of the proceedings of the Board, to receive and answer all communications, to notify each member of the Board whenever there is a meeting called, to give information to immigrants desiring to locate in the county and transact all business the Board may direct. 4. It shall require the attendance of five of the Board to constitute a quorum; any business transacted by a less number will be illegal and void. 5. The Secretary shall receive two dollars per day for his services actually performed, and all traveling expenses paid and shall hold office as long as a majority of the Board shall consider him competent, or until he may see proper to resign. Moved that J. H. Griffis be chosen Secretary. He declined, as the pay would not justify him to leave his business to attend to this business. Moved that M. Peterson be chosen Secretary. It was so ordered. Mr. Griffis presented to the Board a proposition from Gold Hill that it would furnish the Board with suitable office and exhibition rooms. Also the trustees of the town of Medford presented the following proposition which was accepted, viz: To the Honorable Board of Immigration for Jackson County, Oregon, Mr. Wrisley Chairman. We, the trustees of Medford, Jackson County, in Oregon, hereby make you the following proposition, if you will locate your headquarters at Medford. We will furnish you suitable rooms, stationery and lights free of charge during your stay in Medford, while carrying on the business of the Board. J. S. Howard, President; W. A. Burr, E. P. Geary, I. J. Phipps and A. Childers. Mr. Hubbell, of Jacksonville, presented an informal offer of rooms from the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Jacksonville. Moved and carried that Secretary report at each regular meeting of the Board all money expended. Moved and carried. That the next regular meeting of the Board be on Friday, at 1 o'clock July 3, 1885, at Medford, and the first Friday in each month. Mr. J. H. Griffis made quite a good speech on the duty of us as the Board of Immigration to bestir ourselves for the further development of the resources of our county, and as far as possible arouse the dormant muscle and brain of our young Oregonians and bring into requisition every power of body and mind to develop the resources of our grand country, which can be made one of as lovely places as is found on earth. Short addresses were delivered by Messrs. A. L. Johnson, J. S. Howard, G. A. Hubbell and others. Moved to have the proceedings published in the county papers. Moved that we give a vote of thanks to Mr. Hubbell for acting as Secretary pro tem and to Mr. Byars for use of all for meeting of the Board; carried. Moved to adjourn; carried.
J. B. WRISLEY, Chairman.
M. PETERSON, Secretary.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 30, 1885, page 3


    "Nevada," by Ashland amateurs, was played there last week and will be repeated at Medford tonight.

    By addressing Geo. H. Chick at Henley, Cal., you can arrange for the crushing of any amount of quartz, thereby giving it a practical test--more than an assay usually amounts to.
    Medford will celebrate the 4th of July, and $250 has already been subscribed to defray the expenses thereof. We learn that they will hire the Henley band and don't propose to be excelled in the valley in their patriotic demonstrations on the glorious 4th. We certainly admire their energy in the way they take hold of it and predict a splendid time for our neighbors.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 6, 1885, page 3


    NOTICE TO SHIPPERS.--George Freeman, our popular teamster between here and Medford, says that after this date he will not be responsible for any breakages and hereby gives due notice. Mr. Freeman is one of our most careful freighters, nothing but an accident ever having caused an accident while in his hands, and we consider him right in giving this notification.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, June 6, 1885, page 3



    Medford proposes building a large brick hotel soon, to be owned by several of the solid men of the town.
    "Nevada" at Medford by Ashland amateurs last Saturday was voted a success, quite a number attending from here.
    Pat McMahon has sublet his mail route from Medford to Eagle Point to Mr. Stanley, a resident of Central Point precinct.
    The Jacksonville Amateurs will present the play of "Above the Clouds" to a Medford audience at an early day. It should be liberally patronized, and all will get their money's worth.
    Three new brick buildings will soon be put up at Medford by Geo. W. Williams, J. S. Howard and Roberts & O'Neil. Childers and son have taken the contract to do the work.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 13, 1885, page 3


    It was ordered that the proposed road in Medford precinct, running from the old county road at J. Rowland's residence and intersecting the new county road leading from Jacksonville to Medford, be established as prayed for. . . . In the matter of a petition of Martin Peterson and others for a road running from Antelope Creek to Medford, H. C. Fleming, W. T. Moore and Rufus Cox appointed viewers.
"Commissioner's Court," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 13, 1885, page 3


    Medford is making substantial and rapid improvements, of which we will make extended notice next week.
    Medford will soon have another saloon, with W. H. McAdams and W. Heeley as proprietors. They propose opening July 1st and will run a first-class saloon.
    J. H. Griffis, the newly elected Secretary of the Board of Immigration, is an energetic and wide-awake young man, and he is doing effective work in his new position.
    If you have anything in the way of products to show the advantages of this country, send a sample to J. Henry Griffis, Secretary of the Board of Immigration at Medford.
    The citizens of Medford will also celebrate the Fourth in fine style and propose having a grand time. Hon. L. Bilyeu of Eugene City will deliver the oration, and M. A. McGinnis of the Monitor is the Reader. An excellent programme of exercises is furnished.
    Our old friend Howard of Medford is building a two-story brick store, and says he will have a grand parlor in the upper story for his lady customers, and will have a brass band to play on the piazza in front every evening. Howard is a lady's man and will spare no pains to please his lady customers, but we promised not to tell this, as it is intended as a grand surprise, and that is why we haven't said anything about it.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 20, 1885, page 3


Board of Immigration.
MEDFORD, JACKSON COUNTY, OREGON, JUNE 16, 1885.
    Pursuant to a call by the chairman, the Jackson County Board of Immigration met at one o'clock p.m. on the day above mentioned. The board was called to order by the chairman, J. B. Wrisley. Minutes of previous meeting read and adopted. The chairman stated that the object of the meeting was to determine whether the board shall publish a descriptive pamphlet of Jackson County or not. A. J. Daley moved that the secretary of the board be required to make a statement of the immigration work he has done while acting as secretary, carried. The secretary then read letters he had written descriptive of Jackson County. A. L. Johnson submitted a pamphlet published by Klamath County as an example of the manner in which the different subjects should be treated. On motion of J. H. Griffis, the secretary was ordered to obtain information as to the cost of writing and publishing 5,000 pamphlets of about twenty pages each, descriptive of Jackson County, and also to invite those who have already written up the resources of the county to present their manuscript at the next regular meeting of the board. After considerable discussion on matters of immigration, the secretary tendered his resignation, which was accepted by the board. J. H. Griffis was then elected secretary. Hon. H. B. Miller of Josephine County read a letter before the board outlining the work he considered most necessary for them to do in order to have their county properly represented. He also spoke at some length on immigration in general; at the conclusion of his remarks the board showed its appreciation by thanking him for the advice and information given. On motion a recess of five minutes was taken to draw up written instructions to the secretary as follows, to wit: The secretary shall collect specimens of the vegetable, mineral and manufactured productions of the county, to place on exhibition at the immigration rooms at Medford, and also forward specimens to the State Board of Immigration at Portland. The secretary was given an order for fifty dollars of the fund appropriated for immigration purposes, to be used in defraying the expenses of collecting specimens. On motion of G. F. Pennebaker, the meeting adjourned to meet Friday, July 3, 1855.
J. HENRY GRIFFIS, Sec.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 20, 1885, page 3


    The Iowa Press Association arrived at Medford at 9:30 a.m. yesterday morning and were tendered a grand impromptu reception by the citizens of Medford and Jacksonville. When our people found that it would be impossible for the press association to visit Jacksonville, they determined like Mohammed to go to the mountain. And several carriageloads of people headed by the Silver Cornet Band, in their handsome new regalia and magnificent band wagon, repaired to our neighboring town to greet these distinguished visitors. The Jacksonvillians drove up in procession alongside the train, and after some fine music by the band, Hon. N. Langell arose in his buggy, and in a neat and appropriate speech welcomed the visitors in behalf of the people of Jacksonville, and A. L. Johnson, Esq., occupying the same place, extended a cordial welcome from the citizens of Medford. Hon. Lafe Young and President Swalm acknowledged the courtesies on behalf of the excursionists. Hon. Lafayette Young said he had met people from Iowa in every place he had been except the Oregon penitentiary. The two speakers expressed the appreciation of the entire party for their magnificent reception throughout the state which had been a continued ovation since their arrival in Portland, and at no place had they met with as enthusiastic an impromptu reception as from the citizens of Medford and Jacksonville. Only a few minutes' time were allowed the excursionists for welcomes and farewell, when the bell sounded the time for departure, and the train rolled on, bearing with it the good wishes of the assembled multitude.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, June 20, 1885, page 3



    The report that N. Langell was at Medford when the Iowa editors passed through is all a mistake. The gentleman now himself acknowledges that he must have been laboring under a hallucination.
    J. H. Griffis has arranged a fine display of growing grains and fruits of this valley at the Board of Immigration rooms at Medford. He also has samples of all the small grain and corn raised here, and specimens of fruit, vegetables and minerals that make a good showing for this part of the state.

    Mr. G. H. Chick visited our town again on yesterday accompanied by Mr. Thomas Ewing of San Francisco, who is a capitalist and is the owner of two large mines in Arizona that are paying $40,000 net per month. He seems to be very favorably impressed with the mines in the vicinity of Jacksonville and will return here again in a short time to engage in mining. Mr. Chick will put up a mill here to work the Enterprise Company's rock and to prospect the quartz of this vicinity.
    Several buildings are in course of construction at Medford, among which is a large addition to Lewellen & Lynch's livery stable and elegant residences for Dr. Adkins and Mr. Welsh. I. Phipps has completed a large and commodious barn, and the contract has been let to Childers & Sons for the construction of a large three-story brick hotel for Messrs. Barneburg, Naylor & Hamlin. The brick work has been begun on the three large brick stores that are being erected by Messrs. Howard, O'Neil and Williamson; everything lively and people happy.
    Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway, editor of the New Northwest, was in Jacksonville several days this week. She lectured at Holt's hall to a large audience on Wednesday evening. She is also taking orders for the famous picture "The Coronation of Womanhood," which contain in its unique design splendid lithograph portraits of many of Oregon's most distinguished men who voted for the Woman Suffrage Amendment. She lectured at Phoenix last night, and will also lecture at Medford tomorrow (Sunday) night.
    Two of the Iowa editors concluded to make Oregon their home and did not return with the excursion. J. D. Whitman of Dallas Center, Iowa, was so pleased with a farm near Medford, which was on the market, that he bargained for it, including the growing crop. The railway officials promised him a pass to return home whenever he desired, and Mr. Whitman deserted the excursion and will go to his new farm next week, returning to Iowa in the fall for his family. H. H. Arty of Gravity, on the way to Portland, was left accidentally at Baker City, and while there bought a 640-acre farm. He will return this fall.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 27, 1885, page 3


    HOW THEY DID IT.--It was rumored around town last Sunday about noon that a party had just arrived from Medford, Oregon, bent on the marriage of two of their number, Mr. W. N. Hamilton and Miss Julia Dysert. The rest of the party consisted of the mother and brother of the gentleman above named. It seems that the young couple had met with formidable opposition at the hands of the bride's parents, and that lady being "under age," a license could not be attained. This, of course, put things in a pretty bad way, and but for the friendly ocean some 120 miles from their homes--three miles off the shores of which is the imaginary line between our country and the high seas--we will not attempt to guess what the result would have been; possibly one or more of them had died with broken heart, or, taking a more modern view of the matter, one or t'other had been engrossed in some new pursuit and forgotten the old love long ere the now much wished-for 18th birthday had arrived. At all events, they purposed to get married no matter what was in the way. Arriving here they were informed the only show was to go to sea. Nothing loath, the party secured the services of his honor the judge, and a suitable boat with sufficient crew, and by a little after 1 o'clock put boldly out to sea. By virtue of being appointed captain of the boat, Hon. J. E. Murphy performed the ceremony, after which the company returned to town and shortly afterward proceeded to Smith River, where we learn it was their intention to remain a short time [with] a view of resting up a little before going to their home in Jackson County. We look with all kindness upon the affair and trust that though the marriage was a little out of the usual line of things it will result no less a happy one, and that the young husband will lose no opportunity in making peace with his mother-in-law.--Crescent City Record.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, June 27, 1885, page 3


BORN.
ULRICH--In Medford, June 21, 1885, to Mr. and Mrs. William Ulrich, a son.
DIED.
BROWN--Near Medford, June 24, 1885, Mrs. Pauline Farren Brown, aged 41 years, 2 months and 18 days.
Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, June 27, 1885, page 3


    Angle & Plymale of Medford are doing a rushing business.
    Mrs. J. W. Cowles of Medord has a class in Jacksonville in painting.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 4, 1885, page 3


MARRIED
HULL-FITZGERALD--At Medford, July 1, 1885, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Millard Hull and Miss Elizabeth Fitzgerald.
DIED
ROBINSON--In Medford precinct, June 27, 1885, G. H. Robinson, aged 52 years.
Ashland Tidings, July 10, 1885


    COUNTY COURT PROCEEDINGS.--B. W. Powell and seventeen others came in praying the Court to appoint Wm. Mayfield as Constable of Medford precinct and B. S. Webb and forty-one others praying for the appointment of I. Woolf to the same office, the court decided in giving the office to the latter.
    The petition for a new road from Antelope Bridge to a point at or near Medford was disallowed and the cost of survey was ordered charged to the petitioners.
Excerpt, Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 11, 1885, page 3


    Lewellen and Lynch are having a new front put on their livery stable at Medford, having found their quarters too small to accommodate their large trade.
    Marshal Redfield of Medford is having quite a spat with A. L. Johnson of the same place, and both are airing their grievances through the columns of the Monitor.
    Dr. W. F. Kremer was in town yesterday and informed us that he has now got moved to Grants Pass where he will keep a drug store and engage in the practice of medicine. We wish him success.
    Ashland, Medford and Eagle Point celebrated the glorious 4th, but as we have received no report from either place we cannot give particulars. We learn that each had a fair attendance and all passed off in fine order.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 11, 1885, page 3


    Isaac Woolf has been appointed constable of Medford precinct, vice John Slagle, who failed to qualify.
    Clarence Hoover returned to Roseburg last Saturday, after a visit of several months at Medford, where two of his brothers are engaged in the hardware business.
    The county was never so overrun with tramps as it is at present. Hard times and the advent of the railroad has brought a large number of them into Rogue River Valley.
    Oats nearly eight feet high are on exhibit at the rooms of the Board of Immigration at Medford. They were raised by A. W. Bish, on the Minus Walker place near Ashland.
    The Board of Immigration for this county will meet at Medford tomorrow, when the question of issuing pamphlets setting for the advantages of Jackson County will be settled.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1885, page 3


    Barneburg & Naylor will build a brick hotel in Medford 50x80 feet, two stories high. Work upon it will soon be commenced.
    R. T. Lawton, the Medford real estate agent, reports the sale of 160 acres of land belonging to I. J. Phipps to J. W. Short, and 160 acres on Dry Creek belonging to Mrs. Robinson to James B. Hendershott.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 17, 1885, page 3


    Dr. W. F. Kremer is building a new brick building at Grants Pass to be used as a drug store.
    The firm of Bilger & Maegly has been dissolved by mutual consent and A. H. Maegly & Co. have taken charge of the business, to be continued at the old stand. As heretofore they will continue keeping a full line of all kinds of hardware, farming implements, wagons, etc., and propose selling at the very lowest possible prices.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 18, 1885, page 3


    A gentleman who has recently returned from a trip to southern Oregon reports that farmers in the vicinity of Medford and Central Point, and several towns similarly located, are cutting their wheat for hay. It seems that the dry weather of last spring last so long the wheat became stunted, and though the later rains came in generous quantities, the growth could not be regained.
"The Wheat Crop," Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 23, 1885, page 3


    JACKSON COUNTY PRODUCTS--Mr. J. H. Griffis, secretary of the Jackson County board of immigration, has sent to the state immigration bureau in this city a fine lot of sample products from his section. There are half a dozen samples of wheat in stalk, a large quantity of apples, peas, corn, peaches, plums, pears, a full line of minerals, a few samples of alfalfa, and last, but not least, six boxes containing a few boxes each of the different soils of that part of the state. This last is especially worthy of note. Very few farmers coming from the East but are capable of judging soils, and to have samples 300 miles nearer from the location is very convenient and will be appreciated. The samples of fruit and grain sent by Mr. Griffis are very choice, and show better than any thing else could the prolific character of the soil of southern Oregon.
"Local and General," Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 23, 1885, page 5


Death from Pneumonia.
    Mark Conger, of Medford precinct, one of the well-known and successful farmers of the valley, died at his home on Sunday night last of lung fever, after a short illness. It is said that, in a sportive mood, he joined in a foot race at Medford on the Fourth, and overheated himself, contracting a cold which settled on his lungs and continued to grow rapidly worse until the end came. The funeral was on Monday afternoon and was largely attended, the remains being laid to rest in the cemetery at Phoenix. Deceased leaves a sorrowing wife and family of young children to mourn his loss.
Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1885, page 3


Pamphlets for this County.
    The Jackson County Board of Immigration held a meeting at their office in Medford last Tuesday to consider the question of issuing a pamphlet descriptive of the resources of the county. Manuscript prepared by a gentleman of the county and revised by the Secretary of the Board was submitted and accepted as a satisfactory presentation of the advantages which Jackson County has to offer to the home-seeking immigrant and the capitalist and business man looking for investment. Five thousand copies were ordered printed by the Tidings printing house. The bids for the printing were remarkably close, and the county will have the work done at small cost. The Tidings bid $88.50; the Times $89.98, and the Monitor $90.00.
Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1885, page 3



    The walls of the new brick buildings at Medford are about up to the floor of the second story.
    Barneburg & Naylor have abandoned for the present the building of their proposed brick hotel in Medford.
    For the best grade of Butte Creek shingles apply to Angle & Plymale, of Medford, they have a good stock on hand, for sale at lowest prices.
    D. W. Matthews has bought a lot in Medford, next to Angle & Plymale's store. He has rented a room in Byers & Jacobs' building and will open a drug store.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1885, page 3


    The Gem Saloon at Medford has been renovated in fine style.
    Fruit cans in endless quantities at Miller & Strang's, Medford. They are first-class.
    Shely & Jacobs did the stone work for the new buildings at Medford, and well, too.
    D. W. Mathews has purchased Luke A. Port's lot in Medford and proposes putting up a drug store.
    A. L. Johnson, the land agent, has purchased Roberts & O'Neil's unfinished brick building at Medford, and proposes establishing a private bank in it when completed.
    Work is progressing on Williams' and Howard's brick buildings at Medford. They will be occupied in the main by merchants doing business on the street along which the railroad track runs.
    We draw attention to the card of R. T. Lawton of Medford. He is engaged in the real estate business and has been quite successful in the sale of property entrusted to him. Those who have farms, town property, etc., for sale will do well to give him a trial.
    Our farmers should save their choicest products for the specimen car, which will leave Portland in the middle of August and go the rounds of the fairs in several states east of the Rocky Mountains. It will be a big advertisement for our State and county.
    A petition was circulated by residents of Medford requesting the managers of John Robinson's circus to play at that place instead of Ashland. It was liberally signed, but proved of no avail. There is no doubt but what a performance given in the center of the valley would have been very well patronized.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1885, page 3


IF YOU WANT
Farms, Town Property, Etc.
--GO TO--
R. T. LAWTON'S
REAL ESTATE & COLLECTION Agency.
MEDFORD, OR.
Conveyancing & Notarial Business
A Specialty.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1885 et seq., page 3


    THE BUSINESS OUTLOOK--While there has been no perceptible impetus to trade in Southern Oregon in the last month, the business outlook is decidedly more favorable. The crop prospect, which looked doubtful in the beginning of the season, is now so favorable that an average yield of grain is fully assured, and the late rains have made a good yield of corn a certainty. The general business depression that has prevailed everywhere has affected our country to some extent, but not as it has in other localities where they depended altogether on their export and import trade. Our mines, when we have water, yield handsomely, and no season has ever been so dry but that the revenue from this source has met the moderate demands of trade. Whatever is taken from the mines is so much wealth added to the country, and altogether different from commercial exchanges, where what A makes B loses, and the general prosperity of the country is not increased by the transaction. The building of the railroad through the valley has for the time being been greatly detrimental to our business interests by reason of the demand for a change in the productions of the country that it has occasioned. The large amount of grain that was consumed in freighting and by the stage company is now left on our hands, and the large number of men employed in that way have been compelled to seek other places. While perhaps a thousand horses were engaged in this way ever year before the building of the railroad, there is now no demand for the horses, and the revenue derived from these sources goes entirely to the railroad company, without leaving any other compensation therefor than the value of the few cords of wood consumed in running through the valley. The demand now is for a change in the productions of this country. The fact that we occupy a position between two great commercial centers, and cannot compete with them in exporting heavy freights, has to be met, and the only way in which the products of this country can be made profitable is by the production of such crops for export trade as can be shipped in the smallest bulk. The especial adaptability of this county to fruit and grape culture has been well attested by the variety and excellence of our productions in that line, and our people are taking advantage of the situation, and many acres have been already added to the area in fruits and grapes, but some time must necessarily elapse before profits can be realized on this investment, and in the meantime of course will complain of hard times. Hops yield largely in this valley, and it would require but a short time to start a profitable business in them, but as yet they are an import instead of a valuable export that would give employment to hundreds of laborers and be easily got on the market. Sheep husbandry is a profitable occupation if carefully attended to, and Southern Oregon wool has already an established reputation in the outside markets although it has been engaged in but to a limited extent. Hogs are always a profitable investment, and our bacon and lard stands No. 1 in outside markets. There's no embargo on Southern Oregon pork, in American markets at least. Another urgent demand of this country is an increase in our manufactories and a decrease in our import trade. We have one woolen factory at Ashland in the valley, and the quality of its goods is of acknowledged excellence. The Oregon State Penitentiary is using these goods altogether, and heavy shipments are being made all over the coast, and there is no reason why, with our excellent and unlimited water privileges, every article used in that line should not be manufactured here, besides the numerous other articles of commerce that are being shipped to this country. The general outlook for this country was never better, for the so-called hard times have made people more careful in their investments and more frugal in their habits, and the change from the openhanded liberality of "gold fever" days to a more careful and "penny wise" course is one of the much-needed lessons that the people of this coast are just learning.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 25, 1885, page 3


    Brother McGinnis of the Medford Monitor is making it a lively local paper, and if Medford don't make a great city it won't be his fault.
    Our Medford neighbors are having a lively time among themselves, one would judge from the way they are airing their grievances in the Monitor.
    The Medford Monitor criticizes our county court at length in a recent issue, and intimates that there is a collusion between the judge and commissioners to favor Jacksonville and Central Point. The Sentinel has had a critical eye on the county court, and it has failed to observe any cause for the Monitor's indirect accusation.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 25, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick is milling a large quantity of rebellious ores with his new process in Scott Valley, Cal.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1885, page 3


    Holt & Allison are furnishing Childers & Son of Medford a large quantity of fine lime from their kiln on Jackson Creek.
    Merriman & Redfield, the popular Medford blacksmiths, have enlarged their premises and are doling better work than ever.
    The report that Messrs. Barneburg, Naylor, Hamlin and others would build a brick hotel at Medford is unfounded. At least they have given up any such intention if they ever had any.
    I. Harvey informs us that the old road from his corner west to I. W. Thomas' place has been closed, and the new one between his farm and J. R. Tice's has been opened. Both are near Medford.
    Several of the substantial men of Medford are about to remove to Jacksonville. We do not vouch for the accuracy of this item, but it is fully as truthful as those of a like nature which are continually appearing in a little sheet published in a neighboring town. They have become nauseating even to the people of Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1885, page 3


    The family of F. Hubbard of Medford is expected to arrive from Iowa in the fall.
    O. C. Yates of Napa, Cal., a relative of Cummons Bros. of Medford precinct, is in the valley looking for a location.
    G. W. Howard, Dr. Adkins and W. H. Webb of Medford, accompanied by their families, have gone to view the beautiful scenery afforded along the route to Crater Lake.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1885, page 3


MARRIED
ANDERSON-HULL--In Medford, at the residence of George Anderson, July 25th, by C. H. Barkdull, J.P., D. W. Anderson and Miss Dora Hull.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1885, page 3


    Medford citizens talk of getting a street sprinkler.
    The fixtures for the new drug store of D. W. Matthews were shipped from Salem to Medford this week.
    W. F. Williamson, of Medford, represented the Monitor, Wm. Priest of Jacksonville the Sentinel and Miss Julia Goodyear the Tidings at the Teachers' Institute at Grants Pass last week.
    A petition was circulated by residents of Medford last week requesting the manager of John Robinson's circus to show at that place instead of Ashland. The petition was quite liberally signed, but the managers of the circus refused to comply with their request.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 31, 1885, page 3



MARRIED.
ANDERSON-HULL--In Medford, at the residence of George Anderson, July 25th, 1885, by C. H. Barkdull, J.P., D. W. Anderson and Miss Dora Hull.
McCULLOCH-HOWARD--In Medford, at the residence of Wm. Churchman, July 30th, 1885, by Rev. M. A. Williams, James L. McCulloch and Miss Annie Howard.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 1, 1885, page 3


    The Brewery Saloon at Medford has a new billiard table.
    E. Emerson of Eugene City, the book agent, has returned home and quiet reigns at Medford.
    The fixtures for D. W. Matthews' new drug store at Medford were shipped from Salem last week.
    The fixtures and stock in Wm. Egan's saloon at Medford were sold by the sheriff yesterday. The proprietor is said to have skipped to other scenes.
    Prof. W. F. Williamson has been selected as principal of the Medford district school, while Miss Belle Merriman will be his assistant. Both are excellent selections.
    Travel between this place, Ashland and Medford is good and seems to be increasing. Two stage loads of passengers arrived here Wednesday from the head of the valley. Very good for a "discouraged" town.
    Several boys about town made a trip to Medford Sunday evening, where they suddenly conceived an idea to take leave of their parents without their consent and accordingly boarded the northbound train. They had not gone farther than Eugene City, however, when their funds gave out and they [were] sent home for the "wherewith" to come back. The majority will probably be here soon again.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1885, page 3


MARRIED
McCULLOUGH-HOWARD--At the residence of Wm. Churchman in Medford, July 30, by Rev. M. A. Williams, James L. McCullough and Miss Annie M. Howard.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1885, page 3


Horse Thief Captured.
    On Tuesday morning of last week a fine horse belonging to John Slagle, of Medford, was missed from its stall in David Payne's livery stable, and it was at once surmised that it had been stolen during the night before. Inquiry developed the fact that the horse had been seen in Ashland, and deputy sheriff John Dyer and Mr. Slagle started out upon the search. Wednesday of this week they found the horse in possession of a man who was riding down Scott Mountain, Siskiyou County, Cal. The man proved to be one known as Heard, who had been about Medford for some time, and he was promptly arrested and brought back to Oregon. Last night the deputy sheriff and his prisoner stopped at Barron's, and today they will reach Medford.
Ashland Tidings, August 7, 1885, page 3


The R.R. and Its Result.
    Those who have lived in this valley for the past twenty or twenty-five years, when the railroad was first being seriously talked of, have not forgotten the great anxiety manifested by all parties to have a railroad. Farmers believed it would doubly enhance the value of their lands, open up new and enlarged fields for their products and give them a certain and reliable cash market for everything that could be produced. Laborers thought that with the railroad a general impetus would be given to all kinds of business--that farmers would be stimulated to renewed exertion--that there would be more grain grown--that large farms would be cut up and farming diversified--that a much larger acreage would be brought under cultivation--that all the varied and material resources of the county would come in for a share of development--and thus under the new order of things there would be a permanent demand for all classes of labor and at good wages. Everybody wanted the road and seemed to believe it was the thing and the only thing that would save the country.
    Well, the railroad is here, and if the country has been saved or perceptibly benefited by it the person who has made the discovery has been too modest to let it be known. Lands have advanced but little if any in value. The acreage is not perceptibly greater than before the construction of the road--the general product of the country has not been increased, and it has been found that we are too remote from market to compete with more favored sections and cannot profitably ship our heavy or bulky products on account of distance and high freights. So far from verifying the predictions of many, exactly the reverse has been the case; so soon as the road was completed business began to decline and has steadily fallen off until at this writing it is believed to have reached the bottom with a more hopeful outlook for the future.
    The reasons for the decline in business and the stringency in money matters are so obvious that they might go without stating, and yet it might be well to say that a reaction always follows the completion of an enterprise of this character because it almost completely revolutionizes business, throws a large number of persons out of certain employment in which they are, in some sense, skilled, forces them to engage in other pursuits with which they are unacquainted and often at great loss and always at more or less expense and disadvantage; supersedes or does away with many kinds of business--crowds horses, wagons etc. out of employment and while this revolutionizing process is going on, business cannot but be depressed and unstable and capital wary and apprehensive because of the fact that everything is in a kind of chaotic uncertainty. But after a certain time business resumes its wonted channels, order is restored and everything adjusts itself to the new condition of things and trade and commerce are again governed by fixed and rational principles. We have about passed through this unpleasant transition period and may now look forward with some degree of certainty, as to what will be the results of the construction of this road through the valley. But little, of course, can be said, in one article, for the field is a broad one and there is much room for reasonable speculation; but touching one point, it may be predicted that those who believed or affected to believe a grand and imposing city would be built along the line of the road will be doomed to disappointment for the reason that the valley is so situated, with reference to the road, that the building of any considerable city, at any point on the line, is almost an impossibility. Let us see if this is not in the very nature of the situation, true and unanswerable by those who think otherwise. In the first place the valley is 40 miles long and from 4 to 20 miles wide in the widest place.
    Estimating the valley proper from Woodville and taking this as the initial point we have a depot to start with. Those in the vicinity of Woodville who have any business with the railroad will transact their business there. We come south up the valley about 8 miles and there is Gold Hill. This station will accommodate Sams Valley and those living near Gold Hill and all do their business there. About 6 miles south of Gold Hill is Central Point, a station near the center of the valley. The people at this station have gone to considerable trouble and expense to procure a warehouse and side track, and having also pretentious city aspirations will take special pride in patronizing their own place of business. Then 4 or 5 miles south is Medford, a new, brisk and sprightly little station, also building high for city honors, but which, unfortunately, for its situation and surroundings, can only do the business of its immediate locality like those already mentioned. Then comes Phoenix 5 or 6 miles south and Ashland 7 or 8 miles south of Phoenix. They will each do the business of their respective localities and no more; and thus it will be seen to be impossible, on account of the narrowness of the valley, for the business [to] concentrate to any one point along the line so as to make a town of any consequence, and nothing less than business will make a town, and business only will sustain it.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 8, 1885, page 2


    A reduction for shipping oats between Medford and Portland has been made--rate 22 cents per hundred.
    Prof. W. F. Williamson has been reelected principal of the Medford district school and Miss Belle Merriman has been selected as his assistant. The school under this management has given the best of satisfaction.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 8, 1885, page 3


MARRIED.
McCULLOCK-HOWARD--At the residence of Wm. Churchman, in Medford, July 30, 1885, by Rev. M. A. Williams, James L. McCullock and Miss Annie M. Howard.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 8, 1885, page 3


    Byers & Co. intend to put another story on their brick building at Medford, which will probably be used as a hotel.
    Geo. Brown has gone on a trip to northern California with Walter Jackson, and Ed Helms is driving the Medford stage during his absence.
    G. Karewski is hauling a large amount of wheat to the depot at Medford to be shipped to the Salem flouring mills. Mr. K. disposed of 10,000 bushels to that firm at 55 cents per bushel.
    Casey, one of the engineers of the O.&C.R.R., had his left shoulder knocked out of place and sustained other injuries. In stepping from the locomotive he slipped and fell, with the above consequences.
    In another column will be found a notice in which the firm of Kenney & Wolters, of Medford, call on all those indebted to them either by note or book account to settle the same by September 1st. They mean just what they say and expect a prompt response as they must have money.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1885, page 3


EFFECT OF THE RAILROAD.
    In a well-written leader last week upon "the railroad and its results," the Sentinel expresses the opinion that our valley has not been benefited by its railway connection with the rest of the world. Its complaint is as follows:
    "Lands have advanced but little in value, the acreage is not perceptibly greater than before the construction of the road. * * * business began to decline as soon as the road was completed and has steadily fallen off until at this writing it is believed to have reached the bottom with a more hopeful outlook for the future."
    That "the acreage of the valley has not been perceptibly increased" is not very surprising. If the Sentinel expected to see the area of the country increased by the railroad it may have reason to be disappointed in "the result," for it certainly expected greater things than did the rest of us. With its assertion, however, that the price of land has not increased, the Tidings will take issue, and will be supported by every observing citizen and by the record of real estate transactions in the statement that the farming property which has changed hands in the valley since it was first definitely known that the railroad was to be extended southward from Roseburg to Ashland has been sold at prices from 20 to 50 percent higher than it would have brought before the first reports of railroad extension were circulated. The Sentinel will be compelled to admit this if it examines the records.
    The next assertion, that "business has declined," is quite as fallacious, applied to the business of the valley. It will require no demonstration to support the counter statement that there is more "business" transacted in Jackson County now than there ever was before. It is true there are material changes--we have more people to do the business and, as the Sentinel points out, a great many more towns. Money is not "flush" and "times are hard," but, with charming inconsistency, the Sentinel gives some very good reasons for this, reasons which convince the reader that, so far as it is peculiar to this valley, it is but a temporary effect of the completion of the road and not the beginning of a perpetual blight spreading out upon each side of the track, withering the grain and contracting the size of the acres all over the valley. The "reaction" was looked for by the most enthusiastic wisher for the railroad, and it has not been different from what was expected. Two things should be borne in mind by the editor of the Sentinel when the question under consideration is to be treated: First the cry of hard times is not confined to this valley, but is general, not only throughout Oregon, but all over the United States. Second, the grain crops are estimated at less than two-thirds the yield of last year, and the price of wheat is but 50 cts. per bushel. The railroad is not responsible for the short crops, nor can it be held altogether accountable for the low price of grain. A combination of short crops and low prices has produced hard times in this valley in the past, years before the railroad came, and will be very likely to do so again at some time in the future, railroad or no railroad. Farmers of Rogue River Valley can remember that more than once in the past their wheat crop has brought them only fifty cents per bushel, and that it was difficult to get the cash at that, while most of the necessaries and luxuries of life brought hither from the outside would cost from 25 to 100 percent more than the prices of today. The railroad makes a demand for grain at cash pay, even if the price is low, and with the cost of living reduced in many ways, it is difficult to see why (except for the short crops) times should be any harder now than they have been more than once in the past. The trouble is that people compare the present price for produce with those of the railroad-building months, when pork went up to 8 cts. on foot and hay brought from $12 to $18 per ton. We must make our comparisons with the years before the railroad building began. The Sentinel should take a little wider view before growing gloomy over "the results of the railroad."
Ashland Tidings, August 14, 1885, page 2

Chaparral in the Medford area, 1913
Chaparral somewhere in the Medford area, 1913
Didn't Reach Medford.
    In reporting the capture of the horse thief Hurd in Siskiyou County last week, the Tidings said the officers would reach Medford with their prisoner last Friday. That was the calculation, but the programme was spoiled by the trifling circumstance of the prisoner's escape. He had been handcuffed and was riding horseback in company with Mr. Slagle and the deputy sheriff, Dyer. Just after they had crossed the state line and were ascending the Siskiyous, Hurd, who had been allowed to ride some little distance ahead of the others, started his horse on the run and after placing some distance between himself and his captors jumped from his horse and was soon hopelessly lost to the officers in the thick chaparral. The officer fired several shots at him, but whether any of them struck him they couldn't tell--most likely he escaped entirely. The thick brush of the mountains at that place makes it almost impossible to find anyone who chooses to keep concealed there, and has furnished convenient shelter for many a stage robber during the past twenty-five years.
Ashland Tidings, August 14, 1885, page 3



    D. W. Matthews has opened his store in Medford. He is a first-class druggist, and a genial gentleman.
    W. F. Williamson has been engaged as principal of the Medford school and Miss Belle Merriman, assistant.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 14, 1885, page 3



Why Was the Railroad Not Built Nearer Jacksonville?
    This is a difficult question to answer. But, as we have often been unjustly censured by the public and by transient persons passing through this country because we did not put forth the necessary effort to secure the building of the road through, or near this place, we will submit such observations to demand and allow our censors to draw their own conclusions.
    Taking into consideration the geographical lay of the valley and the general direction to be pursued by the road to reach a given point on the Siskiyous we had a right to believe and did believe that the location of Jacksonville was such that an honest survey of the several routes from Rock Point would prove the Blackwell, or Willow Springs to be the shortest and cheapest and therefore the best for the company; and either of these routes would have brought the road sufficiently near us for all practical purposes.
    It was believed, at that time, that no minor consideration, and certainly none of local prejudice, could operate as against us, or have any weight or influence with a company engaged in a public enterprise of such magnitude; and that the best and shortest line, regardless of personal consideration, or pecuniary interest to the managers would be adopted. It has been all along asserted and by common consent admitted that in the beginning the company had at their disposal a large amount of money; indeed nothing short of a fabulous sum would be sufficient to complete the vast and complicated system its projectors had mapped out; and it is perhaps not too much to say that at no point in this great undertaking were the funds of the company poured out with such reckless and inexcusable prodigality as between Rock Point and Wagner Creek. That more was expended than was necessary for the line of road adopted we shall not pretend to say.
    It was understood by all that the company had fixed a maximum grade of something over 52 feet to the mile and that the engineer in charge of this section reported that a grade within this limit could not be had except upon the Gold Hill route. It was confidently believed then, and now almost certainly known from later developments, that the engineer, for some reason, misrepresented the facts in the case, and that this misrepresentation cost the company a large amount of money. Whether true or not it was rumored here that the company were advised of these facts after it was too late and discharged the engineer for being unfaithful. A company charged with such responsibility ought not to suffer itself to be imposed upon nor do we believe it was. The managers knew or ought to have known the true facts in the case and if they did not they were not qualified for the responsible stations they were called to fill. We had a right, however, to suppose that in a public work of this character, the officers in charge would be actuated solely by unselfish motives, and that the road would be located where it would best the serve the public and best promote the interests of the company. But the route around Gold Hill which was finally adopted is considerably longer than the Blackwell or Willow Springs, and it is safe to affirm that it cost the company not less than one hundred thousand dollars more to construct it upon this than upon either of the others named; and, as it is conceded to be longer, it cannot be pretended that its operation is more economical for the company or that it is in any sense more advantageous to the people.
    It is difficult to say by what motives the locators of this road were governed. It will be remembered that when it became a fixed fact that the road would be built nearly all those holding lands near any of the surveyed lines were in the highest state of expectancy, and depots were talked of with such fluent certainty as to leave no doubt of the fevered anxiety of almost everybody to have a depot on his place. It is now more than surmised that bids for the location of depots ran high and nowhere nearly so high as upon the line finally adopted. Can it be that the interests of this great company, who were spending millions of money to build up and perfect a north Pacific R.R. system, were deliberately sacrificed for a miserable penny speculation in depots through this valley? If not, can anyone, even at this day, give a good and valid reason why the road was not located on what was conceded to be the shortest and cheapest route? Why unnecessarily lengthen the road by a circuitous route around Gold Hill and make an expensive rock cut, which, it has been alleged, cost not less than $175,000 when only a light and inexpensive dirt cut through Blackwell or Willow Springs would have materially lessened the distance, diminished the cost and given a better line of road? As Jacksonville was the center of trade and business for the valley and to all appearances likely to remain such was it feared that the location of a depot near it would have so absorbed public interest and attention as to forbid all idea of speculative hope at other points along the line? In a word, why was not the road located in accordance with the natural lay of the country and where it ought, obviously, in the interest of the company, to have been located? If the people of Jacksonville or any of them ever gave cause of offense to the managers or anyone in connection with the company they are not aware of it; but, on the contrary, everyone having authority was treated with the utmost courtesy and every effort made consistent with our means to secure the location of the road where it ought to have been, but every overture was met with a proposition we were unable to reach. That we might be rightly understood, and fairly judged by those in authority, as having a proper appreciation of the situation, we sent two different delegations to Portland to confer with the managers, and also appealed to Mr. Villard himself, but no agreement could be had which would come within our means and we were thus compelled, unwilling, to forgo what would certainly have made this the most booming little town in Oregon; and yet the town will live and grow despite this misfortune and in the face of any and all efforts to disparage or force it down.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 15, 1885, page 2


    D. W. Crosby officiates as stage driver on the Medford route while Geo. W. Brown is absent in California with some drummers.
    Messrs. Kenney & Helms have closed their saddler shop at Medford, Mr. Kenney buying Helms' interest and moving the stock to this place. We learn that Eddy proposes going to San Francisco soon to work at his trade in that city.
    Requiring all the money due them to make contemplated improvements, the firm of Kenney & Wolters at Medford calls on all those indebted to make a settlement without delay. Bill is still the fighting man for the firm and he says he is in dead earnest in what he says.
    The much talked-of straight road between this place and Medford should be improved by the road supervisor so as to make it safe. As it now is, the new lane is all full of stumps, and being a road that is used considerable after nights, on account of the arrival of trains, we look for a first-class item from that section before long.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 15, 1885, page 3


Case to be Reviewed.
    Noland & Ulrich of Medford, being fined $50 for selling liquor without town license, intend having the action of the Recorder's court reviewed by the circuit court. They claim that they have a license from the county court [the county commissioners], and are therefore privileged to sell under it until it expires.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1885, page 3


    F. Hubbard of Medford has sold Dougherty & Co. of the Forest Creek sawmill a planing machine, etc.
    W. G. Kenney was up from Medford Wednesday. He reports a continued improvement at that place.
    We learn that the show of Wm. Zimmerman's collapsed [financially] at Medford. He has taken a job at carpentering in that town.--[Eugene Guard.
    R. T. Lawton, the well-known land agent of Medford, reports the sale of Max Muller's house and lot in that place to Mrs. Rose S. Robinson for $300.
    The firm of Kenney & Helms of Medford was dissolved last week, and their goods were purchased by the senior member and brought to Jacksonville. Medford is consequently without a saddler shop.
    The pamphlets printed under the instructions of the Board of Immigration for this county, for the information of intending settlers, have been distributed. They are typographically neat and the matter they contain of an interesting character.
    There is no longer any doubt that there are too many stores in Jackson County by far. In the last three years the number has doubled while our population has increased only a very few thousand. We fear some of them will be obliged to close.
    Two prostitutes were arrested by Marshal Curtis very late Tuesday night and locked in the "cooler." It seems that they came from Medford in a state of intoxication and raised a disturbance. Being brought before Recorder Huffer the next morning, they pleaded poverty and were allowed to go upon promising never to return.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1885, page 3


    F. Hubbard of Medford made us a call yesterday. He informs us that his family will arrive from Iowa next week, as also will that of J. D. Whitman.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1885, page 3


BORN
GEARY--At Medford, Aug. 16th, to Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Geary, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1885, page 3


    Father Geary, of Medford, has our congratulations.
    Kenney & Helms have closed their saddler shop in Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 21, 1885, page 3


    There is now a project for getting a quartz mill costing about $6,000 for which George H. Chick is agent. The offer is a liberal one.
    Be it remembered that those making judicious use of pamphlets descriptive of Rogue River Valley can get them by applying to J. Henry Griffis, Sec. of the Immigration Board, Medford, Oregon.
    The firm of Noland & Ulrich at Medford were fined $30 and costs in Recorder Lawton's court at that place for selling liquor without a town license. They hold a county license and now propose testing the matter in the Circuit Court.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 22, 1885, page 3


A Card.
    In the Medford Monitor of the 21st inst. the following charges was made:
    "While Kenney ran the harness and saddlery shop of Jacksonville, Helms managed to run the one here, by keeping the prices higher than at Jacksonville. The object was simply to drive the farmers who desired to trade here to Jacksonville, or some other place, and by so doing to corral the business and injure Medford." We desire to say that the above charges are false in every particular. Our books will show that the prices were the same.
KENNEY & HELMS
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1885, page 3


    Isaac Woolf of Medford has closed business and sold his building.
    The Medford school reopens next Monday, Prof. Williamson in charge.
    Messrs. Barr and Woods, accompanied by Attorney Williamson, were up from Medford yesterday.
    R. T. Lawton, land agent, has sold the Medford Hotel, formerly belonging to H. F. Torrey, to A. H. Carlson, for $500.
    R. T. Lawton, land agent at Medford, has purchased the building adjoining the Empire Hotel, and is neatly fitting it up for an office.
    The Sunday schools of Medford and vicinity propose holding a picnic in the near future. Arrangements will be perfected tomorrow.
    Milton Maule, the popular painter of Medford, and Miss Eleanor Murray of Manzanita precinct, were married yesterday. We congratulate and wish them joy and prosperity.
    Now is the time that work on the road between this place and Medford should be commenced. Unless considerable gravel is put on it, it can hardly be traveled in the winter. The many stumps in it should also be removed.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick offers to put a first-class quartz mill in this section very cheap.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1885, page 3


    The firm of Noland & Ulrich at Medford were fined $30 and costs in Recorder Lawton's court at that place for selling liquor without a town license. They hold a county license and now propose testing the matter in the circuit court.
    The "offensive partisan" machine has reached Southern Oregon. At Roseburg Wm. N. Moore has been appointed postmaster, and at Medford David H. Miller succeeds J. S. Howard. Besides these eight other appointments for Oregon have been reported within the past few days.
    Fred Barneburg of Eden precinct sold his wool at Roseburg not long ago, and of such an excellent quality was it that he got 18 cents a pound for it. What makes his profit still larger is the fact that he obtained 3700 lbs. of wool from 460 head of sheep, and the clip was less than one year growing. Mr. B.'s sheep are three-fourths Merino. We have yet to hear of this being equaled in southern Oregon.--[Times.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 28, 1885, page 3



    NEW POSTMASTER--Medford has a new postmaster in the person of D. H. Miller, vice J. S. Howard removed. Mr. Howard made an efficient and obliging official but he was proven an offensive partisan and had to go. The new selection is also a good one.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 29, 1885, page 3


    Thos. J. Kenney and Ed Helms indignantly deny that prices differed for saddlery goods in their stores here and at Medford and say any party interested can satisfy themselves by examining their books.
    The well-known stage team running between here and Medford left that place last Wednesday night while the driver and others were unloading the mail and express matter from the train and started for Jacksonville on their usual gait. When their absence was noticed George Brown, the driver, started after them on horseback and overtook them about half way between Medford and Jacksonville, going along as if nothing unusual had happened. George, of course, had to turn back to get the mail but besides being a little late no damage resulted. Our advice to the contractor is that he have a hostler at each end of the route and when everything is ready tie the lines to the brake and tell the horses to go. In that case there will always be room for one more passenger besides saving the pay of a driver.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 29, 1885, page 3


    THE IMMIGRATION BOARD'S PAMPHLETS.--Our immigration board, appointed not long since by our county court, has, in the last few days, gotten our descriptive pamphlets of the county. Owing to the demand that is being made for the pamphlets at a distance, quick and judicious use is being made of them. Quite a number are already hurrying eastward in Oregon's exhibition car, and our citizens can rest assured that our immigration board has done its duty well. The pamphlets are of 16 pages; a brief statement of many existing facts, and these facts are hugged very closely. The printing done by the Tidings is a credit to the county.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 29, 1885, page 3


A Sterling Appointment.
    J. S. Howard, postmaster at Medford, has been removed, and is succeeded by David H. Miller, a sterling Democrat. The former has always been an active, offensive partisan, like many others whose official heads have been and will in the future be cut off. We congratulate the people of Medford and vicinity on the change.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1885, page 3


    The old Medford Hotel is being refitted in fine style for McAdams & Co.'s saloon.
    The Medford school commenced last Monday, with Prof. Williamson in charge.
    J. C. Cowles has concluded to locate in this valley, and is building a residence at Medford.
    J. W. Cunnyngham [sic] of Medford has bought a half interest in Swartz & Soward's automatic gate.
    Byers & Co. intend to commence operations on the second story of their brick building at Medford at once.
    It is a mistake that John Orth will conduct the Medford butcher shop in connection with his market here.
    Geo. H. Haskins of Medford has increased his stock of drugs, medicines, etc., and improved the looks of his drug store.
    The Sunday schools of Medford and vicinity intend holding a picnic at the old campground on Rogue River in the near future.
    A. L. Johnson, clerk of Medford district, is engaged in collecting the school tax levied not long since, and which amounted to 12 mills.
    O. Gilbert and wife have given up the management of the Central House in Medford and will probably be succeeded by J. A. Slover of this place, an excellent hand at the business.
    A young lady of this place, who became enamored of a festive individual sporting the title of M.D., was induced to return home from Medford a few days since, with the assistance of a public officer.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1885, page 3


    G. W. Howard of Medford, the well-known insurance agent, was in town during the week.
    John R. Tice of Medford precinct has been very sick with intermittent fever, but is much better now.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1885, page 3


    Mr. Berry of Ashland and Wm. Phipps of Medford were in Jacksonville Saturday on business with Supt. Colvig. The former got a first-grade certificate and will teach in the Ashland public school, while the later was awarded a second-grade and will probably teach at Sterlingville later in the season.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1885, page 3


Now is the Time.
    Frank Lewellen, who has the contract for carrying the mail between this place and Medford, proposes putting on a first-class omnibus and making the trip between the two places in less than half an hour if the citizens of the towns will subscribe enough money to improve the road. We think this a sufficient inducement and we hope that all will lend a helping hand in this enterprise.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1885, page 3


Via Medford.
    After next Tuesday Jas. Herely, contractor on the mail route between this place and Butte Creek, will leave and return via Medford. Passengers will be carried on reasonable terms and all orders entrusted to Mr. H. will receive prompt attention. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1885 et seq., page 3


The Awful Railroads.
[State Rights Democrat]
    The Jacksonville papers are claiming that the great depression in business there has been caused by the advent of the railroad. This is very good indeed! It is a good thing railroads have no souls, else they would sink under the many loads they have to bear. It has gone so far that if a man even has corns almost mechanically it is saddled on the railroad by someone. Once on a time pack horses brought goods to Albany, and everybody made money and there were no paupers; but finally railroads came, pack horses were done away with, paupers put in an appearance and any number of people just made their "grub," to use a Eugene expression. The thought presented is a sad one, itchingly so, and suggests that something should be done to put a stop to the fearful cyclones railroads are causing against business. Opening up countries and causing an immense immigration of people, they increase the number of mortgages, extend the credit system, give people an opportunity to trade away from home, enlarge the number of deadbeats, decrease the profit on goods, increase competition, in fact nearly everything ruinous to a country. Look at the N.P., it set people wild, induced them to speculate. A collapse followed. Portland people lost millions, and all for some Transcontinental. So this line of thought could be extended. Southern Oregon people are entitled to the sympathy of the people of the world. Poor unfortunates.
    For our part, seriously, when we "bust up" we want to have the awful collapse occur with a railroad approaching from every point of the compass, N., E., S. and W., with some N.W.'s and N.E.'s thrown in.
Ashland Tidings, September 4, 1885, page 1


    Mr. P. B. Whitney, who is looking after the freight business of the O.&C.R.R., says the company will probably fit up regular refrigerator fruit cars next year, in which pears and other fruits may be shipped east and delivered at St. Paul or Chicago without the fruit being any nearer ripe than when placed in the car.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 4, 1885, page 3


    The Medford Hotel has been closed out, O. Gilbert having quit the business.
    Prof. Williamson is again in charge of the Medford school, studies having been resumed on Monday last.
    A neat circular descriptive of land offered for sale near Medford has been issued by A. L. Johnson, land agent at that place.
    The new brick stores at Medford are approaching completion and will soon be ready for occupants. Byers & Co. will also raise their building one story higher and make a hotel out of it.
    George Freeman will commence freighting on the Linkville route next week and R. S. Dunlap takes his place as local freighter between here and Medford. Give Sargent your orders and he will attend to them promptly.
    The railroad company have again made a change in freight trains whereby we get two freight trains one week and one train the next. Next week there will be only one freight arriving at Medford Thursday morning.
    The new road between this place and Medford promises to be impassable when the rainy season begins unless improvements are commenced at once. Medford citizens propose making it a good road one mile from their town and want Jacksonville to put the rest of it in good shape. If this is done Mr. Lewellen, the mail contractor, promises to put on a new coach and make the time between here and Medford in only half an hour.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 5, 1885, page 3


    A. L. Johnson of Medford has put a vault in his new business quarters.
    R. S. Dunlap will hereafter haul the freight for our business men between this place and Medford.
    J. D. Whitman and family, as also the family of F. Hubbard of Medford, are on their way here from Iowa.
    E. G. Hurt and L. Redding of Medford killed 10 deer on a recent hunting expedition, which they manufactured into canned venison.
    It is all a mistake that J. A. Slover will take charge of the Central Hotel at Medford. He will stay here for the present, we are glad to say.
    The Sunday schools of Medford and vicinity will hold a union picnic at the old campgrounds near Bybee's Ferry one week from tomorrow--Sept. 19th.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1885, page 3


    J. H. Redfield, the affable marshal of Medford, and Miss Wood, of Glendale, made the Times office a call last Saturday.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1885, page 3


    Wm. Mayfield is keeping a hotel in Medford.
    Horace Dunlap and Henry Mensor are expected to run a foot race at Medford on the 20th.
    An Eagle Point correspondent, under date of Aug. 31st, says: After today the mail will come direct from Medford to this place instead of from Jacksonville as formerly. Steps will soon be taken to make it a daily mail instead of tri-weekly, as now.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 11, 1885, page 3


BORN.
McGINNIS--In Medford, Sept. 10, 1885, to Mr. and Mrs. M. A. McGinnis, a son.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 12, 1885, page 2


    Brother McGinnis of the Medford Monitor was made happy last Thursday by the arrival of a new boy baby at his house. Unlike the cranberry marshes of Wisconsin "crops never fail in Oregon" and he can now recommend our climate to his friends back East.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 12, 1885, page 3


Erroneous.
    We are in receipt of a well-written and neatly printed pamphlet descriptive of Jackson County, Oregon, published by authority of the county board of immigration of said county in which we notice what seems to us serious errors; whether intentional or otherwise, we are unable to say. In the enumeration of "health and pleasure resorts" mentioned in the pamphlet the impression is left that Crater Lake is situated either in Jackson County or just over the line, in Josephine County, while a reference to the official map shows that this romantic and popular resort is located in Klamath County, several miles east of the eastern boundary of Jackson County. Also, that Southern Oregon comprises Douglas, Coos, Curry, Josephine and Jackson counties. Now, our impression is and has always been that Southern Oregon, properly speaking, embraced the entire southern tier of counties throughout the state. This (Klamath) county is bounded on the south by the 42d parallel of north latitude, just the same as Jackson County, and it seems to us but only fair and just that not only this but Lake County should be included in the general description of Southern Oregon. We do not mean to reflect on the motives or intentions of the honorable board of immigration by thus referring to these seeming errors, for in their general description of Jackson County they may have had in mind said county as it was originally, when it embrace the entire territory of this and Lake County. Nor do we make any objection to the mention of Crater Lake as a place of health or pleasure resort, for it is certainly fully entitled to be classed as such and is as much, if not more readily accessible from this place than any other, but that it is a point of attraction in and of this county there can be no question, any more than the numerous hot mineral springs, the sulfatara or hot earth, or the numerous other great lakes and excellent hunting and fishing grounds within the borders of this county.--Klamath Star.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 12, 1885, page 4


    J. D. Whitman and his family of eight persons came in by today's train. Mr. Whitman came here in June with the Iowa party, went down to Medford, selected a farm, negotiated for it, and now returns to take possession. Mr. Whitman has long been a resident of Iowa and an influential citizen, and, with his family, will in all ways make a valuable acquisition to this state.
    Among the arrivals on Monday was J. H. Stewart and family, of Illinois. Mr. Stewart, who has been for many years a well-known horticulturist and fruit dealer in the Chicago markets, came out here last spring, made a trip to Medford and bought a large fruit farm. Today he is here with his family, a carload of implements, etc., and has en route 8000 peach trees of a choice variety which he will set out this fall. Mr. Stewart and family went south yesterday.
"Immigration Board Items," Oregonian, Portland, September 16, 1885, page 3


    Some work is done on the C.P. end of the O.&C.R.R., but no great force has been employed as yet, although the prospects are favorable that there will be soon. Many seem to think it is the intention of that company to only build a few miles of their road, or just enough to capture the Yreka and Klamath County freight, much of which is now hauled over the O.&C.R.R. None know what the C.P. folks are going to do, or what their intentions are. They seem to be playing an invisible hand.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1885, page 2


    Wm. Ulrich of Medford informs us that work on the second story of Byers & Co.'s brick building is progressing rapidly.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1885, page 3


    The road to Medford should be put in first-class condition for winter at once.
    The tramps are traveling southward in anticipation of getting work on the railroad.
    Barr & Woods have retired from the butchering business at Medford and are succeeded by J. A. Whiteside and another gentleman.
    McAdams & Healy of Medford are having a building prepared for their use and propose having one of the finest saloons in southern Oregon.
    A social party will take place at the former Medford Hotel building, now owned by A. H. Carlson, this evening. Good music and supper will be provided.
    Messrs. Foster and Morgan of Medford have just completed an addition to A. Alford's residence on Wagner Creek, which greatly improves its appearance.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1885, page 3


    It is reasonably certain that a quartz mill will be in operation in this vicinity before the end of the year. Such an enterprise would not only be remunerative, but of incalculable benefit to our county.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1885, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart and family arrived from Quincy, Illinois, this week. As will be remembered, Mr. S. purchased the farm of Henry C. Howard, near Phoenix, a few months ago.
    J. D. Whitman and family have arrived from Dallas Center, Iowa, as also has the family of F. Hubbard of Medford, and propose becoming permanent residents. The former will locate at Jacksonville. Such additions to our population are truly welcome.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1885, page 3


    Building continues at Medford.
    Chas. Wolters, who has been in the bakery business with his father in Ashland for several years, intends to open a bakery in Medford this fall.
    Work is progressing upon the second story of Byers & Jacobs' brick building at Medford. The building is to be fitted up as a first-class hotel--something greatly needed at Medford.
    The Monitor, of Medford, thinks it worth while to mention that somebody has sent it a Gloria Mundi apple that measures 13½ inches in circumference. We have peaches as large as that in Ashland.
    J. D. Whitman, who came out with the press excursion from Iowa in June and negotiated for a farm near Medford while in this valley, arrived this week with his family, to take possession of the farm.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 18, 1885, page 3


    J. H. Stewart, of Illinois, who was in this valley last year and bought a farm at the west side of the valley, north of Phoenix, arrived this week with his family from Illinois, and is preparing to go into fruit culture on a large scale. He brought with him a carload of implements, etc., and has en route 8000 peach trees of choice varieties, which he will set out this fall. Mr. Stewart has been a prominent fruit dealer in the Chicago markets, and his judgment as to the outlook for the fruit industry in this valley is worth something.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, September 18, 1885, page 3


    Medford is to have a bakery, with Charles Wolters as boss.
    The Central Hotel at Medford is now in charge of Wm. Mayfield.
    Mrs. Ulrich has moved to Medford to reside with her son, William. Marshal Curtis has rented her residence in this place.
    A carpenter named McCullough fell from a building in course of construction at Medford on Wednesday last, receiving injuries that are likely to prove fatal. He had several ribs broken besides receiving other internal injuries.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 19, 1885, page 3


Serious Accidents.
    J. McCullough, who was working on the new two-story brick building at Medford, fell from a scaffolding on the upper story, one day last week, breaking one of his shoulders and it is supposed two of his ribs are also broken, besides receiving other injuries. At last accounts, he was getting along as well as could be expected.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1885, page 3


    A pleasant party took place in Carlson's new building at Medford last Friday evening.
    The real property belonging to the estate of Wm. Justus, deceased, was offered for sale last Saturday, but only a portion was sold, as the administrator did not think the price offered enough. J. D. Whitman, lately from Iowa, bid in the 21 acres lying near the residences of Roberts & O'Neil, at $20 an acre, and bid $24 for the 100 acres next to it.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1885, page 3


    John R. Tice of Medford precinct, who has been quite ill, is able to be about, though still quite weak.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart and family have taken possession of the farm purchased of H. C. Howard prior to his [Stewart's] return to Quincy, Illinois.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1885, page 3


Sunday School Picnic.
To the Editor of the Times:
   
By your permission I will give your readers a brief outline of the Sunday school picnic held on Rogue River, near Bybee's ferry, on the 19th inst. There was quite a large attendance, Medford school having the largest representation. Lone Pine, Lone Oak, Mound and Central Point schools were also well represented. Bro. Williamson, superintendent of Medford school, who was the originator of the picnic, was taken sick on the evening before and was unable to be there until the afternoon, therefore it devolved on your humble servant to call the gathering to order, and the following exercises were observed: 1. Reading of the XII chapter of Eccl.; 2. The congregation sang "All Hail the Power of Jesus"; 3. Prayer by Eld. H. C. Fleming; 4. The friends spread a bountiful supply of provisions on the table which, after thanksgiving, the little folks were first waited upon and supplied; then youth, middle aged and the old grandparents participated with a will that demonstrated the fact that it was good. After all had eaten as much as nature required of the good bread, meat, fowls, etc., the table was cleared. Then Mr. Perry Foster's wagonload of large watermelons, from Holmes Bros.' patch, were placed on the table and all participated in them, and such a feast!! All enjoyed it well. Order then being called and Bro. Williamson having arrived he gave a short talk; 5. Declamation, "Don't Crowd," by Mattie Cunnyngham; 6. Declamation, by Ettie Mayfield; 7. Select reading by Everett Hoag; 8. Song by Central Point Sunday school; 9. Song by Miss Webb's class of small girls; 10. Song, by Central Point Sunday school; 11. Declamation, by Hattie Galloway; 12. Declamation, by Mary Matthews; 13. Five-minute talk by Mr. Cochran of Mound Sunday school; 14. Five-minute talk by Eld. H. C. Fleming of Mound Sunday school; 15. Song, by the audience; 16. Remarks by Fred. Downing of Central Point  Sunday school; 17. Song, by Miss Baker and some of her pupils of Lone Pine School; 18. Talk, by Mr. Hall of Central Point; 19. Song, by the audience; 20. Short speech, by Mr. Williamson to the boys and girls concerning the picnic; 21. Short talk by your humble servant; 22. Dismission. After the close many went to look at the new bridge, which is nearing completion.
M. PETERSON
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1885, page 3


Sunday School Picnic.
MOUND RANCH, Jackson Co.,
Sept. 21, 1885.
    Ed. Ashland Tidings:  By your permission I will give your readers a brief outline of the Sunday school picnic held on Rogue River just below the Bybee ferry, on the 19th inst.
    There was quite a number in attendance. Medford school had the fullest representation. Lone Pine, Lone Oak, Mound and Central Point schools were represented. Brother Williamson, superintendent of Medford school, who was the instigator of the picnic, was taken ill on the evening before the picnic, so he was not able to be there until afternoon. Therefore it devolved on your humble servant to call to order. We read the twelfth chapter, Eccl. 21. The congregation sang "All Hail the Power of Jesus' name." Then prayer was led by H. C. Fleming. The friends spread a bountiful supply of provisions on the table, and after thanksgiving, the little ones were first waited upon and supplied. Then youths, middle aged and the old grandparents participated with a will that demonstrated the fact that it was good. After all had eaten of the good bread, meat, fowls, etc., the table was cleared. The sisters having nearly half of their provisions to take away with them.
    Then Mr. Perry Foster's wagonload of large watermelons from Holmes Bros.' patch were placed on the table (that is most of it) and all participated in them (and such a feast). All enjoyed it greatly.
    Order being called and Bro. Williamson having arrived, he gave a short talk, after which the exercises were as follows: Declamation, "Don't Crowd" by Mattie Cunningham; declamation by Ettie Mayfield; select reading by Everett Hoag, "A Single Head of Wheat"; song by Medford Sunday school; song by Miss Webb's class of small girls; song by Central Point Sunday school; declamation by Hattie Galloway, "Be Good"; declamation by Mary Matthews; five-minute talk by Cochran, of Mound Sunday school; five-minute talk by Fleming, Mound Sunday school; song by the audience; talk by Fred. Downing, of Central Point  Sunday school; song by Miss Baker and some of her pupils of Lone Pine School; talk by Hall, of Central Point; song by the audience; talk by Williamson to the boys and girls concerning the picnic; short talk by your humble servant; and dismission.
    After the close many went to look at the new bridge, which is nearing completion. Yours, etc., MARTIN PETERSON.
Ashland Tidings, September 25, 1885, page 2


    A carpenter named McConnell fell from a building in course of construction at Medford on Wednesday last, receiving injuries that are likely to prove fatal. He had several ribs broken besides receiving other internal injuries.--[Sentinel.
"Brevities," Jacksonville Post, September 25, 1885, page 3


BORN.
KENNEY--In Medford, September 24, 1885, to Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Kenney, a daughter--weight 14 pounds.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 26, 1885, page 2


    W. H. Barr has sold his butcher shop at Medford and will soon move to his farm near that place.
    Tom Turner is now employed in the railroad telegraph office at Medford as assistant to Mr. Fronk, the agent.
    Brother McGinnis of the Monitor has added a job department to his printing office at Medford and seems to be flourishing generally.
    A. L. Johnson, land agent at Medford, is having a fireproof vault put in his new brick building there and his office when finished promises to be one of the finest in the State.
    A new restaurant building is now in course of construction on the main street in Medford to be occupied by O. Gilbert, formerly of the Central Hotel. When finished call on Mr. Gilbert for a square meal.
    The condition of J. McCullough, who fell from a building at Medford last week, is not as bad as first reported and he will soon be out again. He had some ribs broken and was badly bruised up, however.
    Carlson's new building at Medford is nearing completion and soon be occupied by McAdams & Heeley's saloon. It is the building formerly known as the Medford Hotel but would not be recognized now since the changes have been made.
    J. D. Whitman, a newcomer from Iowa,  bought 21 acres of the Justus place near Medford at administrator's sale on Saturday last, paying $29 per acre. He also made a liberal offer for another 100 acres adjoining, but it was bid in by the estate and the sale postponed till Saturday next.
    Many samples sent to the State Board of Immigration rooms are not properly labeled. Each article should be labeled with the name and variety, and the name of the place it comes from. We call attention to this in order that parties who send specimens of cereals, fruits, minerals, etc., will attend to this matter intelligently.
    Medford will soon have a new brick hotel. A second story is being built on Byers' brick and the building will also be considerably enlarged. Kenney and Wolters' saloon will be moved to the room adjoining where they now are and their old stand on the corner changed to an office for the hotel. From the plans shown us we think it ought to make a commodious and well-arranged building for the purposes for which it is destined.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 26, 1885, page 3


    W. G. Kenney of Medford steps rather high, notwithstanding it's a girl.
    Geo. Brown, who drives the stage between this place and Medford, has gone on a trip to Klamath County. Ed. Helms is handling the reins during his absence.
    J. McCullough, the carpenter who fell from the two-story building at Medford not long since, was not injured as seriously as at first reported, and will soon be able to attend to his work again.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 2, 1885, page 3


Discovery of Coal.
    Arthur Wilson, who has been for years a close observer and a student of nature's works, brought to Medford Monday some 50 pounds of bituminous coal, resembling in every particular the Toledo, Ohio coal of that class. The vein is over four feet wide. Mr. Wilson says that croppings of this coal can be found on an area in this section covering over twenty square miles. Mr. Wilson owns 320 acres of land upon which this coal was found, and with an outlay of $100, which he intends to spend, he can convince the most incredulous that the extent of this coal is sufficient to warrant mining operations on an extensive scale, to commence at once. Mr. Woody has also discovered within the same territory a fine and similar prospect of coal.--[Medford Monitor.
Ashland Tidings, October 2, 1885, page 3


    Medford ladies will give a "sack sociable" at Byers' hall tomorrow evening. Wonder how many poor fellows will "get the sack."
    J. D. Whitman, a newcomer from Iowa, bought 21 acres of the Justus place near Medford at administrator's sale, paying $29 per acre.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 2, 1885, page 3


BORN
KENNEY--At Medford, September 24, 1885, to Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Kenney, a daughter--weight 14 pounds.
Ashland Tidings, October 2, 1885, page 3


Discovery of Coal.
    Arthur Wilson, who has been for years a close observer and a student of nature's works, brought to Medford Monday some 50 pounds of bituminous coal, resembling in every particular the Toledo, Ohio coal of that class. The vein is over four feet wide. Mr. Wilson says that outcroppings of this coal can be found on an area in this section covering over twenty square miles. Mr. Wilson owns 320 acres of land upon which this coal was found, and with an outlay of $100, which he intends to spend, he can convince the most incredulous that the extent of this coal is sufficient to warrant mining operations on an extensive scale to commence at once. Mr. Woody has also discovered within the same territory a fine and similar prospect of coal.--[Medford Monitor.
Ashland Tidings, October 2, 1885, page 3


    Geo. W. Brown has returned from his Linkville trip and has again taken charge of the Medford mail line.
    Williams' new brick buildings at Medford will soon be ready for occupancy and will present a fine appearance when finished.
    During the month of September R. S. Dunlap, our local freighter between here and Medford, hauled 124,000 pounds of freight to Jacksonville and paid $1,961.35 railroad freight on the same.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 3, 1885, page 3


Accidents.
    Hon. S. Furry informs us that as John Van Dyke of Eden precinct was skinning a sheep he had just killed, the animal made its final struggle and knocked the sharp knife he was using against his leg with considerable force, cutting a deep gash and severing one of the principal arteries. It was with great difficulty that the flow of blood was stopped. Mr. V. is still quite weak, though slowly recovering. Dr. Pryce is in attendance.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1885, page 3


    Considerable building is going on at Central Point and Medford.
    Wm. Mayfield, of the Central Hotel in Medford, was in town during the week.
    The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Banks of Medford died one day this week.
    A. Davison of Medford has taken up some land in Josephine County, near Grants Pass.
    Thos. T. Turner of this place is assisting C. K. Fronk, the clever railroad agent at Medford.
    Byers & Jacobs have purchased H. Kinney's property in Medford, adjoining their brick buildings.
    E. G. Hurt of Medford has our thanks for a can of nice venison. He has placed it on sale at Jas. Drum's.
    M. P. Phipps of Medford precinct, one of the most thrifty farms of that section, is hauling a large quantity of wheat to Karewski's mills.
    Mr. McCullough, who was so seriously injured by falling from a building at Medford, is partially paralyzed and has been placed in the county hospital.
    G. W. Isaacs has purchased W. H. Barr's place near Medford, paying $1,100 therefor. He has also purchased three acres of land in the same precinct of A. Wilson.
    Pat. McMahon hauled two loads of Chinese to Medford Wednesday, who will take passage for China from San Francisco. May they never return to American shores.
    Roberts & O'Neil have sold a farm near Medford to Mr. Dawson, lately from the east, for $4,000. These enterprising gentlemen still retain their old farm, however.
    A social party will be given in the old Medford Hotel building, but which has been refitted in fine style, next Friday evening. The best of music has been engaged and everybody is invited to participate.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1885, page 3


    C. W. Broback, the founder of Medford, but now a resident of Lakeport, Cal., is back on a short business visit. His many friends are glad to see him.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1885, page 3


    Arthur Wilson has discovered a bituminous coal mine on his farm near Medford. The vein is over four feet wide and said to be inexhaustible. It resembles the coal of Toledo, Ohio. He proposes to develop the mine at once.
    Geo. H. Chick and his engineer are in the valley and submitted a scheme to the citizens of Medford to put up a quartz mill, which is now in Siskiyou County, at that place [sic], providing they would furnish him the necessary land and also purchase the five-eighths interest in said mill owned in California. A public meeting was held Tuesday evening to consider the matter, and Mr. C. informs us that his proposition was accepted. The mill will be brought over at once.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1885, page 3


    The brick work of the Byers & Jacobs hotel at Medford is about completed, and the building presents a fine appearance.
    The Monitor reports that Deputy Sheriff N. A. Jacobs is improving his residence in Medford. Wonder when the happy event will take place.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 9, 1885, page 3


    Mr. McCulloch of Medford was brought to the county hospital this week.
    The Enterprise Mining Co. of this place this week sent a quantity of rock from their mine to Henley, Cal., where George H. Chick will give it a mill test. The owners of this time still have faith in its paying qualities, and the present mode of procedure will show what there is in the rock.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 10, 1885, page 3


    It is a settled fact that this state will receive a large immigration from Iowa next season. This has been brought about by the visit of the Iowa editors and the missionary car now in the East. A letter was received from Portland recently from a well-to-do farmer, living near Oskaloosa, in which he says: "In fact, the great thing at the Oskaloosa fair was the car. Everybody saw it and admitted the Oregon products displayed therein. Consequently, an Oregon fever rages. I am a wealthy farmer, and have an excellent farm, but will sell it out next spring, and leave for the land where it is said crops never fail."
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 17, 1885, page 3


    Rudolph High has opened a barber shop at Medford.
    Henry Baker has purchased Woodford's warehouse at Medford and will put in an elevator.
    There are several cases of whooping cough at Medford, but none have proved fatal so far.
    Cummons Bros., lately of Medford, are conducting a fruit and vegetable store at Yreka, Cal.
    Byers & Jacobs' brick building at Medford is nearing completion and presents a fine appearance.
    Mr. Foster of Medford, an excellent mechanic, has been doing considerable work at Central Point.
    Remember the party at the former Medford Hotel building this evening. It promises to be a fine affair.
    Angle & Plymale talk of putting up a one-story brick at Medford, as a precaution against fire. Insurance rates are quite high in that place.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1885, page 3


    O. Gilbert and wife have opened a restaurant at Medford and are setting an excellent table.
    W. K. Price, an enterprising farmer from Linn County, has rented Jas. Barnum's place near Medford.
    J. W. Cunningham of Medford is receiving quite a number of orders for the celebrated Centennial Gate.
    Dr. Pryce of Medford was in town this week, and from him we learned that the condition of John G. Van Dyke of Eden precinct, who cut himself so severely last week, was somewhat improved, although, from the serious nature of his wound, he is not entirely out of danger.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1885, page 3


    The project of putting up a quartz mill at Medford has been abandoned, and Mr. Chick proposes putting it up in this vicinity, if he can get enough inducements. A mill would be of vast benefit to Jacksonville in more ways than one.
    What this section needs more than anything else is a first-class quartz mill to work the ores of the ledges already discovered, many of which will pay well. Everything possible should be done to get one, for there is no calculating the benefit it will be. There is no doubt but what we have good quartz in Jackson and Josephine counties, but we must prove it before we can expect any amount of foreign capital to be invested here.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1885, page 3


    D. C. Herrin is buying wheat to be delivered at Medford.
    Geo. H. Chick now proposes to put a quartz mill at Medford, it is reported.
    D. C. Herrin will pay the highest cash price for wheat for shipment. Headquarters at Angle & Plymale's, Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 16, 1885, page 3


Atlantic av, s s, 150 ft w Third av, 25x80, Mary E, wife Peter Willson, Medford, Ore., to Samuel Parnson, taxes, assessments, etc. . . . . $6,000
Excerpt, "Conveyances," Brooklyn Daily Eagle, October 17, 1885, page 2


RAILROAD NEWS.
    We are informed by some residents of Ashland that the railroad surveying party has been at work in the hills west of town and that a preliminary line will be run directly toward Wagner Creek from the Siskiyous, as many think that the best route. The C.P. Co. is not partial to crooked roads, full of horseshoes, as the one between Ashland and Roseburg is; and if they assume charge of the O.&C. road will no doubt make several important changes, in order to straighten it out and thereby greatly shorten it. It is a notorious fact that poor engineering skill was employed in its construction, and that the trestle and culvert work is of a temporary character and not substantial enough for running heavy passenger and freight trains at a high rate of speed; besides, the greater portion of the line built in this valley is below high water mark. Under these circumstances it would not be surprising to see some changes made in case the C.P. folks take charge of it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1885, page 3


    The party given at the former Medford Hotel building last Friday evening was a success and passed off pleasantly.
    Geo. Brown, driver of the Medford stage, is suffering with a lame back, and Ed. Helms is temporarily acting in his place.
    The brickwork on the new buildings at Medford has been finished, but it may be some time yet before they will be occupied.
    We hear a great deal of complaint being lodged against the penurious and awkward policy of Manager Koehler of the O.&C.R.R. in more instances than one.
    Some Medford youths who were last week convicted of getting drunk and disturbing the peace officiated in the chain gang for awhile. It was a humiliating lesson, and they should profit by it.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1885, page 3


    It seems as if the people of Medford have accepted Geo. H. Chick's proposition to bring his quartz mill to this county, and a committee has gone to Siskiyou to inspect the situation and probably bring the machinery over.
    Somebody seems to be throwing cold water on the different projects which have been conceived to bring a quartz mill to Jacksonville. We are very sorry to see this, as there is no calculating the benefit such an enterprise would be.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1885, page 3


    Angle & Plymale, of Medford, have bought of D. W. Matthews the lot adjacent to their store property, and intend to put up a two-story brick building.
    Ashland, 1200; Jacksonville, 900; Medford, 500, is the way the figures read in the census returns of the county assessor, as reported by the papers at the county seat.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 23, 1885, page 3


    Work has commenced on Angle & Plymale's brick store at Medford.
    Wm. Oliver, formerly of this place, is burning a kiln of brick near Medford.
    J. C. Elder, formerly of Waldo, has erected a new store building at Medford.
    Twenty thousand pounds of freight were hauled from Medford to this place one day last week.
    Constable Woolf of Medford was in town this week looking for a man who had stolen an overcoat.
    The blacksmithing firm of Merriman & Redfield, Medford, has been dissolved, the latter retiring.
    An anti-Chinese meeting was held in Williams' brick at Medford last Saturday evening.
    A. L. Johnson has moved into his new brick building in Medford, which will be neatly fitted up for a bank.
    Some substantial work ought to be done on the road leading to Medford from this place; and immediately, too.
    McAdams & Healy have moved into their new saloon building at Medford, which has been fixed up in fine style.
    The special car which carried the railroad officials to Ashland last week made the run from Medford in sixteen minutes.
    Miss Vina Gore of Medford precinct expects to return to Eugene in a week or two. She will not go to school this year, but will take music lessons.
    Henry Richardson, lately of Medford precinct, is now a resident of Ritzville, W.T. Al. Bell, who left Jackson County with him , has returned home.
    The specimens of cereals, vegetables, etc., on exhibition at the rooms of the board of immigration at Medford, have been taken charge of by R. T. Lawton, the popular real estate agent.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1885, page 3


THROUGH THE VALLEY.
    In company with Jacob Wagner, the Tidings editor took a ride through a good portion of the central part of the valley last Saturday, stopping at all the towns and budding cities on the route. At nearly every town the citizens appeared to think that every other town in the valley was on its last legs, and that theirs was to be the chief city of the county. Having seen them all within a very short time, we can report that none are yet buried as completely as Pompeii and Herculaneum, and at every place there was signs of life and hope. At Talent several new buildings give the village an air of improvement and prosperity. At Phoenix little improvement is to be seen, but the town has its flourishing mills and its steady, modest business and is apparently undisturbed by dreams of any mushroom growth in the immediate future.
AT MEDFORD.
    The building boom which has made the place so lively during the summer still continues. The fine large brick buildings erected by Geo. W. Williams and J. S. Howard are about ready for the plasterers. The block is two stories in height, and the lower part will contain four fine store rooms. Mr. Howard will occupy his own building--his store in the lower part and a fine dwelling fitted up above. D. H. Miller & Co. will occupy the largest of the other three stores with their hardware and drug business, and the post office. One of the others will be a bakery, and other a jewelry store, it is said. The Byers & Jacobs brick is being fitted up for a hotel and will have 27 fine lodging rooms and a parlor on the second floor. Angle & Plymale, who carry a large stock of general merchandise, are preparing to build a substantial brick store immediately east of the wooden building now occupied by them. The foundation is already laid. A. L. Johnson has just moved into his new brick dwelling, at the front of which is his banking room, fitted up with a fireproof vault of the most approved design. A number of fine dwellings about the town have recently been completed, and two or three wooden business houses are being finished up. I. A. Webb, the contractor and builder, has the contract for several new buildings, among them being a dwelling for Mr. Dorson, in Howard's addition, and A. P. Talent is preparing to put up a dwelling upon his lot. The main business street has been greatly improved by a line of sidewalk on each side within the past two months, and altogether the town looks more businesslike and settled than at the last visit of the writer. D. W. Matthews, formerly of this place, has his drug store in faultless condition and appears to be doing a good business. W. H. Mayfield is landlord of the Central Hotel, R. F. High has a barber shop here, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert keep a restaurant, and Chas. Hosley, of Ashland, is one of the proprietors of the handsome new meat market recently opened.
Ashland Tidings, October 30, 1885, page 3


    I. A. Webb, of Medford, will build a new barn for Rev. M. A. Williams this fall.
    Mr. Dorson, of Medford, a newcomer, has bought of Roberts & O'Neil 154 acres of the old Norton place near that town for $3,500. He is building a dwelling in town for himself.
    The specimens of fruit, grain and other products which has been collected at the room of the county board of immigration have been taken in charge by R. T. Lawton, of Medford, who has them displayed in his real estate office in that place.
    Geo. H. Chick is preparing to put up a quartz-crushing machine in Medford, the object being to attract thither for test the quartz from various ledges in the county now being prospected. The site chosen for the mill is near the railroad track a short distance south of the depot. A number of citizens of Medford "put up" for the enterprise.
    The apple orchards in the lower and central part of this valley, which are usually loaded with fruit at this time of year, failed to yield any this season, and some of the farmers who have never bought apples before since they set out their orchards will no doubt be glad to pay a cent a pound for a few bushels for their own use during the coming winter.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 30, 1885, page 3


    McAdams & Heeley now occupy their new saloon building at Medford.
    Mr. Dorson, of Medford, a newcomer, has bought of Roberts & O'Neil 154 acres of the old Norton place near that town for $3,500.
    Dr. Pryce of Medford was here this week as a witness in the Maxon case. His office is now in A. L. Johnson's building at that place.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 31, 1885, page 3


    T. F. McAndrew, son of Thos. McAndrew of Medford, has gone to Seattle to attend the Territorial University of Washington.
    G. Karewski, the enterprising proprietor of the Jacksonville Steam Flouring Mills, has several teams engaged in hauling 15,000 bushels of wheat to the Medford depot for shipment.
    Neal & Whiteside, who are engaged in the butcher business at Medford, indulged in a quarrel on Wednesday last, in which the former struck his partner on the head with a hatchet. Neal was tried before the recorder of Medford and fined, and was then arrested and brought before the Justice of the Peace of that place, the result of which we had not learned on going to press.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1885, page 3


    The post office at Medford has the handsomest set of private lock boxes in Oregon. They were purchased by Mr. Howard and sold by him to Mr. Miller, the present P.M.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 6, 1885, page 3


    The Justus property, near Medford, was bought at administrator's sale last Saturday by J. D. Whitman for $3,600.

    D. W. Hardin of Grants Pass has just burnt a fine kiln of brick and is now building flues, etc., for which he has contracts to last him several months.
    The new brick drug store of Dr. W. F. Kremer's at Grants Pass is one of the finest in this end of the state and would be a credit to a much larger place. The Dr. also enjoys a large practice and seems to be thriving generally.

    We have been informed that a large and enthusiastic anti-Chinese meeting was held in Medford, the metropolis of Southern Oregon, one evening this week at which a number of bristling sandlot speeches were made, and the Chinese incontinently ordered to "go." Nothing like aping the pretensions of a city boom. By the way, we were not aware that Medford had arisen to the dignity or ability of supporting a Chinaman.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 7, 1885, page 3


    Jos. A. Crain is supplying Medford with fresh milk daily.
    E. J. Pool has sold his place near Medford to W. E. West for $800.
    John Slagle has sold his blacksmith shop at Medford to Mr. Redding.
    G. W. Williams' fine brick building at Medford will soon be ready for occupancy.
    M. Mensor has sold his lot at Medford to Geo. S. Walton, who will probably erect a building on it.
    A gentleman from the East has purchased a lot at Medford and intends building a tailor shop on it.
    McAdams & Healy's opening in their new building at Medford was well patronized and a success.
    The post offices at Grants Pass and Medford have about the neatest set of private lock boxes in the State.
    Street Commissioner Hurt of Medford is making needed repairs on the eastern end of the road to the county seat.
    C. K. Fronk, railroad agent at Medford, reports that nearly 650 tons of grain were shipped from Medford during October.
    Frank Lewellen has sold his interest in the Medford livery stable to E. Worman, lately of California, for $2,000. He talks of engaging in the business of buying and selling cattle.
    The road between this place and Medford is already in a bad condition and needs repairing. The proposition of the County Commissioners to gravel the Tice lane is to be commended.
    Several carloads of grain were shipped from Medford and Central Point during the past week. At the rate grain has been sent out of the valley recently very little will be left by next harvest.
    Nearly 40,000 lbs. of freight was received at the Medford station for Jacksonville on one train this week. Every freight train brings more or less for this place, which is positive evidence that a large business is still done here.
    Sealed proposals for graveling that portion of the road leading from this place to Medford known as the Tice lane will be received at the County Clerk's office until next Tuesday noon. For further particulars see advertisement in another column.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick writes to Jas. A. Wilson of this place that he has arrived at Medford from Siskiyou County, Cal., with the quartz mill he disposed of to the citizens of that place, and that it will be in operation in a few days.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885, page 3


    The marriage of Chas. Hall, the popular jeweler of Medford, and Miss Nellie Childers is announced. We tender congratulations.
    Doctors Pryce and Geary of Medford, two of southern Oregon's best and most prominent physicians, have formed a co-partnership for the practice of medicine and surgery. Attention is called to their notice published in another column.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885, page 3


Notice of Co-Partnership.
WE THE UNDERSIGNED, DEEMING IT for our own convenience and for the best interests of the community, have decided to form a co-partnership in the practice of Medicine and Surgery in Medford and, in order to make the proper arrangements for such co-partnership, those indebted to either of us will confer a favor by settling their accounts at their earliest convenience.
    Our offices will be as heretofore until the rooms which we have engaged in Williams' brick building are completed.
                                                                        R. PRYCE, M.D.
                                                                        E. P. GEARY, M.D.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885 et seq., page 3


    The Medford Monitor has been enlarged to an eight-page paper. "We place too much faith in systems and too little confidence in men," appears at its head. When McGinnis runs the paper a year and calls upon his subscribers for pay, he will turn his motto end for end.--[Yreka Union.

"State and Coast," Ashland Tidings, November 13, 1885, page 1


    The Chick quartz mill at Medford is ready for business.
    Walsh & Bragdon will send some of the quartz from their Wagner Creek mines to Medford for trial
    Churchman Bros., recently from Iowa, bought a twenty-acre tract of land adjacent to Medford from I. J. Phipps last week.
    The Justus property, near Medford, was sold recently to J. D. Whitman for $3,600, the first sale, reported by the administrator some weeks ago, having been set aside.
    Rev. M. A. Williams write that at his place near Medford 0.84 inches of rain fell during the month of October, and up to 6 a.m. Nov. 10th 3.75 inches had fallen this month, making a total of 4.59 thus far this fall.
    Messrs. John W. Curry, at Medford, and W. C. Leever, at Central Point, have consented to act as agents for the Tidings, and will receive and forward subscriptions from those places. They are authorized to collect and receipt for money due the paper upon subscription accounts.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 13, 1885, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES.
    The streets are getting quite muddy.
    Twenty-five immigrants have settled here within the last two weeks.
    Who will be the first man to start a saddle and harness shop in Medford?
    The plasterers are now at work in the new brick buildings, which they expect to have ready for use in about three weeks.
    During the present shipping season 113 carloads of wheat have been shipped from this station, and there is enough wheat already bought to load 64 cars more. Who can beat that?
    The new road between this place and Jacksonville is almost impassable, and should be repaired at once.
    Mr. O. Holtan, an excellent tailor, has purchased a lot on Main Street, and is building a large house to be used as a shop and dwelling.
    The quartz mill is now ready for operation, and parties will begin shipping ore hither next week
    J. W. Cunningham is now engaged in taking orders for the "Centennial" gate. It is something needed by every farmer.
    Angle & Plymale have a large and well selected stock of ladies' and misses' cloaks and gents' overcoats. They also received by last freight a carload of fine Liverpool salt.
    A. Childers & Son have finished their third brick kiln for this season. They make the finest brick in the country and find ready sale for them.
    A little son of Mrs. Minnie Houston, of Antioch precinct, died one last last week of diphtheria.
    There will be a grand ball given in Byers' Hall Christmas night, to which all are cordially invited. The best of music will be furnished and supper will be given at the Central Hotel.
Ashland Tidings, November 13, 1885, page 3



    SOLD OUT--Frank Lewellen has sold out his interest in the Medford livery stable to Ed Worman, a newcomer from the East, for $2,000 and will give possession on the 16th inst. Mr. Lewellen has not yet decided on the business he will follow from now on.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 14, 1885, page 3


    A new brick building will soon be erected at Medford by Geo. S. Walton on the lot formerly owned by M. Mensor of this place.
    37,000 pounds of freight arrived at Medford for Jacksonville on last Wednesday's freight train. Quite a good showing for a town that is dead.
    A special term of the Commissioners' Court will be held next Tuesday to examine bids for the graveling of Tice's lane on the route from here to Medford.
    Drs. R. Pryce and E. P. Geary of Medford have formed a partnership for the practice of medicine. They will make a strong team, as both are acknowledged as fine physicians and surgeons.
    Some villain entered the barn of J. C. Ducket, at Medford, a few days ago and poisoned five head of horses, valued at $1,000. here is no clue to the perpetrator, but is supposed to be a party with whom Mr. Ducket has had trouble.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 14, 1885, page 3


    The board of trustees of Medford have passed an ordinance making it unlawful to carry on a laundry in the town limits, but permitting any respectable woman to apply and receive a license therefor. This law is intended to reach the Chinese, who have been monopolizing the laundry business.
Editorial, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 20, 1885, page 3


Accidents.
    Ed. Saltmarsh, son of Jos. Saltmarsh, of Sterlingville, who is living with Claus Kleinhammer of Medford precinct, cut his foot quite badly one day last week, while cutting wood. Dr. Pryce was summoned who informs us that it will be some time before he wound is thoroughly healed, as it is a severe one.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 20, 1885, page 3


    Frank Lewellen has sold his residence in Medford.
    A. P. Talent is building a neat residence at Medford.
    Work is progressing on Angle & Plymale's brick building at Medford.
    O. Holtan, lately from the East, is putting up a tailor shop at Medford.
    Childers & Son of Medford have just completed another kiln of excellent brick.
    Gilbert's restaurant at Medford is doing a good business, being kept in excellent style.
    Jas. Priddy and sons of Medford precinct brought some fine turkeys to this market Monday.
    J. McCullough, who fell from Carlson's building at Medford several weeks ago, is improving.
    Churchman Bros. bought twenty acres of land near Medford recently. They came from Iowa not long ago.
    J. W. Cunnyngham of Medford is selling many rights to his celebrated Centennial Gate. Every farmer should have one.
    'Squire Walton has let the contract for putting up a brick building on his lot in Medford, and work has already been commenced.
    E. B. Sears, the well-known Medford architect, was in town Wednesday. He has commenced suit against his late partner, Mr. Smith.
    Miss May Crain of Medford precinct has just completed a fine oil painting of "Sentinel Rock." She is a member of Mrs. Cowles' art class.
    Messrs. Sherman and Smith, who have been in the employ of our local blacksmiths, will probably reopen the Slagle shop at Medford. They should be well patronized.
    Hays & Elliott have not rented John Slagle's old blacksmith shop at Medford, as reported, but propose remaining in Jacksonville, where they are doing a good business.
    As will be seen by advertisement elsewhere, a social party will be given at Byers' hall in Medford on Christmas night. The best of music and supper will be provided, and those who attend will be sure of enjoying themselves.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 20, 1885, page 3


    The Medford Reduction Works are now in running order and are testing ore from different mines.
    Considerable prospecting is still being done in different portions of Jackson and Josephine counties. When the quartz mills at Jacksonville and Medford are in operations, there will be much more inducement to prospect for quartz.
    Our citizens are subscribing liberally toward the $2,000 bonus that is required to induce Brown & Co. to bring a quartz mill here. In case that sum is raised, first-class machinery of the most improved kind, and valued at $8,000, will be put up at this place or in the immediate vicinity. It is to be hoped that we will not allow another golden opportunity to slip by.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 20, 1885, page 3


    Medford has three barber shops.
    Charley Wolters has gone to Medford to open a bakery and confectionery store.
    Doctors E. P. Geary and R. Pryce, of Medford, have formed a copartnership.
    Rev. W. G. Simpson and Rev. J. H. Mayfield, of this place, have been holding evening meetings at Medford within the past fortnight.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 20, 1885, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES.
    Building continues.
    The foundation of Judge Walton's new brick building is complete.
    The quartz mill began operations yesterday. Quite a large amount of ore has already been shipped for crushing.
    The brick work on Angle & Plymale's building is being rapidly pushed ahead.
    Quite a number went to Jacksonville from here Monday, to attend the funeral of Squire Wm. Hoffman.
    Archbishop Gross, of Portland, gave a lecture here last Tuesday evening.
    The Medford livery stable is now owned by Lynch & Worman.
    Wm. Kenney has moved into the building formerly occupied by J. Purdom on Front Street.
    Chas. Wolters came down from Ashland Monday. He is now a resident of Medford, and will open a first-class bakery in a few days.
Ashland Tidings, November 20, 1885, page 3


GRAND CHRISTMAS BALL!
A Grand Ball will be given in
Byers' Hall, Medford.
On Christmas Night . . . . December 25, 1885.
    A fine Supper and the best of Music will be provided. The services of a first-class caller have been engaged.
FLOOR MANAGERS
G. A. Hubbell, Geo. Anderson, John B. Griffin, W. W. Cardwell.
GRAND MARCH AT 8:30 P.M.
A good time is anticipated. Come one! Come all!
Tickets $2.50.
GEO. ANDERSON, Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 20, 1885 et seq., page 3


MARRIED.
HALL-CHILDERS--In Medford, Nov. 20, 1885, at the residence of Rev. C. H. Hoxie, Charles Hall and Miss Aggie Childers.
DIED.
ELDER--Mrs. M. E. L. Elder, of Medford, November 18, 1885, of quick consumption.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 21, 1885, page 2


    The Chick quartz mill at Medford is about ready to commence crushing rock.
    Hayes & Elliott of this place publish a card in the Medford Monitor denying that they would open a shop there.
    Mrs. J. C. Elder of Medford died at that place Wednesday. Mr. Elder and wife were former residents of Josephine County, where they are well and favorably known.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 21, 1885, page 3


    Ed. Saltmarsh, son of Jos. Saltmarsh of Sterlingville--who is living with Claus Kleinhammer, of Medford precinct, Jackson County, cut his foot quite badly one day last week while cutting wood.
    The board of trustees of Medford have passed an ordinance making it unlawful to carry on a laundry in the town limits, but permitting any respectable woman to apply and receive license therefor. This law is intended to reach the Chinese, who have been monopolizing the laundry business.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, November 26, 1885, page 3


    J. N. Banks is completing a residence at Medford.
    The roads between here and Medford are in a bad condition.
    Medford needs a cemetery and her citizens should take steps to secure one.
    Chas. Wolters will soon open a bakery at Medford. He understands the business.
    Frank Lewellen has retired from the Medford livery stable and Mr. Worman has assumed his interest.
    G. W. Howard, who bought C. W. Broback's property at Medford, reports having sold quite a number of lots since then.
    Byers & Guerin, the well-known contractors, are engaged in the construction of 'Squire Walton's brick building at Medford.
    The brick buildings of G. W. Williams and Byers & Jacobs at Medford are now being plastered and will soon be ready for occupancy.
    Over 100 carloads of wheat has already been shipped from Medford station, and considerably more will be shipped before the end of the season.
    They say that Charley Fronk, the popular railroad agent at Medford, is building a neat residence, and his many friends are enquiring what it all means.
    A petition has been in circulation asking the establishment of a daily mail between Medford and Eagle Point. We hope the P.O. Department will act favorably on it.
    Owing to press of legal and other business Prof. W. F. Williamson has found it necessary to resign as principal of the Medford school, which will reopen next Monday, with Miss Maggie Sargent and Miss Merriman in charge.
    Mrs. J. C. Elder of Medford, formerly of Josephine County, died rather suddenly last week. She had been ailing some time and came from Eugene City for the benefit of her health. The burial took place in the Jacksonville Cemetery.
    Not enough time having been given for the circulation of the advertisement inviting bids for the graveling of the Tice lane, the county commissioners' court has extended it until the December term. Several bids will no doubt be in then.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 27, 1885, page 3


    C. W. Coker, a well-known citizen of Medford, expects to make a trip to his old home in Georgia for a short time. Bon voyage.
    Messrs. Payne and Worman were over from Medford last week. The former is a brother of Ned Payne, the well-known stage driver, and hails from San Bernardino, Cal., to which place he has since returned. He wishes to know the whereabouts of Ned.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 27, 1885, page 3


MARRIED
HALL-CHILDERS--In Medford precinct, Nov. 18th, by Rev. C. H. Hoxie, Chas. Hall and Miss Agnes Childers.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 27, 1885, page 3


Good Mining Report.
    Messrs. Walsh & Bragdon recently sent to the Medford quartz mill a quantity of rock from which they have received returns as follows: The tailings from the old quartz mill operated a number of years ago yielded at the rate of about $170 to the ton; rock from the "Eva C." ledge went $97 to the ton, and a lot of inferior rock from the outcroppings of the large ledge, the "Pilgrim," went $62 to the ton. The "Pilgrim" is an unusually large lead (7 ft.) and promises exceedingly well. They are now at work upon it and have gone in some ten or fifteen feet, where they are taking out rock which shows much more gold than did the croppings of which a report is given above. The proprietors believe it will go not less than $100 to the ton, perhaps more. They have sent a ton to Medford, to be run through the mill, and will have the returns in a short time. Their water-power arrastra will be ready for operation soon, if the weather does not interfere with work upon it.
Ashland Tidings, November 27, 1885, page 3


    A grand Christmas ball will be given at Byers' Hall, Medford, on Christmas night, by George Anderson.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 27, 1885, page 3


    Isaac Merriman, of Medford precinct, has returned from Montana, whither he went with his sister last year.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, November 27, 1885, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES.
    Ten new buildings in town are being rapidly pushed ahead in spite of the bad state of the weather.
    Frank Langell of the Monitor force has gone to Jacksonville to spend a short vacation. He has been in town for some time, and wanted to go out in the country for a change.
    A very heavy wind prevailed here several days during the last week. No damage was done to property, however.
    Prof. Williamson having resigned, Miss Maggie Sargent of Phoenix has been engaged as principal of the Medford public school. The winter term begins next Monday.
    Mr. Dawson and family left for Kansas last Tuesday evening. They are an estimable family, and their many friends regret their leaving.
    L. L. Angle, Esq., arrived from Kansas last Wednesday on a visit to his brother, Wm. Angle, of this place. He may remain here during the winter, but will return home in the spring.
REV. OLVER.       
Ashland Tidings, November 27, 1885, page 3


DIED
ELDER--At Medford, Nov. 18, 1885, of quick consumption, Mrs. M. E. L. Elder.
Ashland Tidings, November 27, 1885, page 3


    A large amount of grain has been shipped from Medford this season.
    Geo. Knowlton, the printer who lived at Medford for a year past, died in the insane asylum this week. He suffered from lead poisoning in the first place.
    Prof. W. F. Williamson has resigned his position as principal of the Medford district school and will hereafter devote all of his time to the practice of law.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 28, 1885, page 3


    Mrs. J. C. Elder, of Medford, formerly of Josephine County, died rather suddenly last week. She had been ailing some time and went to Medford from Eugene City for the benefit of her health.

"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, November 30, 1885, page 4



    Jacksonville will have a fine quartz mill soon.
    The Medford reduction works are in operation.
"Southern Oregon Mines," Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 3, 1885, page 3


    Building continues at Central Point and Medford.
    Isaac Merriman of Medford precinct has returned from Montana. He is better satisfied than ever with southern Oregon.
    Geo. W. Cole of Medford ascended the Ashland flagpole, which is 100 feet high, last week, and put on the halyards. He got $15 for his work.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford purchased a large number of trees from B. F. Miller's well-known nursery at Sardine Creek, and will go into the fruit business on an extensive scale.
    As soon as the quartz mill is in running order and the crushing of quartz commences in earnest, Jacksonville will begin to boom. This town is the key to nearly the whole mining district of Jackson County.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 4, 1885, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our streets need grading.
    Improvements continue at this place.
    Who will get the contract for graveling Tice's lane? 
    Considerable freight is still being shipped from here.
    W. H. McAdams is now sole proprietor of the Brewery Saloon.
    Several Odd Fellows of this place intend to organize a lodge soon.
    Williams' block will soon be occupied, as it is approaching completion.
    The Times sends more copies to Medford than any other paper published.
    L. L. Angle of Kansas is visiting his brother, Wm. Angle of Medford.
    Chas. Wolters of Ashland will soon open a bakery and confectionery stand here.
    Our citizens should take steps toward securing a suitable burying-ground at once.
    An anti-Chinese meeting was held here last Saturday evening, which was well attended.
    Jas. Perdue, our shoemaker, is now located in the building near Gilbert's restaurant.
    Miss Jennie Wilcox of Woodville has purchased Mrs. J. W. Dougherty's millinery store.
    Vrooman, Miller & Co. keep a first-class stock of hardware, tinware, etc., and sell quite reasonably.
    The Medford Aid Society held a sociable at Byers' hall one evening last week, which was a pleasant affair.
    The Pioneer meat market now belongs to W. M. Turner, he having traded other property for it with C. W. Skeel.
    For rent or sale--the neat dwelling house formerly occupied by W. G. Kenney. Apply to A. L. Johnson for particulars.
    Geo. Anderson is making extensive arrangements for his Christmas party at Medford, and it will no doubt be a success.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 4, 1885, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick of the Medford Reduction Works was in town Saturday. He informs us that he made assays of ore from the Wagner Creek and other quartz mines, which resulted quite favorably.
    Since it has become a settled fact that a fine quartz mill will be put up in this place, a great deal more prospecting is being done. Work has been commenced on a number of ledges which have been lying dormant for many years.
    Attention is called to the advertisement of the Medford Reduction Works, which are now prepared to test all kinds of ores and make assays promptly; also to reduce any quantity of them and save a considerable percentage of the valuable minerals they contain. Mr. Chick, the superintendent, guarantees satisfaction.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 4, 1885, page 3


M E D F O R D
REDUCTION WORKS!
    ARE NOW SUCCESSFULLY
Running on various kinds of Gold and Silver ores from Jackson and Josephine counties.
    Anyone wanting Practical Working Tests made of
GOLD AND SILVER ORES
Can have the same successfully treated at the
MEDFORD REDUCTION WORKS
At Less Than
San Francisco Prices!
ASSAYING, $2.50.
GEO. H. CHICK.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 4, 1885 et seq., page 3


Church Organized.
    Rev. W. G. Simpson, pastor of the Ashland M.E. Church, after having held a series of evening meetings at Medford, organized an M.E. church at that place with twenty-seven members. The statement in the Tidings two weeks ago that he and Mr. Mayfield were holding meetings at Medford was incorrect, as Mr. M. was not associated with him in the work.
Ashland Tidings, December 4, 1885, page 3



    The new road between Medford and Jacksonville is in bad condition.
    The Monitor gives a list of improvements in Medford during the past eight months aggregating $55,000 in value--an excellent showing.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 4, 1885, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES.
    The quartz mill is now running on full time.
    M. E. Beatty, the popular representative of the Vancouver nurseries, is in town delivering trees.
    Thirty immigrants arrived in Medford Thursday morning.
    Medford takes the cake. A Chinaman was arrested this week for washing his own clothes. "The Chinese must go."
    O. Holtan's family arrived from Iowa last week. They are well pleased with our town and have come to stay.
    Mr. Price, of this place, had the misfortune to lose one of his thumbs last Monday. He was engaged in hoisting hay when his thumb caught in a pulley, cutting it entirely off.
    School reopened last Monday, with Miss Maggie Sargent as principal, and Miss Belle Merriman as assistant. Over one hundred and twenty-five scholars are in attendance.
    Doctor Geary met with quite a severe accident last Sunday. In attempting to get on a horse, the animal started suddenly, throwing him upon the ground and bruising him considerably.
    Lee Priddy, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Priddy, aged 16 years, died last Tuesday of diphtheria. It was only a few days before that he was struck with the dread disease and all that medical aid, kind friends and loving parents could do for him was of no avail. He was respected by all who knew him, and his death is mourned by his many friends throughout the valley.
REV. OLVER.       
Ashland Tidings, December 4, 1885, page 3


    Charley Wolters has concluded to locate at Medford, and will soon start a bakery and confectionery store there.
    The new quartz mill at Medford is now in working order and has commenced crushing rock. Geo. H. Chick is in charge.
    The road between here and Medford is said to be in an almost impassable condition. Geo. Brown, the stage driver, says he does not want to look at it in daylight for fear of it making him sick.
    The City Drug Store is now in charge of A. H. Merritt, Cal. Cunningham having gone to Medford to remain. Dr. Robinson still presides over the prescription department as before besides being ready to attend to professional calls at any time.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 5, 1885, page 3


    Johnny Jacobs and Tom Turner, who are now stationed at Medford, paid their relatives and friends a visit last week.
    Get your turkeys at the Brewery Saloon in Medford, where 100 will be raffled off on Christmas eve. A chance for everybody.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 11, 1885, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A number of sidewalks are being built.
    A lodge of Odd Fellows will soon be organized here.
    Medford wants a money order office, and will get one soon.
    Kenney & Wolters have renovated the Gem Saloon in fine style.
    E. J. Curtis of White Point has some intentions of removing to this place.
    Mr. Price had his thumb cut off by a pulley while hoisting hay one day last week.
    A M.E. church, with thirty members, has been organized here by Rev. W. G. Simpson.
    Dr. Geary, who was rather severely hurt recently by being thrown from a horse, has recovered.
    The Medford school is in a flourishing condition, with Misses Sargent and Merriman in charge.
    A Chinese laundryman was fined $15 for violating the ordinance recently passed against his kind.
    A large crowd will no doubt attend the Christmas ball, for which much preparation is being made.
    Misses May Crain and Ada Barr are engaged on paintings of Mt. Pitt and Mt. Hood respectively.
    There will be a grand turkey raffle at the Brewery Saloon on Christmas eve; also, a shooting match next day.
    If the new road to Jacksonville gets much worse our citizens must go by some other thoroughfare to reach the county seat.
    The youngest son [of] Mr. and Mrs. J. Priddy of Medford precinct, a promising young man, died of diphtheria last week. The bereft family have the sympathy of all.
    A fellow named Otto Lind, who has been posing as a mining expert, skipped out of Medford several days ago, leaving numerous creditors to mourn his departure. He took a saddle belonging to David Payne of Medford with him, which he disposed of at Yreka, Cal.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 11, 1885, page 3


DIED
O'BRIEN--In Medford precinct, Dec. 2d, Miss O'Brien, aged 19 years and 7 months.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 11, 1885, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES.
    The holidays are near at hand.
    D. W. Matthews, Esq., proprietor of the National Drug Store of this place, returned from Portland last Sunday morning.
    The brick work on Angle & Plymale's new store is almost completed and the building will soon be enclosed.
    'Squire Walton's new brick is being rapidly pushed ahead, and will soon be completed.
    Medford contains 750 inhabitants. Quite a showing for a town less than two years old.
    A gentleman from Wisconsin intends opening a first-class saddle and harness shop here in a short time. It is something needed badly, and we hope to see it in running order soon.
    Messrs. Retty & Roberts intend opening a skating rink here in a few days. They intend running it three nights in each week here and three nights at Central Point also.

REV. OLVER.       
Ashland Tidings, December 11, 1885, page 3


    Roberts & Retty will open a [roller] skating rink at Central Point and Medford, being at each place three nights in the week.
    Jesse Wilson, Sr., one of the pioneers of southern Oregon, is lying quite ill at his son's place in Medford precinct. He is nearly 90 years old.
    Mrs. S. E. Ward, the widow of the late J. G. Ward, has purchased a fine Italian tombstone of Shely & Jacobs of Medford, which she intends putting on her husband's grave in the cemetery at Tacoma, W.T. She has also selected some choice plants which will be properly arranged there.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 18, 1885, page 3


Grand Shooting Match.
    There will be a shooting match in Medford on Christmas day. One hundred turkeys and a fine three-year-old steer will be shot for.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 18, 1885 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The [roller] skating rink is in full blast here.
    Miss Alice Hathaway of Josephine County is visiting this place.
    There will be a grand turkey raffle at the Brewery Saloon on Christmas eve; also a shooting match next day.
    J. N. Banks has succeeded W. R. Mayfield in the management of the Central Hotel and will no doubt keep a good house.
    The infant son of John Robinson died on Tuesday last of a brain affliction and was buried in the Jacksonville cemetery the following day. He was two years old.
    D. Wilson and another party lately from Michigan intend opening a saddler shop here and have purchased some of the tools formerly used in Kenney & Helms' establishment.
    The shooting match for turkeys and a fine three-year-old steer, which will take place in Phipps' field, at the foot of 7th street, on Christmas day, will call out some of our best shots.
    Our town election takes place on the first Monday in January and is attracting considerable attention. There are already four candidates for the office of marshal, and several candidates for recorder and trustee. A lively contest is expected.
    Everybody is looking with anticipation to the party at Byers' hall on Christmas night, which will probably be the grandest ever held here. The best of music and supper has been spoken for, and those who attend will certainly enjoy themselves. A general invitation to come and be merry is extended.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 18, 1885, page 3


    The capacity of the Medford quartz reduction works is to be increased to ten tons per day.
    A large quantity of quartz rock from the Walsh & Bragdon mines on Wagner Creek was shipped to the Medford reduction works this week.
    Two cases of genuine scarlet fever are reported at Medford, and one in Ashland, the latter that of a little child of Mr. and Mrs. M. N. Long, which was very ill at last report. Thus far no other cases have appeared in town, and it is to be hoped that every possible precaution will be taken to prevent the disease from obtaining a foothold here.
       
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 18, 1885, page 3


    Williamson and Powell, the two attorneys of Medford, were here this week attending to a case in Justice Foudray's court.
    The case of Sears vs. Smith, action to recover $23, was brought here from Medford on a change of venue, and after a two days' trial Justice Foudray found in favor of plaintiff for the sum of $6.25 and costs. Four lawyers were employed on the case, and we doubt if either gained much of a victory--financially.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 19, 1885, page 3


O.&C. Officials Visit Medford.
From the Monitor.
    A special train bearing Receiver Koehler, Superintendent Brandt and Vice-President W. W. Bretherton arrived in Medford Tuesday morning for the purpose of visiting the Medford Reduction Works, under the management of Mr. George H. Chick. The object of the visit was to learn the capacity of the mill and to offer encouragement to the stockholders and miners in the way of switches at different points on the road, and reduced freight rates on the ore.
    Mr. Chick has practically demonstrated to the stockholders that he can reduce rebellious ores and extract the precious metals, if any, from them. Sufficient paying ore to run a ten-stamp mill is ready. Let us have the stamps. We hope the citizens of Medford who have means will not allow this opportunity to slip by. It is an industry of all others that needs encouragement and support, at least until it is placed upon a paying basis.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 20, 1885, page 7


    Two cases of genuine scarlet fever are reported at Medford, and one in Ashland, the latter that of a little child of Mr. and Mrs. M. N. Long, which was very ill at last report. Thus far no other cases have appeared in town.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 22, 1885, page 3


    John H. Lacy has removed from Ashland to Medford.
    The shooting match at Medford attracts considerable attention.
    Chas. Wolters has opened a bakery and confectionery store at Medford.
    J. H. Redfield and Isaac Woolf have announced themselves as candidates for Marshal of Medford.
    Remember the Christmas party at Medford this evening. Everything will be done to assure a good time.
    Dr. J. P. Welch, lately of Medford, has left for more congenial climes and several creditors are disconsolate in consequence.
    An entertainment was given at Byers' hall, Medford, last night, the proceeds of which goes toward building a Presbyterian Church at that place.
    The shoemaker who was putting up a building at Medford departed a few days since, on business so urgent that he forgot to come back. Several creditors mourn his sudden emigration.
    A heavy rain fell last Sunday evening which put the roads in a sorry plight again. It is said that the mud never was so deep before. The road to Medford from this place could not be in a worse condition.
    The roads between Jacksonville and Central Point are in comparatively good condition for this season of the year, and our merchants are threatening to send their freight to the latter place instead of Medford.
    A Medford merchant has a lot of potatoes for sale at 1½ cents a pound, which he imported from Portland. Here the best native potatoes are selling for a cent a pound. Is the Willamette article so much better than our own, or is it impossible to get them to Medford at this season of the year? Which is it?
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 25, 1885, page 3


    W. H. Gore of Medford precinct has been elected president of the Laurean literary society at the State University.
    We received a pleasant call from C. K. Fronk, the clever railroad agent at Medford, and Chas. Strang, the popular treasurer of that place.
    Mrs. J. C. Cowles of Medford still makes regular visits to Jacksonville, but they are not as frequent as when the roads were in good condition. Her art school is progressing rapidly.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 25, 1885, page 3


    Ten tons of ore from the Wagner Creek quartz mines were shipped to Medford yesterday for reduction.
    Money has been raised to purchase stamps for the Medford Reduction Works, and it is expected to have a capacity of ten tons every 24 hours.
    Fourteen hundred pounds of ore from the Wagner Creek quartz mines were tested at the Medford Reduction Works last week and a gold brick worth over $60 was the result, we are informed. Considerable excitement exists in that section in consequence.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 25, 1885, page 3


    Mr. A. J. Weeks, who has the fruit farm near Medford, will set out several thousand more young trees this year. None of his trees are in bearing yet.
    C. B. Carlisle, secretary of the state board of immigration, applied to W. H. Atkinson of this place for Jackson County pamphlets, and Mr. A. sent him by express Wednesday evening all the copies that could be gathered up in Ashland. Many more are needed at the immigration rooms in Portland.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 25, 1885, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES.
    Medford still improves.
    The skating rink runs regularly three nights in each week and is doing a rushing business.
    Mrs. J. S. Howard, who has been quite ill for some time, is able to be around again.
    A child of G. H. Haskins of this place is quite low with scarlet fever, and great fears are felt as to its recovery.
    Medford now has a first-class harness and saddlery shop. Mr. Wilson is a thorough business man, and we wish him much success.
    Winter fights opened in fine style last Saturday. No one was killed or wounded but the pocketbook, which had to suffer the results.
    Paul A. Smith, spiritualist, gave three lectures here this week. He is quite an interesting speaker, and his meetings were well attended.
    John Smith of Big Sticky was in town a few days ago. He reports the general health better in that section than it has been for some time past.
    M. E. Beatty has purchased a block in the Howard addition to Medford and intends making it one of the finest ornamental gardens on the coast.
    Medford can now boast of one of the finest bakeries in southern Oregon. Mr. Wolters understands his business and will no doubt make a success of it.
    The grand ball to be given Christmas night promises to be a fine affair. No pains will be spared to make it the event of the season, and all who attend may be assured of having a good time.
    J. H. Griffis of Gold Hill was in town last Friday. He reports some very rich quartz ledges having been struck in that locality and says the time is near at hand when Gold Hill will be the metropolis of the valley.

REV. OLVER.       
Ashland Tidings, December 25, 1885, page 3


BORN.
McADAMS--In Medford, Dec. 25th, 1885, to Mr. and Mrs. F. M. McAdams, a son.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 26, 1885, page 2


    Medford is to have a Presbyterian Church soon with Rev. M. A. Williams as pastor. An entertainment was given there this week for a benefit.
    Medford will soon indulge in a town election. The only contest we have heard of is for the office of Marshal, for which Isaac Woolf and J. H. Redfield are candidates.
    Angle & Plymale at Medford do the boss business in the general merchandise line at that place. They will soon move to their new brick when they will also increase their already large stock.
    Unless necessary improvements are made on the road between here and Medford, Central Point will hereafter be used as a shipping point, during the winter at least, as the road to that place is much the best.
    A beautiful oil painting and $5 in gold coin will be raffled for at Caton's saloon New Year's Eve, the highest throw taking the picture and the lowest the coin. The painting is the work of Mrs. J. C. Cowles of Medford and shows the highest artistic skill.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 26, 1885, page 3


    Ten tons of ore from the Wagner Creek quartz mines were shipped to Medford yesterday for reduction.
    Money has been raised to purchase stamps for the Medford reduction works, and it is expected to have a capacity of ten tons every twenty-four hours.
    Fourteen hundred pounds of ore from the Wagner Creek quartz mines were tested at the Medford reduction works last week, and a gold brick worth over $60 was the result, we are informed. Considerable excitement exists in that section in consequence.
"Southern Oregon Mines," Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 27, 1885, page 9



Last revised August 20, 2016
For more complete names of persons identified by initials, see the Index.