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Medford News: 1886

No Medford newspapers from 1886 survive. Below are 
Medford-related news items from 1886, gleaned from other towns' papers Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.


THE YEAR THAT IS ENDED.
    This week the Tidings is issued on New Year's Day, that milestone upon the highway of time where each traveler is prone to pause for a retrospective glance at the scenes which he has left behind forever, and, when he has taken a lingering look at these, to turn his gaze to the front and strive to pierce the mists of futurity that hang about the morning of the new year. Pausing in its weekly labor of news gathering, the Tidings will take a brief review of the year which ended yesterday, so far as its impress upon the little circle of our own community is concerned.
    Following the bustling, prosperous period of railroad building in our valley, the year was expected to be one of dullness and depression in comparison, and when the general stagnation of business in the country, the low price of staple agricultural products in Oregon and the crop shortage in our own valley all came together upon the heels of the sudden withdrawal of the railroad building stimulus, it was feared there would be "hard times" in reality in Jackson County. To some extent the fear has been realized. Money is scarce, and economy in general, but we do not know "hard times" here such as the people in some parts of America have experienced. Improvements of all kinds have continued during the year. Towns and villages in all parts of the valley have new buildings and new inhabitants to place to the credit of 1885. Farms have been improved, and new lands brought into cultivation. The scarcity of money, in comparison with the year before, has not been of sufficient consequence to check the steady development of which these things are evidence. And even the Sentinel's gloomy foreboding of a decline in the value of real estate has been dispelled; the assessment roll, the Sentinel's own pet gauge, having perversely gone up instead of falling as had been predicted.
    The year past is the first in which the exportation of grain from our valley has figured to any extent in the balance sheet of the community trade. It marks the beginning of the railroad era and will relieve the farmer's mind of the fear that the market may be glutted by a big crop and large acreage of wheat in this valley. But it is to be hoped the farmers here will be able before many years to do better than raising wheat to ship to Portland.
    Within the past twelvemonth, there has been aroused in Jackson County a widespread interest in the development of quartz mining property. Gathering headway, week by week, it has finally reached the condition of an incipient mining boom of the regulation, exciting, fascinating character familiar to people who have been in the large mining camps that have become famous in the history of the Pacific Coast. What proportions the boom will reach it is yet too early to predict with any accuracy--the fever has just begun to assume the form of an epidemic. Some experienced miners express the opinion that Jackson County will, within a short time, be one of the best mining regions on the coast. This may be simply a wild, random prediction, but it is nevertheless true that the limited amount of prospecting already done has developed a number of very promising ledges, the safest prospects showing, upon assay, from $15 to $75 per ton in lodes of ample width. These ledges bid fair to soon dispel the widespread impression that all the quartz leads of Southern Oregon are pockety, and therefore slippery property for investors. Let the plucky miners now at work once convince the capitalists of the mining centers that Southern Oregon has quartz leads which will yield good returns from a uniform, fair-grade rock, and we shall soon hear the roar of stamp mills in the ravines and gulches reaching up from the fertile valley into the picturesque mountains which form its southern and western border. In the bowels of the hills upon the east are found traces of some of the baser metals and various minerals which may in time yield a greater revenue to the country than the gold mines.
    More modest in its dreams than the gold mining boom, but surer in its returns, is another industry which has lately begun its growth in the Rogue River Valley--fruit culture. The planting of young orchards has been one feature of the year, especially about Ashland. Within the past two years many thousands of fruit trees have been set out in this part of the valley, and the clearing of brush land in the foothills for peach and apple orchards is proceeding steadily through the present winter. The hill land is especially adapted to the culture of some of the choicest fruits, and when the citizens of Ashland can stand upon the rim of her mountain wall and see beneath them on every hand little fruit farms of five or ten or twenty acres, each yielding a comfortable living for a happy family, then the town will know a solid, enduring prosperity, and will be the center of a community in which the life work will be of a kind to elevate and strengthen the character--a group of attractive and happy homes, such as the opulent fruit centers of the Golden State support in surprising number. Will Ashland see this day? The Tidings believes it will, and the enterprising people who are turning the hillsides into orchards are determined that it shall.
Ashland Tidings, January 1, 1886, page 2


    Medford will have a Presbyterian Church soon.
    The boys are spearing some fine salmon trout in Ashland Creek.
    Medford has turned out "locators" [i.e., prospectors] enough to plaster mining claims all over the Wagner Creek hills.
    Pestles and mortars have been brought into requisition frequently for private assays of private rock this week.
    The dancing parties at the different places in the county have not been so well attended as usual during the present holiday season, the bad roads having kept many people away.
    The hoodlums were not quite so obstreperous as usual during the play Christmas night, but made a little more noise than was necessary. Some of them were "big enough and old enough to know better," too.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 1, 1886, page 3


    Prospecting is being actively prosecuted in the Wagner Creek district, and it is claimed that a ledge has been traced from the Walsh & Bragdon mines for a number of miles toward the backbone of the Siskiyous. The flattering returns from the rock shipped by Walsh & Bragdon to the Medford Reduction Works started a number of Medford people out to secure locations, and a large number of claims have been made.
    Walsh & Bragdon have shipped twenty-six tons of tailings from the old stamp mill to Medford. Operations upon the prospect shaft of their Pilgrim mine also continue, under the direction of Mr. Parsons.
    The new machinery which will increase the capacity of the Medford Reduction Works to ten tons per day was shipped from San Francisco on the 26th ult., and is expected to arrive at Medford next week.
    In the Blackwell district in Willow Springs precinct, seven or eight claims have been "located" within a short time by the Medford men. A switch is to be laid by the railroad company at the most convenient point, and rock will be shipped to Medford in considerable quantities from mines in which work is already under way. McAndrew & Slagle are taking out 100 tons for this purpose, and Ragsdale & Co. are also preparing to ship a large quantity.
    M. E. Beatty, a "mining expert" recently from Colorado, and G. W. Howard, of Medford, have located a claim on an extension of the ledge upon which the Cunninghams and Barkdull have recently made such a rich strike in the Gold Hill district.
"Mining News," Ashland Tidings, January 1, 1886, page 3


BORN
McADAMS--In Medford, Dec. 25, 1885, to Mr. and Mrs. F. M. McAdams, a son.
Ashland Tidings, January 1, 1886, page 3


W. F. WILLIAMSON
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR-AT-LAW
MEDFORD, OREGON.
All business in my line will receive prompt attention.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 2, 1886 et seq., page 1


R. Pryce, M.D.                                                E. P. Geary, M.D.
PRYCE & GEARY.
PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS,
Medford, Or.
Offices--For the present will be as heretofore.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 2, 1886 et seq., page 1


A. L. JOHNSON
Notary Public, Real Estate Agent and Collector
Medford, O.
    I make conveyancing and furnishing abstracts of land titles a specialty. Loans negotiated and collections made. All business entrusted to my care will receive prompt and careful attention.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 2, 1886 et seq., page 1


MARRIED.
FRONK-MERRIMAN--At the residence of the bride's parents, in Medford precinct, Dec. 31, 1885, C. K. Fronk and Miss Belle Merriman.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 2, 1886, page 2


    Failing to give $100 bonds, a Medford Chinaman now keeps Lewis O'Neil company in the county jail.
    Medford had only one Chinaman within her corporate limits, and this week Constable Birdseye went down there and arrested him on a charge of assault with intent to kill. The Chinaman has since been bound over and is now in jail and the citizens of that place [are] getting up a fund to buy a medal for Birdseye for ridding the town of Chinese.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 2, 1886, page 3


    Medford will have a Presbyterian church soon.
    Medford has turned out "locators" enough to plaster mining claims all over the Wagner Creek hills.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 2, 1886, page 3


FRI. 8.         Weather, Slight frost
    Teams hauling Hay to Mill and lumber away, also hauling quartz to Talent to ship to Medford to be reduced to bullion and thence to coin, but I have not seen any of the Coin as yet.
Diary of Welborn Beeson, January 8, 1886



    Prospecting is being actively prosecuted in the Wagner Creek district, and it is claimed that a ledge has been traced from the Walsh & Bragdon mines for a number of miles toward the backbone of the Siskiyous. The flattering returns from the rock shipped by Walsh & Bragdon to the Medford reduction works started a number of Medford people out to secure locations, and a large number of claims have been made.
    Walsh & Bragdon have shipped twenty-six tons of tailings from the old stamp mill to Medford. Operations upon the prospect shaft of their Pilgrim mine also continue, under the direction of Mr. Parsons.
    The new machinery, which will increase the capacity of the Medford reduction works to ten tons per day, was shipped from San Francisco on the 26th ult., and is expected to arrive at Medford next week.
    In the Blackwell district in Willow Springs precinct, seven or eight claims have been "located" within a short time by the Medford men. A switch is to be laid by the railroad company at the most convenient point, and rock will be shipped to Medford in considerable quantities from mines in which work is already under way. McAndrew & Slagle are taking out 100 tons for this purpose, and Ragsdale & Co. are also preparing to ship a large quantity.
    M. E. Beatty, a "mining expert" recently from Colorado, and G. W. Howard, of Medford, have located a claim on an extension of the ledge upon which the Cunninghams and Barkdull have recently made such a strike in the Gold Hill district.

"Mining News," Ashland Tidings, January 2, 1886, page 3


    There are about four tons daily of gold quartz being delivered at Talent station for shipment to the Medford Reduction Works.

"Talent Items," Ashland Tidings, January 8, 1886, page 3


    No Chinese in Medford.
    Quartz excitement continues on Wagner Creek.
    Jacksonville is jubilant over the arrival of its quartz mill.
    Medford elected town officers this week, and feels safe once again.
    A Medford correspondent of the Times says: "A change in the management of the 'long-felt want' in the newspaper line is anticipated by many."
    Eight or ten men from Medford were straggling over the hills in the Wagner Creek canyon all night recently, locating mining claims on quartz ledges. Nothing phlegmatic about these fellows.
    One day last week, O. H. Johnson while lighting a cigar at his home threw the burning brand of the cigar upon a pound of powder in the room. It exploded and seriously injured Mr. Johnson's face, but it is hoped that it will leave no lasting scars.--[Medford Monitor]
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 8, 1886, page 3


    There are about four tons daily of gold quartz being delivered at Talent station for shipment to the Medford Reduction Works.
"Talent Items," Ashland Tidings, January 8, 1886, page 3


    Mr. C. K. Fronk, the railroad agent at Medford, was married to Miss Belle Merriman, at the residence of the bride's mother in Medford precinct, last Friday.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, January 8, 1886, page 3


MARRIED
FRONK-MERRIMAN--At the residence of the bride's parents, in Medford precinct, Dec. 21, 1885, C. K. Fronk and Miss Belle Merriman
Ashland Tidings, January 8, 1886, page 3


    The Medford quartz mill is to be enlarged.
    The Medford Monitor is now in charge of George Stockton, M. A. McGinnis having gone back East.
    It is our opinion that the road between here and Medford is the worst in Oregon--in fact some portions of the new road cannot be traveled at all.
    At the Medford town election held on Monday last 125 votes were cast and the following candidates elect: Trustees, Dr. Geary, G. W. Howard, F. Galloway, A. Childers, J. S. Howard; recorder, G. S. Walton; marshal, I. Woolf; treasurer, Chas. Strang; street commissioner, E. G. Hurt.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 9, 1886, page 3


    Medford has been importing potatoes from Portland.
    The Medford town election occurred last week. The total vote was 125.
"News of the Northwest,"
Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 11, 1886, page 4


    The Medford Reduction Works started their stamps Friday. These works can treat ten tons per day, and have had an offer to contract one year's work ahead from one mine, but refuse to contract, as it would go against the development of other mines.
"Southern Oregon Mines,"
Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 14, 1886, page 5


MEDFORD BREVITIES.
    The roads are in a very bad condition, and steps should be taken to improve them if possible.
    Carlos Goddard and N. Freil, of Flounce Rock, were in town last week. They report stock doing well in that vicinity.
    The improved machinery for the quartz mill at this place arrived on last week's freight, and work was resumed the first of this week.
    D. Wilson has received a full line of saddles, hardness, etc. and has one of the finest saddler shops in the valley. He intends running a first-class boot and shoe shop in connection with it, and will be ready for business shortly.
    L. C. Rodenberger has purchased J. Retty's interest in the skating rink. They intend building a fine large hall shortly to better enable them to accommodate their patrons.
    Fred Barneburg has bought the butcher shop formerly owned by Wm. Turner, and will continue the business at the old stand. J. B. Griffin will have charge of the shop.
    Wm. Barnum has returned from San Francisco, where he purchased a fine large engine for his planing mill in this place.
    Messrs. Peach and Libby, of Michigan, spent several days in Medford last week. They are looking up the lumber interests of Southern Oregon, and may conclude to return again and locate somewhere in the valley.

    There is a great excitement here over the quartz discoveries at Gold Hill. Some very rich ledges have already been found. M. E. Beatty located a ledge recently that assays over $900 to the ton. Ragsdale & Co. are engaged in opening the "consolidated mine," which promises to be a very rich ledge, and that section has begun to assume the appearance of "the days of '49."

REV. OLVER.           
Ashland Tidings, January 15, 1886, page 3


    WOLTERS-ALFORD.--At the residence of the bride's parents, in Talent, Wednesday evening, Jan. 13th, occurred the wedding of Mr. C. W. Wolters, now of Medford, and Miss Ollie, youngest daughter of ex-Commissioner A. Alford. The wedding guests, who were nearly all relatives of the bride and groom, were invited to partake of an elegant supper after the ceremony had joined the hands and lives of the happy couple, and the congratulations extended by those present will be joined in by many friends of both the bride and groom in this part of the valley. They will reside in Medford, where Mr. Wolters has recently taken his place among the enterprising business men of the new town.
"Nuptial Vows," Ashland Tidings, January 15, 1886, page 3



    Niles & Yeago went to Medford yesterday to open the dancing season [probably a jocular reference to their roller rink business].
    It will not be long before a quartz mill will be running on Wagner Creek.
    The matter of graveling the Tice lane on the new road between Medford and Jacksonville has been indefinitely postponed by the county court.
    Tom Reynolds informs us that he brought up in Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express car on yesterday's train the concentrator for the Medford quartz mill. It was a healthy express package, weighing over 1800 lbs.
    At the Medford election 125 votes were cast and the following candidates elected: Trustees, Dr. Geary, G. W. Howard, F. Galloway, A. Childers, J. S. Howard; Recorder, G. S. Walton; marshal, I. Woolf; treasurer, Chas. Strang; street commissioner, E. G. Hurt.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 15, 1886, page 3


BORN.
SHORT--Near Medford, Jan. 12, 1886, to Mr. and Mrs. Short, a son.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 16, 1886, page 3


    The stamps for the new reduction works at Medford have arrived and are being put in place.
"News of the Northwest," Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 17, 1886, page 8


    Medford has been importing potatoes from Portland.
    A Grave Creek correspondent of the Courier says: We were visited last week by some eastern people just from Minnesota and Illinois. They were highly pleased with our country, and especially our climate. All expect to locate in Southern Oregon, and send for friends. We welcome them and trust the good work will still go on. They say the people in the East know and hear but little of our county and say we should advertise more extensively, all of which I think true. There are hundreds of people, yes thousands, who will come when they understand what we have. Southern Oregon is the place for them, both for health, mild climate, variety of products and industries.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, January 22, 1886, page 2


    Freight for Jacksonville is hauled from Central Point now, the road being better than that leading to Medford.
    Alexander Mackintosh, a Highlander, who recently arrived at Medford, wants a situation at herding sheep. Has followed the business since boyhood, and understands it thoroughly--brought with him two collies. Address at Medford, or apply to Kenney & Wolters.
    Rev. M. A. Williams, of Medford precinct, who has kept a meteorological record for many years past, kindly furnished the Tidings with a copy of his summary for 1885. It corresponds very nearly with that of the U.S. Signal Service station at Ashland, the difference in the location having but slight effect upon the temperature.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 22, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES
    Farmers are busy plowing.
    Business is quiet since the holidays.
    Mrs. Chas. Wolters now officiates as head salesman at the new bakery.
    J. R. West, who has been quite ill for some time past, is up again we are happy to say.
    J. C. Elder has placed a large new sign in front of his grocery store on Main Street.
    The first snow of the season fell last Monday night. It all disappeared Tuesday, however.
    The Medford Reduction Works received ten carloads of wood from Grants Pass last week.
    The shelving is being put in J. S. Howard's new brick, and he intends moving by the first of next month.
    Quite a number of new crossings have been added to our streets of late, which is quite an advantage to the "masses."
    The A.O.U.W. of this place intend giving a grand ball in Williams' new hall, Feb. 22, 1886. It will no doubt be the event of the season, as no pains will be spared to make it a success.
    Fred Barneburg has purchased the butcher shop formerly owned by Mr. Hosley, of Ashland. Hereafter there will be but one shop in town.
    Wm. Smith, our popular blacksmith, made a trip to Eagle Point Sunday. No need to "agree" the question, Will. But batching is poor business anyhow, don't it?
    The quartz mill is now running on full time and is crushing ten tons of ore per day.
REV. OLVER.       
Ashland Tidings, January 22, 1886, page 3


    The reduction works at Medford have been started up again, after a suspension of some time to permit the putting in of five stamps, a new concentrator and other machinery. Supt. Chick assures us that the best of work will be done henceforth.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1886, page 2


    While in Medford last week we called at Mrs. Cowles' studio, where we were shown several fine pictures. Among the very best and most natural was a crayon portrait of Mrs. S. E. Ish, executed by her daughter Miss Sophie Ish.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The new town officials assumed their duties last week.
    W. S. Barnum has returned from a business trip to San Francisco.
    L. C. Rodenberger has purchased J. Retty's interest in the skating rink.
    Chas. Wolters and wife have returned to this place and settled down to business.
    John B. Griffin will be in charge of Fred. Barneburg's butcher shop in this place.
    'Squire Walton's neat, new brick building is about completed and will soon be occupied.
    Williams' fine brick building is almost completed and will soon be ready for occupancy.
    C. K. Fronk's neat, new residence is nearing completion. Charley never does anything by halves.
    There is considerable water in pools in this vicinity, which reminds our city dads that drainage is badly needed.
    Boran, the shoemaker who skipped for more congenial climes, is advertised by his wife in another column of the Times.
    Jasper Crenshaw is following his trade as wheelwright, and has his shop in the rear portion of Geo. F. Merriman's building.
    S. Rosenthal has a fine stock of merchandise, and sells so cheap that some people are inclined to believe he stole his goods.
    A number of residents of this place, including Frank Lewellen and J. Smith, intend to leave for east of the mountains soon in quest of new locations.
    F. L. Cranfill, the clever manager of Henry Smith's store and lumber yards, continues to sell heaps of goods. He is assisted by his amiable wife.
    Ad. Helms of Wagner Creek has purchased a half interest in D. Payne's livery stable here. New stock and vehicles will be added and the business run in first-class style.
    Byers & Guerin, the well-known contractors, have been finishing the neat new dwelling house of W. S. Barnum, who has moved his planing mill some distance further south.
    A large amount of fir wood was hauled to this place from Grants Pass during the past fortnight to supply the local demand. The roads are so bad that very little can be hauled to town in wagons.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1886, page 3


BORN.
SHORT--Near Medford, Jan. 12th, to Mr and Mrs. J. W. Short, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1886, page 3


    Most of our county roads are the next thing to impassable.
    George Stockton is in charge of the Medford Monitor during the absence of M. A. McGinnis.
    Hereafter there will be but one freight train a week from Portland to Ashland till increasing business in the spring requires another train again. The train will arrive Wednesday evening, and start back next morning.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 23, 1886, page 3


A TRANSIENT OPPORTUNITY.
    While Portland has been talking about it, while everybody has been suggesting what everybody else ought to do, reduction works have actually been set up and put in operation at Medford in Jackson County. Their capacity is small, it is true, but a beginning has been made and the basis created for a larger establishment. One of the advantages of this kind of enterprise is that in order to add to the capacity of works it is not necessary to throw away the original plant. All that need to be done is to add to it, and even suspension of operations while additions are being made is not necessary. It is reported that other works are to be set up at Jacksonville, and a scheme not yet fully developed is on foot to establish works on a large scale at Spokane Falls or somewhere in the Colville country. Certain capitalists of Puget Sound stand ready to set up similar works at Seattle when the Cascade division is built, provided the opportunity still remains.
    Some of these schemes may come to nothing, but it is quite certain that unless Portland takes advantage of her chance, and quite soon too, the chance will be gone. Portland is in a position just now to become the depot of the great mining region hereabout, and there ought certainly to be enterprise and spirit enough here to grasp the opportunity.
Oregonian, Portland, January 24, 1886, page 4



    Ad. Helms of Talent has bought a half-interest in Dave Payne's livery stable at Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 29, 1886, page 3


    B. F. Miller has sold his mines on Sardine Creek to parties from Medford, who will put in a hydraulic pipe soon.
"Mining Items," Ashland Tidings, January 29, 1886, page 3


    Good pasturage can be obtained at reasonable rates by applying  at the Davison farm, near Medford.
    Attention is called to the law card [i.e., advertisement] of W. R. Andrews, who has recently located at Medford for the practice of his profession. He comes well recommended and has had considerable experience.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1886, page 3


    F. L. Cranfill, the efficient manager of Henry Smith's business at Medford, made us a pleasant call last Monday.
    J. H. Whitman of Medford has been here during the week making plats of different townships of the county. He is an adept in abstracting titles, etc.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The post office will soon be in new quarters.
    A. Wansdorf and family have removed to Portland.
    'Squire Walton's neat, new building has been finished.
    Spelling school at the schoolhouse every Saturday night.
    The marriage of Joe Deik and Sarah Ward is announced.
    Several of our businessmen were at the county seat during the week.
    A number of sidewalks and street crossings have been constructed recently.
    F. L. Cranfill has sold his dwelling house to Mr. Bever, a newcomer, for $600.
    Dr. J. P. Welch, lately of this place, is now a resident of Shasta County, Cal.
    The quartz mill is working well and is crushing a considerable quantity of ore.
    When you are in Medford call at the Empire Hotel, where the best of meals and lodgings are furnished.
    Messrs. Roberts, O'Neil and Slagle have been at Jacksonville assisting O. Harbaugh with a large lot of hogs.
    The report that Henry Smith's store had a near escape from fire one night recently is without foundation.   
    Niles & Yeago of Henley, Cal., have started a dancing school in Medford, which meets every Tuesday evening.   
    The A.O.U.W. of this place intends giving a ball on Feb. 22d, in Williams' hall, which will no doubt be a grand affair.
    A. J. Wilcox, an excellent mechanic, has been assisting in the plastering of the buildings of Messrs. Howard and Williams.
    The lower story of Williams' building is about completed and Vrooman, Miller & Co. will occupy the east half of it in a few days.
    F. Hubbard intends to leave for east of the mountains soon, to seek a home. He has already disposed of his residence in town.
    F. Barneburg has purchased the butcher shop of J. Delano and there is only one market in town. Excellent meats of all kinds are disposed of there.
    The last freight train brought 75 cords of wood for the reduction works here from Grants Pass, and still there is an abundance of excellent wood within a few miles of this place.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1886, page 3


    Ad. Helms of Talent has bought a half interest in Dave Payne's livery stable at Medford.
    Fred Grob of this place will send a ton of quartz from his mine to Medford next week to give it a mill test. He has a large lot of rock on the dump, all of which prospects well.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 30, 1886, page 3


    The Medford quartz mill is now running on full time and is crushing ten tons of ore per day.
"Southern Oregon Mines," Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 3, 1886, page 4


    Grand ball at Medford by the A.O.U.W. lodge on Feb 22d.
    The Medford Reduction Works has been using wood shipped on the railroad from Grants Pass.
    The quartz mill belonging to Morris & Jacobs, put up by Geo. H. Chick at Vacent's [Vincent's?], near mouth of Indian Creek, Siskiyou County, has been taken down and will be moved to Humbug, to be used at some good-paying ledges lately discovered at that place.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 5, 1886, page 3


    Wm. Phipps and N. S. Redden, of Medford, who have been attending Ashland College during the winter, returned home the first of the week.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, February 5, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES
    Henry Smith, of Wolf Creek, was in town during the past week.
    The Medford Literary Society meets Wednesday evenings of each week.
    Ed. Hanley started last Monday for Harney Valley to attend to his stock interests there.
    M. A. McGinnis returned last Tuesday from Chicago, where he has been on a business visit.
    The cornice on Williams' block has been completed and presents a very handsome appearance.
    The plasterers are now at work in Angle & Plymale's new brick, and it will soon be ready for the "shebang."
    O. Harbaugh started last Monday on a business trip to California. He expects to return about the first of April.
    A new engine will be added to the quartz mill in a few days, and it will then be able to crush more ore than it has heretofore.
    Geo. H. Chick had the misfortune to cut his wrist quite severely with a chisel one day last week. It is a painful, though not serious, wound.
    Dr. Geo. DeBarr and wife, of Portland, are visiting W. H. Barr, of this place. They expect to remain in this vicinity for some time.
    John Cox, of this place, is engaged in making one of his celebrated plows.
They are warranted to run in the most sticky land. Anyone having much "sticky" to plow should invest in one of these plows.
    February 3d.                                                                                 REV. OLVER
Ashland Tidings, February 5, 1886, page 3


BORN
GUERIN--In Medford, Jan. 31, 1886, to Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Guerin, a son.
Ashland Tidings, February 5, 1886, page 3


Canal Company.
    "The Rogue River Canal Company," an incorporation of citizens of Sams Valley, was organized about two weeks since. The incorporators are A. C. Stanley, H. W. Shipley, Jos. France, F. A. English and A. S. Moon, and the capital stock is placed at $100,000 in shares of $50 each. The object of the incorporation is to construct a canal to take water from Rogue River for use in irrigating and mining, and possibly for power in manufacturing, also. The officers of the company are: A. C. Stanley, president; H. W. Shipley, vice-president; Jos. France, treasurer, and F. A. English, secretary.
Ashland
Tidings, February 5, 1886, page 3


    M. A. McGinnis, editor of the Medford Monitor, has returned from his trip to the East.
    Thirty tons of tailings from Wagner Creek mines were worked on at the Medford mill last week and $1,200 taken.
    The Medford Monitor last week finds fault with our postmaster for changing stage time so that the trip could be made in daylight, there being no mail as no railroad connections were made. With the condition of the roads and no mails or trains the people on this end of the route have no objection to the change.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 6, 1886, page 3


BORN.
GUERIN--In Medford, Feb. 1st, to Mr. and Mrs. Jas. T. Guerin, a son.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 6, 1886, page 4


    Quartz mining and fruit growing are the two building industries of Southern Oregon.
    The report in the Medford Monitor that thirty tons of the tailings from the old quartz mill on Wagner Creek had yielded $1200 at the Medford Reduction Works was entirely erroneous.
    Miss Elizabeth Geary, daughter of Rev. E. R. Geary, of Eugene City, and a sister of Dr. Geary, of Medford, died at her home in Eugene last Saturday, after a protracted illness, from cerebrospinal meningitis.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 12, 1886, page 3


    W. R. Andrews, a lawyer formerly of Spokane Falls, has located at Medford.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, February 12, 1886, page 3


    Thos. Riddle, lately of Medford precinct, has gone east of the mountains.
    Owing to the change in railroad time the stage for Medford leaves this place at six o'clock P.M.
    The masquerade at Medford will be on Feb. 22d instead of March 5th. All who attend will have a grand time.
    J. Delano, lately of Medford, a first-class butcher, has become interested [i.e., secured a financial interest] in the Ashland Cash Market with Chas. Hosley.
    Two Medford Sunday school boys recently had a dispute about their lesson, after having church, and fought it out on the spot to a finish.
    The railroad blockade has been raised and trains are running regularly once more. If the stormy weather continues we may expect a recurrence of these troubles.
    As the railroad between Ashland and Roseburg is not in the best condition as yet, the regular trains leave Ashland before eight o'clock P.M., arriving at Medford at 8:20.
    Miss Lizzie Geary of Eugene City, sister of Dr. Geary of Medford, died a few days since after a brief illness. The deceased was an estimable young lady, and her loss is regretted by a large circle of relatives and friends.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1886, page 3


    Uncle Jesse Wilson of Medford precinct, who is nearly 90 years of age, is in poor health, we are sorry to say.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Angle & Plymale's new building is being plastered.
    Henry Smith of Wolf Creek paid us a visit last week.
    Geo. H. Chick cut his wrist severely with a chisel one day recently.
    The train from Ashland reaches this place at 8:20 o'clock P.M. nowadays.
    Wm. Edwards and son of this precinct have returned from a prospecting tour on Applegate.
    The literary society holds interesting sessions at the schoolhouse every Wednesday evening.
    Jas. Perdue, the scientific boot and shoe maker, may be found in the rear of D. Wilson's saddle and harness shop.
    The managers of the reduction works have secured a new engine and have resumed active operations again.
    A pleasant sociable was given at Byers' hall last Tuesday evening for the benefit of the Presbyterian Church, which was well attended.
    Dr. Geary has been at Eugene City, whither he was called by the serious illness of his sister. We regret to learn of her death.
    Recorder Walton and W. F. Williamson are busily engaged in revising and condensing many of the existing ordinances of the town, which is an excellent idea.
    The report of the recent examination made by the teachers of the public school is a favorable one. Both Miss Sargent and Mrs. Fronk are giving satisfaction.
    The date of the grand masquerade ball at Medford has been changed from March 5th to the 22d of February--Washington's birthday. It will be an away-up affair.
    The A.O.U.W. ball, which was announced to take place in Williams' building on Washington's birthday, has been indefinitely postponed on account of the bad condition of the roads.
    Many of our citizens have the mining fever as badly as ever, notwithstanding the weather is not favorable for that kind of a malady. Several quartz claims have been taken up by them, and some are quite promising.
    Rev. A. M. Russell of Ashland preached at this place last Sunday morning, and also held a conference meeting the day before. Owing to the interruption of the mails we failed to receive notice of Mr. R.'s appointment.
    The post office is now established in the lower story of Williams' fine, large building, and presents a neat appearance. Vrooman, Miller & Co.'s superior stock of stoves, hardware, tinware, etc., is also being displayed there.
    Many of the papers of Iowa have been printing complimentary notices of Hon. J. D. Whitman, who has become a resident of this precinct, while many prominent societies and organizations of which that gentleman was a member before leaving that State have made him the subject of a highly eulogistic resolutions, all regretting his departure. What is their loss is our gain.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1886, page 3


A GRAND MASK BALL
Will be given at
BYERS' HALL, MEDFORD, OR.
On the evening of
MONDAY, FEB. 22, 1886.
----
FLOOR MANAGERS--J. H. Bellinger, R. F. High.
    The best of music has been engaged, and nothing will be left undone to make it a first-class affair in every particular.
    Tickets for dancers with one partner, including supper, $2.50. Spectators, 50 cents.
    GEO. E. ANDERSON,  )
    O. H. JOHNSON,          )       Com. of Arrangements.
    N. KIME,                       )
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1886, page 3


    The Medford stage now leaves here at 6 P.M. to catch the northbound train that leaves Ashland at 7:45.
    The report in the Medford Monitor that thirty tons of the tailings from the old quartz mill on Wagner Creek had yielded $1200 at the Medford reduction works was entirely erroneous.--Tidings.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 13, 1886, page 3


    On Wednesday of this week Daniel Walker and Miss Sarah J. Grubb, of Ashland precinct, were united in marriage, the nuptial knot being tied at Medford by Rev. M. A. Williams.
"Out of Town Notes," Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 14, 1886, page 5


    Among our arrivals on Saturday was Rev. George W. Culver, of the M.E. Church, Wayne County, Iowa, who, with three or four friends, went to Medford yesterday morning to choose a location. Mr. Culver came here as the representative of 75 families who vouched for him, and many of whom will no doubt follow him to this state.
"Immigration Matters," Oregonian, Portland, February 16, 1886, page 3


    The dance of the Medford A.O.U.W. has been postponed until May 1st.
    The spring immigration from the East has already commenced to arrive in Southern Oregon.
    That the pleasant climate of Southern Oregon is constantly becoming more widely known throughout the United States is shown by the many sample requests received for sample copies of the Tidings from people in Iowa, Minnesota, Illinois, Nebraska and other states. It is unfortunate that our county has no descriptive pamphlets for distribution at the rooms of the state immigration board.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 19, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES
    Grand mask ball Feb. 22d, 1886. Everybody invited.
    Mrs. Stanley has improved her residence by the erection of a neat fence.
    The flag hung at half mast in Medford last Sunday in respect to Gen. [Winfield Scott] Hancock.
    W. J. Plymale of Jacksonville informs us that the quartz mill at that city will soon be completed.
    Dr. Geary and family returned from Eugene Tuesday, where they were called by the illness of his sister.
    A Mr. Adams and family arrived this week from Iowa and intend locating near Medford. We wish them success.
    The second story of Williams' block is now being plastered, and the building will be completed in the near future.
    Medford needs a grist mill, and the citizens should use all their influence toward having one erected this summer.
    E. J. Pool, of this place, has rented a tract of land from E. F. Walker and expects to raise an extensive garden this season.
    E. F. Walker has placed one of the Centennial gates on his premises, which works well. They should be used by every farmer.
    Several farmers of upper Rogue River were in town during the week. They all report everything quiet and very bad roads in their vicinity.
Ashland Tidings, February 19, 1886, page 3


    Rev. W. G. Simpson is at Medford this week, holding a series of night meetings.
    Geo. H. Chick, of the Medford quartz mill, was in town Tuesday, and displayed some very rich rock from the strike in the Gold Hill district, reported some time ago.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, February 19, 1886, page 3


BORN
GALE--Near Medford, February 15, 1886, to Mr. and Mrs. Enoch Gale, a son.
Ashland Tidings, February 19, 1886, page 3


BORN.
ROBINSON--At Medford, Jan. 22d, to Mr. and Mrs. John Robinson, a daughter.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 20, 1886, page 2


    Dr. Pryce of Medford called yesterday and reports health too good for his business in that locality.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 20, 1886, page 3


NEEDS A BALANCE WHEEL.
    The Medford Monitor stated some time ago that thirty tons of tailings from the old quartz mill on Wagner Creek yielded $1200 at the reduction works. By the proprietors of the mine, the Tidings was informed that this statement was erroneous, and it said so--simply that and nothing more. The engineer of the Monitor, evidently suffering with a sore head or a disordered imagination, takes this as an insult, and in about a half-column of froth and "swash" charges the Tidings with slurring the Medford quartz mill, "belittling Medford as an enterprising center," and calling him a liar. It is surprising that, while the fit was upon him, he didn't convict the Tidings of high treason against the United States of America, and sentence it to annihilation at once. From the ridiculous he descends to contemptibility when he hints darkly that "it is rather dangerous to tell a brother editor that he lies knowingly and willfully." Possibly it might be serious in his case. If he is wrought into such a fever by simply being told that he has made an "erroneous" statement, the chances are that it would throw him into convulsions that might prove fatal. Nevertheless, should occasion require it, the Tidings will not hesitate to perform this "dangerous" duty.
    The yield of the rock in question is a matter of some public interest in this neighborhood, and the report that it was about $40 a ton naturally excited much comment. When Messrs. Walsh & Bragdon found that it did not reach one-tenth that figure, the public was entitled to know it, and the idea that the simple statement in the Tidings was intended to injury any enterprise, any place or any man is too preposterous for anyone of ordinary common sense to conceive. The facts are simply these. The manager of the reduction works tested a small quantity of the reduced ore before Mr. Walsh at the mill, and the result pointed to a yield of from $35 to $40 per ton. The Monitor man was informed of this and figured out that thirty tons would yield $1200. He stated that thirty tons had yielded that sum. The fact is, the quantity of rock was less than twenty tons, and the returns received by Walsh & Bragdon were less per ton than one-tenth what the Monitor stated. The Tidings is not disposed to be misrepresented even by the Monitor, and if that paper, or any moving spirit behind it, wishes to pursue this matter further, we have a good stock of facts in store which may be pertinently used.
Ashland Tidings, February 26, 1886, page 2


    Messrs. Walker and Anderson, of Medford precinct, have a quartz claim on Applegate which furnishes very encouraging prospects in free gold.
    Messrs. J. S. Howard, David H. Miller and one or two other gentlemen of Medford have located extensions upon the quartz ledge on Rogue River in which the rich pocket was found last week. Hope they will all find more pockets of the same kind, or, better still, a big backbone lead as rich as the pockets that have been discovered.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 26, 1886, page 3


BORN.
GALE--Near Medford, Feb. 15, 1886, to Mr. and Mrs. Enoch Gale, a son.
SLAGLE--In Medford, Feb. 20, 1886, to Mr. and Mrs. John Slagle, a son.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 27, 1886, page 2


    The Medford post office has been moved to its new quarters in Williams' brick.
    Several tons of rock were hauled to the Medford mill this week from Applegate, but we have not yet heard the result of the test.
    A public discussion of the Chinese question will soon be held at Medford between J. D. Whitman and W. R. Andrews.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 27, 1886, page 3


    Medford residents are endeavoring to have a flouring mill built at that place.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 5, 1886, page 3


BORN
SLAGLE--In Medford, Feb. 20, 1886, to Mr. and Mrs. John Slagle, a son.
Ashland Tidings, March 5, 1886, page 3


    The mail contract on the route between Medford and Big Butte has been awarded to James Herely of this place at $784 per year.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 6, 1886, page 3


    J. B. Riddle talks of leasing Byers & Jacobs' fine hotel in Medford.
    Two carloads of sheep were shipped to Portland from Medford last week by J. R. Cameron.
    Chick should take the little man of the Monitor on his knee and explain to him the difference between quartz rock and tailings.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 12, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES.
    Dancing club Thursday night of each week at Byers' hall.
    J. W. Webb, state organizer of the Prohibition Party, will speak at Byers' hall tonight, March 12.
    Work has begun on Mrs. L. J. Foster's new building on Main Street, which will be used for a millinery store.
    Childers & Son will begin work on another large brick kiln in a few days. They find ready sale for all they can manufacture.
    John S. Miller has been appointed night watchman and deputy marshal. He makes an efficient officer and gives general satisfaction.
    The city express took a lively spin around town a few days ago without being troubled with a driver. No damage was done, however.
    Mrs. A. M. Russell narrowly escaped a serious accident on Sunday last. She fell backward from a wagon, but fortunately escaped unhurt.
    McGee & Zimmerman are still at work on their new hall, and it is nearing completion. It is a large building and will be used as a skating rink and public hall.
    Another two-story brick building will be commenced in a short time. The lower rooms to be used by Kenney & Wolters and the upper part will be for rent.
    Mrs. Magnon, who has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. J. R. West of this place, left last Tuesday evening for her home in Nebraska, where she will remain.
  
Ashland Tidings, March 12, 1886, page 3


    An entertainment will be given at Byers' hall in Medford by local talent on the evening of March 17th. Admission only 25 cents.
    W. G. Kenney of Medford was on hand yesterday as an active fireman to act as guard during the execution of O'Neil.
    France Plymale of Medford called on us yesterday and reports the mercantile business over average in his section.
    Four steam whistles can now be heard in Jacksonville; the distillery, the flouring mill, the quartz mill and David Linn's furniture factory. No grass in the streets yet.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 13, 1886, page 3


    Tramps are passing through town every day.
    Prohibition clubs have been organized at Phoenix and Medford.
    E. F. Walker, of Medford precinct, has about a dozen quartz claims, in this and Josephine counties.
    The Prohibition county convention will be held at Medford next Thursday, to nominate a full county ticket.
    C. K. Fronk, the station agent at Medford, bought a house and lot in that place of G. W. Williams last week for $900.
    The Tidings was favored with complimentary tickets for the dramatic entertainment in Medford Wednesday evening, for which we return thanks to the managers.
    Four steam whistles can be heard in Jacksonville, the distillery, the flouring mill, the quartz mill and David Linn's furniture factory. No grass in the streets yet.--[Sentinel.
    Dramatic entertainments by home talent are popular in Jackson County. At Jacksonville, Ashland and Medford local companies have given entertainments within the past week.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 19, 1886, page 3


    McGee and Zimmerman are building a large public hall in Medford.

"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, March 12, 1886, page 3


    Capt. Gorman, an old hotel man of Portland, was in the valley last week, and talks some of going into business at Medford.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, March 19, 1886, page 3


    THE MEANEST MAN IN OREGON.--The meanest man in Oregon lives within three miles of Medford. Not long ago one of his neighbors sent by him to get some brandy for his sick wife. He (the mean man) went into a saloon (a place he never patronized) and represented that there was a poor, sick woman in his neighborhood that needed some brandy, and had no money to pay for it. The saloon keeper, after consulting his partner, concluded to send the woman a bottle of their fine peach brandy. But instead of giving the brandy donated by the saloon keeper he gave the sick woman some water with a little brandy in it from a beer bottle.
    Talk about the man that stole acorns from a blind pig. This barany [?--sic] man takes the "cake" when we consider that he and his wife own a half-section of land with good improvements on it, and his name is not Grindstone either.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 20, 1886, page 3


    C. K. Fronk, the station agent at Medford, bought a house and lot in that place of G. W. Williams last week for $900.
    Roberts & O'Neil of Medford precinct sold 3,000 bushels of wheat to P. W. Olwell of the Phoenix mills, and they got 60 cents a bushel for it.
    We acknowledge receipt of complimentary tickets for the entertainment at Medford last Wednesday night. We could not attend in person, but those who were present say it was a success both financially and otherwise.
    Brother McGinnis of the Medford Monitor was present at the necktie party [i.e., the execution of Lewis O'Neil in Jacksonville] on Friday of last week. He has just returned from a visit East, but while he acknowledged that there are more people in that section he is willing to remain here for reasons too numerous to mention.
    A chronic alarmist circulated the report this week that the well-known firm of Angle & Plymale of Medford had failed; the report proves to be entirely without foundation and the firm will shortly transfer their large stock of merchandise to their new brick store which is nearing completion.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 20, 1886, page 3


    The dramatic entertainment at Medford on Wednesday evening of last week was a complete success.
    The railroad company have reduced the price of their lots in Ashland 50 percent. Reductions have also been made on their lots in Medford, Gold Hill and Grants Pass.
    There has been a large number of strangers in town during the past week--coming both ways--from California and Portland. The low fares from the East will probably induce a great many to come to Southern Oregon.
    The Jacksonville and Medford papers have had considerable to say lately about the fellow they call the meanest man in Oregon, whose name is a half-brother to Grindstone, and who with his wife owns a half section of the best of land near Medford. They say he was sent by a sick neighbor to get some brandy for medicinal purposes and went into a saloon and represented that there was a poor sick woman in his neighborhood who wanted some brandy and had no money to pay for it. The saloonkeeper, after consulting his partner, concluded to send the woman a bottle of their fine peach brandy. But instead of giving the brandy donated by the saloonkeeper, he gave the sick woman some water with a little brandy in it from a beer bottle.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 26, 1886, page 3


    Mrs. A. Berg died at Medford last Wednesday and was buried here on the following day.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 27, 1886, page 3


    Messrs. McGee and Zimmerman are building a new skating rink hall at Medford.
    The I.O.G.T. Amateurs of Ashland played "Among the Breakers" to a good house at Medford last Thursday evening.
    The amateurs of Medford talk of coming to Ashland soon and will probably play "The Boys of '76" or "One Hundred Years Ago." It is spoken of very highly by the people of Medford.
    A short time ago Ragsdale & Co., who own quartz mining property in Willow Springs precinct, published a card in the Jacksonville paper stating that they had selected a sackful of average ore from one of their mines and had it tested at the Medford Reduction Works. The returns given them by Mr. Chick indicated a yield of $53.18 per ton in gold and silver. They they sent tons of rock from the same mine to the reduction works, and received from Chick only $3 per ton, from which experience they deduced and announced the opinion that either Chick had given a false report at first, or else he cannot extract gold from sulphurets, as he claims to, or he pocketed part of the proceeds of the rock. Chick last week began a damage suit for libel against Ragsdale & Co., claiming the modest little sum of $20,000 for the injury to his valuable reputation.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 2, 1886, page 3


    D. W. Matthews, the well-known druggist, of Medford, was in town Wednesday.
    Messrs. Wm. Phipps and J. S. Redden, who attended the college during the greater part of the winter, each have schools near Medford.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, April 2, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD BREVITIES.
    Drummers are as thick as mosquitoes in the summer time.
    Angle & Plymale will move into their new quarters in about two weeks.
    Judge Walton has been confined to his room this week with a severe attack of fever.
    Miss Anna Plymale has returned from Portland and is now bookkeeper for Angle & Plymale.
    J. B. Riddle has leased the hotel building of Byers & Jacobs and will open a first-class hotel here immediately.
    W. W. Stanfield, a homeopathic physician, has located in Medford for the practice of his profession. He is a man of ability and should be given a share of the patronage.
    The quartz excitement has been at its height during the past week. Miller & Co. have discovered a ledge of free ore that promises to be the biggest strike of the season.
    A petition has been circulated this week asking Congress for an appropriation to build a railroad from Gold Hill to Crater Lake. The people of Medford and vicinity should look to their own interests instead of Gold Hill if any such road is to be built.
Ashland Tidings, April 2, 1886, page 3


    Mr. D. Wilson, a harness maker of Medford, will remove his shop to Grants Pass soon.
    Mr. D. W. Matthews, of Medford, who was in town Wednesday, reports that four Medford prospectors, Messrs. D. H. Miller, John Slagle, John Griffin and Fred Barneburg, found a deposit of decayed quartz in the Willow Springs district last week which shows very rich prospects. The lucky finders are considerably excited over their prospective good fortune.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, April 2, 1886, page 3


    A CHANGE.--J. B. Riddle has leased Byers and Jacobs' brick hotel at Medford and will have it ready for the public three weeks hence. W. G. Kenney has sold his interest in the saloon to his partner, H. H. Wolters, and bought Mr. Lynch's interest in the livery stable there.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 3, 1886, page 3


    Geo. Chick, Sup't. of the Medford Reduction Works, brought suit today against C. C. and J. F. Ragsdale for the sum of $20,000. This is a small sum, considering the offense, even if Mr. Chick succeeds in compelling Messrs. Ragsdale to pay the full amount.--Monitor.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 3, 1886, page 3


    George Chick, superintendent of the Medford Reduction Works, has brought suit against C. C. and J. F. Ragsdale for the sum of $20,000. The suit is for damages, claimed from the latter for the publication of an article accusing the Medford Reduction Works of embezzling a portion of the gold ore brought there for reduction.
"News of the Northwest,"
Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 4, 1886, page 6


    The bricks for the new buildings of A. Johnson have been shipped up from Medford. The foundation wall is now being laid.
    J. B. Riddle will take possession of the large hotel at Medford as soon as it can be finished. H. H. Wolters will run the saloon or barroom, having bought out Kenney's interest last week.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 9, 1886, page 3


    Our friend W. G. Kenney has sold his interest in the saloon business at Medford and purchased an interest in Worman's livery business. The new firm have our best wishes for future prosperity.
    Messrs. Zimmerman & McGee, two live and enterprising gentlemen, have just completed a very neat town hall in Medford, 60x24 feet, with stage, scenery etc. which will be a great convenience in that place.
"Local and Personal," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 9, 1886, page 3


    Some quartz is being hauled to Medford from George Schumpf's mine to give it a further test.
    Kenney & Worman of Medford are enlarging their livery stable and seem to be doing a good business in that line.
    What promises to be one of the richest and most extensive strikes that has ever been made in Jackson County was made by John Robinson and John Slagle on the hills in the front of Granville Sears' ranch some two miles distant in the hills. The find is rich decomposed rose quartz, bearing free gold in abundance. The ledge has been traced on the surface for a distance of over 700 feet and at a depth of 6 feet is five feet wide. In every piece of quartz can be found a prospect of free gold. We visited the ledge Wednesday, and found Messrs. Robinson and Slagle at work taking and sacking the quartz--the ledge laying in such a position that one man can take out several tons in a day. Several parties are interested in extensions on the same ledge which has been traced for some distance. On the location notices we noticed the names of D. Miller, Wm. Robinson, F. Barneburg and J. B. Griffin. The above parties being also interested in the first strike.--Monitor.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 10, 1886, page 3


    CHALLENGE.--I will fight the man Nelson now in Jackson County, Marquis of Queensbury rules, for $250 aside. I have this day deposited a $100 forfeiture in the hands of W. H. McAdams. Fight to take place 75 miles from Medford, and to be had with 3-ounce gloves or bare knuckles. Referees and final stakeholders to be agreed upon by both parties.
GEO. A. EDWARDS
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 10, 1886, page 3


    John Wells bought this week at the Fordyce place in Medford precinct a fine two-year-old half Percheron stallion for the stock ranch of Wells Bros. and Slade in Sprague River Valley, Klamath County. The horse is one of the handsomest young grade Percherons raised here.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 16, 1886, page 3


    Chas. Wolters of Medford takes the cake by running the finest bakery in Southern Oregon.
    B. S. Webb of Medford declines the nomination for Surveyor on the Prohibition ticket.
    Medford citizens propose having spring races soon and a number of the leading horsemen of the county are lending their aid to make them a success.
    Chas. Kohn says he has paid this town yearly visits for near twenty years but last Tuesday was the first time he ever came in afoot. The stage getting stuck near Medford was the cause and Charley says he found it warmer to walk than to wait for the wagon.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 17, 1886, page 3


Ring Fight Near Ashland.
    A fight which had been arranged to take place between Edwards, a lightweight pugilist who has been in Northern California for a number of months, and one Lewis, of Medford, came off last Sunday morning in Ashland precinct, near the southern boundary line of the town. Lewis was "knocked out" in the third round, and was shown to be an entirely unequal antagonist to Edwards. The spectators both from down the valley and from this place were numerous. Aside from the money put up by the backers of the men very little changed hands, it is said. Three-ounce gloves were used by the strikers, and although Lewis was "sent to grass" and measured his length on the ground during the last round, the affair was considered rather trifling and farcical as viewed from the standpoint of a sporting man.
    The most serious thing connected with this affair was the arrest of Lewis and Harry Stover, and the issuance of warrants for two or three others concerned, upon charge of violating the law passed by the legislature at the special session against prize fighting. This law is very severe, and provides for a fine of not less than one thousand dollars or imprisonment for one year, or both, upon anyone convicted of being a principal, accessory, aider, abettor, stake-holder, or in any other way connected with a prize fight that has taken place within the boundaries of the state.
    Lewis, one of the principals, and Stover, charged with being one of the backers, had a preliminary examination before Justice Foudray in Jacksonville last Tuesday and were each held to answer before the next grand jury, with bail fixed at $1000. Neither of them had given bail at last report, and the bars therefore keep them on the inside of the county jail. The grand jury will probably consider their case next week. Warrants are out for three or four persons besides Edwards, the charge being that of participating in the arrangements and the putting up of stakes. The defendants hope to escape by proving that the affair was not a regular prize fight as that term is interpreted by the law.
Ashland Tidings, April 23, 1886, page 3


    Medford is preparing for "spring races."
    The most interesting part of the prize fight is the fact of the affair having been photographed in three distinct scenes by one of our ambitious and enterprising camera artists. The gentlemen who announced after the thing was over that they had failed to reach there in time to see it, and a number of others who said they had heard nothing about it wilted like crisp salad in a bowl of hot butter and vinegar when the photographs were "pulled on them" and showed their smiling and interested countenances surrounding the rope, inside of which were the fighters in action.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 23, 1886, page 3


    Hon. Thomas F. Beall, of Central Point, Jackson County, died very suddenly on Monday last of rheumatism of the heart. Mr. Beall was one of the honored pioneer citizens of Southern Oregon. He was a member of the Senate in the last legislature and has always been an honored citizen in his county. In his death Southern Oregon loses one of its ablest representative men.
"Local and Personal," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 23, 1886, page 3



    PRIZE FIGHT.--At Ashland on Sunday last a prize fight for $50 a side was fought between George Edwards of Yreka and Oscar Lewis of Medford. The whole affair was kept very quiet and only the favored ones of Medford and Ashland were let into the secret. The result of the fight was that in three rounds Edwards knocked Lewis out of time, blackening the latter's eyes and somewhat damaging his nose. Several hundred dollars are said to have changed hands on the result.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 24, 1886, page 3


    D. W. Crosby is now chief mixer in Wolters' saloon at Medford.
    Spring races will be held at Medford with H. H. Wolters of that place as the general manager.
    Roberts & O'Neil have sold their farm near Medford to a newcomer from the East for $6000.
    J. B. Riddle, the lessee of the new brick hotel at Medford, expects to be ready for business in about three weeks.
    Report says that Hoover Bros. of Medford were attached this week and their tin shop is now in the hands of the Sheriff.
    We do not remember a time in our lives when there was no complaint of hard times. Some people become so accustomed to making complaint against the times that it becomes a part of their nature, and there is no telling what would happen if they could not gratify or indulge the habit.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 24, 1886, page 3


    McAdams, a Medford saloon man, has been arrested as one of the persons concerned in the prize fight, but is out on bail now.
    It is reported that Williams, one of the principals, and Stover, one of the backers of the recent prize fight, had a little fight of their own in the county jail the other day, in which Stover broke Williams' nose.
    There will be three days' races at Medford on the 13th, 14th and 15th of next month. On the 13th there will be a running race of ½ mile and repeat for purse of $100; free for all. The programme for the 14th includes a single running dash of one mile, purse $75, free for all, and another running race of 1/4 mile and repeat, purse $75, free for all Scamperdown and graded horses owned in the county. On the 15th there will be a trot of one mile and repeat for a purse of $50; free for all untried horses.
    Edwards, the "victorious" pugilist, was arrested in Portland by deputy sheriff Berry of Jacksonville last Thursday, and after trying the habeas corpus loophole without success was compelled to come southward as far as the Jackson County Jail, to await an interview with the grand jury.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 30, 1886, page 3


MARRIED
WEEKS-STEWART.--At the residence of the bride's father in Medford precinct, Apr. 25, 1886, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Mr. Arthur J. Weeks and Miss Annie Belle Stewart.
Ashland Tidings, April 30, 1886, page 3


    OUR FREIGHT.--From R. S. Dunlap, our local freighter, we learn that he has hauled to this place from Medford 300,700 pounds since the first day of January 1886. Besides this other freighters have hauled from Medford besides what came via Central Point and taken altogether it makes a very good showing for "a decayed town."
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 1, 1886, page 3


    D. W. Mathews, druggist of Medford, has decided on quitting there and will move back to Salem.
    Kenney & Worman are the new contractors on the mail route between here and Medford. They will fill the duty with promptness as usual.
    Ham Wolters' Gem Saloon at Medford has been moved to the adjoining room where he shows up as smiling as usual. D. W. Crosby is his right-hand bower.
    Warren Hull and the little China boy from here took a notion this week to strike out on their own account and footed it to Medford. When last heard from they were negotiating with the railroad agent at that place for passes to Portland.
    The Riddle Hotel at Medford is the Boss. While it will not be open for business until the 5th inst. we can still say that they have excellent rooms, fine beds and even now are furnishing the best of meals. We have tried all and know whereof we speak.
    W. H. McAdams, a saloon keeper of Medford, was arrested this week for aiding and abetting a prize fight between Edwards and Lewis at Ashland and Justice Foudray held him under $1000 bonds, which he furnished. Edwards, Lewis and Stover are still in jail and all will be called on to attend the regular session of the grand jury next week.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 1, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
WEEKS-STEWART--At the residence of the bride's father, April 25th, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Arthur J. Weeks and Miss Annie Belle Stewart.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 1, 1886, page 3


    The question of greatest present interest is: "How much fruit is there left?"
    Roberts & O'Neil have sold their farm near Medford to a Pennsylvania man for $10,450, reserving this year's crop for themselves.
    A train load of cattle will be shipped from Medford within a few days--something over 500 head, probably--cattle that have been bought for shipment to Montana.
    Among the new ads this week is that of the fine horse "Sir Walter, Jr.," owned by Mr. D. R. White and in charge of Isaac Woolf of Medford. The horse is a handsome black, of good size and action, and is much praised by horsemen who have inspected him.
    People who have been in Rogue River Valley only two years may conclude that our climate is rather precarious for fruits, but it should not be forgotten that for many years there was not a single failure of the peach crop here, and the average is better than in Delaware. The apple crop, although shorter last year than ever before, has never been an entire failure here yet.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 7, 1886, page 3


    Mr. G. W. Howard, of Medford, agent for the State Insurance Co., went out to Linkville this week, in the interest of that company.
    D. W. Matthews and family of Medford, formerly of this place, will move to Salem this week or next. Mr. Matthews formerly had a prosperous drug business at the capital city, and will again open a drug store there.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 7, 1886, page 3


MARRIED
SONGER-SLADE.--At the residence of the officiating minister, Rev. M. A. Williams, in Medford precinct, April 29, 1884 [sic], Dr. S. T. Songer and Miss Belle Slade, both of Ashland.
DIED
BANKS--In Medford, May 2, 1886, Eva May, daughter of J. N. and Annie Banks, aged 10 years and 20 days.
Ashland Tidings, May 7, 1886, page 3


    Both the Grants Pass Courier and the Medford Monitor, neither of them a party paper, support Judge Webster.
    For county commissioners the Democratic convention last Saturday nominated Ben Haymond, of Rock Point, and Judge Walton, of Medford. Both are good and capable men so far as is known to the writer. Mr. Haymond is an old citizen of the county, a man of good judgment, experience in business and excellent reputation for integrity and square dealing. Mr. Walton is not so well known in the county outside of his own immediate neighborhood, but the people of Medford all speak well of him, and inform us that he is familiar with the methods and details of public affairs, having repeatedly held responsible positions in Lane County.
"Editorial Notes and News," Ashland Tidings, May 14, 1886, page 2


Shipping Cattle.
    The work of shipping young cattle from different sections of Southern Oregon to Montana has just been commenced by the Oregon & California railroad company. This morning two trains, of twenty cars each, left the east side depot and headed for the south. One train will load with live cattle at Oakland, and the other at several points between Medford and Grants Pass. The cars used belong to the Northern Pacific and are built expressly for shipping livestock. Each car is capable of carrying about forty-five head. It is estimated that there will be over two hundred carloads of cattle. this stock will be shipped to Helena as rapidly as possible.--[Portland Telegram.
Ashland Tidings, May 14, 1886, page 3


    The Medford races have been postponed till the 3d, 4th and 5th of June.
    Rev. M. A. Williams reports the mercury as having gone down to 23º at his place near Medford on the cold night, April 30th. This was two degrees colder than it registered in Ashland.
    It is reported that McAdams, the Medford saloon man who figured prominently in the prize fight, has "skipped" from Medford. He probably feared a drubbing at the hands of Edwards.
    Roberts & O'Neil saved the fruit in their orchard near Medford by keeping up a fire during the cold night--bonfires of oak wood and half-dry barnyard manure on the windward side of the orchard. They will have abundance of peaches.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 14, 1886, page 3


DIED
CROOK--In Medford, Sunday, May 9, 1886, Henry F. Crook, aged 53 years.
Ashland Tidings, May 14, 1886, page 3


    The Riddle House at Medford is now open and ready for business. Give it a trial when traveling that way.
    Reports say that one of the saloon keepers at Medford has left for parts unknown, leaving numerous creditors behind.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 15, 1886, page 3


DIED.
BANKS--In Medford, May 2, 1886, Eva May, daughter of J. N. and Annie Banks; aged 10 years and 20 days.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 15, 1886, page 3


    
    W. M. Colvig, the Democratic nominee for district attorney, has been speaking at different places in the district, and the people find him to be an easy and forcible talker. He has had much experience before public audiences, both of political and other character, and is abundantly able to demonstrate his ability.
   Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, has been nominated for State Senator in this county, and it would certainly be to the credit of our county to elect him. He is a young man of unexceptional [sic] character and recognized ability, is a son of one of the pioneers and most respected citizens of Oregon, and is earnestly interested in the development of the Rogue River Valley.
"Editorial Notes and News," Ashland Tidings, May 21, 1886, page 2


    The Riddle House, of Medford, is open for the accommodation of the public.

    Five hundred head of cattle were shipped from Medford for Montana yesterday.

    No ice was put up in Jackson County last winter, and the luxury will have to be imported from the Portland factory.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 21, 1886, page 3


    Arthur Wilson, road supervisor of Medford precinct, is improving the roads between Jacksonville and her railroad station and is doing good work.
    Pryce & Geary is the well-known name of a medical firm at Medford. Both are candidates for office this time, but their names appear on tickets of different complexion.
    If Brad Dean was born in 1851 we will bet our old hat that he did not first see daylight in a cabin at Willow Springs, notwithstanding the Times has twice stated this to be the fact. He has a young competitor for the office of Sheriff, also a Jackson County boy, and we fail to see the object of trying to make Brad several years older than he is.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 22, 1886, page 3


    Five hundred head of cattle were shipped from Medford for Montana last Thursday.
    Jacksonville Times: H. D. Kubli this week delivered over 100 head of young cattle at Medford, which will be shipped to Montana.--A large band of cattle were delivered at Medford for shipment by Hanley Bros. this week.--Several thousand head of young cattle have been shipped recently from Southern Oregon to Montana, leaving a large amount of money in their place. The price paid was $15 for yearlings and $20 for two-year-olds.
"Stock and Range," Morning Oregonian, Portland, May 27, 1886, page 6


    Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, nominee for State Senator, is a gentleman exceptionally well qualified for the position. He is a young man of vigor and energy and there is no one of either party in the county who would not believe, upon a comparison of the two candidates, that he would be able to do much more for the interests of Jackson County than would his opponent, Dr. Stanley.
    Mr. M. L. Alford, who is before the people of Jackson County as a candidate for county clerk, is a young man of good ability and good education and a practical training in business and bookkeeping which fits him well for the duties of the clerk's office. His qualifications for the position are unquestioned, and the taxpayers of the county who recognize the advisability of giving the "machine" a wholesome shaking up and taking the wheels of the county affairs out of the rut in which they have been running of late will be able to unite upon him with full confidence and entire satisfaction.
"Editorial Notes and News," Ashland Tidings, May 28, 1886, page 2


    Medford will soon have an Odd Fellows' lodge.
    Medford races on Thursday, Friday and Saturday of next week.
    The Ashland Mills have been shipping wheat from Medford by railway.
    T. A. Harris has bought the butchering business of F. Barneburg in Medford, and has removed with his family to that place to take charge of the shop.
    The firm of Harris & Hosley, engaged in the butchering business, has dissolved. Mr. Harris goes to Medford, and Mr. Hosley will continue the business here. Their notice to the public will be found in another column.
    In Medford precinct C. H. Barkdull is the candidate for justice of the peace and J. K. Darnell for constable on the Democratic ticket. On the Republican ticket Arthur Wilson is the candidate for justice and Isaac Woolf for constable.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 28, 1886, page 3


    Mr. J. D. Cornish and Miss Clara Fordyce, of Medford precinct, were married in Ashland on the 13th inst. The bride, who formerly resided in Ashland, is one of the estimable young ladies of the valley whom any man should be proud of winning, and her many friends here will unite with the Tidings in the hope that the future may be happy and prosperous for Mr. and Mrs. Cornish.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 28, 1886, page 3


    The Medford stage now leaves here at 7 P.M.
    The grand lodge I.O.O.F. has granted a charter for a lodge at Medford, and it will be instituted in a short time.
    Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, has been nominated by the Republicans of Jackson County for State Senator. The citizens of that county would do themselves a credit by electing him.--Eugene Register.
    Suit was brought by Jerry Retty against W. G. Kenney this week for $1,000 damage sustained by a slap Bill gave him in the face. We are of the opinion that Mr. Retty will have to eat grass before he gets a very small share of such damages.--Monitor.  Political things are warming up.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 29, 1886, page 3


Railroad to Medford.
Jacksonville, Or., May 28, 1886.
    EDITOR SENTINEL:--Having been requested to give some figures in regard to a branch R.R. from this place to some station on the O.&C.R.R., will submit the following: The first question naturally asked is will it pay, and then how much will it cost, and how should it be operated, by steam, or horse power, what gauge it will be, etc., etc. To the first question will it pay? We say yes, from the first car that runs over the line. Well, why will it pay? Because the traffic now being carried on between Jacksonville and Medford will more than pay operating expenses, approximating the expense of a road known to the writer, of the same distance, not taking the competition of the O.&C.R.R. into account, as the fast development of the surrounding country, as to the entire cost of building and equipping ready to run, less than $18,000 will be required. How can $18,000 be raised? Easy enough, railroads are not paid for when built. Only about one-third of the amount will be necessary the first year, long time can be had on the balance. Well, is not $6,000 a large amount of money to put into an enterprise that will not pay much more than running expenses the first year? No, we think not. When we take into account the fact that there is more than $500,000 worth of property in Jacksonville alone that will be directly benefited, taking all other known roads of a similar character as a criterion to go by. The difference of operating is in favor of steam from the start. Can the County Commissioners grant the right of way along the county road, yes. Would a county fair be a success by having the grounds located midway between the two towns? We think it would. Should a company be organized to build such a line, if not, why not?   D.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 29, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
KIMBLE-JOHNSON--At the residence of the officiating minister in Medford precinct, May 24, 1886, Mr. Edmund Kimble and Miss Martha E. Johnson.
BORN.
WILSON--In Medford, May 7, 1886, to Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Wilson, a son.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 29, 1886, page 3


    G. H. Baker, of Medford, has bought the warehouses at Central Point and will run the business connected with them there this season.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 4, 1886, page 3


Medford Races.
    Following is a report of the races at Medford last week:
    First day, Thursday, running race half mile and repeat; purse $100. Harry Stover entered Quebec, Julius Fitten Bingo, Jesse Simpson Little Dick. Quebec won, time given at 33½.
    Second day, Friday, running race half mile and repeat; purse $75, twenty percent entrance added. Bingo entered by Stover, Mose by Ralph Dean, Little Dick by Dave Payne, Dollie C by Tom Miles. Bingo took both heats in 23 and 24¼ respectively; Mose was shut out and Little Dick was withdrawn.
    Third day, Saturday, running race, single dash of a mile. Stover entered Quebec and Fitten Bingo. The first named came in ahead, time given at 1:53.
    The next race was a match race, quarter mile dash for $100 a side, between Dave Payne's Little Dick and "the Kansas horse," entered by some Butte Creek parties. The latter came out a good distance ahead; no time announced.
    Besides these there were a number known as "scrub races" each day. The horse Bingo was formerly known as Mark Daly.
Ashland Tidings, June 11, 1886, page 3   The Tidings' results were reprinted in the Oregonian of June 15, on page 2.

    In Medford precinct Barkdull was elected justice of the peace, and Darnell constable.
    The livery horses in Ashland, Jacksonville and Medford were nearly run to death in the last week before election.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 11, 1886, page 3


    C. H. Barkdull was elected Justice of the Peace and J. K. Darnell Constable of Medford precinct.
    The Medford marble works, formerly owned by Shely & Jacobs, has been bought by J. C. Whipp of this place, who will run both shops with main headquarters here.
    Avery & Taylor, the dentists, run against a stump while driving from Medford here in the dark one night this week. One of the horses was so badly injured that he died the next day and they now threaten to sue the county for damages.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 12, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
KIMBALL-JOHNSTON--In Medford precinct, May 22, 1886, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Edmund Kimball and Martha E. Johnston.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 12, 1886, page 3


    J. C. Whipp has purchased the Medford Marble Works and will concentrate their business with his own at Jacksonville.
    The reduction works at Medford are working ores from different sections of the state. These works, under the management of Geo. H. Chick, are proving very successful.
"Jackson County News," Grants Pass Courier, June 18, 1886, page 3


    The Medford marble works formerly owned by Shely & Jacobs have been bought by J. C. Whipp of Jacksonville, who will run both shops with headquarters at Jacksonville.
    Avery & Taylor, traveling dentists from the Willamette, who went out to Klamath County the first of the week, lost a fine horse from their matched team through an accident caused by their running against a stump in driving from Medford to Jacksonville one dark night recently. They talked of suing the county for damages, but have not done so yet.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 18, 1886, page 3


    The reduction works at Medford are working ores from different sections of the state. These works, under the management of Mr. Geo. H. Chick, are proving very successful.
"Jackson County News," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, June 18, 1886, page 2


    Brick from Medford and lumber from Grants Pass will make the new block on the corner of Main and Oak streets. It is too bad that there is no timber or clay near Ashland.
    The Medford Monitor temporarily suspended publication last week, McGinnis having arrived at the end of his string. A. L. Johnson has bought the paper, it is reported, and intends to have it issued on time next week. He has moved the office to his building on Front Street.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 25, 1886, page 3


BORN.
HOCKERSMITH--Near Medford, June 4, 1886, to Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Hockersmith, a daughter.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 26, 1886, page 2


    JOINED THE MAJORITY--On last Wednesday evening shortly after seven o'clock Edward Wilkinson and Miss Flora Orth were joined in the holy bonds of wedlock at the residence of the bride's parents, Rev. F. X. Blanchet tying the knot according to the Catholic ceremony. Only the relatives and a few of the most intimate friends of the contracting parties were present at the ceremony, but when that was over a large number of their friends dropped in to extend congratulations. The Jacksonville Cornet Band was also on hand at once and tendered them a serenade when all were invited in to partake of wedding cake and champagne. An hour or more was then spent in wishing the newly married couple the best of success in life and a safe journey to their new home in Eastern Oregon when they took carriages to Medford to catch the evening train accompanied by a number of their young friends from here. In company with their many friends we wish them a long life of prosperity and happiness.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 26, 1886, page 3


    D. W. Crosby is now on the special police force of Medford besides being general manager of the Riddle House at that place.
    W. R. Andrews, the Medford attorney, was here Thursday looking for a house, and proposes making this his place of residence.
    John Van Dyke is very low and was not expected to live several days this week. A tumor caused by accidentally cutting himself in the groin with a knife is the original cause of his illness.
    The Medford Monitor suspended last week, and since then we learn that the plant has passed into the hands of A. L. Johnson, who will continue its publication at the old place. Mr. McGinnis will commence teaching school again, so we are informed.
    Since the political excitement has died out several of our business men are again agitating the project for building a branch railroad from Jacksonville to Medford or Central Point. The estimated cost of building and equipping the road is from $16,000 to $17,000, and it is believed that the road will pay running expenses from the start. If such can be done the road should be pushed through at once.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 26, 1886, page 3


    J. G. Van Dyke of Eden precinct, who accidentally cut himself in the thigh with a knife while butchering a sheep several months ago, is in a critical condition. A tumor has made its appearance where the leg was wounded, and the worst is feared.
"News of the Northwest,"
Morning Oregonian, Portland, June 29, 1886, page 3


THE ROAD TO CRATER LAKE.
MEDFORD, Or., June 25.
    TO THE EDITOR OF THE OREGONIAN:
    On my return from a visit to the vicinity of Crater Lake, I find in your Friday's number, June 24, the following statement: "The road from Medford to Crater Lake is blocked for miles by fallen trees, rendering it necessary to convey the government boats via Ashland, Linkville and Fort Klamath to Crater Lake, requiring ten days by teams." The road from Medford to Fort Klamath is open. Hundreds of cattle are being driven over the mountains, and huckster wagons are running from this valley to Fort Klamath, passing the point on the Fort Klamath and Rogue River road to which via the longer route the boats must come before diverging by the road leading direct to the lake. The boats can be delivered in five days via the direct route from Medford, and with equal safety and much less expense.
J. D. WHITMAN.               
Oregonian, Portland, June 29, 1886, page 5


    Passing Central Point, we soon arrived at Medford, a bright, thrifty-looking town, which has already a number of pretentious-looking buildings and which aspires to be the town of that section.
    Partaking of a hearty meal, we boarded a coach and in a short time were rattling into Jacksonville. There are many handsome and cozy homes in this town, a very fine courthouse and a number of other substantial brick buildings, but its distance from the railroad gives it an air of quiet, and as it is one of the oldest towns in the state some of the primitive buildings show signs of decay. The towns of Medford and Central Point, being on the railroad and nearer the center of the prairie, are endeavoring to secure the business of the section and to supplant the older town. Jacksonville is, however, talking of building a branch to connect with the O.&C. and will not yield its supremacy without a struggle.
"Out South: Notes on a Flying Trip to Ashland and Vicinity," Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 1, 1886, page 8


    W. R. Andrews, the Medford attorney, was here Thursday looking for a house, and proposes making this his place of residence.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, July 2, 1886, page 2


    Medford will not celebrate the 4th this year. A number of citizens of that place will come to Ashland tomorrow.
    Hay has been delivered in Medford at $1 per ton this season, it is reported. Poor profits for the farmers.
    Says the Sentinel of last Saturday: Since the political excitement has died out several of our businessmen are again agitating the project for building a branch railroad from Jacksonville to Medford or Central Point. The estimated cost of building and equipping the road is from $16,000 to $17,000, and it is believed that the road will pay running expenses from the start. If such can be done the road should be pushed through at once.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 2, 1886, page 3


    Kenney & Worman have again received the mail contract between here and Medford.
    A new lodge of Odd Fellows will be installed at Medford July 16th with fifteen charter members. They will meet in Williams' new hall.
    Mr. W. R. Andrews, the Medford attorney, has rented Mrs. Hansen's house on Oregon Street and will make this his home after the 5th of this month.
    M. A. McGinnis, late editor of the Medford Monitor, left for Nebraska last Sunday night, and numerous creditors are now asking what his next address will be.
    Geo. W. Williams has just finished his fine lodge room at Medford and has made it one of the prettiest in the State. The Odd Fellows and Workmen will meet there.
    The firm of Noland & Ulrich of Medford has been dissolved by mutual consent, Wm. Ulrich retiring. Don't fail to give John a call when at Medford and he will treat you well.
    A party from Medford was brought here last Tuesday to be examined for insanity, but investigation proved that it was only an exaggerated case of jimjams and he was discharged in consequence.
    Our branch railroad to the main line is now a settled fact, as Jacksonville business men have agreed to take all the stock without asking outside aid. A meeting will be held next week when it will be decided whether to run it to Medford or Central Point.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 3, 1886, page 3


    Sentinel: Our branch railroad to the main line is now a settled fact, as Jacksonville businessmen have agreed to take all the stock without taking outside aid. A meeting will be held next week when it will be decided whether to run it to Medford or Central Point.
"Jackson County," Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 7, 1886, page 4


    H. E. Baker is building a large new grain warehouse at Medford.
    An Odd Fellows' lodge is to be instituted at Medford on the 16th.
    The Sentinel says McGinnis, late publisher of the Medford Monitor, left a number of unpaid debts behind him when he started for the East last week.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 9, 1886, page 3


    J. G. VanDyke, whom we reported as being in a critical condition from the growth of a sarcomous tumor in the thigh, resulting from a bad knife wound, went to Portland last week for treatment in the hospital there, and expected to submit to an operation for the removal of the tumor.

"Personal," Ashland Tidings, July 9, 1886, page 3


Our Railroad.
    Now that the Fourth of July is over, and there being nothing of any great importance to attract the attention of our people, we would therefore recommend to them to immediately make a start in the enterprise of building a railroad from this place to the road passing through the valley. If our people ever expect to do anything to build up our city, we say now is the time. It is well known throughout the State that we have one of the healthiest cities on the coast, which is an important consideration to those who are seeking health above all other inducements; again we have the best assurance that our mines will be thoroughly prospected during the summer and fall, as a ten-stamp mill will be put in operation as soon as the work can be done, with all the new improvement for saving gold that is now in use. We have an immense limestone quarry from which hundreds of tons of as fine lime as ever was placed in any market can be made, and by easy transportation to the railroad in the valley, would doubtless be a source of profit to the owner. For these and other good reasons we might present, we would earnestly urge upon our business men and our property holders of our city the importance of immediate action in that direction. Delay is dangerous, and the interest manifested by our people may be lessened by delay.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 10, 1886, page 2


    W. R. Andrews of Medford has located with us and will continue the practice of law here. He was called to Olympia, W.T. yesterday to attend to an important case before the Supreme Court of Washington Territory but will only be absent about ten days. His office will be at the Courthouse.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 10, 1886, page 3


    SOLE PROPRIETOR.--The partnership existing between John Noland and Wm. Ulrich, proprietors of the Railroad Exchange, was dissolved June 30. Mr. Noland has filed his bonds according to law and taken out license for six months. Mr. Noland is a genial, whole-souled gentleman, always has a good word for everybody. He is straightforward in all his dealings, and his guests and patrons can rely on fair and honest treatment in every particular.--Monitor.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 10, 1886, page 3


    H. E. Baker is building a large new grain warehouse at Medford.
    The report from the Crater Lake [rail]road survey is to the effect that in the first twenty miles the ascent does not exceed eight inches to the rod, and no heavy work so far.
"Southern Oregon," Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 13, 1886, page 2


    The Monitor came out on time last week, under the editorship of A. L. Johnson.
    H. E. Baker, the Medford warehouse man, has introduced the custom of loaning or advancing money on stored wheat in this valley.
    Mr. White, of Medford precinct, has placed his fine black horse "Sir Walter Jr." under training, to develop his speed qualities.
    John G. VanDyke, who is now under surgical treatment at the Portland hospital, has been considerably relieved already by the surgical treatment, and is much encouraged over the prospects of his ultimate complete recovery.
    A man known as Bill Short has been making himself conspicuous at Medford. About ten days ago he was sent from that place to Jacksonville to be examined on charge of insanity. He was pronounced sane, and went back to Medford. A few days afterward he was arrested upon charge of attempting to open Kenney & Worman's safe, and is now in the county jail awaiting the call of the next grand jury.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 16, 1886, page 3


MARRIED
ZIMMERMAN-TURNER--At the residence of the officiating minister, Rev. M. A. Williams, in Medford precinct, July 11, 1886, Wm. G. Zimmerman and Etta Turner.
Ashland Tidings, July 16, 1886, page 3


    A new lodge of Odd Fellows was to be established at Medford last night. More members from here would have attended had not other business prevented, but even as it was some six or seven went down to help them in the work.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 17, 1886, page 3


    COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' COURT--Arthur Wilson, road supervisor, was ordered to have the stumps removed from the road leading from Jacksonville to Medford, providing the cost does not exceed $30.
Excerpt, Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 17, 1886, page 3


BORN.
ANDERSON--At Medford, July 10th, 1886 to Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Anderson, a son.
MARRIED.
ZIMMERMAN-TURNER--At Medford, July 11, 1886, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Wm. G. Zimmerman and Miss Etta Turner.
DIED.
ELDER--At Medford, July 10th, 1886, Mary, eldest daughter of John E. Elder, a native of Josephine County, aged about 21 years.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 17, 1886, page 3


    In the matter of a county road in Medford precinct, beginning on the western line of N. B. Evans' donation claim, running thence along the county road to Merritt Bellinger's claim and on the lines between the lands of Jesse Wilson and Mrs. Geo. Fordyce and between those of Jos. Crain and Jas. Hamlin, terminating at the intersection of the old stage road from Jacksonville to Phoenix. Road established.
    Arthur Wilson, road supervisor, was ordered to have the stumps removed from the road leading from Jacksonville to Medford, providing the cost does not exceed $30.

"County Commissioners' Court," Ashland Tidings, July 23, 1886, page 2


    Jacksonville people are still talking seriously about their branch railroad project.
    W. R. Andrews, formerly of Medford, and W. M. Colvig, District Attorney, have formed a law partnership at Jacksonville.
    Ashland seems dull now to the people here, compared with what it is at times, but it is simply the truth that it presents a livelier appearance than any other town along the line of the O.&C.R.R.
    The Board of Trustees of Medford have donated $100 towards the starting of a brass band in their town. The Monitor is kicking and thinks they should expend the money in road work or fire apparatus.
    J. W. Walsh has leased the Medford quartz mill and moved it to the Hope ledge on Wagner Creek, owned by himself, H. T. Bragdon and others, and will have it running upon rock from that ledge within a few days. It is understood that Mr. Walsh will buy the mill if it is found to answer his purpose.
    The supply of ice was exhausted in town before the hottest portion of last week. Geo. Engle, who ships it up from Portland by the carload and supplies it for this place and Jacksonville, supposed he had plenty on hand, but when he came to find out, it had all melted, and there was no ice to be had until this week's freight train arrived, except what little was shipped up by express. Too bad there could not have been some ice put up in this county last winter.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 23, 1886, page 3


BORN
ANDERSON--At Medford, July 10th, to Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Anderson, a son.
DIED
ELDER--At Medford, July 10th, Mary, eldest daughter of John E. Elder, a native of Josephine County, aged about 21 years.
Ashland Tidings, July 23, 1886, page 3


Hymeneal.
    The wedding of Mr. N. H. Clayton, of this city, and Miss Vina Gore, of Eden precinct, took place at the home of the bride's parents, two miles this side of Medford, yesterday afternoon, July 22d. Rev. M. A. Williams officiated in the ceremony, following which the wedding party and guests partook of an elaborate dinner. The bride and groom drove to Ashland later in the evening. Their home will be at Mr. Clayton's residence property on the corner of Factory and Helman streets as soon as improvements now in progress are completed. The Tidings joins the many friends of the bride and groom in hearty congratulations.
Ashland Tidings, July 23, 1886, page 3


BORN.
WILSON--Near Medford, July 6th, to Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Wilson, a daughter.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 24, 1886, page 2


    Mr. McAdams of Medford will leave there soon to go to Ashland to open soda works there.
    Sheriff Dean has one boarder, a man charged with trying to rob Kenney & Worman's safe at Medford.
    Arthur Wilson, road supervisor for Medford District, is doing some good work on that road in taking out the stumps.
    Five brothers from here attended the institution of Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., Friday night of last week. All say they were royally entertained.
    Misses Wilcox of Medford have gone to Newville, Cal., on a visit. They were the recipients of a complimentary party at McGee & Zimmerman's hall prior to their departure.
    Baker's new warehouse at Medford is well under way and will be ready in due time. Improved apparatus for the cleaning of grain will be put in, as well as other conveniences.
    D. Loring was in town again Wednesday on his return from a hunting trip to Galice Creek. He reported game plenty and his appearance shows that he has improved in health.
    Quite a number of Odd Fellows from different portions of the valley were in Medford Friday to assist in the organization of the new lodge there. The event caused quite a stir and proceedings lasted until 5 o'clock Saturday morning.
    J. W. Walsh has leased the Medford quartz mill and moved it to the Hope ledge on Wagner Creek, owned by himself, H. T. Bragdon and others and will have it running upon rock from that ledge within a few days. It is understood that Mr. Walsh will buy the mill if it is found to answer his purpose. The Hope ledge is unquestionably rich, and the result of the first mill run of its work will be awaited with much public interest. The mill is located about three-fourths of a mile from that of the Wagner Creek Mining Co.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 24, 1886, page 3


    The board of trustees of Medford have appropriated $100 to encourage the organization of a brass band.
"News of the Northwest," Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 28, 1886, page 4


New Lodge.
    Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., was instituted on the evening of July 16th. And installed as officers to wit: N.G., B. F. Adkins; V.G., J. A. Wells; Secretary, W. F. Williamson; Treasurer, G. H. Hastings; Warden, B. S. Webb; Conductor, S. Rosenthal; I.G., B. W. Powell; R.S.N.G., A. Childers; L.S.N.G., H. Kinney; R.S.V.G., Kelley; L.S.V.G, G. L. Webb; R.S.S., G. W. Howard; L.S.S., G. W. Williams. District Deputy A. D. Helman officiated.
Ashland Tidings, July 30, 1886, page 3


    Medford now has an Odd Fellows' lodge.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 30, 1886, page 3


    Mr. L. A. Rose and Mrs. Jemima Colver, of Phoenix, were married on the 18th inst., by Rev. M. A. Williams at his home near Medford. The bride and groom both have hosts of friends who wish for them a bright and happy future.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, July 30, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
ROSE-COLVER--In Medford precinct, July 18th, by Rev. M. A. Williams, L. A. Rose and Miss Jemima Colver.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 31, 1886, page 2


    The Medford Brass Band organized by electing Chas. Wolters, president; G. L. Webb, secretary; and D. H. Miller, treasurer.
    The Chick quartz mill, which was moved over to Wagner Creek from Medford, began running Wednesday morning on rock from the Hope ledge.
    The people of Medford are circulating a petition to the county commissioners' court for the building of a county bridge across Bear Creek at that place.
    On and after August 1st the mail route from Medford to Eagle Point will leave out Central Point, and include Smith's, a new office lately established. Central Point will receive its mail direct from the trains.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 6, 1886, page 3


    J. G. VanDyke, of Eden precinct, is rapidly improving at St. Vincent's Hospital, Portland. A News reporter interviewed him last Sunday and reports as follows: "On Sunday, when the News reporter visited St. Vincent's Hospital, one of the first sights that caught his eye was an elderly, dark-complexioned, stalwart gentleman, who was wheeling himself cheerfully about the corridors in an invalid's chair. His feet were comfortably encased in red blankets. This was J. G. VanDyke, of Phoenix, Jackson County, Or. 'Several months since,' he said, 'I accidentally ran a knife in my thigh. The physicians in the county told me the wound had assumed a cancerous form and said they could do nothing for me. I came into this hospital expecting to die. I secured Dr. Jones to attend to my case, and he cut into the leg and found an artery leaking into a cavity which contained about two quarts of pus and old blood. There was no sign of a cancer. The Dr. trained up the artery and extracted the blood and pus, and I am getting better. In a week or two I'll go home a well man. This is much more cheerful than being packed out of here in a wooden box. But I owe much to the careful nursing of the good sisters. Why, they nursed me just as well as my wife did, who was with me during the most trying time--before and after Dr. Jones performed the operation.'"
Ashland Tidings, August 6, 1886, page 3


    TO CRATER LAKE.--Persons who desire to visit the wonderful Crater Lake can find teams of all sorts at reasonable rates at Kenney & Worman's livery stable, Medford, Jackson County. The distance from Medford to the lake is 72 miles, and the route embraces the magnificent scenery of Flounce Rock, Rogue River Falls and Castle Falls.
Oregonian, Portland, August 6, 1886, page 3


    The railroad problem is now in a tangible form, and the committee appointed will wrestle with it for all it's worth.
    The people of Medford are circulating a petition to the county commissioners' court for the building of a county bridge across Bear Creek at that place.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 7, 1886, page 3


Railroad Meeting.
    A meeting was held at the town hall, in Jacksonville, on Saturday evening, July 31st, to consider the matter of building a railroad from Jacksonville to Medford or some other suitable point on the O.&C.R.R.
    On motion, N. Langell was chosen chairman and J. M. Smith secretary. The chairman stated briefly the object of the meeting, and invited an expression of sentiment from others. Thereupon W. J. Plymale, R. S. Dunlap and others delivered in a brief and pointed manner their views upon the necessity and utility of the enterprise. Mr. Plymale submitted the following preamble and resolution, which was unanimously adopted:
    WHEREAS, It is the sense of the citizens of Jacksonville that a railroad from this place to connect with the O.&C.R.R. at Medford or some other suitable point is a necessity, and that such road cannot be built without certain indispensable preliminaries, and such preliminaries can be more speedily and effectually arranged by the few than the many, therefore be it
    RESOLVED, That a committee, composed of the following gentlemen--David Linn, T. G. Reames, Henry Klippel, Kaspar Kubli, J. Nunan, N. Fisher and C. W. Kahler--be and they are hereby appointed to take such steps in the premises as they shall judge necessary and expedient, and to propose or formulate a plan and devise ways and means for purchasing material, securing the right-of-way, and for the construction of said road at the earliest practical moment.
    On motion, the secretary was authorized to inform absent members of the committee of their appointment. On motion, the meeting adjourned.
N. LANGELL, Chairman.
J. M. SMITH, Secretary.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 7, 1886, page 3


CRATER LAKE!
The Great Summer Resort! via Medford,
Jackson Co., Or.--The Shortest Route
by Fifty Miles!
    By no other route will you have the opportunity of visiting the magnificent country of FLOUNCE ROCK, ROGUE RIVER FALLS and CASTLE FALLS.
    Buy your tickets on the O.&C.R.R. to Medford, where you will find first-class hotel accommodations in Riddle's New Brick Hotel.
    Kenney & Wolters' Large Livery and Feed Stable will furnish outfits, from a pack mule to a coach and four at the lowest living rates. Distance from Medford to Crater Lake 75 miles.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, August 11, 1886, page 3


    D. W. Matthews, the well-known druggist, formerly of this place and Medford, writes from Salem that he is "still dishing out poison to the afflicted populace," being comfortably located again in the Capital City, where he has a nice drug store and is doing a better business than he anticipated.
Excerpt, "Letter from Salem," Ashland Tidings, August 13, 1886, page 2


    Jacksonville is feeling brighter in view of having a railroad of her own.
    Baker's large new warehouse at Medford is nearly completed. The lumber for it was furnished by C. T. Harris & Co., of the Wagner Creek mill.
    An exchange truthfully says, "The number of persons in a town who desire to have it boomed are gratifyingly large, but the number of those who are willing to bear a share of the expenses of doing the booming can usually be counted on the fingers of the hand."
    At a meeting of the citizens of Jacksonville held on the 31st ultimo to consider the proposition to build a railroad from that place to the main line of the O.&C.R.R., a committee composed of David Linn, T. G. Reames, Henry Klippel, Kaspar Kubli, J. Nunan, N. Fisher and C. W. Kahler was appointed to formulate a plan and devise ways and means for purchasing material, securing right of way and constructing the road.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 13, 1886, page 3


A Fine Fruit Farm.
    People who want to know what can be done in the way of making a fruit farm in this valley should visit the place of Mr. J. H. Stewart, about two miles north of Phoenix. Mr. Stewart is an experienced fruit grower, having spent some thirty years in the business in its various branches in Illinois. He came out with his family to this valley last October to take possession of this farm of 180 acres, which he had bought the year before. He knew just what he wanted to do, and just how to do it. Messrs. S. B. Galey and F. H. Carter, of this place, paid Mr. Stewart a visit one day this week, and report that he now has growing on his place a young orchard composed of 4000 pear trees, mostly Bartletts, 3000 peach and 3500 apple trees, and has raised from the seed and budded several thousand more young peach trees. Besides this he has what he calls his "home" orchard, in which are some 300 young trees of 30 or 40 different varieties. Mr. Stewart has entirely transformed the appearance of the place, and is now building a fine new farmhouse on it.
Ashland Tidings, August 13, 1886, page 3


    M. A. McGinnis, formerly of the Medford Monitor, is now a partner in the Julesburg (Col.) Gazette.
    The advance agent for Cole's Circus was in Medford this week making arrangements to show at that place.
    Cole's Circus will give one performance in Jackson County next month, and will probably show at Medford.
    D. W. Crosby, solicitor of the Riddle House of Medford, made Jacksonville a flying visit on Thursday last.
    Kenney & Worman have leased David Payne's livery stable at Medford and will hereafter run that in connection with their own.
    J. H. Redfield of Medford was arrested on a charge of seduction, and taken to Roseburg by S. C. Miller, deputy sheriff of Douglas County.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 14, 1886, page 3


    COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' COURT.--The petition of Wm. Angle and 66 others for a bridge across Bear Creek, near Medford, was continued until next term of court.
Excerpt, Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 14, 1886, page 3


    INCENDIARY FIRE.--The house on the crossroads this side of Medford, occupied by Doc Rose and owned by Mr. Pool, was set on fire by a tramp last Thursday night and the building and its contents were burned to the ground, proving a total loss, the occupants barely escaping with their lives. A young boy and some smaller children were alone in the house at the time when about 12 o'clock a tramp rapped at the door and asked for something to eat. The boy answered that he was alone and being in bed would not give him what he wanted. The tramp then responded by saying if he did not get something to eat at once he (the boy) would have no place to sleep the rest of the night. The boy made no further reply and in less than ten minutes thereafter the building was in flames with the above result. The loss does not amount to a great deal in figures, but nevertheless takes nearly all the occupants had, making it just as severe as if it had been in the thousands. No clue of the guilty party has yet been found, as the boy never seen the man. Hanging would be too good for such a wretch as he.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 14, 1886, page 3


Phoenix Items.
    John VanDyke is expected home from Portland this week, having almost entirely recovered from his injuries and consequent illness.
Ashland Tidings, August 20, 1886, page 3


    The Medford band boys have begun regular practice on their new instruments.
    The circus will be at Medford instead of Ashland this time. Ashland is pleased with the change.
    A Mr. Barnhart, recently from Pennsylvania, has bought the Roberts & O'Neil farm near Medford.
    Kenney & Worman are running both livery stables in Medford, having leased David Payne's stables recently.
    Consideration of the petition of citizens of Medford for the building of a county bridge across Bear Creek at that place was postponed by the county court at the August term.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 20, 1886, page 3


    Several San Francisco papers, notably the Chronicle and Post, predict that San Francisco will capture the whole trade of Southern Oregon as soon as connection between the California & Oregon and the Oregon & California roads is made. This prediction finds some credit here, and the advancement of the California road toward Oregon is viewed by some of our businessmen with alarm. There will no doubt be an effort on the part of San Francisco to take this field, and she may gain a share of its business, but we cannot believe that she will get it all or any great proportion of it. Other things being equal, and in this case they are about equal, people prefer to do business in their own state, and if we do a fair part in our dealings with Southern Oregon, we will certainly hold the bulk of its trade. We have one great advantage in the fact that the productions of Southern Oregon will find less competition in this market than in the market of San Francisco and, presumably, better prices. We have had several alarms of this kind and have lost business from time to time in our own immediate field, in the Sound country, in Southern Oregon and in the Columbia River basin, but always in the long run we gain. It is a fact [to] which any of the large merchants will attest that Portland, in spite of direct Eastern competition, sells more goods now than in the height of the boom three years ago. It is in the nature of things for the commercial city of the state to grow with the growth of a state, and Portland will not prove an exception to the rule.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, August 20, 1886, page 2


CIRQUE DE COLE
To Shortly Appear at Medford.
----
DR. CARVER'S FAMOUS WILD WEST
Will Form One of the Features.
----
MAGNIFICENT ROMAN REVIVAL.
----
The announcement that W. W.
Cole's consolidated shows will visit
MEDFORD, SEPT. 6th.
Carte de Visite, W. F. Carverwill bring joy alike to the juvenile heart and to sire that has reached the "sere and yellow leaf" of life. The constituency of the circus includes a more comprehensive range of people than any king, emperor or president can count as his subjects. For more than two thousand years the circus, with its glamour of romance, has held undisputed sway in the realms of amusements. Other forms of entertainment have risen, thrived for a time, and then passed away, but the charms of the sawdust arena have never lost their potency from Caesar's day down to the present. The circus is universal, all-embracing--a truly regular ruler of all ages, climes and phases of life. After all, perhaps, the clue to perennial popularity of the circus here. It touches the spring of immortal youth, and serves as the connecting link [of] babbling childhood and querulous old age. Thus may--but enough of this philosophizing, and let us return to our original subject, the coming of Cole's big show. At no time during his long managerial career has Mr. Cole presented so much that was new, novel and brilliant as is seen under his ten-acre tents this season. Both Europe and America have contributed their most expert bareback riders, acrobats, aerial marvels, vaulters, clowns, jugglers, boxers, wrestlers, fencers, and contortionists of all kinds, so that the show in [illegible] wide and complete departure from the conventional circus. The most important of Manager Cole's recent acquisitions are a real Roman hippodrome and a "Wild West" exhibition. The latter is headed by the illustrious wizard rifleman, Dr. W. F. Carver, Evil Spirit of the Plains, and one of the most prominent figures in Western history. The Wild West combination includes many noted scouts, cowboys, Sioux, Cheyenne and Pawnee Indians, all of whom appear in thrilling scenes illustrative of wild life on the Plains. Manager Cole is said to have the best-equipped and most realistic Roman hippodrome ever seen in this country. The horses used in the races are of the finest English and Kentucky stock, and their contests for supremacy are pronounced as exciting as those seen at the great turf meetings of St. Louis, Long Branch and Saratoga. That Cole will be warmly welcomed here goes without saying.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 21, 1886, page 1


    Geo. W. Williams of Medford has traded off his brick block at that place to James Hamlin for 190 acres of land in Eden precinct. Mr. Williams will make a fine farm of this place.
    Dr. Carver's appearances at Medford Monday Sept. 6th with W. W. Cole's circus will be the last opportunity to see this celebrated marksman in this city, as he has perfected all arrangements to take his "Wild West" combination to Europe, opening in London next October. Such an enterprising undertaking involves, of course, some financial risk, but Carver has received so much encouragement from prominent men of the European countries that he feels sanguine of brilliant success. He has already an established reputation in Europe, having defeated all the crack shots during his sojourn there a few years ago.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 21, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
CURTIS-BAYLEY--In Medford, August 14th, 1886, at the residence of Mrs. A. A. Cunningham, by C. H. Barkdull, J.P., Joseph Curtis and Miss Hattie Hayley--all of Jackson County.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 21, 1886, page 3


    Logan will be in Medford on Sept. 5th, 6th and 7th, to take negatives, which will be used in finishing up choice photographs at his gallery in Ashland.
    The salary of the M.E. minister of the Ashland and Medford charge during the past year was $900, $100 of which was contributed by the home mission fund.
    Geo. W. Williams of Medford has traded his brick block at that place to James Hamlin for 190 acres of land in Eden precinct. Mr. Williams will make a fine farm of this place. [Sentinel.
    Medford has voted a 14-mill tax to finish its public school building and keep up a free school during the coming year. Jackson County is coming to the front in its progress toward free education.
    W. G. Kenney, of the enterprising livery firm of Kenney & Worman, makes frequent trips from Medford to Ashland with passengers who won't wait for the train. He was in town Tuesday on such business. Kenney & Worman have a good livery outfit and do a good business now.
    Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, who was at Soda Springs with his family the first of the week, was hastily summoned to Eugene by a telegram Tuesday announcing the critical illness of his father, the Rev. E. R. Geary, of that city. The venerable Dr. E. R. Geary is a brother of ex-Governor Geary, of Pennsylvania, and has been prominent in church work in Oregon for many years. He has reached the advanced age of four score and more, and cannot long sustain the double weight of years and disease.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 27, 1886, page 3


    J. E. Niles and family, of Hanley, moved over to Medford this week, as Jay has been engaged to instruct the new brass band at that place.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 27, 1886, page 3


COLE'S SAWDUST COMEDIANS
White-Headed Gags Knocked Out by Chestnut Register.
    Momus, the merry god, and the deity at whose shrine the major portion of show patrons of the present day worship, will hold high carnival in the ring performance of W. W. Cole's New Colossal Shows, which appear at Medford Monday, Sept. 6th. The array of motley humorists will be something unprecedented, as regards number and cleverness, and if some "new gags" and "business" are not sprung on the people, it will be surprising. The list of merrymen is headed by the noted English pantomime and acrobatic clown, the "Great Ernest," who will tickle the risibilities of the audiences with his aesthetic donkeys and ingeniously constructed rubber elephant, "Goodyear." Tom McIntyre, the Chesterfield of Shakespearean wits, will amuse in his own quaint, inimitable style; "Billy Rollins," one of the brightest jesters that have ever donned cap and bells, will vocalize the latest comic songs, tell rib-tickling stories, and introduce his comic little trained pig, "Ben Butler." Ten other high priests of Momus will participate in the revelries. Any clown that springs a musty, hoary-headed chestnut, with whiskers on it, is subject to a fine of $10. A new feature in connection with clowning will be introduced in the shape of a "chestnut register," a clock-shaped affair, the hands of which record with unerring accuracy every venerable joke which the clowns, while in a reminiscent mood, may unconsciously utter. Everybody will want to see the working of the "chestnut register."
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 28, 1886, page 3


Special Train.
    The O.&C.R.R. will run a special train from Ashland to Medford and return on next Monday, Sept. 6th. Train will leave Ashland at 7:30 A.M.; Phoenix 7:50. The train will return to Ashland from Medford after the circus performance is over.
Ashland Tidings, September 3, 1886, page 3


    Medford people continue to prospect for coal near that place.
    The Medford Monitor has been enlarged to an eight-column paper.
    Dance at Zimmerman's hall in Medford next Monday evening, Sept. 6th.
    Medford is having her main street graveled and will escape the mud next winter.
    A special train will be run from Ashland to Medford and back next Monday to haul people for the circus. See notice in another column.
    The railroad name for the new C.&O.R.R. station at Cedar Flat is "Dunsmuir," and the stage company name is Castle Rock.
    The plans and specifications have been drawn for the new Presbyterian Church building at Medford, which, it is expected, will be erected this season.
    We were in error in stating last week that the estimate for the cost of a railroad from this place to connect with the main line of the O.&C.R.R. was furnished by M. Volk. It was made by another person altogether, but we are not at present at liberty to mention who it was. There is every probability that the line will be built and steps toward it will soon be taken.--[Jacksonville Times.
    The house on the old Justus place near Medford, now belonging to Mr. J. D. Whitman, was accidentally burned on Monday of last week. Mr. Whitman had set fire to some rubbish near the house, which after he had left communicated to the house and was beyond control when discovered. This house was one of the old landmarks of the valley, and was the scene of the Justus murder a few years ago.
    The directors of the Medford school district have chosen the following teachers to take charge of the public schools at that place for the ensuing year: Principal, Prof. Scott Morris; principal primary department, Miss Mollie Merriman; assistant, Miss Sophia Wilson. There were said to be no less than nine applicants for the principalship.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 3, 1886, page 3


    John VanDyke, who has been at the hospital in Portland for some two months or more, returned last Saturday to his home near Phoenix. He considers himself on the road to complete recovery.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, September 3, 1886, page 3
   

    What has become of our railroad committee?
    The circus parade will be held at Medford on Monday morning, Sept. 6th, and the performance begins promptly at twelve o'clock noon. Doors will be opened at 11 in the morning to give people a chance to see the menagerie.
    Fletcher Linn of Jacksonville, Fred Myer and L. H. Countryman of Ashland and Miss Ella Galloway of Medford have made application for the vacant scholarships in the State University. There are three vacancies at present.
    The directors of the Medford school district have chosen the following teachers to take charge of the public schools at that place for the ensuing year. Principal, Prof. Scott Morris; principal primary department, Miss Mollie Merriman; assistant, Miss Sophia Wilson. There were said to be no less than nine applicants for the principalship.
    A special train will run between Ashland and Medford, September 6th, leaving Ashland at 7:30 A.M., and Phoenix 7:50 A.M. and returning after the circus is over. Special train will also leave Grants Pass on the same date at 9:30 A.M., Woodville 8:55 A.M., Gold Hill 10:15 A.M. and Central Point 10:50 A.M. and will return to stations north by our regular passenger train. This enables all to visit Medford and see the circus.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 4, 1886, page 3


The Circus.
    Nearly a hundred people went down on the special train from Ashland to attend the circus at Medford on the 6th. They report that the usual large crowd was in attendance; also that the "usual" circus was there with its varied attractions and numerous "faking" games that people are always anxious to be taken in by. The parade and menagerie were fair, and the ring acting was said to be very good and was enlivened by an excellent band of music. Cole probably left several thousand dollars richer and the people, of course, so much poorer. Medford hotels and restaurants "made a killing" too, probably.
Ashland Tidings, September 10, 1886, page 3


    The lightning ticket seller of Cole's circus tried to get away with a young fellow from Jacksonville in making change at Medford last Monday. After the performance the aforesaid young man hunted up this "lightning" ticket seller, and accused him of holding back a dollar in making change. The ticket man denied the charge, at the same time using some "bad words" toward the young man. About the first thing the "change" man knew he was rolling in six inches of dust and the victim of his dishonesty on top of him. The marshal put in an appearance then but the crowd held him back, as they wanted to see the circus out. After losing his diamond, the "lightning" man cried enough and the two were separated, the ticket seller getting much worsted and probably some of the "lightning" taken out of him.
Ashland Tidings, September 10, 1886, page 3


    Medford now has a dentist, Dr. A. D. Gleaves having located there recently.
    Messrs. Robert & O'Neil, who sold their farm near Medford some time ago, have gone to Lake County, Cal., to reside.
    Two Jacksonville boys got on a "tear" at Medford last week, and they were required to put up $5 and costs for disturbing the peace.
    Nearly all the Indians who came in from the reservation last Saturday after government freight attended the circus at Medford Monday. They spent a good part of the day Sunday in inspecting the numerous attractive bills on the "dead walls" of the city. Dr. Carver's Wild West combination seemed to take their eye.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 10, 1886, page 3


DIED.
GEARY--At his home in Eugene City, Sept. 1, 1886, Rev. Edward R. Geary, D.D., aged 75 years and 5 months.
Ashland Tidings, September 10, 1886, page 3


    The First Baptist Church of Medford has incorporated and filed articles with the secretary of state.
    The Monitor says the cartridges which "Dr. Carver" used in breaking the glass balls at the circus were loaded with fine shot, instead of a single ball.
    N. K. Lytle intends to start another distillery soon near Medford, and prominent citizens of that place are said to be interested in the project.
    Jay Niles, who was up from Medford Tuesday, reports the new band at that place improving rapidly. After only five weeks' training, they came out in public and played five times last Monday evening. Good record.
    The scale bug has appeared in one or two orchards down the valley upon trees imported from other states. The interests of the owner of the orchards in question, and every other orchard in the valley, demanding that the trees having the scale upon them be cut down and burned.
    Some of the largest and finest watermelons brought to Ashland this season were from the farm of J. H. Stewart (the old Ball place), between Medford and Phoenix. It was thought before Mr. Stewart bought this place that vegetables couldn't be grown there to advantage, but Mr. S. tried his system of farming on it and has thoroughly surprised some of his neighbors. The Tidings can testify to the quality of the melons, having been favored with a thirty-pound sample by Clayton & Gore, who are handling them here.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 17, 1886, page 3


    Geo. H. Chick, formerly of the Medford quartz mill, is now operating in Siskiyou County.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, September 17, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
CONGER-DEAN--Near Medford, Sept. 11th, M. S. Dean of Josephine County and Josephine Conger.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 18, 1886, page 3


    DENIED.--The citizens of Medford and vicinity made application to the County Commissioners last term for a bridge across Bear Creek near that place, but the petition was denied. Our heavy indebtedness at present time is the cause of the denial.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 18, 1886, page 3


    Did you look for the "black pea" under a nutshell during the Cole's Circus performance? It only cost $5. We know of several who thought they could find it, but lost their fives--[Plaindealer. Albany can beat that, Mr. "Plaindealer." One fellow here who had more money than common sense lost $80 through the "black pea" racket in a few minutes.--[Albany Bulletin.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 18, 1886, page 3


Lost.
    Lost Sunday on the road between Ashland and Jacksonville, or between Medford and Central Point, a black cashmere shawl. The finder will receive the thanks of the owner by leaving it at this office.
Ashland Tidings, September 24, 1886, page 3


    There are several cases of diphtheria reported across Bear Creek in the lower valley; also one at Medford.
    Medford is soon to have a brick church edifice. Messrs. A. Childers and son have contracted with the proper authorities to furnish 60,000 bricks for the building. The building will be for the use of the Baptist Church of this place.--Monitor.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 24, 1886, page 3

MARRIED
NICHOLS-CARDWELL--Near Medford, Sept. 1st, at the residence of the officiating minister, by Rev. H. C. Hoxie, W. J. Nichols and Miss Jane A. Cardwell.
DEAN-CONGER--Near Medford, Sept. 11th, M. S. Dean of Josephine County and Mrs. Sarah E. Conger.
Ashland Tidings, September 24, 1886, page 3


    A charge of assault with intent to kill was brought by Oscar Lewis against Wm. Lewis, both of Medford, but Justice Barkdull thought there was nothing in the case and dismissed the case.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 25, 1886, page 3


    Byers & Guerin, of Medford, are talking of going down to San Diego.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 1, 1886, page 3


    Mr. O. Burton, of Indiana, is visiting his sister, Mrs. I. A. Webb, of Medford, whom he had not seen before for seven years.
    Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, who is administrator of the estate of his father, the late E. R. Geary, was in Eugene last week on business connected with the settlement of the estate.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, October 1, 1886, page 3


    INSANE--A party named Wilson was brought to town from Medford this week thought to be crazy, but an examination proved that it was only a bad case of jimjams and he will be all right in a few days.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 2, 1886, page 3


    RETURNED.--Mrs. Harriet E. Chambers, who left Jacksonville a year ago last April to visit her old home in Michigan, arrived here a week ago. Mrs. Chambers found the change from the mild climate of this valley to the rigorous seasons of Michigan too great for her constitution. While there she lost much general health and vitality, and concluded to return as a last resort. She is now at the Empire Hotel in a very feeble condition. The hostess, Mrs. Cunnyngham, and other kind friends, are doing all they can to make her return to us pleasant, and if possible restore her to health. It is hoped that these kind attentions and the buoyance of our climate may give her a new lease of life.--[Monitor.
    LATER.--Mrs. Chambers died at Medford Thursday night.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 2, 1886, page 3


    S. Booth was kicked on the knee this week while handling horses at Medford, receiving injuries from which he was laid up for several days this week.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 2, 1886, page 3


    Miss Nettie McCornack, who has been visiting friends at Medford for some weeks, has returned home.

"Eugene Notes,"
Morning Oregonian, Portland, October 7, 1886, page 3


    Medford is soon to have a brick church edifice. Messrs. A. Childers & Son have contracted with the proper authorities to furnish 60,000 bricks for the building. The building will be for the use of the Baptist Church of this place.
"News of the Northwest,"
Morning Oregonian, Portland, October 7, 1886, page 8


REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS
IN JACKSON COUNTY
DURING THE MONTH OF MAY.
    B. W. Powell to D. A. Levens, 1 lot in Medford; consideration, $333.50.
DURING JUNE.
    I. J. Phipps to J. R. Armpriest, lot in Medford; consideration, $115.
    F. L. Cranfill to J. Bever, lot in Medford; consideration, $600.
    J. H. Barnum to Bertha S. Barnum, lots in Medford; consideration, $1000.
    W. H. McAdams to Wm. Morris, lot in Medford, consideration, $375.
    O.&T. Co. to R. T. Young, lot in Medford; consideration, $50.
    D. W. Mathews to Angle & Plymale, lot in Medford, consideration, $350.
    O.&T. Co. to Angle & Plymale, lot in Medford; consideration, $175.
    O.&T. Co. to D. T. Lawton, lot in Medford; consideration, $175.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 8, 1886, page 1


    Mac Wilson has sold 27 acres of unimproved land near Medford to J. W. Short for $10 an acre.
    It is expected that trains on the California & Oregon R.R. will be running to Sissons [i.e., Mount Shasta] by Nov. 1st. This will leave but 88 miles of staging to Ashland.
    Mrs. Harriet E. Chambers, who left Jacksonville a year ago last April, to visit her old home in Michigan, returned to this county about two weeks ago very low with consumption, and died at Medford last Friday.
    Says the Medford Monitor of last week: The team attached to J. A. Crain's milk wagon, driven by Mr. Bonar, became frightened Tuesday evening and ran away, demolishing the wagon and seriously injuring Mr. Boner and his son, a small lad who was in the wagon at the time. Mr. Bonar received a small cut on the head, and was otherwise bruised, while the boy appeared to be badly stunned. The wounds, though of a serious nature, are not considered dangerous.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 8, 1886, page 3


    Dr. J. O. Allen and family, old residents of Linkville, have moved to Medford.
    Messrs. Byers and Guerin, of Medford, have been in town within the past week. They say they have not yet determined to go to San Diego.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, October 8, 1886, page 3


BORN
COLLEEN--In Medford, Sept. 24th, to Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Colleen, a son.
Ashland Tidings, October 8, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford needs a watchmaker and jeweler.
    Dr. Geary has returned from his trip to Eugene City.
    The attendance on the district school continues to improve.
    D. W. Crosby has gone to Portland to pay his mother a visit.
    Mrs. Foster is displaying a fine, new stock of millinery goods.
    J. W. Dougherty, formerly of this place, has removed to Little Shasta, Cal.
    O. Burton of Indiana is visiting his sister, Mrs. I. A. Webb of this place.
    J. W. Cunnyngham is at Portland and is doing well with the Centennial Gate.
    This town will have two places of religious worship, or churches, in the near future.
    E. G. Hurt is building an addition to his dwelling and otherwise improving his premises.
    Dr. Pryce has been in Jacksonville at different times during the week. He is kept busy.
    Some wheat is being shipped, but considerable is also being received at the warehouses.
    The party given at McGee & Zimmerman's hall last Friday evening was a pleasant affair.
    W. F. Williamson, our attorney-at-law, has gone to Yamhill County and will be gone some time.
    S. Booth, who was severely kicked by one of Kenney & Worman's horses, is able to be about again.
    Zimmerman & Webb have commenced the preliminary work for the new Presbyterian Church at this place.
    Rev. W. S. Holt's lecture at this place last week proved a rare intellectual treat. He left an excellent impression.
    Several Indian teamsters, while on their way to Ashland and Fort Klamath for freight, tarried in town one day last week and bought a considerable number of goods.
    Mrs. F. L. Cranfill, who has been in Cole's Valley, Douglas County, visiting her relatives, and who was taken sick while there, has recovered and returned home a few days since.
    R. M. Shely and wife paid Jacksonville a visit Wednesday. They were preceded by two of their children, aged five and two years respectively, who had traversed the entire distance from Medford afoot and were on their way to Applegate when found.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 8, 1886, page 2


    G. H. Chick vs. C. C. and J. F. Ragsdale, action for damages. H. K. Hanna allowed to withdraw as attorney for plaintiff.
"Circuit Court Proceedings,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 8, 1886, page 2


    Mrs. Harriet Chambers, the well-known dressmaker, died at Medford one day last week, after a lingering illness.
    R. M. Shely, a first-class marble cutter, has resumed business at Medford, where he is prepared to fill orders in his line in the best style and at the lowest living rates. He can furnish monuments, tombstones, etc., of every description and at any price. Copings, bases, and all kinds of stonework well done. Satisfaction guaranteed. Give him a trial.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 8, 1886, page 3


    W. F. Williamson, the Medford attorney has gone to McMinnville, to remain for about three months.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 9, 1886, page 3


Mrs. Duniway to Lecture.
    Mrs. A. S. Duniway will lecture in the Ashland Baptist Church this evening (Friday) upon the subject: "The Pending Problem; and How Shall it be Solved?" Mrs. Duniway, who was the pioneer and has been the ever-active advocate of the equal suffrage movement in Oregon, has now to confront the problem of the relations between the suffrage and the prohibition movements. She takes issue with most of her prohibition friends; but as she is acknowledged by both friends and foes as one of the ablest speakers and writers of the Northwest Coast, it is needless to say that she presents her view of the subject with great force and skill. Her lecture, as usual will be free, and all are invited.
    On Saturday morning Mrs. Duniway will take the stage for Linkville, her first visit to Klamath County, and on Monday will no doubt deliver a lecture to the people of that place.
Ashland Tidings, October 15, 1886, page 3


    W. F. Williamson, the Medford attorney, has gone to McMinnville to remain for about three months.
    Mrs. A. S. Duniway, the editor of the New Northwest, and the able lecturer so well known here and elsewhere on the Pacific coast, arrived in town Wednesday, and will be in Southern Oregon for several days, with the purpose of lecturing at several places before her departure.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, October 15, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
COLEMAN-BRINER--At the residence of the officiating minister, Oct. 10, 1886, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Mr. Elmer G. Coleman and Miss Jenny Briner.
Ashland Tidings, October 15, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
COLEMAN-BRINER--In Medford precinct, Oct. 10th, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Elmer G. Coleman and Miss Jennie Briner.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 16, 1886, page 2


    "Ham" Wolters of Medford called yesterday. He said he wasn't courting.
    Mrs. E. B. Watson started for Portland Thursday night, where she expects to join her husband and make her home. Mother-like Mrs. Kubli provided her with a fine lunch to be used on the road, but its evidence can only be testified to by the thief who stole it at Medford. They must have a number of the hungry and thirsty in our neighboring city.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 16, 1886, page 3


    Mrs. A. S. Duniway started for Linkville on Tuesday morning's stage.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, October 22, 1886, page 3


The Proposed Railroad.
    About two months ago a public meeting was called at the town hall for the purpose of taking the sense of the community upon the construction of a railroad from this place to Medford or some other suitable point on the main line. Considerable discussion ensued and the result was the appointment of a committee to ascertain the cost and advisability of its construction and to report as early as practicable the result of their findings.
    The committee consisted of D. Linn, H. Klippel, T. G. Reames, J. Nunan, N. Fisher, K. Kubli and C. W. Kahler. It was understood that this committee would gather all available facts concerning the matter, call a meeting and submit them for the consideration of those interested. More than two months have elapsed and the committee, so far as we know, have not yet been called together; and yet we are informed they had in their possession for some time a full and complete itemized statement of the construction. Why the meeting has not been called and these facts submitted we are unable to say. It is not worthwhile at this time to talk about what might and ought to have been done in past; the question is what shall we do now? It must be obvious to every discerning person that if we desire to maintain our position as the business and commercial center of Southern Oregon we must do something and that something is to determine to have, at any reasonable cost, railroad connection with the general business of this section. The Sentinel believes it can be shown by actual figures that the road will pay from the moment of its completion, with a certainty that its construction will largely increase business and thus in a short time make a good, paying enterprise. We have the figures to show that the aggregate daily cost of freights, the transportation of mail and express matter and passengers between this place and Medford will exceed twelve dollars, and responsible citizens of our town will give bonds to operate the road when completed for six dollars per day. It is not unreasonable to assume that with a railroad as the passenger traffic between these places and would increase tenfold [sic]. Now if a man wants to go to Medford or come from Medford here he must wait no matter what his business is and take the stage or hire a team at the cost of two dollars, and this expense is so great that there is no travel except what business actually requires; whereas with a railroad persons could go and come with but little loss of time and with one-fourth of the expense, and the result would be a large increase of both travel and business. If the people of Jacksonville will stop and think for one moment of the decline and depreciation which must inevitably result from our isolated condition they must conclude, as a rational business community, that they cannot afford to do without this road. Jacksonville pays about one-fifth of the taxes of the whole county. The question is: shall not some decisive effort be made to save this property or shall it be practically abandoned and in time be pinched out--as it must be through the indifference of its citizens. The building of this road is within the reach of this community.
    We urge the committee to call a meeting, at least of its members, and to make public the facts in their possession that our people may know what further action to take in the matter.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 23, 1886, page 2


    Married--At the Riddle House, Oct. 20, by C. H. Barkdull, J.P., Mr. George Ridinger to Miss Hattie McDonough.
    The superintendent of the motive power of the C.P.R.R. made an inspection of the O.&C.R.R. roundhouses and car shops last week. This is a straw which may indicate the direction of the wind.--Tidings.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 23, 1886, page 3


    Roberts & O'Neil have bought the fine farm of Mrs. W. S. Stone near Talent, 320 acres, for $9,000; and have also bought the old Norton place adjacent to Medford, for $7,000. They had intended moving to California, but after an extended tour through that state in search of a place to suit him, Mr. Roberts returned to this county last week convinced that they could do better in Southern Oregon than anywhere else. They are enterprising men and good farmers, and we are glad to see them remain in this valley.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 29, 1886, page 3


    The Sentinel wants the Jacksonville people to make another effort to begin the building of the proposed branch railroad.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 1, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our public school is flourishing.
    The cornet band will give a brand ball on Christmas.
    Cummons Bros. of this precinct are being visited by their aged grandmother.
    Jay Niles, our musical instructor, has returned from his trip to Henley, Cal.
    Dr. Gleaves was in Jacksonville Sunday, accompanied by Mr. Burton, a newcomer.
    Messrs. Skeel, Zimmerman & McGee were at the county seat during the week.
    M. Purdin, our photographer, has been visiting relatives and friends in Washington County.
    Dr. Rose interviewed the county clerk this week, but will be obliged to wait awhile yet for his marriage license.
    A footbridge will soon be built across Bear Creek, which will enable those living on the other side of that stream to cross it any time of the year.
    Our clever railroad agent has been reinforced, a new telegraph operator having made his appearance at the family residence a few days since. [A birth announcement for C. K. Fronk.]
    A number of ladies and gentlemen of Medford have formed a literary society, which will hold its first regular meeting this evening. Dr. Gleaves is president and Mrs. J. R. West secretary of the organization.
    Jas. Herely, the mail carrier on the route between here and Big Butte, has removed from Jacksonville to this place. The post office department requires him to start on schedule time (7 o'clock a.m.) which caused him to change his place of residence.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 29, 1886, page 2


MARRIED.
RIDINGER-McDONOUGH--In Medford, Oct. 20th, by C. H. Barkdull, J.P., Geo. D. Ridinger, and Miss Hattie McDonough.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 29, 1886, page 3


    R. M. Shely, a first-class marble cutter, has resumed business at Medford, where he is prepared to fill orders in his line in the best style and at the lowest living rates. He can furnish monuments, tombstones, etc., of every description and at any price. Copings, bases, and all kinds of stonework well done. Satisfaction guaranteed. Give him a trial.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 29, 1886 et seq., page 3


MARRIED
STRANG-BEALL--At the residence of the bride's parents near Medford, Nov. 3, 1886, Mr. Chas. Strang and Miss Mamie Beall, Rev. M. A. Williams officiating.
Ashland Tidings, November 5, 1886, page 2


    Marriage epidemic in Jackson County.
    Medford didn't get its county bridge across Bear Creek, but will build a footbridge, anyhow.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 5, 1886, page 3


    O. Gilbert and family, of Medford, who have kept a restaurant there during the past year or two, moved to Crescent City this week.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, November 5, 1886, page 3


    It is rumored that C. B. Carlisle, secretary of the state immigration board, has been appointed postmaster of East Portland.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, November 5, 1886, page 3


    In 1885 a Mr. Chick built a small but very complete test mill at Medford, a station on the Oregon & California Railroad, favorably located for access to the quartz claims of Jackson County. Its operations were probably not very successful. The mill was propelled by steam, and the machinery consisted of a five-stamp battery with 500-pound stamps, a concentrating device, tanks and two amalgamating pans of small capacity. Operations ceasing at the mill, the little battery has been removed to the Pilgrim Ledge, on Wagner Creek, where it is in active use.
Excerpt, "Our Mines," Morning Oregonian, Portland, November 11, 1886, page 3


    MARRIAGES.
    WEBB-HOWARD--Our Medford correspondent sends the following account of the wedding of a young couple well and favorably known in the valley: "Mr. Benj. S. Webb, of the firm of Adkins & Webb, and Miss Nettie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Howard, were married today (Nov. 10th) at the residence of the bride's parents in this place, Rev. Martin Peterson officiating. The bride and groom are both well known here, and have hosts of friends who wish them a long life of happiness.
Ashland Tidings, November 12, 1886, page 3


    Dr. J. O. Allen, of Medford, wants to teach shorthand to classes in the different towns in this valley.
    John G. VanDyke of Eden precinct was in town last Saturday in company with his wife. He is able to be about, but is not well yet. The wound in his thigh which has caused him so much suffering and danger is not yet entirely healed, but he is slowly gaining strength and has good prospects of complete recovery if he takes care of himself as he should.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 12, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    M. E. Beatty has returned from Portland.
    Medford is having its share of weddings nowadays.
    Mrs. Duniway, the noted woman suffragist, is here on a lecturing visit.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 12, 1886, page 2


    O. Harbaugh has purchased the John R. Tice farm near Medford of Peter Britt, paying $5,000 for it. Mr. H. no doubt got a good bargain.
    Jesse Wilson, Sr., and son of Medford precinct were at the county seat Monday. The old gentleman is over 90 years old, but still able to be about.
    Trains now leave Ashland at 8:45 o'clock p.m., reaching Medford by 9:20. Trains from the north reach those points a few minutes earlier than before.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 12, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
WEBB-HOWARD--At Medford, Nov. 10th, by Rev. M. A. Williams, B. S. Webb and Miss Nettie L. Howard.
[Compliments received. We extend our congratulations and best wishes.]
McGEE-CROSBY--In Medford precinct, Oct. 31st, by Rev. M. A. Williams, S. B. McGee and Miss Nettie Crosby.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 12, 1886, page 3


MARRIED
WEBB-HOWARD--At the residence of the bride's parents in Medford, Nov. 10, 1886, by Rev. Martin Peterson, Mr. Benj. S. Webb and Miss Nettie Howard.
Ashland Tidings, November 12, 1886, page 3


MARRIAGES
WEBB-HOWARD--Our Medford correspondent sends the following account of the wedding of a young couple well and favorably known in the valley: Mr. Benj. S. Webb, of the firm of Adkins & Webb, and Miss Nettie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Howard, were married today (Nov. 10th) at the residence of the bride's parents in this place, Rev. Martin Peterson officiating.
Ashland Tidings, November 12, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
WEBB-HOWARD--At Medford, Nov. 10th, by Rev. M. A. Williams, B. S. Webb and Miss Nettie Howard.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 13, 1886, page 2


    O. Harbaugh has purchased the John R. Tice farm near Medford of Peter Britt, paying $5,600.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 13, 1886, page 3


    Dr. J. O. Allen of Medford would like to teach a class in shorthand writing in Jacksonville. A class of fifteen will be instructed for twenty-five lessons at the rate of $5.00 per scholar, scholars to furnish a suitable room, with the necessary lights and fuel.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 13, 1886 et seq., page 3


    Miss Emily Brown of Eagle Point and her sister Mrs. Guerin have opened a dressmaking establishment at Medford.
    Mr. B. S Webb and Miss Nettie Howard, both of Medford, were married on Wednesday last at the residence of the bride's parents. We join their many friends in wishing them continued prosperity in their new life, and may their sea of matrimony be an unlimited, pleasant and agreeable one. Compliments received.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 13, 1886, page 3


    The Jacksonville people regret their great mistake in not getting the railroad through that place, and are now industriously endeavoring to build a branch road for connection with [the] main line. Yreka has a much larger amount of wealth at stake, and should take warning from the fate of Shasta, and the inevitable downfall of Jacksonville.
"Semi-Weekly Mixture," Yreka Semi-Weekly Journal, California, November 13, 1886, page 3


    Peter Britt has sold the Tice farm near Medford to O. Harbaugh for $5,600.
    The Tidings acknowledges receipt of a box of choice wedding cake with compliments of Mr. and Mrs. B. S. Webb, of Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 19, 1886, page 3


    R. M. Shely, the marble cutter, has resumed business at Medford.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, November 19, 1886, page 3


MARRIED
McGEE-CROSBY--In Medford precinct, Oct. 31st, by Rev. M. A. Williams, S. B. McGee and Miss Nettie Crosby.
Ashland Tidings, November 19, 1886, page 3


    The road between this place and Medford is now being graveled.
    It is said that the Mackey-Bennett Telegraph Company will construct a telephone line between this place and Medford.
    The fate of Shasta City in California, by being left to one side by the railroad, and having the county seat removed from that place to Redding, should serve as a lesson to the people of Jacksonville. Property in this place is sure to decrease in value in its present condition, and if the business men of this place ever expect to hold the trade, or even a part of it they formerly held, they should build a branch railway from this place to connect with some point on the O.&C.R.R., for, as we have said before, if this matter is to be let go unnoticed, there will not be enough business in the course of five or six years to keep up half of the stores that are now here, and will eventually follow in the same footsteps as Shasta City.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 20, 1886, page 3


    The Jacksonville people regret their refusal of the railroad offer to come close to that town, and if they had the chance again, would eagerly accept. Some of the most prominent business men talk of moving away. Yet while Jacksonville is becoming a dull place, the insignificant towns along the railroad are also very poor places, the business being so scattered as to make all the towns appear dead, with no improvement visible.
"Semi-Weekly Mixture," Yreka Semi-Weekly Journal, California, November 20, 1886, page 3


    The Jacksonville Sentinel urges the people there to be warned by the fate of Shasta, and build a branch railroad if desirous of maintaining their present business and the county seat. A branch road can be brought right into the center of town at a very small outlay, and the business over it ought to pay expenses and interest on the investment.
Yreka Semi-Weekly Journal, California, November 24, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Thanksgiving Day was duly observed here.
    Winter fights have blossomed in this place.
    Our district school is in a flourishing condition.
    Elder M. Peterson will hold services in this place on Sunday next.
    Mrs. J. B. Riddle has returned from a visit to her former home in Douglas Co.
    The Medford Aid Society holds interesting meetings regularly and is doing good work.
    The Pickwick Literary Society meets semi-monthly and is in a flourishing condition.
    B. W. Powell continues to wield the razor with dexterity at his shop in the Central Hotel.
    J. W. Short is fitting up his town property and will soon have one of the neatest residences in town.
    The DeMoss family, a well-known concert troupe, will perform at this place during the coming week.
    Several carloads of wheat were shipped from here last week. The warehouses are both nearly full as yet.
    Rudolph High has one of the neatest barber shops in southern Oregon, having just renovated it in fine style.
    Prof. H. G. Fairclo is teaching a writing school here and giving general satisfaction. He should be well patronized.
    T. A. Harris, our clever butcher, has purchased the building formerly owned by M. E. Dougherty, and is fitting it up for a shop.
    J. C. Elder's store building was afire one day last week, but fortunately this fact was discovered in time to prevent a conflagration.
    I. A. Webb was at Grants Pass lately, to purchase lumber for the Presbyterian Church building in this place, which is now under way.
    G. W. Howard, the energetic agent of the State Insurance Co., has been east of the mountains, and wrote a large number of policies while there.
    For sale at a bargain--a cozy dwelling house not far from the center of town of Medford. For further particulars enquire of R. T. Lawton.
    It is said that the Postal Telegraph Co., which will soon complete its coast telegraph line, will have connection with Jacksonville by a telephone line from this place.
    Dr. Gleaves, our popular dentist, will leave for Tacoma, W.T., in a few weeks, intending to spend the winter there. He is a good workman, and those needing any work in his line should call soon.
    The brass band of this place, assisted by our best local talent, gave an entertainment at McGee & Zimmerman's hall yesterday evening, which was well attended and gave the best of satisfaction. A neat sum was realized, which will be applied on the indebtedness of the band.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 26, 1886, page 2


    Ed. Hendricks of Applegate has shipped two carloads of potatoes from Medford. He raised about 60,000 lbs. of them last season.
    A. J. Weeks of Medford precinct, who has an extensive orchard of young trees, planted 800 trees this season, most of which are apple trees.
    H. E. Baker, the Medford warehouseman, has been here lately. He says the grain market is dull and not a great deal of wheat is being shipped.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart, one of the most progressive farmers in the State, has lately completed a handsome and well-arranged residence on his place in Eden precinct. It is second to no farmhouse in the county. A. J. Weeks was the architect.
    Dr. J. O. Allen of Medford would like to teach a class in shorthand writing in Jacksonville. A class of fifteen will be instructed for twenty-five lessons at the rate of $5 per scholar, scholars to furnish a suitable room, with the necessary lights and fuel.
    Our businessmen should contribute more or less to the graveling of the road between Jacksonville and Medford, as it will be of great benefit and convenience to everybody. The county commissioners propose contributing as great a sum towards this enterprise as the public subscribes, which ought to ensure the making of a good road between the two places.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 26, 1886, page 3


    H. E. Battin & Co., commission merchants of Portland, shipped eight carloads of apples for Montana and some others for Colorado. Each car was a sign in itself, and will advertise Oregon as it rolls toward its destination.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 26, 1886, page 3


    The road between Medford and Jacksonville is being improved by a liberal coating of gravel.
    A queer combination of business is that of barbering and the practice of law, both of which are carried on by B. W. Powell, of Medford.
    T. A. Harris, the Medford butcher, has bought the building in that place formerly owned by M. E. Dougherty, and is fitting it up for a market.
    Messrs. Webb & Zimmerman, contractors for building the Medford Presbyterian Church, have a large part of the lumber on the ground. Messrs. Byers & Guerin are putting up the foundation, which is of stone. The contract calls for the completion of the building by the first day of next February.--[Monitor.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 26, 1886, page 3


    Two carloads of wheat were shipped from Medford to Portland last week.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, November 26, 1886, page 3


    The Rogue River Distillery will start up next Monday if a sufficient supply of water can be had.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 27, 1886, page 3



    Remember the entertainment by the Medford Band at Myer's Hall tomorrow evening.
    Give the Medford amateurs a good house tomorrow evening. The drama they will present is said to be a thrilling one, and in able hands.
    Jacksonville people keep talking about the branch railroad, but as yet have done nothing that looks like building it. They can well afford to build the road, if the moneyed men of the place will only bear their due share in proportion to their interests in the town.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 3, 1886, page 3


    Medford wants a flour mill.
    The Rogue River Distillery started operations last week.
    The valley has been covered with a dense fog for the past week.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 4, 1886, page 3


    Supervisor Wilson has had about 100 yards of the Tice lane, on the road between this place and Medford, graveled in first-class style. The balance ought to be treated likewise, and the county court should lose no time in seeing it done.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 10, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. S. Howard has been reappointed a notary public by Gov. Moody.
    Dr. A. D. Gleaves, the popular dentist, will leave for Tacoma, W.T., next week.
    Dr. Pryce made M. Mensor, of the county seat, a visit yesterday. He reports him very sick, but somewhat of an improvement noticeable.
    O. Burton has been at the county seat a number of times of late, looking quite prim. He seems to have taken a liking to this part of the globe.
    Mark Armstrong and Wm. Smith, lately of Jacksonville and Eagle Point, have opened a blacksmith shop in this place. Both are good mechanics and will no doubt give satisfaction.
    A correspondent states that the Medford dramatic society gave an entertainment at Ashland on the night of the 4th inst. to a crowded house, and seemed to give general satisfaction to everyone.
    Sheriff Dean will, tomorrow, sell at the courthouse door in Jacksonville a dwelling house in this place and also a piece of real estate in the immediate vicinity. For further particulars see the notices on the fourth page of the Times.
   
The dramatic club will give an entertainment this evening for the benefit of the Medford Aid Society, when the popular drama, "The Social Glass," will be presented for the last time. We hope to see the societies well patronized, as they deserve it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 10, 1886, page 3


BORN
GEARY--In Medford, Dec. 8th, to Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Geary, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 10, 1886, page 3


"Victims of the Bottle."
    The drama presented at Myer's hall last Saturday evening by the Medford amateurs was witnessed by a full house, and gave full satisfaction to the audience. The cast of the piece included in the characters several young people who did admirably, and the whole play was considered excellent for an amateur performance. Among the leading players well known here were C. W. Wolters and J. E. Niles, who each took their share of the applause. The characters of Miss Nettleby and Rob Brittle, by Mrs. West and Mr. Hamilton carried the humor of the play, and their appearance was always greeted with smiles. The other ladies in the play did the pathetic and tragic scenes smoothly and easily, and the "heavy villain," Hollis, looked and acted wickedly enough, but couldn't quite prevent the audience from considering him a pretty good sort of man outside of the play. Profs. Williams and Woolf furnished the orchestra music. Come again.
Ashland Tidings, December 10, 1886, page 3


    J. S. Howard, of Medford, has been appointed a notary public.
    The Medford Brass Band will give their first Grand Reception Ball Dec. 24th at Howard's Hall.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 10, 1886, page 3


    George H. Chick, a mining expert, formerly a resident of this city, now of Yreka, Cala., has invented a silver plate for apron to battery of quartz mill, with metallic chambers that causes the plate to attract gold and silver as a magnet will attract iron. Sulphurets and iron will pass over the plate without adhering to it. The metallic chambers can be attached to old plates with the same result, and cause no loss to those having them. Below this plate are a set of silver-plated pocket riffles, with pockets for quicksilver and amalgam, which is kept in active motion by water passing through perforated pipes. Quicksilver or amalgam cannot pass the riffles, no matter how great the pressure of water. This invention is also valuable for placer mining as well as quartz mining. The Yreka Journal speaks highly of the new invention.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 11, 1886, page 2


    Medford Monitor: Lagrand H. Hill, one of the pioneers of this valley, died at the residence of his sister, Mrs. Dunn, November 30, after a lingering and painful illness. Deceased was in his 59th year--older than his appearance indicated. He came hither early in the '50s with his parents, Isaac and Elizabeth Hill, who settled upon the donation claim south of Ashland, and whose home so hospitably entertained the early settlers of the valley. He was the eldest of their children. Three sisters and one brother survive him.
"Jackson County," Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 14, 1886, page 2


    Jacksonville people are making great exertions to build a branch to the main line, as they begin to see their business prospects failing. Medford, the depot for that place, does not amount to much, although several lots were sold at start. The work of building up new towns has proven a failure everywhere along the railroad route, the only town of any importance being Redding, which secured its start by having been the terminus for a long time, together with extra advantages in the nature of locality. If Jacksonville secures the branch, it will continue to be the principal town in Southern Oregon, and should Yreka fail in securing the main road to Butcher Hill, the building of a branch to main line would make Yreka the metropolis of Northern California, so that no new railroad town would amount to anything of importance in a business way.
"Railroad Items," Yreka Semi-Weekly Journal, California, December 15, 1886, page 3


    The band will give a social party Christmas Eve.
    Mr. Cole and wife have returned from Lake County.
    P. Nystrom lectured at Walton's Hall one evening last week.
    There will be two parties here on Christmas Eve, a surplusage, it would seem.
    A change in our livery stable firm will soon take place, W. G. Kenney retiring.
    Mrs. W. K. Price of Medford, who has been visiting in Albany, returned home last week.
    It is said that the Postal Telegraph Co. will establish an office at this place and a telephone line to Jacksonville from here.
McGibeny Family 1886 Henry Ford Museum
    The McGibeny family, consisting of fourteen performers, performs at Medford on Dec. 21st, or next Tuesday, for the benefit of our cornet band. This concert troupe has a well-earned and first-class reputation and will no doubt be as liberally patronized here as elsewhere. Everybody should turn out on this occasion.
    The "Social Glass," a play which has become popular in Southern Oregon, was repeated at Zimmerman & McGee's hall last Friday evening for the benefit of the Ladies' Aid Society. There was a good attendance and the performers did even better than before. Dancing followed and was generally participated in. Several couples from Jacksonville were present.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 17, 1886, page 2


    Twenty-five carloads of wheat have been shipped from the Medford warehouse during the past ten days, also a considerable amount from Central Point and Gold Hill. Not much grain remains at the last two warehouses, but a large quantity is still at Medford, Mr. Baker informs us.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 17, 1886, page 3


BORN.
ALLEN--In Medford precinct, Dec. 3d, to Mr. and Mrs. Allen of Portland, a daughter.
HURT--In Medford, Dec. 5th, to Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Hurt, a son [i.e., Grover Garland Hurt].
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 17, 1886, page 3


    Negotiations are pending for the establishment of a bank at Medford with ample capital.
"News of the Northwest," Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 18, 1886, page 2


    Mr. Kidder, a newcomer, has located in Medford precinct, having taken a land claim here.
    A. L. Reuter has purchased A. L. Johnson's large burglar-proof safe, and it was brought up from Medford a few days since.
    The mining property of J. W. Walsh and wife, situated on Wagner Creek, has been attached by G. H. Baker of Medford, who sold them the quartz mill formerly used by the Medford reduction works.
    Mrs. S. E. Ish gives warning elsewhere that trespassing on her premises will not be allowed in the future. Hunters have made this notice necessary by their careless shooting, which has on different occasions almost proved serious.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886, page 3


R. STRAIT,
PRACTICAL GUNSMITH,
MEDFORD, OR.
----
GUNS, PISTOLS AND AND OTHER FIREARMS repaired in the best style and new ones made to order. Sewing machines also repaired and put in first-class order.
    Prices to suit the times and satisfaction guaranteed.
    Give me a trial.
Medford, Dec. 18, 1886.                                                                R. STRAIT.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    John Byers has been at Ashland on business.
    A skating rink is running regularly in Zimmerman & McGee's hall.
    The Central Hotel is again open, parties from the East being in charge.
    There is a report that a bank will be opened in this place next spring.
    Mark Armstrong's family arrived here from Jacksonville this week and will locate.
    The union Sunday school meets at Walton's hall every Sunday morning at 10 o'clock.
    There will be social parties at both Howard's and Zimmerman & McGee's hall this evening.
    The Railroad Saloon has been renovated, besides receiving a new side, which greatly improves its looks.
    A. H. Carlson of the Brewery Saloon has invested in a lot of fine turkeys, which will be raffled off on Christmas.
    Wm. Trimble has returned from a trip to the C.&O.R.R. front, and reports operations progressing at a lively rate.
    J. W. Cunnyngham, who is in Portland with his patent gate, has been quite ill, but is now somewhat improved in health.
    Dr. B. F. Adkins, one of our prominent citizens, started for Indiana last week, to visit his aged mother, who is quite ill.
    Geo. W. Howard, the well-known agent for the State Insurance Co., has gone to his old home in Iowa for a visit. Bon voyage.
    A number of persons from Jacksonville attended the performance given by the McGibeny family at Medford Tuesday evening.
    The rumor that O. Burton had removed to the county seat is erroneous, though he may find it more convenient at present to do so.
    The roads between this place and the county seat are in a bad condition and gradually getting worse. More gravel is needed.
    J. C. Cowles has had his residence neatly painted, and is expecting the return of Mrs. C., who has been in Chicago for some time past.
    This place now has three halls, J. S. Howard's hall (the upper story of his brick building), being the latest candidate for public favor.
    J. D. Whitman, who has been planting quite a number of fruit trees, received two large cases of first-class trees from New York not long since.
    W. R. Mansfield has removed to this place from Josephine County for the benefit of his health. We hope to hear of his early restoration to health.
    The editor of the Times was at Medford last Friday evening. He extends thanks to C. K. Fronk, the gentlemanly railroad agent, for favors extended.
    Mrs. A. H. Wyland of Antelope Creek, who has been quite sick for some time past, is recovering under the efficient treatment of Drs. Pryce and Geary.
    H. G. Fairclo's select school has 50 pupils, who are making excellent progress. The professor spares no pains to give satisfaction, and is succeeding admirably.
    Dr. A. D. Gleaves left for Tacoma, W.T., last Friday night, but may return in the spring. He is a good dentist and has made many friends during his stay here.
    The parties at work for the Postal Telegraph Co. were paid off a few days since and on Sunday had a lively time in this place, punishing a large amount of tarantula juice.
    Some liquors, etc., belonging to McAdams & Heeley were sold by Sheriff Dean last Saturday, but did not bring a fancy figure. Thos. Riley of the Farmer's Exchange at Jacksonville purchased the refrigerator.
    Attention is called to the advertisement of H. Strait, the gunsmith and sewing machine repairer. He has permanently located here, and being a first-class workman should be liberally patronized. His prices are quite reasonable.
    The district school gave an entertainment last Friday evening, in honor of the poet Whittier, which was well attended and proved quite interesting. It was under the management of Prof. Morris, to whom much credit is due.
    The McGibeny family performed here to a large audience last Tuesday evening. The performances were first-class in every respect and fully sustained the well-earned reputation of the troupe. But for the inclement weather there would have been much larger attendance.
    A petition for a road from Jas. Bigham's farm in Manzanita precinct to this place is in circulation, which has received many signatures. It is likely that there will be no remonstrance and that small damages will be claimed by parties through whose lands the road will pass.
    The Riddle House and Gem Saloon are two of the leading business places in Medford, each doing a good business. The best of meals and lodgings are furnished at the former, while superior liquid refreshments can be obtained at the latter. Whenever you are in this place give Bous and Ham a call, for they will treat you well.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886, page 3


THE RIDDLE HOUSE!
Medford, Oregon,
J. B. RIDDLE, Prop'r.
----
THIS HOUSE HAS BEEN THOROUGHLY fitted up with new and elegant furniture and is second to none south of Portland.
    Special pains taken in making commercial travelers feel at home.
    The tables are supplied with the best of everything the market affords.
----
FAMOUS GEM SALOON!
J. B. RIDDLE                     H. H. WOLTERS
RIDDLE & WOLTERS, Proprietors,
MEDFORD, OR.
----
ONLY THE FINEST WINES, LIQUORS AND Cigars kept on hand, and a first-class billiard table is connected with the saloon. The leading papers of the day can also be found on the reading tables.
    The proprietors are also sole agents of Medford for the Celebrated Rogue River Whiskeys.
    The saloon will always be found open at the arrival of all trains.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886 et seq., page 3


    H. STRAIT,
PRACTICAL GUNSMITH,
MEDFORD, OR.
----
GUNS, PISTOLS AND OTHER FIREARMS repaired in the best style and new ones made to order. Sewing machines also repaired and put in first-class order.
    Prices to suit the times and satisfaction guaranteed.
    Give me a trial.                                                                                    H. STRAIT
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886 et seq., page 3


WARNING.
THE UNDERSIGNED HEREBY GIVES WARNING that no trespassing will hereafter be allowed on the Ish farm. All persons interested will please take notice.                                                                             MRS. S. E. ISH
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886 et seq., page 3


    Medford will have a public Christmas tree.
    R. F. High has returned to Ashland from Medford, and reopened his barber shop here.
    Geo. H. Chick is down at Redding proposing to put up one of his patent furnaces for the working of rebellious ores, the Press says. He doesn't seem to plant his works very firmly in any one locality.
    Revs. Jones and Sails, the evangelists, will probably finish their work in Ashland next Sunday, but will spend another month in Jackson County--the greater portion of the time at Medford and Central Point.
    The latest railroad project in Jacksonville contemplates the bonding of the town to raise money to build a branch to the O.&C.R.R. The city charter will have to be amended to permit this, and the amendment is to be submitted to the legislature at next session.
    Medford has three school teachers and pays all three of them only $100 per month--$50 to the principal, $30 to the first assistant and $20 to the second assistant. The first two "board themselves," that is, pay their own board, and the $20 teacher boards at home with her parents.
    From Jan. 1 to Nov. 24, 1886, there was shipped from Central Point the following quantity of freight: 104 cars, weight 2,158,905 lbs., and 36,683 lbs. of stuff shipped in small lots, which will make nearly two cars more. The demand of that place for full depot facilities certainly cannot be ignored by the railroad much longer.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 24, 1886, page 3


    Says the Medford Monitor: We are pleased to announce that negotiations are pending for the establishment of a bank at this place with ample capital. Our safe, now in use, will be exchanged for a massive time lock steel chest for the use of the bank.
    Says the Monitor of last Saturday: "Mr. W. A. Bodine was in town last Saturday, circulating a petition to the county court praying for the opening of a county road from the farm of James Bigham to this place. The petition received the signatures of nearly every citizen to whom it was presented. It is understood that there will be no remonstrance, and only a few persons whose lands it touches will claim a light damage."
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, December 24, 1886, page 3


    John W. Curry, of Medford, was in town last Sunday, as a wedding guest.
    Miss Melle Wrisley, of Medford, was in Ashland Tuesday. She is now a compositor in the Monitor office.
    Dr. Adkins and G. W. Howard of Medford started east last Thursday night, Dr. Adkins to visit his mother in Indiana, and Mr. Howard to see relatives in Iowa.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 24, 1886, page 3


    ROGUE RIVER DISTILLERY.--We are informed that the Rogue River Distillery has had a thorough overhauling from top to bottom. All the machinery has been repaired and put in order. They will commence operations on the first of the year.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 25, 1886, page 3


    JACKSONVILLE, Dec. 30.--A. L. Johnson, proprietor of the Medford bank and publisher of the Medford Monitor, made an assignment today. His liabilities are placed at $3500.
"Failure at Medford," Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 31, 1886, page 1


    Tramps have been numerous in the valley, despite the inclement weather.
    Claus Kleinhammer of Medford precinct made our town a visit one day during the week.
    Fred. Tice is now managing Jos. A. Crain's place in Medford precinct and will put in a large crop.
    Salmon have been running up Rogue River and Bear Creek in large numbers and many have been captured with nothing but a pitchfork. They are of an excellent quality.
    Mrs. Lizzie F. Allen, wife of Chas. W. Allen, of Portland, died at the residence of her father, Rev. C. H. Hoxie, near Medford, Tuesday, and was buried at Phoenix Wednesday afternoon.
    Revs. Jones and Sails, the evangelists, have ceased their labors at Ashland, but will probably spend some time in Medford and Central Point. They are said to be effective preachers.
    Geo. H. Chick is down at Redding proposing to put up one of his patent furnaces for the working of rebellious ore. The Press says: He doesn't seem to plant his words very firmly in any one locality.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 31, 1886, page 3


    Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford made our town a visit on Christmas, being the guest of his son, J. H. Whitman, deputy county clerk.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 31, 1886, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Melle Wrisley is now a compositor in the Monitor office.
    R. F. High, the tonsorial artist, has returned to Ashland, where he has reopened his shop.
    Medford is still furnished with pure, fresh milk, from Jos. A. Crain's farm by Fred. Tice.
    W. G. Kenney has sold his interest in the Medford livery stable to his partner, E. Worman.
    Mrs. A. Merriman, who is now a resident of this place, was at the county seat during the week.
    This place had a Christmas tree entertainment at Walton's hall, which was well attended and passed off smoothly. An excellent programme was presented.
    Mass was held at the residence of John Noland by Rev. F. X. Blanchet one day this week, which was attended by a number of residents of this place and vicinity.
    H. H. Wolters has sold his interest in the Gem Saloon to his partner, J. B. Riddle, who will hereafter conduct the business. What Ham proposes engaging in is not known.
    John W. Curry, who has been clerking for Angle & Plymale for the past two years, has retired to his father's farm in Table Rock precinct. He will be missed here, especially by the fair sex.
    There were two parties in Medford on Christmas eve, and as a consequence neither one was patronized as well as it ought to have been. We learn that the band boys sold forty tickets and their opponents half as many. Still everybody enjoyed themselves.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 31, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
WILLIAMS-SWENSEN--In Medford precinct, Dec. 22d, by Elder H. C. Fleming, J. A. Williams and Miss Gertrude Swensen.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 31, 1886, page 3


    Medford's debt is only $131.85.
    Dr. Gleaves, the dentist, has left Medford for Tacoma.
    J. D. Whitman, of Medford, has recently received from the East a large lot of fruit trees to plant this season.
    Medford had its public Christmas tree in the large grain warehouse at the railroad track, and a general good time is reported.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 31, 1886, page 3


    The mining property of J. W. Walsh and wife, on Wagner Creek, has been attached by G. H. Baker of Medford, who sold them the quartz mill formerly used by the Medford Reduction Works.
    Ashland has come to be the liveliest, brightest town of its size in Oregon--so the visitors from other parts of the state tell us. Of course our people are too modest to notice anything of the kind themselves.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, December 31, 1886, page 3


    Mr. J. W. Curry and Miss Anna Plymale, of Medford, attended the Knight's mask ball in Ashland Christmas eve.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 31, 1886, page 3




Last revised August 20, 2016
For more complete names of persons identified by initials, see the Index.