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Medford News: 1888

Only part of one issue of a Medford newspaper from 1888 survives. Below are Medford-related news items from 1888, mostly gleaned from other towns' papers. Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.


The northeast corner of Main and Central, 1888.

MEDFORD.
    Medford is situated on the O.&C. railroad, four and three-fourths miles east of Jacksonville, and is the depot for that town. Its population is about 600. It has two churches and a large public schoolhouse. Its mercantile and business houses represent nearly every line of trade. The town has been built since the completion of the O.&C. railroad.
Excerpt, "Jackson County," by Silas Day, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1888, page 1


    The local teachers institute held in this city last week was a grand success.
    Fruit trees at wholesale prices for sale by M. E. Beatty, Medford, Oregon.
    We are sorry to state that there is no improvement in John Rolison's illness.
    Charles Strang, assistant P.M. at Medford, made our city a flying visit Tuesday.
    It now takes four horses on the stage running between Jacksonville and Medford.
    It is estimated that there is from two to three feet of snow in the hills surrounding town.
    Trains have been delayed on the Siskiyous of late, and mails arrive from the south at almost any time.
    J. A. Slover has sold everything belonging to the Slover House and will leave shortly for Roseburg, his future home. James Slover, his eldest son, will remain here in the employ of Dr. Robinson.
"Local News," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 5, 1888, page 3


    C. B. CARLISLE, we want to say to you that we champion no man, but "speak forth the words of truth and soberness." Right and justice can always have a hearing in our columns, and hypocrisy and lying in places will be exposed through the same medium while we are astride this tripod. You said last week in your paper that "Nothing was said (in your letter to Johnston) about the circulation of other papers in the county, but in this district. In your letter to Johnston of July 30th, 1887, you use these exact words: "I have issued 480 papers at this office and have a circulation bona fide of upwards of 300 copies, all assured. I know (italics Carlisle's) that no other paper in this county can testify to as many." How base the falsehood here proven. We challenge you, Mr. Carlisle, to publish C. W. Johnston's letter to you of July 29th, 1887, which if published will prove you in your articles to be a man absolutely devoid of truth and reliability: In a week or so we shall publish the full text of the law bearing upon newspapers capable of publishing land notices, which of itself will exonerate Mr.Johnston completely from the unjustifiable attacks of this man Carlisle.--Roseburg Review.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1888, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. A. Slover is holding an auction sale in this place.
    Railroad trains have been rather scarce here during the past week.
    Snowballing and coasting have been liberally indulged in for several days past.
    E. E. Gore's fine new residence in this place will soon be ready for occupancy.
    R. T. Lawton and son, real estate agents, report several sales during the past month.
    Mrs. D. H. Whetstone, who lives not far from here, is reported as feeling quite sick.
    The town election last Tuesday passed off quietly. There was practically no opposition to the ticket nominated at the citizens' meeting lately.
    Much improvement has been made here during the past year, but it will not compare with what will be done during 1888. Our town is growing rapidly and substantially.
    F. L. Whitman, who is in the employ of H. E. Battin & Co., has been shipping considerable fruit out of the valley for that firm, among which were two carloads of apples for California. Mr. Battin is also in the valley at present.
    According to Recorder Walton's report the receipts of the town government for the past 13 months were $1076 and the expenses $1153.72, leaving a small indebtedness, $77.72. Much of this sum was spent in improving the streets and making necessary improvements, and the showing is quite a favorable one.
    Several members of Ruth Rebekah lodge of Jacksonville paid their sister lodge at this place a visit one evening this week, to participate in the installation ceremonies conducted by A. D. Helms, D.D.G.M. A supper followed and a general good time was had. Medford lodge will reciprocate the call at an early date.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1888, page 2


J. B. WRISLEY,                                                                     J. S. MILLER
WRISLEY & MILLER,
Pioneer Real Estate Firm,
Forty Years in Oregon.
----
IN ORDER TO MEET THE GROWING DEMAND for real estate property we have opened an office in the
Town of Medford, Jackson
County, Oregon.

For such business.
    We are also agents for the Woodburn Nursery, Marion County, Oregon. All orders in that line promptly attended to.
ROSS & WRISLEY.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1888 et seq., page 2


    Wheat is quoted at fifty cents per bushel by Baker & Merrill of Medford.
    J. A. Slover, after holding an auction here lasting several days, moved what remained to Medford, where they will be sold to the highest bidder today and tomorrow.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1888, page 3

    Supt. Jacobs has awarded Miss Mollie Merriman of Medford a scholarship to the Monmouth normal school, and she will soon commence studies there.
    Thos. F. Fisch of San Francisco, who has bought a large body of land in southern Oregon for speculative purposes, is in this section again, accompanied by his brother Henry Fisch of Santa Barbara.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1888, page 3

ROGUE RIVER VALLEY FENCE CO.
Manufacturers of the
CELEBRATED UNIVERSAL COMBINATION FENCE !

(View of Fence in position.)
For Farms, Ranches, Orchards,
Gardens and Lawns.
NEAT, DURABLE, STRONG
AND CHEAP.
    Circulars and small samples of Fence sent on application. Charges prepaid. Address
E. G. HURT, Medford, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1888 et seq., page 4


    Medford wants a high school or academy.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, January 9, 1888, page 4


    The Transcript editor has hushed in respect to the present county board. Wonder if he has received any hush money.
    Medford polled 100 votes at the late town election. They claim one thousand population or ten persons to each voter. What town in the state can beat it.
    W. J. Plymale is running a daily stage from Jacksonville to Medford to connect with the trains both north and south. His stage leaves Jacksonville promptly at 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. A liberal share of the patronage is solicited.
    At the Medford town election held Jan. 2nd, the following officers were chosen for the ensuing year: Dr. E. P. Geary, Mayor; A. Childers, D. H. Miller, C. W. Skeel and E. G. Hurt, Trustees; C. P. Strang, Treasurer; Judge Barkdull, Recorder; J. S. Miller, Marshal.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 12, 1888, page 3


    Miss Mollie Merriman has secured a scholarship in the state normal school at Monmouth, and will take a thorough course in that institution of learning.
    Miss Helen Strang, an experienced teacher, has been selected to fill the vacancy in the Medford school caused by the resignation of Miss Mollie Merriman.
"Local Gleanings," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1888, page 1

MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford needs a good watchmaker and jeweler badly.
    For bargains in saddles and harness go to Cooper & Son. They will please you.
    The cold weather seems to be ending and Medford is assuming its wonted activity.
    Rev. Wm. Stewart will preach in the Baptist Church next Sunday morning and evening.
    There have been several cases of measles in town lately, but the number is decreasing daily.
    Mr. Van Sickel, who recently built a residence near the Baptist Church, is now occupying it.
    Ed. Worman's teams are kept busy hauling drummers here and there. He always gives satisfaction.
    Several new buildings are already projected and building promises to be quite active during 1888.
    C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville, who owns a number of lots in this place, is selling several of them.
    The Medford Cornet Band is making considerable progress under the leadership of Prof. Ganiard.
    Hanley & Love's market in this place is well managed by Phil. Butcher, an old hand at the business.
    If you want your property sold quickly, at the best figures, call on M. E. Beatty, at his real estate office in Medford.
    Sickness among children here is fast abating, and the district school will probably resume studies next Monday.
    The Brewery Saloon, conducted by August Carlson, has been closed, through the financial embarrassment of its proprietor.
    Merrill & Baker are disposing of considerable hay at fancy figures, for which they paid only $6.50 in the stack last summer.
    F. Hubbard, the veteran dealer in agricultural implements, is still in the field, and will have a larger stock of goods than ever when the season begins.
    For sale at a bargain--a cozy dwelling house not far from the center of the town of Medford. For particulars enquire of R. T. Lawton, real estate agent.
    The best fence in use is the Celebrated Universal Combination Fence now being manufactured by E. G. Hurt of this place. He has several contracts already secured.
    G. W. Howard, the well-known insurance agent, and who owns many desirable lots in this place, is doing a good business in both lines. He is thoroughly reliable and enterprising besides.
    The Medford Ladies' Aid Society will meet next Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock, at the residence of Mrs. J. W. Short. Among other things, officers for the ensuing term will be elected.
    The following is a list of the newly elected officers of Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., which will be installed on the 21st inst.: C. K. Fronk, N.G.; S. Rosenthal, V.G.; W. H. Gore, Sec.; H. E. Baker, Treas.
    The following are Rev. M. A. Williams' regular appointments: On the first, second and fifth Sundays he will preach in Medford; the third Sunday at Eagle Point and at Grants Pass on the fourth Sunday.
    The firm of McCallister & Williams, broom makers, has been dissolved, Mr. Williams retiring. Mr. McCallister will continue the business and will furnish the market with the best brooms at the lowest living rates.
    J. A. Whiteside, our efficient street commissioner, in his annual report shows that he has done much substantial work during his term of office; and the condition of our streets, side and cross walks will also attest this fact.
    One Dubell, a very stylish individual who has been doing odd jobs about town for some time past, and who was last in the employ of J. B. Riddle, has departed for more congenial climes, without leaving his creditors his address, it is said.
    The following is a list of newly elected town officers; Mayor, Dr. Geary; councilmen, D. H. Miller, A. Childers, E. G. Hurt and C. W. Skeel; recorder, C. H. Barkdull; treasurer, Chas. Strang; marshal, John S. Miller. A better set of officials could not have been elected, as they are all good and progressive citizens.
    The following officers of Olive Rebekah degree lodge NO. 25, I.O.O.F., of Medford, were recently elected; Mrs. Isaac Woolf, N.G.; Miss Nora Plymale, V.G.: I. Woolf, Sec.; H. Nicholson, Treas. They were installed on the 31[st] inst. by A. D. Helman, D.D.G.M. A number of members of Ruth Rebekah Lodge of Jacksonville were also present.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1888, page 2


    The roads are in a sorry plight, but not as bad as they were last year.
    Thousands of fruit trees were planted in southern Oregon last season and as many more will be planted in the spring.
    Henry Klippel of this place has given E. G. Hurt of Medford a contract to manufacture a large quantity of his unrivaled fence.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1888, page 3


    Chas. Strang, the clever deputy postmaster of Medford, was at the county seat one day this week.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1888, page 3
    The most censurable piece of attempted trickery was to be seen in the Medford Transcript of Jan. 3d. Carlisle does not essay to answer our charge, only admits it, and then presents the most unmeaning subterfuge of an explanation possible. There is no "Medford district" in regard to land notices; it is only a ruse of Carlisle's to pull the wool over the eyes of the ignorant. The editor of the Transcript prevaricates so fast that we cannot undertake the job of correcting him. It was said that his reputation in Portland was that he was not particularly dishonest, but that he would rather "tell a lie on ten years' credit than to tell the truth for cash."--Roseburg Review.
     He has kept up his reputation very well ever since he came to Jackson County. He has backed and filled so often he hardly knows "which one of the boys he is." His latest, though not his largest, "yarn" is that the interest on county warrants is compounded every year. He has prevaricated so much in speaking of Medford that our neighbors will find that in advocating their cause he is really injuring it, and they will do well to bridle this modern Baron Munchausen before he becomes entirely ungovernable.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1888, page 2


JACKSONVILLE.
----
IT HAS PROSPERED DURING THE YEAR--
EXCELLENT PROSPECTS FOR THE YEAR.
----
    Jacksonville, which is the county seat of Jackson County, is the pioneer town of Southern Oregon, has a population of 1200, and is noted for its healthfulness and the romantic scenery contiguous. It holds the key to the extensive mining industry of Jackson County, nearly all of the many paying mines of that section being tributary to it. Its business houses are mainly of brick, as also its public buildings, one of the largest and prettiest courthouses in the state being located here. Jacksonville also has a number of substantial dwelling houses, as it is the abiding place of several wealthy men. One of the best public schools in Oregon, with four teachers, is also maintained at this place. Being nestled in the foothills, and having been a mining camp of note, whose location necessarily must be in the vicinity of the gulches and creeks which first gave it prominence, the O.&C.R.R. Co. found it advantageous to leave Jacksonville about five miles to the west. This has had the tendency to retard its growth, especially since other towns have sprung up on the line of [the] railroad. Its citizens were not dismayed, however, and the town looks better than ever. Not many new buildings have been built here during the past year, but repairs and improvements on public and private property have been general, so that there is no evidence of decay. The most expensive and beautiful building which has been put up in Jacksonville during 1887 is the new dwelling house of postmaster Muller, erected as a cost of $3000. The town is surrounded by a large body of the best fruit and grape land in Oregon, which sooner or later will be taxed to its full productive capacity. Then we may look for the pioneer town to take a new growth and maintain its old-time prominence. Considerable land not far off has lately been located by actual settlers, and there is a lively disposition of landowners to plant orchards and vineyards in the immediate vicinity.--New Year's Oregonian.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1888, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    News of importance is quite scarce, the cold weather discouraging everything.
    Much building has been projected, and Medford will make much progress this year.
    Our citizens were very much surprised to see the mercury drop below zero, something unknown here.
    Our new town officials have taken the reins of government, and everything is running as smoothly as ever.
    John S. Miller, one of our real estate agents, passed through Jacksonville yesterday, on his way to Applegate.
    If you want your property sold quickly, at the best figures, call on M. E. Beatty, at his real estate office, in Medford.
    J. B. Riddle has built a commodious ice house in the rear of his hotel building and is filling it with the summer luxury.
    Your correspondent thinks that our citizens, in their anxiety for the welfare of their town, should be cautious. The positions made by Messrs. Booth and Carlisle seem to be inflated too much to ever materialize in anything but wind. It will injure our town and her interests if we catch on to every bait that is thrown out.
    The following is a full list of the officers of Olive Rebekah Lodge No. 28, I.O.O.F., recently installed by A. D. Helman, D.D.G.M.: Mrs. I. Woolf, N.G.; Miss Nora Plymale, V.G.; I. Woolf, Sec.; H. G. Nicholson, Treas.; H. E. Baker, Warden; Mrs. A. Childers, Con.; W. H. Gore, Chaplain; S. Rosenthal, I.G.; I. A. Webb, R.S.N.G.; Mrs. I. A. Webb, L.S.N.G.; G. L. Webb, R.S.V.G.; Mrs. Belle Fronk, L.S.V.G.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1888, page 3


    Merrill & Baker of Medford offer a superior quality of baled hay for sale, and are disposing of much of it. Read their advertisement elsewhere.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1888, page 3


    One hundred votes were cast at the recent town election in Medford.
    The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Herely of Medford died one day last week aged 12 days.
    John T. Rolison, a respected citizen of Jacksonville, died yesterday evening in the 43d year of his age. He will be buried under the auspices of the Red Men.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1888, page 3


MARRIED.
HILL-STEWART--AT the residence of the bride's parents in Eden precinct, Jan. 17th, by Rev. Wm. Stewart, D. R. Hill and Miss Cora E. Stewart.
DIED.
ROLISON--In Jacksonville, Jan. 12th, John T. Rolison; aged 42 years, 6 months and 8 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1888, page 3


    MORE DISCRIMINATION AGAINST PORTLAND.--A traveler for a well-known commercial house who returned this week from Southern Oregon brings the information that merchandise is shipped from San Francisco to Medford at 12 cents per hundred less than the rate from Portland to Medford. This intelligence was received by him from the O.&C. agent at Medford. An Oregonian reporter interviewed General Freight Agent Rogers of the O.&C. on the matter. He said that the Southern Pacific had not yet issued a freight tariff for Oregon, hence he was unable to deny or confirm the report. While such rates may have been offered, there had been no shipments as yet from San Francisco to Medford, so far as he knew. Indeed the Southern Pacific, owing to the unsettled condition of the road over the Siskiyous, were not prepared yet to handle freight.
Oregonian, Portland, January 21, 1888, page 5



    The Medford school under the present management is in a flourishing condition. Prof. Gore is a hard worker, and is ably assisted by competent instructors.
"Local Gleanings," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 1


    C. B. Carlisle, who has borne out his previous reputation as a cranky intermeddler very well during the few months that he has been a resident of Medford, has called an assemblage to take steps toward repudiating the county debt, designating his own little den, where he grinds out his slanderous editorials and grossly exaggerated local items, as the place of the meeting. He evidently has a bad attack of worms, and we recommend a liberal dose of "Rough on Rats" for the relief of this officious carpetbagger, who has no interest in this county whatever, and who is doing it all the injury he possibly can.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 2


T. A. Harris to Lydia Harris, lot 14 in block 13, Medford, consideration; $1.
I. J. Phipps to S. W. Speas, lot 8 in block 6 in Medford; $25.
J. C. Vannoy to Melissa P. Anderson, premises in Medford, 100 feet square; $250.
J. W. Cunningham to J. Hamlin, property in Medford; $1400.
M. E. Beatty and H. E. Baker to Mrs. Susanna Whitney, property in Medford; $25.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 2


    C. B. CARLISLE, late secretary of the State Board of Immigration, is running a little paper at Medford, Jackson County. With his usual self-importance, he assumes to be the censor of the Southern Oregon press. But he is meeting with poor success. Professor Merritt, of the Sentinel, and Chas. Nickell, of the Times, are literally cauterizing the little fellow, and he will soon find it convenient to emigrate again.--Portland Siftings.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 2


Exaggeration a Boomerang.
    The Medford paper says that zero was not reached in the valley during the recent spell of cold weather. The necessity of such prevarication on the part of Mr. Carlisle is hardly evident; but, perhaps, "it is the nature of the fellow." Everybody knows that the thermometer registered a few degrees below zero on two or three different occasions this month, and this attempt to deceive the outside world would prove a boomerang if anybody outside of the immediate vicinity of Medford read the Transcript. It is just such exaggeration that has injured southern Oregon more than anything else.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3


A Quack As Mining Expert.
    Dr. Willis E. Everette, the so-called mining expert, who was discharged by the Hope Extension Mining Co. for incompetency, I understand, went around Medford and other places and reported the company as bankrupt. If the company had retained him it probably would be bankrupt in due course of time. The company is able to pay all bills and will continue to be so. As this is the Doctor's first mining experience, he is excusable on that account for any bad breaks he made. A little more experience probably might improve his knowledge of mining, if he is not too old to learn.
                                                          A.G.E.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3


    Mr. Butler, lately from the eastern states, talks of starting a bank at Medford.
    M. S. Booth, who claims to represent San Francisco capitalists, makes a very nice proposition to furnish Medford with waterworks, electric lights and a big hotel.
    A wordy contest is taking place between Bros. Merritt and Carlisle. The latter has no equal in the State when it comes down to unqualified prevarication; but in the controversy now going on it is generally conceded that our cotem. [editor] has the best of it.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The school tax has all been collected.
    Politics is becoming a favorite topic here.
    There are few, if any, cases of measles in town at present.
    Geo. Williams has opened another broom-making establishment in town.
    E. C. Phelps, the job printer, has been appointed a notary public by Gov. Pennoyer.
    J. B. Riddle has gathered several tons of ice from Bear Creek, which he has stored for summer use.
    F. W. Clayton of San Francisco, an excellent watchmaker and jeweler, will probably go into business here.
    Mrs. J. R. West, who went to Lincoln, Neb., not long since, is recovering from a severe spell of sickness, and may return here in the spring.
    The Baptist Church presents a much more comfortable appearance since a neat, new carpet was laid in it and handsome chandeliers hung.
    G. W. Isaacs, one of our prominent citizens, was at Jacksonville last Wednesday, paying his friend, Judge Day, who has been quite sick, a visit.
    Our citizens will be favored with a first-class performance by Royce & Lansing's troupe on Saturday evening, Jan. 28th. Everybody should attend.
    Street Commissioner Whiteside, who has been a quite efficient official, has put nearly 1½ miles of county road in good condition during the past year.
    We are glad to announce that our citizens appreciate the value of vaccination, and Doctors Pryce and Geary have been kept busy distributing bovine virus.
    A number of persons interested in Sunday school work met at the Baptist Church last Wednesday evening and spent a few hours profitably and pleasantly.
    The Tice lane between this place and the county seat, is in a terrible condition and as muddy as ever. It is a shame that it should have been neglected so long.
    H. U. Lumsden and family of San Jose, Cal., have arrived here and will locate in this vicinity. Mr. L.'s father recently bought some property of J. H. Barnum.
    Mrs. L. J. Foster, who has been in San Francisco for several weeks past, returned home a few days ago. She purchased a fine stock of millinery goods while there.
    The general opinion seems to be that Carlisle is becoming so cranky on the county debt question that it will be necessary to remove him to Salem before long.
    Mr. Butler, who intends opening a bank here, has rented Mrs. Stanley's brick building, and went to San Francisco last week to make the necessary arrangements.
    Mr. Schultz, representing Gove & Co. of Portland, who have agreed to build a grist mill here, has been in town lately and selected a site where to locate the enterprise.
    A number of real estate transactions have taken place here lately. Mrs. Bradley selling some land to A. Giffen and W. H. Barr disposing of a parcel to C. H. Brace, through Lawton & Son's agency.
    Our district school, which reopened on the 16th inst., is well attended, and the pupils are making excellent progress. Prof. Gore, the able principal, and his corps of efficient assistants are doing good work.
    The business of the board of trade has increased so much that a corresponding secretary has been deemed necessary. D. T. Lawton, who is well qualified therefor, has been appointed to fill that position.
    J. C. Whipp, of the Jacksonville Marble Works, which does the best of work, was in town last week and took several orders. E. Worman and G. F. Merriman are among those who made contracts with Mr. W.
    Milton Maule, the enterprising painter, has sold the Briner farm, a few miles south of this place, to C. P. Buck for $2600. Mr. M. bought this land at administrator's sale about a year ago and realized more than 100 percent on his investment.
    Rev. Wm. Stewart of Quincy, Ills., brother of Hon. J. H. Stewart, who has been paying this valley quite a visit, started on his return home a few days since. We hope he has become sufficiently attached to this valley to permanently locate here in the near future.
    H. Kinney, the artistic painter, who still retains his interest in Medford, but is now employed in Los Angeles, Cal., paid us a visit during the holidays. He returned to his new home not long since and favored the Odd Fellows lodge here with a case of fine oranges on the occasion of their late installation.
    Mr. and Mrs. Dillon Hill, who were united in matrimony on the 17th inst., have already commenced housekeeping at the new residence recently built on Hon. J. H. Stewart's farm near this place. They begin married life under auspicious circumstances, and they have the congratulations and best wishes of a host of friends.
    Capt. A. D. Helman, D.D.G.M., installed the following officers of Medford lodge of Odd Fellows last Saturday: C. K. Fronk, N.G.; S. Rosenthal, V.G.; W. H. Gore, Sec.; Geo. H. Haskins, P.S.; H. E. Baker, Treas.; H. G. Nicholson, W.; M. Purdin, Cond.; B. S. Webb, L.G.; I. A. Webb, R.S.N.G.; I. Woolf, L.S.N.G.; A. M. Woodford, R.S.V.G.; L. L. Angle, L.S.V.G.; G. L. Webb, R.S.S.; G. W. Howard, L.S.S.
    A. H. Carlson of the Brewery Saloon, now closed, gave a bill of sale of his fixtures, stock, etc., to a whisky drummer named Lewis, with the express understanding that he would divide the proceeds, pro rata, among the creditors. The fellow, after securing the papers, proceeded to sell everything at a great sacrifice, without regard to his promise and to the great disadvantage of Carlson and those he owed, being careful to get what was due the house he represented, however. His conduct is generally condemned, and was no fault of Mr. G. that his creditors were thus defrauded.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3


Gone to His Rest.
    The late John T. Rolison was interred in the Jacksonville cemetery last Friday under the auspices of the Improved Order of Red Men, of which he was a respected member. Mr. R. was a native of Mecklenberg, Schuyler County, New York, and has resided in Jacksonville for several years past. He entered the Union Army at an early age, serving with credit until the close of the war. His reputation was that of an industrious, upright citizen, which made him a host of friends wherever he resided. The funeral services took place at the Presbyterian Church, Rev. Robt. Ennis preaching an impressive and quite appropriate sermon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3



MARRIED.
AUSTIN-EDWARDS--At the residence of the bride's parents in Medford precinct, Jan. 22d. by Rev. Geo. W. Black, Minot Austin and Miss Linda Edwards.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3


E. F. Walker to Mary R. Phelps, lot 3 in block 3, Medford; consideration, $250.
Mrs. Susanna Whitney to M. E. Beatty and H. E. Baker, property in Medford; $25.
D. A. Levens to M. Purdin, lot 12 in block 15, Medford; $250.
C. C. Beekman to Agatha Brandenburg, lots 1, 2 and 3 in block 79, Medford; $150.
S. Childers to F. Galloway, 1.23 acres in Medford; $300.
I. J. Phipps to Wm. Angle, property in Medford; $100.
C. W. Broback to J. Teeson, property in Medford; $100.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1888, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Everybody is getting vaccinated, which is the proper thing.
    Gaylord Bell sold several White sewing machines here this week.
    Mr. Clayton, a practical watchmaker from California, has located here.
    A debating society will be formed at Stanley's Hall next Tuesday evening.
    A Baptist covenant meeting will be held at the church next Saturday evening.
    Services will be held at the Baptist Church next Sunday morning and evening.
    A. H. Carlson was in Jacksonville last Friday. He will not resume the saloon business.
    There is a steady inquiry for good lots in town, and several have been sold during the past month.
    H. C. Mulvaney, formerly of this place, now resides at the new town of Sisson, Siskiyou County, Cal.
    W. M. Turner, until lately a resident of this town, has removed to Kerbyville precinct, Josephine County.
    The Presbyterian Sunday school will soon have a nice library, some money having already been subscribed for that purpose.
    M. E. Beatty & Co., the enterprising real estate agents, removed to B. W. Powell's building, where they will remain for the present.
    Messrs. Short, Angle and Plymale, who purchased some land near this place of C. Mingus, will divide it into small parcels and place it upon the market.
    The Baptist Sunday school library will be enlarged at once, an addition of 50 books deemed necessary to meet the wants of the pupils, whose numbers are steadily augmenting.
    C. W. Skeel, one of Medford's leading mechanics, was at the county seat last Saturday. He has commenced remodeling Johnson's bank building for the use of Mr. Butler, who has returned from San Francisco.
    Royce & Lansing's company gave one of their enjoyable performances at this place last Saturday evening. There was a good attendance, and everybody was well satisfied. A larger crowd will greet the troupe next time.
    The town trustees will hold their regular monthly meeting next week. A street commissioner will be chosen then, and it will be wise to "let well enough alone" and reappoint Mr. Whiteside, who has proved a first-class official.
    Ward Douglas, the gentlemanly agent of that old and tried insurance company, the New York Life, is now in town and will no doubt do a good business. Our citizens cannot find a better investment than a policy issued by this company.
    Your correspondent, on all sides, hears much dissatisfaction with the course of the Transcript, which has already done this place and country injury by its exaggeration. Misrepresentation never wins and generally reacts, something our citizens are well aware of.
    Mayor Geary has appointed the following committees, to serve during the existence of the present board of trustees: Streets, Miller and Childers; finance and ways and means, Hurt and Miller; fire and water, Skeel and Hurt; sanitary, Childers and Skeel.
    There is  some talk of another paper being started here soon. Our people are very much disgusted with the course that the Transcript has taken against other sections of the county, as they wish to be friendly with all and know that wholesale abuse and slander of their neighbors is not only unjust and improper, but injurious to our best interests.
    It is generally conceded that the Times has more genuine news concerning this place and vicinity than any paper published. It does not solely consist of a patent outside and a lot of slanders against some of the best citizens in the county, mixed up with hypocritical gush and religious cant; neither does it advocate the repudiation of honest debts.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1888, page 2


A Railroad Proposition.
    The annual election for town officials will take place next month, and many of our citizens urge the advisability of submitting to the people at that time the proposition of giving public aid to any persons, or number of persons who will build a railroad of some kind from this place to the main line of the O.&C.R.R. This question will be discussed at the meeting of the board of trustees which will be held next Tuesday evening. No definite line of action has been agreed upon or a decision made as to which will be the best manner in which to submit this all-important question. The future prosperity of Jacksonville depends upon rail communication with the main line, and the sooner our people face the issue square and "take the bull by the horns" the better it will be for all concerned. We are amazed to see so many residents of this town who are largely interested in real estate and are abundantly able to subscribe liberally, stand idly by and allow so important a matter to go by default. If everybody will give but ten percent of the value of their real property here there would be no doubt of the success of this railroad enterprise; and that anyone should refuse to give ten percent to either maintain or enhance the value of the other ninety percent, is past our comprehension.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1888, page 3


The Result of Lying.
    A Southern Oregon paper (published at Medford) says Rogue River apples sell at 10 cents apiece in San Francisco. Now that is a little top thin. Rogue River apples are no better than those raised in Lane County, and they will come nearer selling at the rate of ten for a cent. Besides San Francisco market reports quote apples at 75 cents to $1 per bushel. Perhaps it only takes about ten Rogue River apples to make a bushel.--[Eugene Register.
   
As the Times has said, in discussing the immigration question on different occasions, it is far better to tell the whole truth than to resort to deception and lying. If people are attracted hither by false and highly colored statements concerning southern Oregon, they are likely to become dissatisfied when they learn the facts, and in most cases go elsewhere. Thus much injury is done by irresponsible and untruthful "boomers," who generally are carpetbaggers and adventurers, and care nothing for the future results of their duplicity. This section has enough natural advantages without requiring the services of anybody to exaggerate or misrepresent them. The above extract is only one of the many which have been published in ridicule and to the detriment of southern Oregon, and have already done it much injury.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1888, page 3


    There has been regular mail service during the week--between Jacksonville and Medford.
    From all accounts we are likely to have a healthy boom in southern Oregon this year. Get ready at once to take advantage of it.
    A favorable year is all that southern Oregon needs to attract much attention from the outside world. An abundance of fruit is the biggest advertisement we can have.
    The real estate agents are using printer's ink quite extensively, anticipating an immense immigration from the eastern states in the spring. The more ink, the more immigrants.
    The railroad track built last year, and which extends from Ashland to Delta, has a slide of earth on it at regular intervals, which the S.P.R.R. repairing force has been kept busy for several days past removing. In consequence, no trains have arrived from San Francisco for nearly a week and it will be several days before communication is reestablished. This doesn't beat staging, by any means.
    Rev. C. H. Hoxie of Medford precinct informs us that he will in a short time receive 200 pounds of sugar beet seed from Claus Spreckels of California, which he will distribute among the farmers of this valley when it arrives. In this manner the soil here may be tested and its adaptability to the beet industry ascertained.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1888, page 3

    D. T. Sears of Polk County, a relative of Postmaster Miller of Medford, is 
paying the valley a visit.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1888, page 3


    The Shetland pony belonging to the Uncle Tom's Cabin Company was badly bitten by one of the bloodhounds and was left at Medford. It is a pity that the balance of the troupe were not kept away for that or some other reason.
"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1888, page 3

NOTES FROM MEDFORD.
MEDFORD, Feb. 6.
    Born, February 6, 1888, to the wife of A. H. Phelps, of Medford, a son.
    Country real estate is taking a rise. Town property is about on a stand.
    Mr. Booth, of the San Francisco syndicate, has been in town the past week.
    Splendid warm weather has taken the place of the cold weather experienced here during December and January.
    Mr. Isaac Limpkins, of Woodville, who had a cataract removed from his eye on Monday last, is very much improved and able to distinguish objects at a short distance.
    Our town has been full of drummers for the past month, and the slides on the O.&C. Railroad kept two of them in town nearly a week after they had completed their work here.
    Mr. Schultz, who came here some time ago for the purpose of perfecting arrangements to build a steam flouring mill, could not agree with the committee, so has decided to build the mill himself.
    The O.&C. Co. are making arrangements to put in an engine at the water tank near the depot for the purpose of pumping water. The wind does not blow enough to operate a mill during the summer.
    At the preliminary meeting of taxpayers of Jackson County to consider the county debt question, J. D. Whitman, Esq., was appointed a committee to procure the best legal advice of Portland as to the constitutionality of the debt, and the meeting adjourned to await the report of the committee.
Oregonian, Portland, February 9, 1888, page 3


    Even the Medford whangdoodle was so much ashamed of the repudiation fizzle that it barely mentioned the matter. Carlisle has enough gall for any emergency, but he could not muster sufficient on this occasion to notice his bantling at length.
    As might well be expected, the meeting held at Medford last Saturday, to take steps to repudiate the county debt, was an inglorious failure. Less than a dozen people were present, and some of those went there from sheer curiosity. Nearly all who participated were newcomers, who probably wanted to teach the sturdy old residents of the county some new tricks. It speaks well for the honor of our people that they treated the repudiationists with such utter contempt and gave them to understand that if they do not wish to accommodate themselves to the circumstances as they found them, they were at liberty to return whence they came.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 10, 1888, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Health is good.
    School is progressing nicely.
    A. S. Poston has gone to Portland.
    Mr. Butler will open his bank in a few days.
    Some improvements have already been begun.
    Be enterprising and liberal, if you wish our town to progress.
    Look out for a considerable increase in our population this year.
    Jas. Herely has resumed his trips to Butte Creek with the U.S. mail.
    G. L. Webb, school clerk, is engaged in taking the census of the children in this district.
    The Medford Board of Trade will hold its regular monthly meeting next Monday evening.
    A debating society, with a good membership, was formed at Stanley's Hall last Tuesday evening.
    Elder Richardson's protracted meeting, which has been going on at the Baptist Church, ended last Sunday night.
    The Christian denomination will probably build a church here during 1888. The ground has already been secured.
    Jas. C. Jones has been appointed street commissioner by the board of trustees and will no doubt make a good official.
    A. H. Phelps, the popular printer, is happy over the advent of a 10-pound boy baby. Congratulations are in order.
    A neat residence has been commenced just outside the southern limits of town by H. U. Lumsden, lately of San Jose, Cal.
    The trustees have made it a misdemeanor to sell, give or expose for sale any obscene pictures in connection with cigarettes, etc.
    Webb & Zimmerman have built a platform for the choir and organ in the Presbyterian Church, besides making a number of other improvements.
    The repudiation meeting last Saturday was a complete fizzle. People here, as well as in other portions of the county, are in favor of paying their debts.
    The local sheet indulged in a scurrilous attack on one of our prominent real estate agents, which is as uncalled-for as it is false. Our people generally denounce it.
    Our school needs apparatus and appliances of different kinds, and steps should be taken at the next school meeting to provide for the same. They are actually necessary.
    On the third Sunday in this month a protracted meeting will be commenced at the Baptist Church here. Prominent ministers will be in attendance and much interest will no doubt be manifested.
    The railroad company has generously deeded a handsome block of land to the town for park purposes, and our authorities have taken formal possession. This property will be improved and beautified at once.
    E. C. Phelps last month issued the first issue of the Medford Advertiser, which is devoted to the interests of Jackson County. It is a neat little paper, and will make its appearance regularly. We wish Bro. Phelps success.
    The Transcript man poses as a great moralist, and is advising other folks how to do in order "to be saved." It is the opinion of your correspondent as well as of many others that he should take big doses of his own medicine.
    Our people are very tired of the abuse and slander of other towns in the valley and residents thereof by Carlisle and repudiate him. We would like to have the friendship and trade of the whole county, if that were possible, and the course of the Transcript drives that away.
    It is reported that the parties who promised to put up a flouring mill at this place have crawfished, and the prospects for such an enterprise are not so bright as they were, we are sorry to say. Medford needs and should have this mill. The cash bonus of $2000 is said to be open to any responsible party who will give us the enterprise.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 10, 1888, page 2


    Railroad communication between Oregon and California has been resumed and everybody is happy.
    A vast number of fruit trees are now being planted in this county. It will not be many years before southern Oregon will be one of the greatest fruit-growing sections of the Pacific coast. Speed the day.
    A. L. Johnson, quondam real estate agent and founder of the expression "the Italy of America," has left Los Angeles, Cal., for other scenes. He writes that he has been left penniless by the failure of the firm by which he was employed.
    The cold weather prevented the shipment of the apples purchased in this valley last fall by Portland and San Francisco parties until now. Large quantities are now being shipped. Rogue River apples are popular wherever tried, and the demand for them abroad will steadily increase.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 10, 1888, page 3

    F. L. Whitman, son of Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, who is at present engaged in shipping the apples bought by H. E. Battin & Co. of Portland, made our town a visit last Wednesday.
    Hon J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct made us a call last Tuesday. He is now engaged in planting 6000 choice fruit trees. Mr. S. is one of the most enterprising and intelligent of our citizens. We are always glad to see him.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 10, 1888, page 3


    The road between Jacksonville and Medford is in a terrible condition. How long, O Lord, how long! will this continue.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 10, 1888, page 3


MARRIED.

PRIDDY-GUCHES--At Medford, Feb. 8th, by Rev. G. W. Black, Geo. W. Priddy and Miss Alfretta Guches.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 10, 1888, page 3


    As an instance of what organized effort will accomplish, I will mention the little town of Medford, in Oregon, which, four years ago, was merely a townsite, with a house scattered here and there. Today it is a thriving little town of 2,500 people and its Board of Trade has a membership of 135, all merchants, who are actuated by a common desire to build the town up. And they are succeeding, too. The advantages of the town are kept constantly before the homeseeker, public improvements are encouraged, strangers made welcome, and every inducement held out to businessmen to locate there.
George A. Crofutt, quoted in "A Traveler's Opinion," Reno Evening Gazette, February 11, 1888, page 3


ITEMS FROM MEDFORD.
MEDFORD, Feb. 12.
    We are informed that Central Point is soon to have a depot.
    The Bank of Medford will soon be opened and ready for business.
    School Clerk G. L. Webb is engaged taking the census of this district.
    Jas. Jones was appointed street commissioner at the last meeting of the city council.
    Our town is full of strangers seeking homes in Southern Oregon. Many remain with us.
    Medford needs some new sidewalks on several of her streets. Especially on C and B streets.
    Mr. Geo. Priddy and Miss Alfretta Guches were married last Wednesday by Rev. Black, of Medford.
    Mr. Harris has his new residence about completed. It will be one of the neatest little houses in Medford.
    Several of our citizens are putting up new picket fence about their property, thereby greatly adding to the looks of our town.
    Medford is the main shipping point of Southern Oregon now. Nine cars of freight were left by Friday's freight train from Portland.
    The family of our townsman, Mr. Angle, are all very sick with the measles. Mrs. Angle is very bad, but was somewhat improved this morning.
Oregonian, Portland, February 15, 1888, page 3


    Jacksonville and Ashland are the chief towns of the county. The former is the county seat. The latter has a fine water power, which is practically applied in a woolen mill, flour mill and sash factory. Medford and Central Point, towns created by the railroad a few miles from Jacksonville, have made great progress and bid fair to rival the older towns.
Excerpt, "Southern and Southeastern Oregon," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1888, page 1

MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Work on Adkins & Webb's big brick building will soon be commenced.
    There are several cases of measles in town again, but all are improving.
    T. A. Harris' residence is about completed and will be a handsome one.
    Many improvements are contemplated here and some are already under way.
    E. G. Hurt is manufacturing large quantities of his unequaled combination fence.
    Mrs. C. Vrooman of this place is paying her daughter, Mrs. N. A. Jacobs of Jacksonville, a visit.
    A large number of buildings will be put up here during the year, some of which are already under way.
    The Presbyterian Church in this place has one of the best choirs in Southern Oregon. The music is highly spoken of.
    Ward Douglas, representing the old and reliable New York Life Insurance Co., is still among us and doing a good business.
    The railroad company will pump water at this place for locomotive use by steam in the near future, the windmill not being equal to the emergency.
    Your correspondent learns that the publication of the Transcript has been suspended. Its course on different questions was not approved by our citizens.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1888, page 2


    The Mark property in the Cove, Ashland precinct, was sold at auction last Saturday. It was bid in by Thompson & Butler at $400.
    Travel is increasing rapidly since the nice weather began, and southern Oregon will soon be full of immigrants looking for homes.
    Wheat is quoted at 48 cents a bushel at the Medford warehouse. Very little grain has been sold, on account of the low prices, and we are afraid our farmers are waiting in vain for any considerable improvement. Thus does grain-growing become less remunerative each year.
    Elder Peterson writes to the Times under date of the 14th: Some are turning the "sticky" today, and if this weather continues a week much grain will be sown. Messrs. Young, Simmons and Richardson are pruning my orchard. They are experienced pruners, the first-named gentleman being recently from Michigan.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1888, page 3


    Gaylord Bell and wife, after stopping in Medford for a fortnight, have gone to San Francisco, their future home.
    We have received a communication from Medford, showing up the would-be repudiators in their true colors, which will be published next week.
    The board of trustees discussed the streetcar line to the O.&C.R.R. at their last meeting, and the question whether the town will give a subsidy thereto will be submitted to the voters at the March election. Something ought to and must be done in the matter.
    Jacksonville must be connected with the main line of the O.&C.R.R. by rail and soon, too. A motor road would be a paying investment, and if our town will subscribe a liberal bonus, no doubt parties would be found to build it.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1888, page 3


    The Medford Transcript failed to come out as usual this week. Something the matter with its patent outside.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 17, 1888, page 3



CROSSING THE SISKIYOUS.
    Arthur Sharpstein of Walla Walla has just returned from the vicinity of the blockade on the California and Oregon railroad. On a signboard near the state line were written the following effusions:
"It's no use,
Without a cayuse,
To try to cross the Siskiyous.
Arthur Sharpstein, Walla Walla."
Afterwards the following appeared:
"If I had a bottle of good old booze,
I'd risk the terror of the Siskiyous.
Chas. Davis, Walla Walla."
"That, too, shall stand as my excuse,
To steer clear over the Siskiyous.
Ed. Wilton."
"My wife doth us gently refuse
To scale the scaly Siskiyous.
G. D. Morgan."
"The mud is thick, and it quickly glues
A fellow to the soil of the Siskiyous.
Mattie Evarts, Oakland, Cal."
"No doubt I'd lose my overshoes,
By walking over the Siskiyous.
Ellen Tracy, Woodland, Cal."
"Let us sit down and all abuse
The railroad over the Siskiyous.
Many Travelers."
"The steamers quarantined it, and hence ensues:
I am lodged at the Siskiyous.
Traveler."
"I'll come by water with rudder on my shoes,
Rather than cross the Siskiyous.
S. Jacobs, S.F."
"It will be a very cold day when I get the blues,
And attempt to make my way across the Siskiyous.
Marcus J. Davis, Portland, Or."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1888, page 4


O.&T. Co. to Geo. S. Walton, property in Medford; consideration, $275.
G. W. Howard to C. B. Carlisle, property in Medford; $300.
G. W. Howard to A. E. Woods, property in Medford; $75.
O.&T. Co. to W. R. Dickison, property in Medford; $300.
I. J. Phipps to J. G. Grossman, property in Medford; $200.
C. C. Beekman to Geo. Deitrich; Q.C.D. to property in Medford; $130.
Geo. S. Walton to Andrew Giffen, property in Medford; $1850.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1888, page 1


    A JACKSONVILLE correspondent of the Oregonian very truthfully says: A large number of new people are in the valley already looking for homes in the "Italy of Oregon." Jackson County, and Rogue River Valley in particular, will boom during the present year. The effects of a coming boom is already being felt. Land is being cleared on all the hills adjoining this city. The time is not far distant when all of the available land on the foothills will be planted in one vast garden of fruit and grapes.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1888, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    C. D. Cummons has removed to Ashland.
    G. W. Isaacs' child, which has been quite ill, is convalescing.
    The measles are still prevailing here, though not in an aggravated form.
    A neat residence will soon be built for Mrs. Sears by Webb & Zimmerman.
    P. Chartrand, one of our new residents, visited Jacksonville a few days since.
    J. S. Howard has gone to Applegate to survey J. T. Layton's mining property.
    Ward Douglas is still with us and doing a good business in the life insurance line.
    A number of buildings are in the course of construction in this place, and others are talked of.
    Another insurance agent made his appearance at the residence of Wm. Ulrich on the 15th.
    The infant child of Jos. F. Kelley died a few days since and was buried in the Phoenix cemetery.
    A large number of improvements are under way in town and many more are contemplated.
    Mrs. Rose S. Robinson has sold several hundred acres of land east of this place to D. T. Lawton.
    G. W. Howard, our live insurance agent, has invested in some excellent real estate near Woodville.
    Owing to sickness in his family, Dr. Will Jackson, the well-known dentist, has deferred his visit to this place.
    Dave Crosby is piloting commercial travelers through the valley for E. Worman, and fills his position creditably.
    Miller & Strang of the Post Office Store have just received a large and handsome safe. This betokens prosperity.
    Medford will have a few candidates for political preferment, subject to the decision of the Democratic county convention.
    Mrs. I. S. Cowles, the artist, is at Red Bluff, where she and her husband have made some investments in real estate.
    After a suspension of a week the Transcript has reappeared, reduced in size, but under the same management as before.
    The infant son of C. K. Fronk, our clever railroad agent, has been quite sick, but we are glad to learn that it is better at this writing.
    Prof. Gore's department of the district school now boasts of a flourishing literary society. No doubt it will be productive of much good.
    'Squire Walton has succeeded Hon. J. D. Whitman, who has so efficiently acted as president of the Board of Trade. It is a good selection.
    W. N. Ladue, president of one of the Salem banks, and who loans considerable money through Baker & Merrill, paid us a visit not long since.
    W. F. Williamson, who formerly practiced law here, but who is now teaching school in Yamhill County, will pay his old home a visit during the summer.
    The revival meeting now in progress at the Baptist Church in Medford is well attended and much interest is being taken in it. It will be continued awhile longer.
    Notices for the annual school meeting, to be held here on March 5th, have been posted by G. L. Webb, district clerk. Matters of much importance will come up, and we hope to see a good attendance.
    The O.&C.R.R. Co. are making arrangements to put in an engine at the water tank near the depot, for the purpose of pumping water. The wind does not blow enough to operate a mill during the summer.
    The flouring mill enterprise is said to have collapsed. It is also reported that the water right, necessary thereto, has been taken up and must be purchased, which is another drawback. We are very sorry to learn that such a state of affairs exists, as the mill would have been a great help to our town.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1888, page 2


Annual Town Election.
    Notice is hereby given that the annual town election for the town of Jacksonville, Oregon, will be held at the Town Hall, in said town on Tuesday, the 6th day of March A.D. 1888, for the purpose of electing five trustees, one marshal, one recorder, one treasurer and one street commissioner; also to vote for or against the following resolution, to wit: WHEREAS, the interests of the property holders of the town of Jacksonville will be enhanced by having a first-class road or roads built to some point on the O.&C.R.R., therefore be it resolved that a tax of $6000 be levied for that purpose, and this resolution be submitted at the next annual election to the voters of said town. The polls at this election will open at 10 o'clock A.M. and will remain open until 3 o'clock P.M. By order of the board of trustees.
J. H. HUFFER, Recorder.
Jacksonville, Feb. 23, 1888.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1888, page 3


    Jacksonville badly needs good roads leading to the railroad. Therefore build them, and at once, too.
    We must have a wagon road to the railroad, if we wish to maintain the commercial importance of our town.
    Everybody should consider the best interests of Jacksonville and vote for the road proposition. Nothing is needed more than a good road to the railroad.
    Immigrants are becoming numerous again, now that the weather is good and traveling pleasant. Let them come--there is room for plenty of them.
    The people of Jacksonville will be false to themselves and their every interest if they do not vote "yes" on the proposition to levy a tax for the construction of a first-class road from this place to the railroad.
    During the last four months of 1887, over $25,000 worth of fruit was purchased and shipped from this county. This is the beginning. Fruit raising is yet in its infancy. With proper care in packing and marking the demand will keep far in advance of the supply. Buy a farm and plant an orchard and you can become wealthy.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct, who also owns a piece of land near Medford, has just finished planting 65 acres of it in choice fruit trees. He leads all other horticulturists in southern Oregon, having nearly 200 acres in trees, all of which will be bearing by 1892. It can truly be said that Mr. Stewart is an energetic and progressive farmer and fruit raiser.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1888, page 3


    J. S. Morgan and wife of Galls Creek have sold their real estate to W. Gates for $1000, and will probably remove to Medford.
    The road between the county seat and Medford is in almost an impassable condition and a burning disgrace to a civilized community. It should be well graded at once.
    The Medford Transcript, which should have reached Jacksonville last Tuesday, has not arrived as yet, and it is reported that the publication of the paper has been discontinued.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1888, page 3


BORN.
ULRICH--In Medford, Feb. 15th, to Mr. and [Mrs.] Wm. Ulrich, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1888, page 3


    The Medford Transcript has been reduced to one-half its former size. It was half printed at Portland, but is now all home print.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 24, 1888, page 3


    It is estimated that at least 250,000 fruit trees will be planted in Rogue River Valley this year.

"Local News," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1888, page 3


    There is some prospect that the people of Jacksonville will invest in a railway between that place and Medford. Against one or two there are fifty arguments in favor of such a railway. The people of Medford ought to interest themselves to foster this enterprise, for it would contribute greatly to the convenience and general benefit of their town. A good macadam road, or an old-fashioned down-East turnpike would be a splendid substitute for the present road, but a railway would be better than anything else.--Transcript.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 2, 1888, page 2


Our Duty.
    To maintain its commercial importance Jacksonville must have roads leading to it that can be traveled at any time of the year at a fair rate of speed. The people next Tuesday will vote on a proposition to levy a reasonable tax for that purpose, and they should not fail to carry it by a rousing majority. Unless something is done in this matter at once, our town is likely to suffer and property will depreciate in value many times more than what it will cost to place us in easy communication with the O.&C.R.R. Of course, a railroad of some kind would be just the thing; but a first-class wagon road would be as necessary if we were connected by rail with Medford or Central Point, for certainly farmers and those who desire to dispose of their produce and trade in Jacksonville would not leave their teams at one of the above-named points and ride here on the cars to do their business. After we have a good macadamized thoroughfare of sufficient width, one-third of the expense of building a railroad will have been met, for rails can be laid upon the road with a small amount of further grading. The people of Jacksonville now have it in their power to enhance the price of their property, increase their business and help themselves generally. We therefore hope that they will show the proper public spirit next Tuesday. This is the first town tax that has been levied in a decade, and it is not an onerous one.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 2, 1888, page 3

Redfield Patent
    Our scientific young mechanic, E. E. Redfield of Linkville, has been granted a patent on a magazine gun of his own invention, which is expected to revolutionize firearms.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 2, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford certainly needs better protection from fire.
    Born--Near Medford, Feb. 22d, to Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Gray, a son.
    The council has ordered a five-mill tax levied for town purposes.
    A large number of fruit and shade trees have been planted here lately.
    The Rev. Father Leonard will hold Lenten services at this place next Monday.
    The next meeting of the Fruitgrowers Association will be held in this place.
    M. S. Damon has been appointed street commissioner, Jas. Jones failing to qualify.
    It is rumored that another grain warehouse will be built here in the near future.
    C. B. Carlisle, editor of the Transcript, was at the county seat Wednesday, accompanied by his wife.
    Miss Genevieve Riddle has gone to Spokane Falls, W.T., where she will make relatives quite a visit.
    The Methodists will occupy the Presbyterian Church building until they can provide quarters of their own.
    The New England supper given last week for the benefit of the Presbyterian Sunday school netted a neat sum.
    We learn that C. B. Carlisle of the Transcript intends engaging in the real estate business before long.
    Childers & Son have commenced hauling stone for the foundation of their new brick building on Seventh Street.
    J. S. Howard has returned from Applegate, where he has been engaged in surveying J. T. Layton's mining claim.
    F. M. Poe and W. H. Branton are at Jacksonville, having taken a contract to plaster the M.E. church building there.
    The school meeting, to elect successors to Director Howard and Clerk Webb, will be held next Monday. Remember the time.
    The proposition to license [business] houses is not favorably received by most business men, and their remonstrance defeated it in the council.
    The work done in the bank building by M. Maule and C. W. Skeel, the expert painter and carpenter, is superb and hard to beat.
    It is rumored that Mr. Butler, our would-be banker, has left this section suddenly, without settling for the work done on the bank building by his orders.
    Ed. Worman, the popular proprietor of the Union Livery Stable, and Wm. Ulrich, the well-known insurance agent, were in Jacksonville this week on business.
    J. H. Settlemeier of the Woodburn nurseries sold the town authorities 50 shade trees for the town park and donated 30 more, which is a very liberal proceeding.
    The town authorities have purchased the block adjoining the park of C. C. Beekman, paying $275 for it. It will also be used for public square purposes and be greatly beautified.
    G. W. Crystal of this place has filed on a fine body of land near this place, which everybody thought belonged to the parties who had used it for many years past, and put a number of valuable improvements on it.
    The proposition to do away with the services of a night watchman is a penny wise and pound foolish one. The protection of our property and the maintenance of the public peace require that such an official should be employed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 2, 1888, page 2


    Vote for a good road to the O.&C.R.R.
    Jacksonville badly needs a first-class road to the O.&C.R.R.. so cast your ballots accordingly.
    A good macadamized wagon road now means a motor line to the railroad in the near future. By voting for the first you are indirectly voting for the other.
    After we have a macadamized road between this place and the railroad it will be much easier to get railroad connection, as one-third the expense has then been met.
    O. A. Hubbard & Co. of Grants Pass and F. Hubbard of Medford have ordered three carloads of agricultural implements and machinery from Emerson, Talcott & Co. of Rockford, Illinois.
    Ward Douglas, Fred. Hansen, W. N. Luckey and J. T. Rodgers, all well-known and reliable gentlemen, have formed a co-partnership and will engage in the real estate, insurance and money-loaning business on a large scale, with offices at Ashland, Medford and Central Point. They will also have branch offices at Portland, Seattle and San Francisco. This combination will no doubt prove an auspicious one, and we expect Douglas & Co. to do a large and first-class business.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 2, 1888, page 3


BORN.
BLACK--In Medford, Feb. 24th, to Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Black, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 2, 1888, page 3


    LET IT BE DONE.--Some of the citizens of this place say that they will not pay their tax for the construction of a wagon road to the O.&C.R.R. To those who are thus inclined, we will say: Would you rather lose all of your property than to pay a few dollars taxes? A good wagon road made, we have the foundation laid for a railroad, which would be the making of our town and your town property would double in value. Now don't be so contrary, but all stand in together and build up our town. No town can expect to grow and prosper when one faction of her people are pulling one way and the other just the opposite. Let everybody join in and lend a helping hand and build the road. We cannot stand back and let our neighbor towns outstrip us in importance and population. We have resources and advantages, and we should make use of them while we have the opportunity. One and all work together and in harmony, and Jacksonville's future will be forever bright.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 8, 1888, page 3


    G. W. Miller, of the firm of Baker & Merrill, of Medford, called at the county seat last Saturday.
    Bert Whitman, of Medford, is in town helping his brother, J. H. Whitman, in the county clerk's office.

"Local News," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 8, 1888, page 3


    The failure of Baker & Merrill of Medford, produce merchants and warehousemen, is announced. Mr. Merrill has gone to San Francisco, and the state of affairs will not be definitely known until his return. The assets will probably equal the liabilities.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 9, 1888, page 3


    It will not be many years before southern Oregon will be one of the greatest fruit-growing sections on the Pacific coast.--Spirit Farmer.
    An exchange very truthfully says "those who are beset with the devil of discord and jealousy should begin their summer vacation today." Are there such individuals in Jackson County.
"General Notes and News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 9, 1888, page 4


    The Medford Transcript seems to have fallen into "innocuous desuetude," as it were.
    J. H. Stewart, of Medford, shipped 1300 lbs. of sweet potatoes recently from his farm between Medford and Phoenix. Mr. Stewart raised tons of sweet potatoes last season, and has demonstrated since coming to this valley that vegetables of all kinds, melons, corn, etc. will grow well on the land in this valley without irrigation, if only thorough cultivation be employed.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 9, 1888, page 3


    Medford appears to have its quota of candidates for two of the fat places over next to the foothills.
    Mr. Schultz, who is to build a flouring mill at this place, has purchased of A. S. Jacobs a half interest in the property known as the Riddle House. He is making a bid for the balance of this fine property, and if he can buy it will purchase adjoining buildings on D Street, and not only increase the extent of the hotel but raise the whole to two stories. Mr. Schultz will, in addition to this, erect the mill this season.
Southern Oregon Transcript, Medford, March 13, 1888, page 2


    Medford is in school district 49.
    The servant girl question is one of the nonplussing things, just now.
    Building operations here are in full swing.
    A majority of 108 is in favor of a public highway between Jacksonville and the railway.
    The ladies who desire first-class millinery goods will be glad to learn that an artist in this profession will locate here this spring.
    The new bulletin board at Wrisley & Miller's real estate office fairly bristles with attractive bargains.
    The voting of the money to build the road between Jacksonville and the railway was a good thing to do, but to collect from citizens of a town money with which to build a road, outside of that town, will be rather a new thing.
    Our C Street is fast becoming a favorite thoroughfare for residences. Chas. Wolters has commenced the erection of a home place on his lot on C Street, corner of 8th. With good drainage, he will have the benefit of a cellar.
    Mr. Mark Purdin, of Gales Creek in Willamette Valley, is visiting his brother, Mr. M. Purdin, of this city.
    We are told that the fast train will be put on our road within a week or two.
    N. A. Jacobs, the county supt. officially visiting our school, makes a very favorable report of it in quite all respects, except the building. We do not blame him for finding fault with that. We want a fine large brick structure, to make Medford the school town of Southern Oregon.
    If the paper does not appear as interesting as usual our friends will excuse us when told that with the care of a sick wife, a ten months old baby, and, owing to our inability to get help, housework generally as well as the care of this office, we have had our hands full during the week.
    According to our school clerk's report, which gives a total of pupils between four and twenty years of age of 263, we have made gain of 39 during the past school year. Jacksonville has lost 51 in the same time and Ashland has increased.
    Douglas & Co. are fitting up the Lyons building on D Street, and will have it ready for occupancy in the lower floors in a few days. It is a very desirable property.
    Proposition to place lamp posts at the corners of our principal streets will be introduced at the next meeting of the council. This, a much-needed improvement, would give our city a fine appearance. A committee has the matter in hand.
    Elsewhere in this paper we have a notice of a change in the well and favorably known firm of Vrooman Miller & Co. The new firm name is Miller & Strang. Still at the old stand.
    Douglas & Co. report the sale of lots 1, 2, 3 in block 24 to Dr. Patton, of Portland, who came here at the solicitation of this firm to make an investment. Dr. Patton made an investment of about $2,000; buying city property of Mr. Howard and others. It is possible that the Dr. may find it to his interest to make a home here in the near future.
    The committee appointed to look after the park has set out the trees necessary to make there several groups, and ultimately to provide all the shade needed. What with these trees, a handsome planting of shrubs and other flowering plants, we shall soon be in possession of a delightful playground for this public.
    S. S. Pentz of Washington city, late of Benicia, Cal., who came here last fall, took in the situation and considerable property, arrived by Friday's train and has come to stay. Mr. Pentz has practiced before the United States Supreme Court, and comes to us as a lawyer of long experience, and also as a prominent educator. He has fitted up rooms in the Hamlin Block for the present. We most cordially give him welcome.
    Among the recent arrivals, of those who come to stay, we are pleased to mention D. C. Herrin of Ashland, long a resident of this valley. Mr. Herrin has secured the Lyons building of Douglas & Co., agents, on D Street and just as soon as it can be fitted up he will open a photographic gallery, and be prepared to do fine work in that line. Mr. Herrin is in possession of the secret process of instantaneous picture-taking, and tells us that he can take a train on the run or a horse running and show an exact picture of the people flocking to and from the train. He will give us such a picture some of these days.
    The completion and dedication of the Baptist Church in this city brings to a close the services of Rev. Geo. W. Black, who, as missionary for this portion of the state, has served our people for many months. It gives us a great deal of pleasure to add our voice to that of hundreds of others in Medford and vicinity, to testify to the thoroughly earnest, efficient, intelligent and zealous work performed here and elsewhere in his field by this reverend and Christian gentleman, Mr. Black. He has accomplished a good and far-reaching work, and wherever he may locate he will have the best wishes of a host of these our good people who know and appreciate him.
    If we have the straight of it, Robert A. Miller of Jacksonville has been made president of the fruit growers association of Southern Oregon. This no doubt means that the organization will take on new life and vigor and become something more than a sort of haphazard advertising medium for tree peddlers. With such actual and practical, and experienced, growers of fruit and grapes as Stewart, Whitman, Miller, Galey and others, this association should be made one of the recognized interests of the state. It ought to be able to make rules and regulations for all growers in Southern Oregon, and so hedge this great interest, that dishonest men in the business or deal with it cannot get it at a disadvantage.
    The registers at our hotel boarding houses and real estate offices tell the story of a steady increase in the number of arrivals. Every train brings a number of people who either come to remain, or are in search of land to purchase, looking to a residence at some future time. Just now we are at the high tide of immigration on the coast, and we ought to make a liberal distribution of such literature as honestly advertises this valley. That is the way in which California secures the bulk of immigration to this coast, and it is the only feasible plan we have for the same end in view. It ought to be done by the town or the Board of Trade. It is manifestly unfair to ask real estate men to do all of this work.
    The school meeting held last Monday for the election of a clerk and a three-year director, was a quiet, practical affair. Mr. Webb read his valedictory, and Mr. Howard announced the business. The citizens made the excellent nomination of W. H. Barr for director, and, in response to a motion, the clerk cast the vote of the people. Mr. Webb, who has made an efficient and capable clerk, and who was the first choice of the meeting, positively declined to be a candidate, and Mr. Frank Galloway was elected. Both the new members are popular.
    From the report of the clerk we find that 263 persons in the district between 4 and 24 years of age [are enrolled] and under 6 years 5; average daily attendance 111. Not attending 47. School property $2,040. Months taught 8¼. Taxes voted: 10 mills. Total amount of funds received during the year $1,954.69. Disbursements $1,807.52. Balance on hand $147.17. The affairs of our school are certainly in a very satisfactory condition.
    Rev. Mr. Russ of McMinnville spent the Sabbath in Medford and preached two excellent sermons at the Baptist Church.
    Isaac Woolf has the agency for Jackson and Josephine for "The White," a new, elegant, easy-motion, first-class sewing machine. He will keep these machines for sale here in Medford, and will visit all portions of the two counties with them. They are cheap, reliable, the best.
Southern Oregon Transcript, Medford, March 13, 1888, page 3


Notice.
    The hardware and drug business conducted by D. H. Miller and Chas. Strang under the firm name of Vrooman, Miller & Co., on and after this date will be continued under the firm name of Miller & Strang, who will pay all outstanding bills against Vrooman, Miller & Co. incurred in said business, and to whom all sums due Vrooman, Miller & Co. are to be paid.
D. H. Miller.
Chas. Strang.
    Medford, Oregon, March 1st, 1888.
Southern Oregon Transcript, Medford, March 13, 1888, page 3



NOTES FROM MEDFORD.
MEDFORD, March 9.           
    S. S. Pentz, of California, has located at Medford for the practice of law.
    Nine carloads of beef cattle have been shipped to Portland within the past eight days.
    Apples and hay have been shipped from Medford during the past two weeks in large quantities.
    Mr. E. G. Hurt, proprietor of the Rogue River fence factory, this city, has been very sick, but is recovering.
    Work on several brick buildings will be begun in a short time. Times will be lively in Medford this season.
    The Baptist Church of this city was dedicated on last Sunday. A large audience was present and the services were well conducted.
    A gentleman from Portland or Albina has been in the city for the past two days, and made several heavy purchases of real estate, amounting in all to $16,000.
    Medford is one of the leading cities of Southern Oregon now, and we hope to see it maintain its position. Parties in search of investment will do well to come here and look about them before purchasing elsewhere. We have the best of climate, good soil, excellent timber and the finest fruit grown in the state.
Oregonian, Portland, March 13, 1888, page 6


MEDFORD NEWS.
(Southern Oregon Transcript.)
    Medford appears to have its quota of candidates for two of the fat places.
    Just the kind of weather, this, to retard the progress of the oncoming fruit, and release it after all danger of frost has passed.
    Would-be candidates who begin already to raise the hue and cry about sticking to the nominee of the convention, may be trusted to have the big end of half a dozen combinations.
    The voting of the money to build the road between Jacksonville and the railway was a good thing to do, but to collect, from citizens of a town, money with which to build a road outside that town, will be rather a new thing.
    Proposition to place lamp posts at the corners of our principal streets will be introduced at the next meeting of the council. This, a much-needed improvement, would give our city a fine appearance. A committee has the matter in hand.
    Mr. Shultz, who is to build a flouring mill at this place, has purchased of A. S. Jacobs a half interest in the property known as the Riddle House. He is making a bid for the balance of this fine property, and if he can buy it will purchase adjoining buildings on D Street, and not only increase the extent of the hotel but raise the whole to two stories. Mr. Shultz will, in addition to this, erect the mill this season.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 15, 1888, page 3


A. L. JOHNSON EXPOSED.
    A. L. Johnson, a former well-known real estate agent, banker and newspaper proprietor of Jackson County, who was the founder of the expression "The Italy of Oregon," has left Los Angeles, Cal. He writes to a Jacksonville friend that he has been left penniless by the failure of the firm by which he was employed.
    This vividly brings to mind the career of the man, who, several years since, was traveling through southern Oregon an itinerant showman with a third-rate panorama outfit. He traveled by means of his own conveyance, and gave performances at all small towns and backwoods schoolhouses. He finally struck Jacksonville, sold his panorama outfit of cheap chromos and conceived the idea of engaging in the real estate business. This man was A. L. Johnson, who soon rose to prominence among his fellow men. He opened a real estate office, advertised extensively--newspapers and circulars were filled with his flaming advertisements of "The Italy of Oregon," as he styled the Rogue River Valley.
    He soon built up a thriving business in the real estate line, and married a very estimable lady, Mrs. Brogan, the widow of C. C. Brogan, a former prominent mining superintendent of Jackson County. Mr. Johnson was a regular attendant at church, and soon began to be looked upon as one of the substantial citizens of that region.
    When the extension of the O.&C. railroad was constructed through the Rogue River Valley, and the town of Medford was laid out on the line of the railroad, with the expectation that it would soon rival Jacksonville as a business point, Mr. Johnson removed his goods and chattels and became a fixture of that place. He opened a bank in connection with selling real estate, and did a land office business. After awhile he purchased the Medford Monitor, which had bankrupted one proprietor. A few months after this venture his career as a reliable and solid man was nipped in the bud. The subscribers who had paid in advance for their newspaper missed its visits, for one winter day Johnson closed his bank and left for the much-boomed climate of California, and the church and Sunday school had to make a new collection of funds, as he was acting as treasurer for more than one church and benevolent society, who had deposited their funds in his bank for safekeeping. But the bank was bursted--the church and Sunday school funds were missing--so was Johnson.--Portland Times.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 16, 1888, page 1


    ALL ABOARD FOR OREGON.--The stream of immigration has begun to flow for 1888, and it promises to land a large number in the Northwest, says the Portland News. Recently the Northern Pacific brought 277 immigrants in two days. In conversation with A. D. Charlton, assistant general passenger agent of the Northern Pacific, it was learned that the largest number of immigrants that ever visited the Northwest will come this spring and summer. The past winter has been so severe in the East that thousands have become disgusted with the rigor of the climate, and will seek homes on the mild Pacific Slope. The rush will be greater, Mr. Charlton says, than it was during the Coeur d'Alene mining excitement, when the Northern Pacific carried more passengers than were ever transported by a transcontinental railroad before in the same length of time.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 16, 1888, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    S. S. Pentz, attorney at law, has been appointed a notary public by Gov. Pennoyer.
    Judge Crawford made an excellent showing in the Hamlin case, and his abilities as a lawyer are conceded.
    The reported failure of Baker & Merrill, warehousemen, is now denied. Mr. M. has returned from San Francisco and business is being transacted at the office of the firm, as usual.
    The M.E. Church, South, will erect a place of worship at this place soon, and have appointed Judge Day, G. W. Isaacs and J. A. Anderson a committee to look after it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 16, 1888, page 2


    D. W. Crosby has gone to Ashland to accept a position as runner for the Ashland House. He is a valuable addition to any hotel.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 16, 1888, page 3


MARRIED.
LEWIS-RIGGS--At the residence of the officiating minister in Medford, March 18th, by Rev. C. H. Hoxie, O. F. Lewis and Miss Nancy Riggs.
STEARNS-RADCLIFF--At the residence of the officiating minister in Medford precinct, March 13th, by Rev. M. A. Williams, J. H. Stearns and Miss Mary Radcliff.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 23, 1888, page 2


MEDFORD.
    Ward Douglas is still here, and building up a good business in his line.
    Geo. Stephenson will be at Medford today for the purpose of buying horses.
    Mrs. E. W. Ogan, who has been paying California a visit, has returned home.
    C. B. Carlisle went to Grants Pass this week, to look after the affairs of J. C. Boyd.
    Henry Richardson, well known in this section, is now a resident of Placerville, Cal., where he is in the employ of the S.P.R.R. Co.
    According to an advertisement in the Oregonian, the warehouse property and business of H. E. Baker of this place is offered for sale.
    M. E. Beatty has already sold several lots in his addition to Medford. His land is situated in a good location and is being sold at reasonable rates.
    A grand masquerade ball under the auspices of our cornet band will take place at Stanley's Hall on the 28th inst. A pleasant time is assured all who attend.
    The Democratic primary meeting held here last Saturday was well attended and considerable interest was taken in it, there being two tickets in the field. W. Crawford, D. H. Miller, John Noland and I. J. Phipps were chosen.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 23, 1888, page 2


Dissolution Notice.
    THE FIRM OF DOUGLAS & CO., doing business at Ashland, Medford and Central Point, has this day been dissolved. Mr. Douglas will have his office at Medford, Lucky & Co. at Ashland and Fred. Hansen at Central Point.
            WARD DOUGLAS.
            FRED. HANSEN.
            J. T. ROGERS.
            W. N. LUCKEY.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 23, 1888, page 3


    Fish from Bear Creek find ready sale in this market. P. W. Olwell's sons find no trouble in disposing of all they bring in.
    The firm of Douglas & Co., real estate agents, doing business at Ashland, Medford and Central Point, has been dissolved. See notice to that effect elsewhere.
    So great has been the demand for fruit trees that nurserymen are out of goods, and much land that would otherwise have been utilized must necessarily remain unplanted until next season. Southern Oregon is fast becoming one vast orchard.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 23, 1888, page 3


    Geo. Yaudes of Sterlingville has purchased Mr. Caruthers' property in Medford, paying $1000, and will take up his residence there in the near future.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 23, 1888, page 3


    Letters from southern California say the bottom is dropping out of the big boom there. That southern California boom has been a good thing for Oregon and Washington lumber interests, creating as it has an unprecedented demand for logs and lumber all along the Columbia River and Grays Harbor.
"General Notes and News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 23, 1888, page 4


    S. Veatch, of Cottage Grove, the brakeman who was so severely hurt at Medford not long since, is able to be about again.
"Jackson County Notes," Oregonian, Portland, March 26, 1888, page 4



    The changes at the meat market of Hanley & Love have modernized and citified it until you hardly know the place.
    The Hamlin case record ought to defeat the political aspirations of Mr. Colvig in the coming campaign.
    Married--at the house of Rev. C. H. Hoxie March 18, 1888, by the Rev. C. H. Hoxie, O. F. Lewis and Miss Nancy Riggs, all of Jackson County, Oregon.
    R. T. Lawton reports the sale of 38 acres adjoining Phoenix and belonging to Donna Dunlap to Andrew Brown.
    New buildings are going up on almost every street in this city. Lumber is getting scarce again.
    Since last Friday nine families have arrived and taken up residence in this city. Property is changing hands rapidly.
    The building of Mr. Childers' residence on the east side of Bear Creek has laid the foundation for East Medford. We are told seven other residences will be built on that side of the creek during the present season. In another season, Mr. McAndrew will be inside the city limits.
    The high school literary society is flourishing. It has a membership of 20 scholars. Debating every Friday after school.
    Mr. I. A. Merriman is a smilingly happy man. A ten-pound stranger at his home. Such things should make any man happy.
    Unless the company ask the engineers to haul "Q" cars there will not be any strike on this line of the road.
    D. J. Lumsden and family of San Jose, Cal., who purchased the Barnum ten-acre tract of land south of town, came north by the Sunday evening train. Mr. Lumsden is building and will remain.
    Mr. George W. Howard has sold his residence property to Mr. Davis of California. Price $2700.
    W. Crawford and Miss L. Eaton were married in this city last Saturday evening. They have gone to housekeeping in the Hamlin block.
    During the month of December the citizens and farmers in the adjacent country subscribed $2000 to induce the erection of a flouring mill of 50 barrels per day capacity.
    During the fruit season of last year, Medford shipped nearly 1000 tons of fruit as freight and almost 100 tons as express matter.

Southern Oregon Transcript, March 27, 1888, quoted in the Medford Mail Tribune, January 24, 1916, page 4

NOTES FROM MEDFORD.
    MEDFORD, March 25.
    Mr. Spencer Childers is building a fine residence a short distance from town, across Bear Creek.
    The weather in this part of Oregon is warm and sunshiny with a cooling breeze in the afternoons.
    Fruit trees of various kinds are beginning to bloom. Signs are for a splendid fruit crop here this season.
    The census taken by the city authorities a short time ago shows Medford to contain over 1000 inhabitants.
    Medford is on the rise as concerns business. Many wagons and country people are to be seen on our streets every day.
    The building on D
[Front] Street known as the Lyon building is being plastered and put into shape for a photograph gallery.
    Work on the foundation of Childers' brick building was begun last week, and it will be pushed to completion.
    The brass band of Medford will give a grand masque ball on the evening of the 28th inst. Everybody is invited and a good time insured.
    In a rumble about town the past week we see eight new dwelling houses under construction. Some of them are very well up to the modern fine residences.
    We understand that the Southern Oregon Transcript will cease publication with its issue of March 27, as the proprietor, C. B. Carlisle, has other business to attend to.
    The Medford Advertiser, a small monthly publication issued here, will be published as a weekly on or about the 6th of April. It will have for its work "Medford, Jackson County and Southern Oregon generally," with fair and impartial treatment to all sections.
Oregonian, Portland, March 27, 1888, page 3


    A regular meeting of the Fruit Growers' Association of Southern Oregon will be held at Medford on March 31, at the usual hour, says a Jacksonville paper. As important business is at issue, the association is desirous of making progressive steps.
    Jacksonville exchange: So great has been the demand for fruit trees that nurserymen are out of goods, and much land that would otherwise have been utilized must necessarily remain unplanted until next season. Southern Oregon is fast becoming one vast orchard.
"Fruit and Crop Notes," Oregonian, Portland, March 27, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Measles has about disappeared.
    Considerable improvement is going on everywhere.
    J. S. Howard is in Josephine County on a surveying expedition.
    Regular services will be held at the Baptist Church on Sunday.
    Jas. Elder of this place is teaching school in one of the rural districts.
    A. S. Jacobs is still the owner of half of the Riddle House property.
    Geo. Stephenson purchased a number of fine horses at this place last Friday.
    Mrs. J. R. West is expected to return from her visit to Nebraska in a short time.
    A number of new buildings are in course of construction and several more are contemplated.
    Spencer Childers is building a neat residence a short distance from town, across Bear Creek.
    Cummons Bros., who are now engaged in business at Ashland, paid a visit a few days since.
    Hanley & Love have had their meat market renovated and it presents a much improved appearance.
    The census taken by the city authorities a short time ago shows Medford to contain about 1000 inhabitants.
    Judge Walton has gone to Fort Coeur d'Alene, I.T. on a visit to relatives. He will be gone a short time.
    The Southern Oregon Fruit Growers' Association will hold its next regular meeting in this place tomorrow.
    A. H. Carlson, who is now engaged in the fence business at Ashland with H. B. Reed, was in town this week.
    Rev. F. W. Easton has declined the call from the Baptist Church at this place and is now on his return to North Carolina.
    District Attorney Colvig was in town last Wednesday evening. He will get a very large vote in Medford this time.
    A large area of land in this vicinity is being cleared and put in cultivation. Improvements are visible on every hand.
    W. H. Barr has surveyed his tract of land just west of town into five-acre tracts, which he is selling at reasonable rates.
    A number of immigrants are stopping off here almost daily, and many of them will no doubt locate somewhere in Rogue River Valley.
    D. J. Lumsden, who bought ten acres of land of J. H. Barnum on the outskirts of town several months ago, has arrived with his family and is improving it.
    Childers & Son have commenced operations on the fine brick building they propose putting up on Seventh Street, adjoining S. Rosenthal's place of business.
    The literary society, which meets in the school house every Friday afternoon, and is composed of pupils of the higher department of the school, is in a flourishing condition.
    D. C. Herrin and family have located at this place. Mr. H. has opened a photograph gallery in Lyon's building, where he is now ready to accommodate those who wish good work in his line.
    The masquerade ball given at Howard's Hall last Wednesday evening, under the auspices of our cornet band, was a success. Everything passed off smoothly and several characters were well represented.
    Some parties have been distributing an anonymous circular reflecting upon the character of one of our citizens, and it is quite likely that they will have an opportunity of explaining to the next grand jury why they did so.
    G. L. Webb, the school clerk elected at the annual meeting, having failed to qualify, this district is without such officer. One ought to be selected at the earliest opportunity, as there is no telling when his services may be needed.
    A subscription list is in circulation to raise funds for the improvement of the wagon road between this place and Jacksonville. It is proposed to put a mile of the road in first-class condition. We are glad to notice this enterprise upon the part of our citizens.
    Geo. W. Howard, the insurance agent, has sold his dwelling house and a parcel of land to a newcomer, for $2,700.  He has still eighty lots left, which he is selling at reasonable rates. Mr. H. has already netted several thousand dollars from his original purchase from C. W. Broback.
    A Medford correspondent of the Oregonian gives this piece of news: "We understand that the Southern Oregon Transcript will cease publication with its issue of March 27, as the proprietor, C. B. Carlisle, has other business to attend to. The Medford Advertiser,  a small monthly publication issued here, will be published as a weekly on or about the 6th of April. It will have for its work 'Medford, Jackson County and Southern Oregon generally,' with fair and impartial treatment to all sections."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1888, page 2


A Denial.
    In its last issue, the Medford Transcript gave space to the following:
    The Jacksonville Times says that the failure of the firm of which H. E. Baker is set forth as manager is denied. The report of a failure probably had its rise in the fact that there had been a transfer of some warehouse property to Mrs. Baker, and some to Mr. Baker, Sr.: a part of this to secure a new loan of $1,800 from W. Fowler; and another fact, that of the recent visit of Mr. Ladue of Salem, who has some money invested in this company, who came here to have these funds made safe. One or two other little matters, which, taken with an advertisement in a Portland paper of a business for sale; supposed to be that in question, very naturally gave rise to inquiry, at least, among interested parties.
    In reply to the above, H. E. Baker writes to the Times as follows: "The statement made by C. B. Carlisle in the last issue of the Transcript, concerning my business affairs, is a lie, and C. B. Carlisle is the liar. If the farmers with whom I have dealings will ask Mr. Fowler, they can ascertain the truth of the matter. Although Mr. Carlisle is superintendent of a Sabbath school, he has not learned to tell the truth. I repeat it, Sir, he is a liar.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1888, page 3


    The army of Jackson County real estate agents are busy, and will be much more so in a short time.
    Quite a number of immigrants are arriving in Southern Oregon, and several real estate transactions are taking place.
    It is estimated that no less than 100,000 grape vines have been planted in Jackson County this season--by far the greatest number in the vicinity of Jacksonville.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1888, page 3


    S. Veatch of Cottage Grove, the brakeman who was so severely hurt at Medford not long since, is able to be about again. It was a narrow escape.
    W. G. Cooper of Medford was in town last Saturday, exhibiting his fine stallion, which is one of the best in the county.
    Judge Crawford of Medford and Miss Linda Eaton of Jacksonville were married in Medford Saturday evening. We tender our congratulations and best wishes.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1888, page 3


    "Yes, the Nash hotel was there about that time, I know. I lay there for two weeks when I got hurt."
    While doing the switching on a cold, rainy night, Mr. Veatch caught his foot in a "frog." The car started backward. He wrestled his foot from the track, just as the car approached, but was knocked down by it, he said today, and went to the Nash for hospitalization.
"Mr. Veatch Joins Judge Colvig in Pioneer Stories," undated Medford Mail Tribune clipping, DAR scrapbooks, vol. 18, RVGS


MARRIED.
CRAWFORD-EATON--In Medford, March 24th, by C. H. Barkdull, J.P., Willard Crawford and Miss Linda Eaton.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1888, page 3


Masque Ball.
    The event of the season at Medford was the Brass Band's masque ball which took place on the 28th ult. Howard's Hall was crowded to its utmost, and the sport was continued until a late hour. Everybody enjoyed themselves and went home well pleased, and with a good word for the management. The following is a list of the persons and the characters they sustained; Ray Young, domino; Miss Cunnyngham and Mrs. T. A. Harris, jockeys; G. Cunnyngham, Mary Cunnyngham and Grace Foster, dominos; Jas. Dawson, Forepaugh's circus; Cecil Young, sister of charity; Elma Young, knight; Jennie Wilcox, day and night; Jessie Slocum, fancy dress; Mary Wilcox, good luck; Mattie Cunnyngham, flag of the union; Alice Griffis, old Columbia; Belle Butcher, Topsy; Emma Justus, sailor; Millie Riddle, morning and dawn; Ernest Langley, jockey; B. Miller, dude; Bert Redden, Bob. Riddle and Wiley Cunnyngham, clowns; Miss Dyar, morning star; Mrs. West, Folly; Nora Corbett, Red Riding Hood; Mrs. R. Corbett, Reuben's wife; Miss McCrary, Scotch lassie; Will. Merriman, Irishman; Misses Hofto and Mattie Hogue, school girls; P. N. Butcher, sailor; T. A. Harris, clown; Minnie Riddle, mikado clown; Mort. Foster, sailor boy; J. H. Stubblefield, Irish bloke; Bert. Whitman, darkey; John Turner, peasant girl; Cassie Hoagland, Folly; D. W. Crosby, silly; Mrs. Geo. Langley, knight; Miss Langley, lady.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 6, 1888, page 3


    There being no more opposition, the W.U.T. Co. have again raised their rates for ten-word messages to Medford from fifteen to twenty-five cents.
    Medford has two local papers, E. C. Phelps having issued the first number of the Advertiser in an enlarged form this week. We wish it success.
    Medford was visited by a heavy gale of wind a few days since, which tore down a number of the canvas sun shades in the front of the business houses.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 6, 1888, page 3


    Ed. C. Phelps will publish the Medford Advertiser weekly hereafter. It was begun as a monthly, but the suspension of the Transcript leaves the field open for its issue as a regular, weekly newspaper.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 6, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Improvements everywhere.
    Mrs. J. R. West has returned from her visit to Nebraska.
    F. Hubbard is kept busy in handling farming implements.
    E. G. Hurt has orders for more fence than he is able to manufacture.
    J. A. Morey from Illinois has purchased a fine house and several lots on the west side of the city.
    The Medford Advertiser will appear for the first time tomorrow, the 5th. May it live long and prosper well.
    G. W. Merrill has returned from a business trip to San Francisco.
    Mrs. Morris and daughter have erected a fine photograph gallery on D Street, where they are now ready to accommodate those who wish good work in their line.
    Through the agency of Wrisley & Miller, Mr. Fleming has sold 420 acres of land to J. A. Bell, from California; consideration, $8,000.
Ashland Tidings, April 6, 1888, page 3


APRIL 7, 1888

    Grand Pa [i..e, John Beeson] walked down to Medford. . . . a new paper called the Medford Advertiser is started in Medford.
    Carlisle paper has suspended
.

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent


A CALM REVIEW.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES:
    Having read a very exuberant and glowing letter in reference to Medford and its vicinity in last week's Transcript, and also previous ones, which consumes almost entirely the first page (with the exception of a few advertisements), I wish to make a few statements also: Not that I hold any antipathy against our sister town, nor will I do so, but to correct a few statements which I think just a little too alluring to retain the home-seeker, even if they should be the dominant matter to gain them there.
    First, is Medford the metropolis and chief city of southern Oregon, or is it not? Are there not cities equally advanced (if not more so) as a market for products of all kinds, and fruit in abundance of all descriptions? No place in southern Oregon is the manufacturing business carried on so extensively as in the town of Ashland. A town with all the privileges that man can boast--an old reliable town--that is now putting forth (as you might say) its foliage in all its grandeur; for school and church privileges it is unsurpassed. Railroad accommodations are equal to any (or nearly so) on the Pacific coast. The buildings, both business and dwelling houses, show the work of artistic skill, beautiful and grand. Yet I will not (like the writer) exaggerate and say it is the principal city, etc. I wish to state truths and facts; for rather would we have the stranger, when he comes among us, to say what a beautiful town and country you have here; it far surpasses any description I have seen given, instead of, Mr. your town and surrounding country are not at all as represented; where is your banking business; where is your orchards, hedging your city on all sides, stretching away for miles on every hand? One would suppose, by your glowing description, that the fruit shipped from this railroad point was gathered from these orchards; yet, where are they? Even what are here are yet in their infancy. Why give such a graphic description until it is here to see; and still he continues in reference to "Our Climate," as being as near perfect as possible on this mundane sphere. Well, that is very well, if he had but ceased there, or had gone no further respecting the climate; but hear what he says: The past has been an exceptionally cold winter; yet not a thermometer in this city registered down to zero, three above being the coldest, and the snow that fell just before the cold snap lay on the ground about one week, and only two or three inches deep.
    Now I wish to correct this statement, knowing that it will be no detriment to our cities and surrounding country, neither will it deter the western home-seeker, for our coldest weather is of short duration and enjoyed by both old and young. In the month of January there fell snow to the depth of five inches, at least, laying on nearly three weeks, and according to the registers, as was quoted in the papers (even the Transcript), there is not one but what went from 1 to 4 degs., below zero, and about five of six miles north of Medford it registered 8 degrees below; but our coldest weather at that time was of about a week's duration. We have beautiful weather here most of the time through the winter seasons, comfortably warm and pleasant, and these few days of exceptionally cold weather is rather exhilarating than otherwise.
    A few words now to our adjoining towns--Jacksonville and Central Point--two well-known and as enterprising towns as any in southern Oregon. Well may they be called the landmarks of Rogue River Valley. Jacksonville is situated in a cozy little nook in the foothills, and to the beholder it presents a nice and pleasant view while passing to and fro through this superb and beautiful valley; and when we enter upon its streets we see the busy merchant in his daily occupation, supplying his ready customers, who come and go from day to day. We see the man of toil, who, with bold and energetic zeal uniting in the support and prosperity of his little town, which, although small at present, with the present facilities and the prospect of uniting with that little town, Central Point, which is suitably situated, will, in the near future, be one of the most commodious and thriving cities in southern Oregon. Central Point is a small town, as yet, but being situated on the railroad and being the central point in the valley, will, no doubt, become a large and prosperous city; for should there be (and no doubt but there will) a connection between that point and Jacksonville, it would greatly enlarge the facilities of both places.
    Let us now, as the tide of immigration comes in, work with unselfish motives, wishing success to our sister towns, feeling that the adjoining country, which extends to quite an extent through this valley, surrounds not only one little city but all, and be equally eager for the prosperity of his or her town.
APROPOS.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1888, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Al. Hoskins of Albany talks of opening a barbershop here.
    Our town is rapidly gaining in population and wealth.
    Newcomers are numerous and they are constantly becoming more so.
    J. S. Howard went to Portland to attend the Republican state convention.
    E. J. Smillie has opened a variety store here and is doing a good business.
    Miss F. E. Russ, lately from McMinnville, has opened a millinery shop here.
    Ward Douglas is at Grants Pass, where he is writing a large number of life insurance policies.
    Medford now has two papers, but it is expected that one of them will suspend in a short time.
    Mr. Sears spent Wednesday at the county seat. This place seems to have many attractions for him.
    Business is better here now than it has been for a long time past, and our merchants are generally doing well.
    M. S. Damon, who has been selected as school clerk for this district, and commenced to discharge his duties last week.
    Quite a number of real estate transactions are reported in this place during the past few weeks. Our real estate agents are consequently busy.
    A. S. Jacobs has sold his half interest in the Riddle Hotel building to a gentleman from Portland named Drucks, for $3,000. We are informed that A. H. Sunderman negotiated the sale.
    This place has been exercised considerably over a libel case that has found its way into the courts and in which a number of our citizens will figure as witnesses or otherwise.
    John Morey, a brother-in-law of J. W. Short, who arrived from the East recently, has purchased the brick residence in the western end of town and the four acres connected therewith, paying $1,000 for the property.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1888, page 2


Jacksonville to Medford.
    Patronize the only wagon that connects with every train, rain or shine, and carries the U.S. mail and Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express. Satisfaction guaranteed.
ED. HELMS, Driver.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1888 et seq., page 3


    E. Langley, who is still in the employ of the Union Livery Stable at Medford, was here yesterday.
    W. G. Cooper's fine stallion has been withdrawn from sale, and will be at Medford and Central Point during the season.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1888, page 3


    A. H. Sunderman has become a permanent resident of Medford, where he is engaged in the real estate business.
    I. L. Hamilton of Medford, E. Worman's popular assistant, made us a pleasant visit one day this week.
    John H. Stubblefield, who has been at Medford for some time past, has gone to California and may continue his journey to the eastern states.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD ITEMS.
    Emigrants coming to stay.
    The Empire House is sold.
    Improvements are being continued.
    J. E. Drucks, of Portland, is sick at the Riddle House.
    Mr. Lumsden has bought G. H. Baker's property in town.
    Mr. Baker has sold his house and lot on C Street; consideration, $2600.
    West Johnson sold to D. Minnick house and lot; consideration, $1000.
    "On investigation," it has been found that southern Oregon is a finer country than even the southern part of California.
    A. S. Jacobs has sold his interest in the Riddle House to J. E. Drucks, from Portland, through the agency of A. H. Sunderman.
    Lawton & Son report the following sales: O. T. Hufts, house and lot to Mr. Russ; consideration, $1000. J. M. Shadle, house and lot in block No. 2 to  D. T. Lawton; consideration, $1300.
    Thirteen lots have been sold in Beatty's addition, on the north side of the city.
    Medford, Or., April 11.
Ashland Tidings, April 13, 1888, page 2



    The Medford Advertiser is out--a neat little paper, published by Ed. C. Phelps. The Transcript is still alive, too; and its publisher seems to resent the impression that it has been about to expire.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 13, 1888, page 3


    Medford has the tramp nuisance.
    Nearly every orchard in the valley is in full bloom, and predictions of a full crop are plenty, says the Medford Advertiser.
"Northwest News: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, April 16, 1888, page 8


    SOUTHERN OREGON FRUIT OUTLOOK.--Mr. H. E. Battin, of the extensive commission firm of H. E. Battin & Co., has returned from a flying trip as far south as Medford, where he found a boom in business of all kinds. He reports the outlook for a large crop of fruit during the coming season throughout the entire state as very flattering. He finds that this county, in this respect, is both as early and promising as any of the more southern counties. The acreage of apple orchards in Jackson County has been greatly increased during the past winter, and the people in Douglas are turning their main attention to the cultivation of prunes, in the growth of which fruit that section excels.
Oregonian, Portland, April 18, 1888, page 5


APRIL 19, 1888

    Emmett Rolling [and] I took Grand Pa [i.e., John Beeson] riding away across Bear Creeck to the Medford Road running East and then to Medford  Pheonix home, been very Hot day.
Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent


Newspaper Change.
    C. B. Carlisle of the Medford Transcript writes to the Times that he has sold his paper to W. M. Holmes, for a friend in the east, and that it will be reissued in an enlarged form in a short time. Mr. H. agrees, as a part of the sale, to complete all unexpired contracts. Mr. C. has been offered a position on the staff of a California paper, but will remain here for some time.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1888, page 3


Work in the Right Place.
    The people of Medford have wisely decided to make a first-class road as far as corporation line, and, as our citizens have already commenced work in the same direction, it will not be long before two miles of the thoroughfare between the two places will be in first-class condition for travel throughout the entire year. The county should also lend some assistance to this project, as the road to the county seat is one of the most important in southern Oregon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1888, page 3


    Medford scores one, having the first political club which has been organized this season.
    Claus Kleinhammer of Eden precinct, one of the most enterprising farmers in Jackson County, has planted thirty-five acres in choice fruit trees during the past season.
    As will be seen by advertisement elsewhere, a convention of the Prohibition Party will be held at Medford on April 30th for the purpose of nominating candidates for county offices.
    Roberts & O'Neil, the wide-awake farmers, are hauling material to their farm near Phoenix, where they will erect a neat dwelling house. They own two of the best farms in the valley.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1888, page 3


    The purse which "Nelly Gray" won from the backers of "Ten Cents" at Medford last fall has been refunded to Crit. Tolman, who paid the costs of the suit instituted by him against the stakeholders.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1888, page 3


Call for Prohibition County Convention.
    A Prohibition county convention for Jackson County is hereby called to meet at Medford on
MONDAY, APRIL 30, 1888,
at one o'clock P.M., for the purpose of nominating candidates for the offices of said county, and to transact any other business that may properly come before it.
J. H. RUSSELL, Chairman.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    No sickness in this city.
    There are several horse buyers in town at present.
    Immigrants are numerous and real estate transfers ditto.
    W. M. Holmes, Dept. Sheriff, has purchased the Transcript office in this place for his brother.
    John H. Stubblefield, who has been at this place for some time past, has gone to the eastern states.
    J. E. Drucks has become a permanent resident of Medford, where he will engage in business soon.
    Robert Smith has sold his stock ranch on Little Butte to W. Slinger of this place; consideration, $2300.
    Quarterly meeting of the M.E. church will be held in Medford on Sunday next April 22. All are cordially invited.
    Thos. Martin, of Sams Valley, has sold his farm of 200 acres to John Gregerson, from California; consideration, $3200.
    April 17, 1888.
Ashland Tidings, April 20, 1888, page 3


    C. B. CARLISLE, who left the secretaryship of the board of immigration at Portland, for the board's benefit, and to run Chas. Nickell's Times out of southern Oregon with his journalistic miscarriage yclept the Medford Transcript, has disposed of his bantling $250, and left the State.--Sunday Welcome.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1888, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Many real estate transfers are taking place here.
    Childers & Son's fine brick building is assuming proportions.
    The Methodists of Medford hold a quarterly meeting tomorrow and Sunday.
    Several buildings in course of construction, and all of our carpenters are busy.
    The Prohibitionists will meet in county convention at this place on the 30th inst.
    Dr. Geary and family have been visited lately by Mrs. Worth of Eugene City, a sister of the Doctor.
    Wes. Johnson has returned from Klamath County and sold his property in this place to a newcomer for $1000.
    Rev. Wm. Stewart, who spent last winter here, is now preaching in the First Baptist Church of Quincy, Ill.
    The little folks' entertainment at Stanley's Hall last Friday evening was well attended and proved a success.
    The number of strangers is increasing and a considerable portion of them are locating in town; hence our population is increasing steadily.
    The Transcript has suspended publication, but the Advertiser lives and flourishes. Mr. Phelps makes a good local paper and deserves success.
    O. Holtan has sold his store building on Seventh Street to E. Russ for $1000, through R. T. Lawton & Son's agency. Mr. H. is engaged in stock raising on Dry Creek.
    Several members of Ruth Rebekah lodge of Jacksonville paid their sister lodge at this place a visit last Tuesday evening and spent a few hours quite pleasantly.
    W. G. Cooper, the saddler, denies the report, recently published in the Transcript, that he was swindled out of $800 by the gentlemen who purchased his farm.
    Three persons were admitted to membership in the Methodist Church last Sunday in Medford. Services have been continued the entire week by Rev. J. W. Miller and others.
    Our town council proposes to do its share toward building a road between here and the county seat. It is to be hoped that nothing will be left undone in this direction.
    D. J. Lumsden, lately of San Jose, Cal., has purchased G. H. Baker's two residences in this place, paying $2300 for them. Mr. B. will return to Oakland, Cal., before long, to reside.
    Wrisley & Miller's real estate circular has received a wide circulation and is doing much for this county. They have a large lot of desirable property in their hands and offer great bargains.
    Miss Mollie Merriman has returned from Monmouth, Polk County, where she has been attending the state normal school. Failing sight compelled her to abandon her studies for the present.
    Medford is the first to start the ball rolling, and this Friday evening a Democratic club will be permanently organized here. A preliminary meeting was held last Monday evening when M. Purdin was elected temporary chairman of the club.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Robt. Smith was in Jacksonville Monday. He is now a resident of this place.
    The Prohibition Party will nominate candidates for county offices in this place next Monday.
    C. B. Carlisle, formerly publisher of the Transcript, has gone to California, accompanied by his wife.
    Bud. Stewart has returned from Klamath County, where he has taken a land claim and will engage in stock raising. He will go back about the middle of May.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1888, page 3


    Amateur baseball clubs of Jacksonville and Medford met in friendly contest at the latter place last Saturday. Our club won in two straight games.
    Those who know say this is an "off year" with fruit trees, which have borne so freely before, which will account for the scarcity of blossoms on many of them. There will nevertheless be an abundance of all kinds of fruit in southern Oregon, unless late frosts interfere.
    The prospect for fruit in the whole of southern Oregon was never better in April than it is this month. The trees are all thrifty and healthy, and the blossoms have dropped their petals to display an abundance of young fruit which will require much thinning by orchardists unless nature should conclude to assist in the work by a pruning frost, such as southern Oregon men consider a benefit to the country. Many acres of young peach orchards will come into bearing this season, and from the present outlook great care will have to be exercised to prevent the young trees from bearing too much fruit for their strength, says the Ashland Tidings.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1888, page 3


MARRIED.
GOOKIN-FARES--At the residence of I. A. Webb, in Medford, April 10th, by Rev. Geo. W. Black, F. W. Gookin and Miss Clara Fares.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Wesley Johnson has bought a house and lot on D Street.
    Several new houses are going up and ground broke for several more.
    Mrs. Susie West was dangerously ill on Monday at her residence, caused by eating too many hard-boiled eggs for dinner on Sunday.
    L. L. Angle has sold his ranch at Fort Lane to Scott Griffin and E. F. Rowe for five thousand dollars. Rowe & Griffin will erect a sawmill on the land.
    J. S. Howard is busy surveying. He has just finished plotting out eleven acres of ground west of the town for Mr. Colwell, for whom Lawton & Son are agents.
    There is a new outfit of eastern Yankees in the valley selling stoves and ranges, with headquarters at Medford. They are all six-foot men, smart and intelligent.
    April 25th.
Ashland Tidings, April 27, 1888, page 3


Medford Political Notes.
    MEDFORD, Or., April 28.--A Democratic club of twenty members was organized here last night, with J. D. Whitman, president. Final organization was effected. The Republican primary was held here today. J. S. Howard, J. B. Riddle, J. A. Whiteside and I. A. Webb were chosen delegates to the county convention to be held at Jacksonville, Wednesday, May 9.
    The Democratic primary, held here today, selected as delegates E. G. Hurt, William Roberts, George S. Walton, M. Purdin and W. Crawford. The county convention will be at Jacksonville Saturday, May 5.
Oregonian, Portland, April 30, 1888, page 6


Jackson County Prohibition Convention.
    MEDFORD, April 30.--Prohibition speaking throughout Jackson County last week resulted in a county convention here today. A full ticket was nominated. For representatives--D. H. Hawkins, of Ashland, E. F. Walker, of Medford, and W. W. Miller, of Eagle Point; county judge--Fred T. Downing, of Central Point; sheriff--W. W. Willits, of Flounce Rock; county clerk--David C. Herrin, of Medford; treasurer--C. B. Kingsbury, of Ashland; assessor--C. H. Gillette, of Ashland; school superintendent--Lake France, Sams Valley; commissioners--Charles Carney, of Eagle Point, and L. A. Rose, of Phoenix; surveyor--W. H. Newton, Gold Hill; coroner--Dr. George Kahler, Phoenix. There was a ratification meeting tonight.
Oregonian, Portland, May 1, 1888, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. F. Strait, formerly of this place, is now stationed at Ashland.
    T. A. Harris and family have moved into their fine, new residence.
    Considerable town property is changing hands, and our population continues to increase.
    The Medford cornet band is rapidly improving. It has just received a lot of new music.
    W. H. Beauchamp, who has been a resident of this place for several months, has returned to Sams Valley.
    Major Hendershott, the drummer boy of the rebellion, gave one of his performances here last Friday evening.
    The Democratic Club at this place holds regular meetings and promises to do much good for the cause of the Democracy.
    S. L. Bennett, one of our most enterprising farmers, is being visited by his mother, who recently arrived from Modesto, Cal.
    Several new buildings are in course of construction, and more will soon be commenced. Our town is moving right along.
    The May Day party at this place was a very enjoyable affair. The arrangements were perfect, and general satisfaction was given.
    Mrs. A. Riddle of Douglas County is the guest of J. B. Riddle and family. She is accompanied by her daughter, who came for medical treatment.
    The people of Medford are engaged in making a first-class road to the western line of their corporation, and are to be commended for their enterprise.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has reopened the saloon formerly kept by A. H. Carlson, thoroughly refitting it and making many improvements. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 4, 1888, page 3


    The Prohibitionists met in Medford last Monday and nominated a full set of candidates for county offices. The nominees are all excellent citizens, but will be sadly in the minority, as usual.
    C. H. Pickens has purchased of W. G. Cooper his fine horse, "Young Norfolk," who is no doubt the fastest stallion in southern Oregon, size considered. He is of fine form and action, and is highly spoken of by all who know him.
    Westward the star of empire takes its way. A New York dispatch of April 30th says that large numbers of emigrants are arriving from Europe, many of whom are going west. A party of German emigrants headed by Heinrich Kirschner left for Rogue River Valley, Oregon, that afternoon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 4, 1888, page 3


    In an opening speech in the Jackson County Democratic convention held at Jacksonville last Friday, Judge Willard Crawford, a Medford delegate, after declaring himself in favor of the nomination of Horatio Seymour as candidate for President of the United States, said: "Oregon will go Democratic this year, and I will tell Republicans the reason why. The prohibition party is well organized throughout the state, and its efforts will give the election to the Democracy. God bless the prohibitionists." This sentiment met with the approval of the convention, the members of which cheered it to the echo.

Daily Morning Astorian,
May 8, 1888, page 1



    N. A. Jacobs, school superintendent, who, it seems, was the real purchaser of the Medford Transcript plant, has shipped the same to Ashland, where he will commence the publication of a newspaper, to be known as the Valley Record. It will be Democratic in politics, and the first number will be issued about the 17th inst.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 11, 1888, page 3


    Mrs. Dr. Geary of Medford spent a few days in Jacksonville during the week, being the guest of Mrs. Dr. Robinson.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 11, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Real estate transfers are numerous.
    The Empire Hotel has been sold to J. H. Faris.
    H. H. Richardson, formerly of this precinct, is now a resident of Woodland, Cal.
    Our Catholic citizens have purchased two blocks in Beatty's addition to Medford, and no doubt a church will soon be erected thereon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 11, 1888, page 3


    G. W. Howard, of Medford, has bought the farm of Mrs. D. P. Anderson, in Eden precinct; consideration, $5000.
    The O.&C.R.R. Co. has issued orders that employees of the company must be total abstainers from intoxicants.
    A considerable quantity of potatoes have been shipped from Josephine County to Medford and Ashland recently.
    The Medford brass band has been engaged to play at Merlin in Josephine County on the 4th of July, the Courier says.
    W. S. Gore brought up from J. H. Stewart's place last Saturday a pie plant stem and leaf which is the largest displayed here up to date, measuring 30x31 inches across when spread out flat. Mr. Stewart is preparing to raise a large amount of truck this year, as usual. He has in ten acres of sweet potatoes and a large area of corn, tomatoes, watermelons, etc.
    N. A. Jacobs, for whom the plant of the late Transcript (Carlisle's paper at Medford) was purchased, will begin the publication of a Democratic newspaper in Ashland next week, and expects to have the first issue out on Thursday, May 14th. Mr. Jacobs has rented the rooms in the second story of the McCall building, occupied some years ago as the Tidings office, and moved in last Wednesday. The name of the paper is to be the Valley Record.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 11, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD ITEMS.
MEDFORD, May 13.
    Mr. J. T. Knight, of McMinnville, is in town.
    Crops are beginning to look brown for the want of rain.
    The Empire Hotel of this city has been sold to J. H. Faris.
    Mr. Chas. Munker, of Portland, arrived here Thursday.
    Ira A. Phelps has gone to Ashland to work on the new paper.
    There are a number of persons in town looking for homes.
    Rev. G. G. Thomas and wife arrived last week from Kansas.
    Mr. Burns and family left for their home, in Eastern Oregon, this week.
    The Riddle House has new rooms to accommodate the fast increasing business.
    S. E. Redden and Miss Amy Redden, a cousin, arrived this week from California.
    Mr. George Bowers and family arrived from Minnesota this week and will make this their future home.
    N. A. Jacobs, for whom the plant of the late Transcript (Carlisle's paper at Medford) was purchased, will begin the publication of a democratic newspaper at Ashland next week, and expects to have the first issue out on Thursday, May 14. Mr. Jacobs has rented the rooms in the second story of the McCall Building and moved in last Wednesday. The name of the paper is to be the Valley Record.
Oregonian, Portland, May 15, 1888, page 7


MEDFORD NOTES.
MEDFORD, May 15.
    Many of our suburban places are being laid out in additions to the city.
    J. E. Drucks, late of Portland, will soon begin the erection of a large roller flouring mill.
    The city council has ordered built a system of sewerage and provided for a fire department.
    A great many new houses are being built, and contracts are closed for the erection of one or more large business houses.
    Real estate transactions are largely on the increase and strangers from the East are coming in on every train, buying and taking residences.
    Experiments will soon be made for an artesian well within a short distance of Medford, and indications point to the striking of a fine vein of water.
    The farmers are complaining of the lack of rain, and yet we had a slight thunder shower Sunday last, which did much good, and prospects for crops of all kinds are good.
Oregonian, Portland, May 17, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Improvements and transfers are quite numerous.
    The Board of Trade held an interesting session last Saturday evening.
    Attention is called to the card of S. S. Pentz, attorney-at-law, formerly of Washington city, where he practiced his profession for some time.
    W. H. Barr has divided a considerable portion of his land on the outskirts of this place into five-acre tracts which he is selling at $500 each. He has sold several of them already.
    Col. J. T. Bowditch, Democratic candidate for representative, spoke at Stanley's Hall in this place last night to a good-sized audience. He is a pleasant and forcible speaker and left a good impression.
    For some reason Medford has been slighted by the principal speakers of both parties. This should not be, as our town is one of the most important in the county and can furnish a large-sized audience at any time.
    E. G. Hurt, who has been annoyed a great deal lately by the failure to procure pickets, this week received a carload of them, from Springfield, Lane County. He is again prepared to fill orders for the celebrated Universal Combination Fence.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1888, page 2


Barn Burned.
    EDITOR TIMES:--On the morning of May 13th a fire broke out on the ranch belonging to Rufus Cox on Big Sticky. Truett Cox (son of the owner) and family reside on the place at the present time, and, between three and four o'clock Mrs. C. was awakened by a roaring noise and gave the alarm. The barn was discovered to be afire and the flames beyond control. The building, a header, carriage, saddles, harness, brushes, combs, etc., were consumed. The fire is supposed to have started from a cigar or cigarette, as there had been a social surprise party at the house the evening before. The loss is about $1100, and the insurance $600.
SUBSCRIBER.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1888, page 3


    A fine, new stage has been placed on the route between this place and Medford by E. Worman.
    Dr. Geary of Medford, one of the Republican nominees for representative, has declined, and the vacancy on the ticket will be filled at once.
    J. B. Riddle of Medford and D. L. Curtis of this place have leased the Jackson County Telegraph Co.'s line and will put in Bell telephones at once. This will be a great convenience.
    The firm of Pryce & Geary of Medford, the well-known physicians and surgeons, will soon be dissolved. Elsewhere will be found their notice calling upon those indebted to call and settle at once.
    We are very much pained to hear of the death of Frank Whitman, the second son of Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, which occurred at Portland last Tuesday. He was an intelligent and energetic young man and had a host of friends. To the relatives of the deceased, cruelly bereft of a dutiful and promising son and brother, is extended the sincere sympathy of all.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1888, page 3


SETTLE-UP NOTICE.
ALL THOSE KNOWING THEMSELVES indebted to the undersigned, either by note or book account, are hereby earnestly requested to call and settle at their earliest convenience. Our business must be closed.
PRYCE & GEARY.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1888, page 3


S. S. PENTZ,
(formerly of Washington City)
    ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
    Will practice in all Courts of the State and before all Governmental Departments.
    Money loaned and collections made.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1888 et seq., page 3


    Drs. Pryce & Geary, of Medford, call upon all who are indebted to them to make settlement, either by cash or note, as soon as possible. Dr. Geary has sold out in Medford, and is preparing to move to Seattle as soon as he can settle his business affairs.
    Dr. E. P. Geary has sold his house and lots in Medford to his partner, Dr. R. Pryce, and will move to Seattle as soon as he can settle his business affairs in this county. Dr. Geary has gained a high reputation and a large practice in this valley, and many people will regret to see him leave.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 18, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Real estate is changing hands rapidly.
    Several new buildings have been contracted for the last week.
    Angle & Plymale and Short are laying out their new addition north of Medford, in building lots. Choice acre and five-acre lots can be secured if spoke for in time.
    Mr. Noble, a gentleman from Nebraska, is building a residence on the five-acre lot he purchased from Wm. H. Barr on the south side of Medford.
    M. E. Beatty, the real estate agent, is selling lots every day in his new addition. Beatty is a wide-awake fellow and catches the customers on the fly as they come into town.
    Medford has some very fashionable people. They try to keep up the styles of New York and Boston million heirs. They change their costumes two and three times a day and parade the streets. Medford is bound to boom.
    Mr. Farris has purchased the Cunningham property and will erect a fine brick structure for hotel purposes, which will make a desirable location.
    Medford is bothered with a red dog roaming the streets, to the annoyance of the citizens. He prefers darkness instead of daylight to do traveling. There are several shotguns awaiting him.
    H. G. Nicholson has abandoned farming and is now head clerk in Adkins & Webb's hardware store. He knows how to fix up a store and weigh out a pound of nails as well as the best of older clerks who have served an apprenticeship at the business.
    Spence Childers is building a two-story brick on the corner of Main and C streets. The ground floor is for store rooms, the second floor is for offices. It will be a fine structure and an ornament to the city.
    D. C. Herrin has erected a new photograph gallery on [D] Street. It is well located and nothing is to hinder him from doing a fair business. He is considered a fine artist and is up with the times in that art. We wish him success.
    Miss Russ, on the corner of Main and B streets, has a fine selection of millinery goods and understands the business thoroughly. We wish her success and a hearty welcome with us.
S.       
    May 11.
Ashland Tidings, May 18, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD ITEMS.
MEDFORD, May 18.
    Our young people will soon organize a tennis club.
    Several ten-acre suburban tracts changed hands this week.
    Quite a number of Californians have been in the city this week prospecting.
    Col. Faris, of the Empire House, is making extensive improvements to his hotel.
    Col. Hayden and the Misses Cousins of Melbourne, Australia, were visitors here last week.
    Several new streets have been laid out and extensions of old ones made during the past week.
    J. H. Anderson of Minnesota has become a resident of this city and will engage in contracting.
    The young ladies of the Baptist church [will] give a strawberry supper soon for the benefit of the church.
    Medford needs a live weekly newspaper, and such will receive a liberal patronage from our people.
    Hon. John D. Whitman has been invited to address the democratic party upon the tariff and other questions.
    Strawberries of the finest quality are plentiful and prices are very reasonable. The fruit prospect is very flattering.
    A charter for a Masonic lodge, to be located in this city, will be asked of the grand lodge of the state in a short time.
    The funeral of D. R. White was largely attended by the Masonic fraternity under whose rites Mr. White was buried.
    The Medford brass band will soon give outdoor concerts. Our band is the finest in Southern Oregon and has received numerous invitations from abroad.
    A party of Australian tourists stopped here lately for supper, when two young ladies of the party availed themselves of the time to view the scenery of our valley and they were left by the train.
    The sad death of Frank Whitman, son of Hon. J. D. Whitman, of this city, created much sorrow here. Mr. Whitman was in the employ of Battin & Co., of Portland, and was known for his sterling business qualities and standing as a young man of the highest integrity.
Oregonian, Portland, May 21, 1888, page 2


MEDFORD NOTES.
MEDFORD, May 20.
    John Curry is clerk in Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express office in Medford.
    P. N. Butcher has moved to Ashland, and will open a meat market there.
    Five real estate transfers were reported in the Advertiser by one firm last week.
    Mr. C. F. Lewis and Miss Anna Crystal, of this city, were married last Sunday.
    Dr. E. P. Geary will leave for the Sound in a short time, where he will make his future home.
    Mr. I. A. Webb made a trip to Portland last week, as a delegate to the annual I.O.O.F. reunion.
    Dr. B. F. Adkins and Geo. S. Howard with their families have gone on a trip to the mountains.
    The ladies will give a strawberry festival on Friday evening to raise money to purchase a bell for the Baptist church of this city.
    The first number of the Valley Record, the new democratic journal of Ashland, was issued on Thursday by N. E. Jacobs. It is an eight-column folio, patent outside, and presents a very neat appearance.
    An election will be held in this city on the 22d inst. to vote on the question of "shall we bond the city of Medford for $5000 for the purpose of bringing water into the city for fire and manufacturing purposes?"
    The board of trade met last week, and Mr. J. E. Drucks' proposition to bring water into the town was considered, and a committee of four were appointed to act with a committee from the council on the proposition.
Oregonian, Portland, May 22, 1888, page 7


CHAS. E. WOLVERTON, President.            
J. R. WRISTMAN, Vice-President.
J. W. CUSICK, Treasurer.                               J. K. ELDERKIN, Sec. and Manager.
The Farmers and Merchants Insurance Company.
CAPITAL STOCK, $300,000.
CASH PAID UP, $60,000.00.
ALBANY, OREGON.
WM. ULRICH, District Agent  -  -  MEDFORD, OREGON.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 25, 1888 et seq., page 2


    It will be the proper thing for Jacksonville and Medford to join in a celebration in one of the groves between the two places.
    It is expected that church buildings will be erected at Ashland and Medford by the Catholic residents of the respective towns.
    The Republicans have nominated R. T. Lawton, one of Medford's real estate agents, as a candidate for the legislature to fill the vacancy caused by the withdrawal of Dr. Geary.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 25, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Several new streets are being laid out and extensions of others made.
    The Empire Hotel is being enlarged and improved by its new owner, Col. Faris.
    Rev. G. W. Black of Medford has purchased 40 acres of land near Grants Pass.
    Jacksonville and Medford should and probably will have a joint celebration on the 4th of July.
    I. A. Webb, representative to the grand lodge from Medford lodge of I.O.O.F., has returned home.
    Several real estate transactions have taken place lately, and our town is rapidly filling up and improving.
    Phil. Butcher, the well-known knight of the cleaver, has opened a butcher shop at Ashland. Success to him.
    The ladies of the Baptist Church gave an ice cream and strawberry festival last night, which was well attended and proved much of a success. The net receipts were very fair.
    The proposition of a joint celebration of the coming 5th of July by the people of Jacksonville and Medford, at some point between the two places, receives much attention and will probably be acted upon favorably.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 25, 1888, page 3

MEDFORD ITEMS.
MEDFORD, May 22.
    The Medford board of trade is doing much to encourage immigration.
    Real estate transactions have been numerous during the past few days.
    Capt. Heale, of Southern California, is in the city prospecting, and will locate.
    J. S. Howard, surveyor, is busy platting several suburban ranches for residence tracts.
    The farmers are complaining of the lack of rain, and crops in many sections are looking poor.
    Every train brings fresh arrivals of California and Eastern people, looking for homes.
    C Street [Central] has been extended to within a short distance of Central Point, and is now the boulevard of the city.
    Medford has determined upon a barbecue picnic for the Fourth of July, and will run special local trains that day.
    Medford boasts of the most beautiful lady artist in Southern Oregon, and our boys are all having their photos taken.
    Why are not the city ordinances against vagrants enforced? Tramps are numerous, and work is plentiful. Clean the streets. Run off the nuisances.
    The coming hope of Medford is an infusion of Eastern blood and brains and the evolution of modern progressiveness. Do not let it be said of the city of the valley that she lies in "sleepy" hollow. The first inspiration to hopeful life is self-help.
    Rev. Mr. Miller preached, Sunday morning, a sermon upon the "Cause and Cure of Earthquakes." Nearly a century ago the Rev. John Wesley preached a similar sermon. Medford people don't take much stock in Wesley's sermon, as against well accepted scientific views.
Oregonian, Portland, May 25, 1888, page 7


    Spencer Childers has [illegible] and some other property in Salinas for 160 acres of land on Rogue River, Jackson County, Oregon, and will take his departure for that place in a few days. Mr. & Mrs. Furman, with whom Mr. Childers made the trade, will henceforth reside in Salinas. Mrs. F. is a sister of Mrs. W. P. Nichols of this city.
Salinas, California Weekly Index, May 31, 1888


    Dr. Pryce of Medford is one of the best and most popular physicians in southern Oregon, and has filled the office of coroner very efficiently and acceptably for one term. The size of his majority is hard to estimate now, as it will be very large.
"Our Ticket," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1888, page 2


Another Railroad Proposition.
    Nelson Bennett, the well-known railroad contractor, has signified his willingness of building and operating a narrow-gauge railroad between Jacksonville and the main line of the railroad, if the people will offer him sufficient inducements. He has the necessary plant and plenty of iron, and it will take him only a few weeks to build and equip the road. The Times has always been, and is yet, strongly in favor of railroad connection, as it seems quite important to our town's prosperity. Mr. Bennett's proposition is probably the most businesslike which has yet been presented, and our citizens should consider it seriously and at once, too.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1888, page 3


Pointer for Fruit Growers.
    Every orchardman who wants gold coin for his fruit crop this year must go to work immediately and thin out the fruit on his trees--thin it out well--and cultivate the orchards. If you don't do this there is no use in your raising fruits. This year we have the railroad completed to California and will have to compete with California in the size of fruit, as well as flavor. Freight rates are high, and it will not pay to ship scrub fruit. If you expect to sell, go to work and unload your trees and loosen up the ground around them.
L. MARTIN.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1888, page 3


    Wheat is quoted at 47 cents a bushel at the Medford warehouse, showing that the price of grain is still low.
    F. Hubbard of Medford, the well-known dealer in agricultural implements, etc., keeps a large and first-class stock of goods, which he sells at prices that defy competition. Read his advertisement elsewhere and give him a call.
    Immigrants are flowing into southern Oregon in greater numbers than usual. This section is gaining a good name everywhere, and will attract many in search of homes in the near future. All that is lacking is proper advertising, and in this particular Washington Territory is away ahead of this state.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1888, page 3


    Nelson Bennett, the great railroad contractor, will build a narrow-gauge railroad line between this place and the county seat, if the proper inducements are given him. This is an enterprise of much importance to both towns and should be greatly encouraged.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. W. Cunnyngham and family intend leaving for Seattle, W.T. before long.
    Rev. E. McLean of Linkville has accepted a call from the Presbyterian Church at this place.
    A grand celebration of the 4th of July will take place, and extensive preparations are under way.
    A large crowd greeted the Democratic speakers here Wednesday. The speeches were excellent and had a good effect.
    J. B. Wrisley, as will be seen by notice elsewhere, has withdrawn from the firm of Wrisley & Miller, real estate agents.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman will deliver a tariff speech at Grants Pass tomorrow evening. He has no superior in southern Oregon in the discussion of this subject.
    Attention is called to the advertisement of F. Hubbard, the pioneer dealer in agricultural implements, who is in the field with a larger stock than ever.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1888, page 3


F. HUBBARD,
DEALER IN
Agricultural Implements,
ZIMMERMAN'S FRUIT EVAPORATOR

And Manufacturer's Agent for the
CELEBRATED NEWTON WAGON,
Which has a reputation second to none. Also Agent for the
EMMERSON, TALCOTT & CO.'S, ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS,
Standard Reapers, Hay Rakes, with steel wheels, and Mowers with cutting power greater than any other mower, with less draft, and the only machine with Sickle Edge Guard Plates, which prevent the grass from slipping forward when the section strikes it, besides having the only guard that sharpens itself by use. Call and see the serrated guard before purchasing.
THE NORWEGIAN PLOW CO.'S GOODS,
of Dubuque, Iowa, known the world over as the best ever made.
    All these goods are manufactured expressly for the Coast Trade and shipped through the carloads from the factory, enabling me to sell at very low prices. Call and see for yourselves.
F. HUBBARD                    -   -   -   -                    MEDFORD, OREGON.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1888 et seq., page 2


Medford Items.
    Grand Fourth of July celebration at Medford this year.
    James Elder of this place has just completed a successful term of school in Antioch precinct.
    Messrs. Davis and Stewart, of Santa Cruz, Cal., have located here and will open a large flour and feed store in a few days.
    D. C. Herrin started for San Francisco last Monday, where he will take in all the latest points of Photography. He will be gone about three weeks.
    Chas. Howard, Geo. Webb and Lon Woodford, of the R.R. surveying party, spent last Saturday in town, the rain having stopped work for a few days.
    At the special election held last Saturday it was decided by a large majority to bond the city for $5,000 for a full system of water works for fire purposes.
    Miss Jennie Wilcox and Mrs. Harris have opened a dressmaking establishment in the Central Hotel, where they will be pleased to receive all orders in their line.
    Every train brings persons seeking a home in Southern Oregon. Medford being situated so near the center of the valley, a great many stop here and seldom fail finding a home.
    Mr. J. H. Faris, the new proprietor of the Empire House, is making many substantial improvements on the property, besides thoroughly renovating the house throughout. It will be open for the public about the 1st of July.
    Quite a number of the boys of this place are in the habit of running in the street and hanging on behind wagons passing by. It is very dangerous sport to say the least, and some of them will no doubt get severely hurt if they do not stop it.
    Medford will celebrate the coming Fourth in grand style. A large amount has already been subscribed, and no pains will be spared to make it the leading celebration of the valley. A grand barbecue and free dinner will be one of the leading features. There will be a dance in Childers' new brick building at night. Come, everybody, and have a good time.
Ashland Tidings, June 1, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
MEDFORD, May 30.
    Mr. W. H. Norris of Illinois is in the city.
    Mr. W. H. Barr is suffering from inflamed eyes.
    Medford should erect a suitable city hall for its public officers.
    Dr. Pickel of Tennessee has located in our city to practice.
    Rev. M. McClain takes charge of the Presbyterian Church in a short time.
    The Catholics will soon begin the erection of a church and other buildings.
    Medford will soon be in receipt of daily weather reports from the signal service.
    The citizens of Medford are agitating the question of the erection of a large hotel.
    W. H. Benham of Chicago and S. L. Culp of New York, capitalists, are in the city.
    Memorial Day hereabouts appears to exist only in the memory and not in the practice.
    Allen B. Matthews of Albany, Or. is in the city looking around for bargains in real estate.
    Judge Penniss and his accomplished wife and beautiful daughter paid Medford a visit of late.
    Copious rains have fallen within the past few days, and all fears of short crops have vanished.
    The proposition to build water works and provide a sewerage system for the city carried by a majority of 7 to 1.
    Quite a shower of hail and rain visited this section Tuesday, but the hail did no damage while the rain was most welcome.
    Several new business houses have been opened of late and more are to follow, as nearly every train brings fresh arrivals looking for locations.
    Excursion trains for the Fourth of July celebration will come from San Francisco and Portland. Tickets good for twenty days and at reduced rates.
Oregonian, Portland, June 1, 1888, page 7


Sudden Death Near Medford.
    MEDFORD, Or., June 2.--R. C. Fielder, a prominent ranchman and late arrival from the East, dropped dead today, while walking in a field.
Oregonian, Portland, June 3, 1888, page 8


Medford Items.
MEDFORD, June 4.
    Judge Walton is erecting a handsome residence, having sold his old one to a late arrival.
    A large wholesale and retail agricultural and furniture establishment will soon be opened in our midst.
    M. E. Beatty has entered upon the practice of law and will soon win his "spurs" in the case of Biggs vs. Biggs.
    S. W. Speas and family, of California, arrived overland this week and have located upon their ranch near town.
    The city is making rapid strides towards metropolitan airs and is ever ready to encourage progress in the right direction.
    Col. J. B. Riddle has purchased a set of Bell telephones for his hotel, and we enjoy telephonic communication with our neighbors.
Oregonian, Portland, June 6, 1888, page 3


O.&T. Co. to C. D. Walrath, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 17 in Medford; $195.
O.T. Co. to M. P. Phipps, lot 20, blk 21 in Medford; $300.
G. W. Howard to Sarah A. Bateman, lots 7 and 8, blk 18 in Medford; $135.
C. D. Walrath to M. S. Damon, lot 4, blk 18 in Medford; $70.
G. W. Howard to Lucy A. Clark, lot 11, blk 16 in Medford; $75.
J. S. Higinbotham to M. S. Damon, lot 9, blk 16 in Medford; $65.
G. W. Howard to M. S. Damon, lot 10, blk 16 in Medford; $75.
O.&T. Co. to M. Maule, lots 3 and 4, blk 12 in Medford; $150.
E. A. Cummons to J. W. Cummons, lots 4 and 5, blk 52 in Medford; $100.
F. Galloway to J. H. Caruthers, blk 5 and portion of blk 6, Medford; $1500.
J. H. Caruthers to Geo. Yaudes, lot 1in blk 5 in Medford; $1000.
O.T. Co. to town of Medford, blk 68 for a public park.
C. C. Beekman to Nannie Barr, lots 14, 15 and 16, blk 44 in Medford; $110.
C. C. Beekman to town of Medford, blk 77 in Medford; $275.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1888, page 1


Prohibition Party Wanting Here.
    The prohibition vote has almost entirely disappeared in this county, most of it having been consolidated with the Republicans. This will account, in a considerable measure, for the reduction of the Democratic majority in southern Oregon, and is more evidence that the Prohibitionists are mainly original Republicans.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1888, page 3


    The Farmer's & Merchants' Insurance Co. of Albany lost $5,000 to the Goldendale, W.T. fire, and they sent an agent up immediately to pay it. This company is reliable, prompt in the payment of its losses and a good one for the people of this state to insure with, being a home institution. Wm. Ulrich of Medford is district agent.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1888, page 3


E. B. PICKEL, M.D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N ,
Medford, Oregon.
---------

Graduate of the University of Louisville.
Office on B Street.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1888 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Attention is called to the professional card of Dr. Pickel, who lately located here.
    Rev. E. McLean, who has taken charge of the Presbyterian Church here, has arrived from Linkville, accompanied by his family.
    One of the grandest celebrations ever held in Jackson County will take place here on July 4th. A first-class programme is in course of preparation, and no pains will be spared to make this the event of the season. Everybody is invited to participate.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Messrs. Campbell & Palm have opened an insurance agency on Front Street. They have come to stay and should receive a good share of patronage.
    H. E. Baker has moved his office in with M. E. Beatty.
    The election passed very quietly here, although a great interest was taken by both sides.
    The people of Jackson County have tired of the way things have been carried on of late, and have decided to make a change by electing Max Muller for County Clerk.
    Miss Jennie Wilcox has gone to Woodville to visit her parents.
    Fowler brothers returned from Seattle last Sunday. They did not find any place that suited them as well as Medford.
    J. E. Drucks left last Tuesday for Portland on business connected with the building of the grist mill at this place.
    Julius Goldsmith arrived here from Albany this week, and will open a full and complete stock of groceries within a few days.
    Miss Jennie Wilcox and Mrs. Harris have opened a dressmaking establishment in the Central Hotel, where they will be pleased to receive all orders in their line.
Ashland Tidings, June 8, 1888, page 3


G. W. Howard to Wm. Slinger, lots 7 and 8 in blk 46, Medford; $120.
O.T. Co. to T. W. Johnson, lots 1, 2 3, blk 66, Medford; $135.
O.T. Co. to C. Andrew, lots 1 and 2, blk 25, Medford; $125.
Nannie Barr to I. A. Webb, lot 3 in blk 2 in Barr's add. to Medford; $450.
Nannie Barr to B. S. Webb, lot 4 in blk 2 in Barr's add. to Medford; $405 [sic].
O.T. Co. to T. A. Murray, lot 3 in blk 1 in Medford; $70.
O.T. Co. to G. W. Wolters, lots 12 and 13 in blk 14, Medford; $100.
H. E. Hoover to W. G. Cooper, lot 1 in blk 14, Medford; $
800.
J. H. Caruthers to M. J. Patton, lot 2 in blk 4, Galloway's add. to Medford; $250.
T. B. Houston to P. H. Oviatt, lot 1 in blk 60, Medford; $125.
G. H. Baker to J. D. Whitman, lots 3 and 4 in blk
48, Medford; $78.80.
J. Bradley to A. Griffin, lot 18, blk 13 in Medford; $900.
J. Shadle to D. T. Lawton, property in Medford; $100.
G. H. Baker to H. N. Lumsden, property in Medford; $700.
E. F. Walker to M. J. Patton, lots 1 and 2, blk 54 in Medford; $175.
O.T. Co. to M. J. Patton, lots 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, blk 17, and lots 5 and 6, blk 21 in Medford; $890.
I. J. Phipps to R. Luellen, lots 7 and 8 [omission] in Medford; $50.
H. E. Baker to Amelia Furry, lot 6, blk 52 in Medford; $100.
C. B. Carlisle to J. S. Dilley, property in Medford; $300.
G. W. Howard to T. W. Johnson, property in Medford; $400.
T. W. Johnson to David Minnick, property in Medford; $700.
G. H. Baker to E. M. Lumsden, property in Medford; $1600.
G. H. Baker et al. to Sarah A. Sutton, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 11, and lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 10, Beatty's add. to Medford; $200.
O.T. Co. to Mrs. S. A. Bateman, lots 1 and 2, blk 31 in Medford; $60.
G. H. Baker et al. to A. B. Seal, lot 4, blk 17, Beatty's add. to Medford; $40.
G. H. Baker et al. to O. N. Fowler, property in Medford, Beatty's add; $170.
G. W. Howard to A. Johnson, property in Medford; $700.
Plat of Short's add. to town of Medford.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1888, page 1


Lawn Sociable.
    The ladies of Medford will give a lawn sociable Tuesday evening, June 19th, for the benefit of the Presbyterian Church, which will be held on the grounds west of the depot. A pleasing and unique programme will be furnished, and ice cream, cake and fruit will be provided. Japanese ladies will serve tea to all who desire it. There will be music by the choir, and the Medford brass band is expected to add to the enjoyment of the evening. Should the weather prove unfavorable the sociable will be held in Stanley's hall. All are invited.
COMMITTEE.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1888, page 3


    John Dubell and Miss Eulina Lepuherr were married at Roseburg recently. They have since come to Jackson County.
    The Medford celebration on the 4th of July will be a grand one in every particular. No pains are being spared to make it the chief event of the season.
    Jacksonville, having indulged in a grand celebration last year, will give way to other towns in the county this time. Next year it will again come to the front.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Considerable town property is still being sold.
    J. B. Riddle has returned from a trip to his farm in Douglas County.
    D. W. Crosby may again be found at the Riddle House.
    Much improvement is going on in our town, and its population is rapidly increasing.
    Rev. F. S. Noel of Jacksonville is in town for the purpose of making arrangements for the construction of a Catholic Church at this place.
    The celebration at this place will be a grand affair. A huge crowd is anticipated, and no doubt everybody will go away satisfied. A first-class programme is in preparation.
    Owing to the unfavorable weather the proposed lawn party for the benefit of the Presbyterian Church was changed to a sociable at Howard's hall, which proved a very pleasant affair. There was a large attendance, including several couples from Jacksonville, and a neat sum was realized.
    Steps are being taken to secure better protection from the fire fiend, and it is proposed to obtain a good supply of water from Bear Creek. We are sorry to learn that progress has been interrupted by the objection of owners of important riparian rights, who wish to be remunerated therefor.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1888, page 3


BORN.
WEBB--In Medford, May 20th, to Mr. and Mrs. B. S. Webb, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1888, page 3


G R A N D
4th of JULY CELEBRATION
AND BARBECUE
At Medford, Or.
----
THERE WILL BE A GRAND celebration, barbecue and free dinner at Medford on Independence Day, and a cordial invitation is extended to the citizens of Jackson and surrounding counties to participate.
OFFICERS OF THE DAY:
    President of the day, J. S. Howard; chaplain, Rev. M. A. Williams; reader, Dr. E. P. Geary; orator, Hon. Willard Crawford; marshal, D. W. Crosby.
PROGRAMME:
    Hoisting of flag and firing national salute at sunrise. The procession will form at the depot grounds at 9:30 o'clock A.M., and, after marching through the principal streets of Medford, will proceed to the grove, where the following exercises will be observed: Salute of thirteen guns; music by choir; music by band; music by choir; reading Declaration of Independence; music by band; oration; music by choir; dinner; including roasted ox and mutton.
AFTERNOON AMUSEMENTS.
    In the afternoon there will be a baby show, racing of all kinds, climbing the greased pole and catching the greased pig, etc., for prizes. A match game of baseball will also be played. In the evening there will be a magnificent display of
FIREWORKS!
    The celebration will close with a
GRAND BALL
in the evening.
    The Henley (Cal.) brass and string band will furnish music for the occasion.
    Half-fare rates on the railroad have been secured. Come, everybody, and enjoy yourselves.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1888 et seq., page 3


Medford Items.
    J. B. Riddle is looking after his farm in Douglas County this week. D. W. Crosby has charge of the hotel in his absence.
    Miss Mary Wilcox, of Woodville, is visiting her sister, Miss Jennie Wilcox, of this place.
    General Babcock, of San Francisco, is in town, a guest of Judge Crawford.
    A case from Phoenix was tried before Justice Barkdull last Monday, and decided in favor of defendant.
    The Wrought Iron Range Co. received another carload of their celebrated ranges last week. They are selling a great many throughout the county.
    C. C. Ragsdale and Scott Griffin, of Tolo, were in town Wednesday. They report everything in a flourishing condition at Tolo.
    Persons having poultry for sale will do well to call on W. H. Fowler, of this place, who will always pay the highest market price in cash for eggs and poultry.
    A great deal of pleasure is anticipated by our citizens in the coming lawn social to be given next Tuesday evening, June 19th, the proceeds to be donated to the Presbyterian church. Great effort will be made to render it the most delightful event of the season. Everybody is cordially invited to be present.
Ashland Tidings, June 15, 1888, page 3


I. J. Phipps to D. T. Lawton, property in Medford; $500.
B. W. Powell to J. Gaines, property in Medford; $3000.
J. Gaines to B. W. Powell, land in Medford; $3000.
Nannie Barr to G. C. Noble, property in Medford; $450.
O.T. Co. to J. B. Riddle, property in Medford; $134.
Map of Cottage add. to Medford.
Map of Beatty's add. to Medford.
Map of Medford, being in secs. 24 and 28, tp 37, R2W.
M. G. Royal to Emma Jacobs, property in Medford; $500.
Wm. Angle, F. M. Plymale and J. W. Short to Sarah E. Perdue, lot 9, blk 3 in Cottage add. to Medford; $200.
J. Hamlin to J. H. Faris, lot 10, blk 13 in Medford; $2000
Nannie Barr to J. H. Faris, property in Medford; $500.
Nannie Barr to J. H. Faris, property in Medford; $250.
E. J. Wilson to Nannie Barr, lot 5 and 6, blk 68, Medford; $300.
Nannie Barr to D. T. Lawton, lot 2, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford; $300.
E. P. Geary to R. Pryce, lots 8, 9 and 10, blk 15, Medford; $1850.
G. H. Baker to H. E. Baker, power of atty. to sell our interest in Beatty's add. to Medford.
C. B. Carlisle to J. S. Dilley, land in Medford; $300.
Sarah E. Purdin to J. W. Short et al., land in Beatty's add. to Medford; $100.
Nannie Barr to C. J. Howard, E ½ lot 1, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford; $250.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 22, 1888, page 1


    A beef and sheep will be roasted whole at Medford on July 4th. Everybody is invited to partake of the feast free of charge.
    The price of wheat is still low, with no probability of raising soon. Some has been sold lately at the Medford warehouse for 46 cents a bushel.
    The Bailey divorce case will be appealed to the supreme court, C. D. Bailey not being satisfied with the decision of the lower court in giving J. H. Barnum and wife charge of his child.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 22, 1888, page 3


    Rev. F. S. Noel is making arrangements at Ashland and Medford for the construction of Catholic churches.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 22, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Clear weather again.
    Walter Jackson interviewed his many customers here Wednesday.
    Messrs. Follett & Fowler will open a large furniture store here next week.
    Three hundred and fifty persons took meals at the Riddle House last Sunday. Pretty good for one day.
    Julius Goldsmith will run a free delivery wagon for the accommodation of his customers after this week.
    A large crowd witnessed the tight-rope exhibition here last Friday given by Davidson Bros. They are first-class performers.
    The R.R. company intend lengthening the depot platform at this place 500 feet, to accommodate the large trains now being run over this road.
    Everybody should come to Medford to spend the Fourth. Great preparations are being made, and no pains will be spared to make it the leading celebration of the valley.
    The Wrought Iron Range Co. have moved their headquarters to Roseburg, and have finished canvassing this section. They are gentlemen in every respect, and we all regret their leaving.
    The sociable last Tuesday evening was a decided success. Owing to the inclemency of the weather, it was decided to postpone the lawn sociable until later in the season, and hold this one in the hall.
Ashland Tidings, June 22, 1888, page 3



    Mr. H. E. Battin returned yesterday from a visit to Southern Oregon. He reports that section as looking fine and everything prosperous and everybody happy. They have had lots of rain out there but not enough to hurt. There will be a big crop of peaches, plenty of the better varieties of apples and an abundance of pears. The fruitgrowers there have to compete with California in this market, but they have the advantage of a cent and a half a pound in express rates in their favor and so should be able to hold their own.
"Local News in Brief," Oregonian, Portland, June 26, 1888, page 9


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A number of real estate transactions are still taking place.
    Rev. G. W. Black and family have removed to Grants Pass.
    J. B. Riddle elsewhere calls for a general settlement. His business must be closed at once.
    Wm. Ulrich has sold his interest in the saloon building opposite the depot to John Noland for $1,000.
    Julius Goldsmith, lately of Eugene City, has opened one of the nicest grocery stores in southern Oregon.
    Recorder Barkdull has resigned, and Judge Walton has been appointed by the trustees to succeed him.
    Miss Eva Galloway of this place, who is now attending the State University, will return home in a few days.
    Jasper Crenshaw, who is now following his trade at Ager, Cal., is paying his friends in this section a visit.
    E. J. Smillie keeps an excellent variety store and restaurant and is liberally patronized. He spares no pains to give satisfaction.
    No doubt our town will be crowded on the 4th of July. The programme which will be observed is second to none and will attract many hither.
    There is much stir in anticipation of the coming 4th of July, for which event our citizens are making much preparation. A grand time will be had, and no mistake.
    J. H. Faris, the new proprietor of the Empire Hotel, is enlarging the building and thoroughly renovating it. He will reopen it in a short time and keep a first-class place.
    J. B. Riddle will retire from the management of the Riddle House on July 1st, and will be succeeded by M. A. Brentano, who fully understands the business. Mr. R. and family have made numerous friends while in the valley, who will regret to hear of their departure for Douglas County.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 29, 1888, page 2


    Business is dull in Southern Oregon.
    Half-fare railroad rates on July 4th.
    S. McCallister of Medford was in town with a load of brooms a few days since.
    A tramp armed with bagpipes has been annoying the people of Southern Oregon lately.
    Tramps and peddlers were never so numerous as now. They are a regular pest and should be legislated against.
    The Jacksonville and Medford baseball clubs will indulge in a friendly game at the latter place tomorrow afternoon.
    Those having claims against J. B. Riddle of Medford are requested to present them for settlement, and all indebted to him in any manner will call and settle at once.
    The handsomest lady on the 4th of July ground at Medford will be presented with one dozen cabinet photographs of herself by D. C. Herrin, the leading photographer of Southern Oregon.
    Not many immigrants are arriving, and real estate transactions are not numerous. After harvest there will no doubt be a lively real estate market, as a large immigration from California and east of the Rocky Mountains may be expected.
    Most of the effects of Dr. Lempert were sold last Saturday at sheriff's sale. There were quite a number of them and some very valuable. Nearly everything went quite low, however. The mystery concerning his sudden departure still remains unraveled.
    H. E. Battin has returned from a visit to Southern Oregon. He reports that section as looking fine and everybody happy. They have had lots of rain out there, but not enough to hurt. There will be a big crop of peaches, plenty of the better variety of apples and an abundance of pears. The fruit growers there have to compete with California in this market, but they have the advantage of a cent and a half a pound in express rates in their favor, and so should be able to hold their own.--[Oregonian.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 29, 1888, page 3


    Capt. A. J. Stewart, a brother of Hon. J. H. and F. M. Stewart, arrived from the East a short time since and will locate. He has purchased some land of S. B. Edsall and J. A. Anderson.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 29, 1888, page 3


    The barbecue at Medford will be one of the features of the 4th of July in this section.
    The Medford celebration will be one of the very best and doubtless will be very largely attended.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 29, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Hurrah for Harrison and Morton!
    N. A. Jacobs, of the Valley Record, was in town several days this week.
    The R.R. Co. have discharged the Mongolians and employed white men on this section.
    A little child of Wm. Angle, of this place, is quite low with fever, but is improving slowly at present.
    Perry Foster of Antioch precinct was in town the forepart of the week, with a load of choice wood which he sold to Goldsmith.
    Quite a number of newcomers are in town looking up a place to locate. Several have bought property here during the last few days.
    The first ripe peaches of the season made their appearance in the market last week. They were raised on the Bodine place near here.
    W. H. Fowler, of this place, pays the highest market price in CASH for all kinds of poultry and eggs. Give him a call before selling elsewhere.
    It is reported that J. B. Riddle has disposed of his hotel business here to M. A. Brentano, and will leave with his family for their old home in Douglas County in about two weeks. He is a first-class hotel man, and the people of Medford regret his leaving very much.
Ashland Tidings, June 29, 1888, page 3


JULY 4, 1888
    Jessie Fane Ann & Katie John and Eva Robison went to Medford to attend the Celebration, Wellie went on the pony. Grand Pa went with us in the Hack. Emmett went on the train 
    There were about twenty five hundred people out.
Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent


    A camp meeting will be held at Heber Grove, commencing on July 12th, under the auspices of the M.E. Church, South. All are invited to attend.
    The price of wheat is very low, prime bringing only 44 cents a bushel at the Medford warehouse. Grain raising is not profitable at such low figures.
    The Jacksonville and Medford baseball clubs indulged in a friendly game on the grounds of the latter last Saturday. It resulted in a victory for our nine.
    The Phoenix and Medford baseball clubs have lately been playing a number of games. Some good playing has been done, and the honors are about equally divided.
    It is estimated that there were nearly 4,000 people at the Medford celebration on July 4th, which was probably the largest crowd that assembled anywhere in southern Oregon that day. The programme was a first-class one in every particular and carried out to the letter. Everybody speaks highly of it.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1888, page 3


    Geo. Yaudes has removed to his former residence in Sterlingville precinct from Medford.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ward Douglas, the insurance agent, may be seen among us again.
    J. T. Kennedy, lately of Applegate, is now a resident of this place.
    Medford has another saddle and hardness shop; also a new furniture store.
    Our population is increasing and there are some real estate transactions.
    A number of improvements are under way in different portions of town.
    The crowd that assembled on the 4th of July was the largest ever seen here.
    Frank Kasshafer of Jacksonville is assisting H. H. Wolters at the Monarch Saloon in Medford.
    A new barber shop has been started on Front Street, in the rooms formerly occupied by Baker & Merrill.
    J. B. Riddle is still in charge of the Riddle House, the Hotaling Co. of Portland having failed to come to time as yet.
    The firm of Harris & Bunch has been dissolved, and T. A. Harris is again conducting the butcher business at this place.
    Haskins & Lawton keeps a complete and first-class line of drugs, medicines, etc., and never fail in pleasing all who call on them.
    Dr. Geary and Miss Ella Gore witnessed commencement exercises at the State University in Eugene City last week.
    Judge Walton and T. A. Harris were in Jacksonville yesterday. The former is building a fine residence in the northern portion of town.
    Another store building is being built in town, on C Street, and will soon  be occupied by a gentleman who has lately become a resident of this place.
    Medford's 4th of July celebration is highly spoken of everywhere, and no doubt was more of a success than any other in southern Oregon.
    The Empire Hotel has been enlarged, nicely painted and otherwise improved. It presents a good appearance and will be conducted in the best style.   
    The Union livery stables was crowded with business as it never was before on the 4th of July. Ed. knows how to conduct a livery stable, and is ably assisted by Shorty.
    Mrs. I. L. Hamilton was adjudged to be the handsomest lady by the judges of the celebration here, and gets the photographs offered by D. C. Herrin, our enterprising photographer.
    W. G. Cooper & Son have one of the largest and best stocks of saddles, harness, etc., in Jackson County and sells at prices that give satisfaction. Call on them, if you need anything in their line.
    Dr. Pryce is kept very busy and his practice extends the length and breadth of Rogue River Valley. He was a few days since called to Ashland, in consultation with Doctors Parson and Beebe, in the cases of Mesdames Wilson and Dollarhide, who have been dangerously ill.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1888, page 3


His Earmarks Too Plain.
EDITOR TIMES:
    If the Medford correspondent of the Ashland Tidings will sign his surname, leaving off the last syllable, the public will have no difficulty in locating the author of the would-be witty and wholly ungrammatical articles that occasionally emanate from his brain and pen.
SEVERAL LADIES.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1888, page 3


    Medford and Jacksonville are joined by a Bell telephone, which extends between the U.S. Hotel and the Riddle House.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1888, page 3


B. W. Powell to Lucy E. Langley, property in Medford; $450.
B. W. Powell to J. C. Cowles, property in Medford; $200.
J. C. Cowles to B. W. Powell, property in Medford; $200.
B. W. Powell to W. H. Turner, property in Medford; $100.
Map of Medford.
Map of Beatty's addition to Medford.
Map of the Cottage addition to Medford.
J. C. Cowles to D. T. Lawton, property in Medford; $6.50.
O. Harbaugh to H. Richards, property in Medford; $185.
Beatty & Baker to Anna
P. Hammon, property in Medford; $200.
I. J. Phipps to H. Richards, property in Medford; $
400.
G. S. Walton to H. Richards, property in Medford; $
1000.
W. Lynch to S. Childers, property in Medford; $200.
I. J. Phipps to Catherine Simpson, property in Medford; $200.
Map of Park addition to Medford.
O.T. Co. to J. Kavanaugh, property in Medford; $150.
B. W. Powell to J. Brinegar, property in Medford; $550.
O.T. Co. to H. F. Wood, property in Medford; $125.
H. F. Wood to B. S. Webb, property in Medford.
O. Holtan to E. Russ, property in Medford; $1000.
C. W. Wolters to B. S. Webb, property in Medford; $150.
H. F. Wood to C. W. Wolters, property in Medford.
B. S. Webb to C. W. Wolters, property in Medford; $100.
W. Ulrich to J. Noland, property in Medford; $1000.
G. H. Baker to Mrs. C. K. Alford, property in Medford; $90.
J. A. Whiteside to D. Reynolds, property in Medford; $500.
B. W. Powell to J. C. Corum, lots 1 to 10, inclusive, blk 5 in Medford; $700.
J. Hutchens to J. F. Tryer, lot 11, blk 40 in Medford; $75.
I. J. Phipps to J. Hutchens, lot 11, blk 40 in Medford; $25.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1888, page 1


    Prof. Vawter of Eugene City and Mr. Bentley, lately from the eastern states, made our town a call during the week.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1888, page 3


OUR NATAL DAY.
AT MEDFORD.
    It was estimated that nearly 4000 people were in attendance at the celebration in Medford. About 10:30 o'clock the procession, headed by the liberty car, formed and proceeded to the grounds, marshaled by D. W. Crosby. It was handsome to behold. J. S. Howard acted as president of the day, and announced a first-class programme of literary exercises. The well-known Henley brass band furnished instrumental music for the occasion, while an excellent choir was also in attendance. Hon. Willard Crawford delivered the oration, Rev. M. A. Williams the prayer, and M. E. Beatty read the Declaration of Independence. Dinner was then announced; and such a feast as it proved! The tables fairly groaned under their load of good things. The large crowd was easily accommodated and there was plenty to spare. The barbecue was a feature. Then came the amusements. The engrossing subject was the baby show, the first prize being awarded to the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Elliott of Jacksonville. Mrs. I. L. Hamilton of Medford was adjudged the handsomest lady on the grounds, and received the prize. Much interest was manifested in the foot races and games, which occupied a large portion of the afternoon. The display of fireworks in the evening was good, although an accident destroyed some of the best pieces. The attendance at the ball in the evening was quite large and it passed off very pleasantly. Taken as a whole, the celebration was a grand success and the management have reason to congratulate themselves on having the largest crowd assembled in the valley on that day.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    I. M. Harvey is furnishing this market with excellent vegetables, for which he finds a ready sale.
    Dr. Pryce's team took fright in Heber Grove a few days since and demolished the buggy to which they were attached.
    F. M. Mingus continues to furnish this market with the best milk, and his patronage is consequently increasing steadily.
    J. H. Faris has thoroughly renovated the Empire Hotel and is furnishing the best of accommodations for all at reasonable rates.
    John Noland is now the sole proprietor of the Railroad Saloon building, having purchased Wm. Ulrich's interest several days ago for $1000.
    Henry Smith's store, under the efficient management of Mr. and Mrs. Cranfill, is doing a big business. The know how to treat their customers.
    Prof. Vawter of Eugene City and Mr. Bentley, lately from the eastern states, have rented Mrs. Stanley's brick building and will soon open a bank there.
    Rev. E. McLean will hold services at the Presbyterian Church in this place Sundays, both morning and evening, excepting the third Sunday morning in each month.
    J. B. Riddle, until lately the genial and enterprising host of the Riddle House, has transferred the management thereof, and with his family will remove to Douglas County in a few days. They have made many friends during their stay in Jackson County. We wish them prosperity in their new home.
    M. A. Brentano has taken charge of the Riddle House, which will retain its present name. He will thoroughly renovate it and spare no pains in keeping one of the best hotels in Southern Oregon. Mr. B. knows how to cater to the wants of the inner man, and we bespeak him a liberal share of the public patronage.
    Hon. Willard Crawford's oration at Medford on the 4th is spoken of by all as one of the best efforts ever made in that line in this county. A resolution was passed requesting that it be published. M. E. Beatty read the Declaration of Independence in an excellent manner, while the vocal and instrumental music was also very good.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    The new furniture store opened this week, in the store formerly occupied by Angle & Plymale.
    F. W. Clayton, our enterprising jeweler, started Tuesday morning for San Francisco on a business trip.
    M. A. Brentano now has charge of the Riddle House. J. B. Riddle has moved his family to their old home in Douglas County.
    Messrs. Scott, Hornlett, Wingston and Creed, of the Wrought Iron Range Co., came out from Roseburg to attend the celebration at this place. They are meeting with splendid success selling their ranges in Douglas County.
    J. S. Howard left for Waldo last Sunday to survey some mining claims in that section. He will be gone about a week.
    The heaviest shower of rain we have had this season fell Wednesday evening, flooding the ground and doing much damage to hay already down.
    It is not fair for the best paper in Jackson County to leave out a report of our delightful Fourth of July. We had a gala day. The celebration began with the arrival of the Henley Brass Band on the evening of the 3d, and continued with little interruption until their departure on the morning of the 5th, and they proved a valuable auxiliary to the choir, as well as the success of the day. The Declaration of Independence was read by Mr. M. E. Beatty, with good taste, and in good voice. The Hon. Judge Crawford, orator of the day, made a very happy, well-timed speech. The singing of the choir was well rendered, particularly the solo by Miss Lumsden. The day concluded with a grand ball at Howard's Hall.
Ashland Tidings, July 13, 1888, page 3



Accidents.
    Mrs. J. H. Huffer was summoned to Medford on Tuesday by a message stating that her sister, Mrs. E. McLean, had fallen and broken her hip. The note stated that the chances were against her recovery. Mrs. Huffer is still in Medford.
"Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 19, 1888, page 3


    The card of Dr. S. Danielson, who located at Medford not long since, may be found in another column.
    The price of grain is still quite low, good clean wheat bringing 46 cents at the Medford warehouse. There is some prospect for a slight advance in the near future.
    Attention is called to the advertisement of F. W. Clayton, the popular watchmaker and jeweler, of Medford, who carries a large and superior stock of jewelry, optical goods, watches, etc. He never fails in giving satisfaction.
    The Jacksonville Silver Cornet Band took a spin to Medford and back in their handsome bandwagon last Saturday evening. After rendering several of their choicest selections, they were the recipients of numerous courtesies at the hands of Medford's business men. The boys perform better than any other band in southern Oregon, to our way of thinking, and Medford doubtless realizes now that they play better than some imported bands.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 19, 1888, page 3


    John Dyar and wife have returned from southern California, and are assisting in the management of the Grand Central Hotel at Medford.
    John W. Dyar has returned from Red Bluff, Cal., and resumed prospecting some quartz mines in Jacksonville precinct. He has been gone over two months.
    Rev. F. S. Noel has been at Ashland and Medford for the purpose of making arrangements for the building of Catholic churches at both places. He succeeded in getting liberal subscriptions, which will ensure the construction of the edifices in the near future.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 19, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A heavy rain fell here last Tuesday night.
    Childers & Son have just completed a large kiln of superior brick.
    Dr. Pickel has opened an office on 7th Street, next door to Smith's variety store.
    Mr. Bentley, a newcomer, will probably start a bank at this place in the near future.
    E. G. Hurt is kept busy filling orders for the Universal Combination Fence, the best made.
    The Odd Fellows' cemetery near this place is being enclosed with a neat, new fence.
    Johnny Curry is now in the employ of J. S. Howard, Wells, Fargo & Co.'s agent at this place.
    Dr. Geary has returned from his trip to Seattle, W.T., which will soon be his future home.
    J. B. Riddle and family have gone to Douglas County, which will be their home in the future.
    Cal Cunnyngham and wife returned from Portland some time since and are now residing here.
    M. Purdin, the well-known blacksmith, is building a neat residence, which will soon be completed.
    A new hotel building is under course of construction west of the depot, which will be a substantial one.
    T. A. Harris is again sole proprietor of the Medford butcher shop, and furnishes the market with choice meats.
    Milton Maule, the scientific painter, is completing a neat, new residence. He is always energetic and enterprising.
    Dr. Martin of California is paying this place a professional visit, accompanied by his wife. He is an excellent dentist.
    The performing bears, who maintain three hale and hearty Italians, attracted considerable attention here last Friday evening.
    M. Galloway, father of our fellow townsman Frank Galloway, is paying this place a visit. He is well pleased with southern Oregon.
    Rev. F. S. Noel of Jacksonville was here a few days since, for the purpose of soliciting subscriptions for the building of a Catholic Church here.
    Follett & Fowler have opened a fine, large stock of furniture in the store building formerly occupied by Angle & Plymale, and are doing a lively business.
    Dr. S. Danielson, who located here some time since, is building up an excellent practice. He has met with good success and is steadily making friends.
    S. Rosenthal, as accommodating and popular as ever, may still be found at his old place of business. When you need anything in his line give "Rosy" a call.
    F. W. Clayton, our jeweler, lately returned from San Francisco, where he replenished his stock of goods and took in a number of pointers in his business. He is deserving of success.
    Dr. Jessup of Newport organized a post of the Grand Army of the Republic in this place one evening last week, with 28 charter members. M. S. Damon and R. T. Young are the chief officers.
    M. A. Brentano has changed the name of his house, which will hereafter be known as the Grand Central Hotel. He will conduct it in a first-class manner and spares no pains in giving satisfaction.
    Chas. Strang, who has been representing Medford lodge in the grand lodge of the     A.O.U.W., returned home during the week. Miss Helen Strang filled his place in the post office while he was gone.
    The music  by the Jacksonville Silver Cornet Band last Saturday evening was greatly appreciated. Our citizens made a great mistake in not engaging this band on the 4th of July, as it would have given great satisfaction and saved us a neat sum of money besides.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 19, 1888, page 3


I.O.O.F. Installations.
    Medford Lodge No. 73, July 6th.--S. Rosenthal, N.G.; Isaac Woolf, V.G.; M. Purdin, Sec.; H. G. Fairclo, F.S.; B. F. Adkins, Treas.; H. E. Baker, War.; P. W. Johnson, Cond.; B. F. Adkins, R.S.N.G.; L. L. Angle, L.S.N.G.; W. H. Gore, R.S.V.G.; E. G. Hurt, L.S.V.G.; S. L. Bennett, R.S.S.; H. G. Nicholson, L.S.S.; Ben Webb, I.S.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 19, 1888, page 3


DR. S. DANIELSON,
Physio-Medical
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N ,
Medford, Oregon.
Special attention given to Chronic Diseases.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 19, 1888 et seq., page 3


Medford Items.
    Warm weather this week.
    Wm. Edmunds received a new "Minnesota Chief" thresher by Tuesday's freight.
    Tuesday was the warmest day of the season, the thermometer reaching 104º in the shade.
    Medford is to have another meat market. The building is completed and will be opened in a few days.
    Dickison's hotel is fast nearing completion and will when finished be one of the finest buildings in town.
    Quite an excitement was caused Wednesday evening by the burning of a curtain in the Medford House. Fortunately no damage was done, although it was a narrow escape.
    Work on the brick building was begun again last Tuesday and will be rapidly pushed until completed. Childers & Son have just finished burning a kiln of 300,000 brick to be used in buildings to be put up this season.
    Last Sunday evening Mrs. McClain, the aged mother of Mrs. E. G. Hurt, of this place, had the misfortune to fall from a stairway to the floor, breaking her thigh besides receiving several severe bruises. Drs. Geary and Pickel are in attendance, and it is to be hoped that she will recover, although being in delicate health it will be a very severe strain upon her.
Ashland Tidings, July 20, 1888, page 3



MEDFORD NOTES.
MEDFORD, July 20, 1888.       
    Efforts will be made to discover artesian water.
    The hotels are full of strangers looking for locations.
    The members of the G.A.R. have formed a Medford post.
    The young people of Medford have organized a club for social amusements.
    The citizens would gladly welcome men of capital and energy to engage in manufacturing.
    The board of trade should erect a fruit palace near the railroad for the fruit exhibits.
    The [city] board of trustees have engaged Arthur B. Dennison of New York as principal of the public school.
    The boundaries of the city will be extended and the several additions to the town become part of the corporation.
    The Empire House has earned a well-merited reputation for being the most accommodating and well-kept hotel in Rogue River Valley.
    Follett & Fowler of New York have opened a large furniture establishment shipping large consignments from Portland and other points.
    The fruit and other crops are in most excellent condition and large shipments of peaches have been and are being made to Portland by Goldsmith and other firms. The Fruit Association meets next Saturday the 28th at Central Point.
    The following city improvements are under way: Childers' brick store building, Webb's brick store, Judge Walton's residence, Dr. Minnis' cottage, Dickison's large hotel and the water ditch together with a large number of other valuable frame stores and residences.
    Messrs. Stewart and Hon. J. D. Whitman have the finest fruit ranches in the county. Frequent visits by strangers are made to these beautiful places. The crops upon both are simply immense and are convincing evidence of what brains and energy will do in this glorious climate.
    [John H.] Bentley, president, and Stephen Davis, vice president of the First National Bank of Malvern, Iowa, have determined to open a branch bank in Medford, and are in the city perfecting arrangements. Mr. Bentley is the president of Hamilton County Bank, Syracuse, Kan., and W. [I.] Vawter of Eugene City, Ore., will assume charge of the branch here.
Oregonian, Portland, July 24, 1888, page 6



Runaway.
    Last Tuesday,on Green Springs Mountain, a team owned by E. Worman of Medford ran away coming down hill. He was driving the team while Mr. Morden, traveling agent for Akin, Selling & Co. of Portland, who was with him, walked behind. The mountain is both rocky and steep, and as Worman threw his weight forward on the brake, a sudden lurch of the wagon pitched him out over the horses, and the spring seat followed. As the horses started to run Mr. Morden sprang forward and undertook to stop them, when he was struck on the arm by the seat, breaking the bone. Worman fortunately escaped being run over, but is nursing a badly bruised hand. The team was stopped without any other great damage being done.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 26, 1888, page 3


Accident.
    John Hockenjos had the misfortune to fall from a load of hay near Medford one day last week, striking on his head, causing concussion of the brain, and receiving several bruises. Dr. Gill of this place was summoned, and under his treatment Mr. H. is recovering. He has been quite unfortunate during the past year, having met with accidents at different times.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 26, 1888, page 3


    The Medford brass band held a picnic at Gold Hill not long since, which was well attended and passed off pleasantly.
    The Grand Central Hotel at Medford is proving quite popular and doing a good business. Give Brentano a call when you are in town.
    Some farmers are summer-fallowing their land, notably W. H. Barr of Medford precinct, who completed considerable plowing quite recently.
    From every portion of southern Oregon comes the report that crops will be very large and much more grain than ever will be harvested. The hay crop is immense and of good quality.
    The folly of allowing fruit trees to overbear is apparent on all sides. At least one-half of the crop should have been thinned out, as that which remained would have been larger and of better flavor and would have commanded a much better price.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 26, 1888, page 3


Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 19, 1888 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Strangers are numerous.
    Medford has six physicians and but little sickness at present.
    Ed. Worman carries his hand in a sling, the result of his late accident.
    Elder Sidener of the Christian Church has been holding services here.
    A branch of the W.C.T.U. will soon be organized here; also a Band of Hope.
    F. Hubbard's new residence is almost completed. It is a neat and comfortable one.
    Postmaster Miller and Dave Crosby each sport a Cleveland hat, which is quite becoming.
    A. H. Phelps is now a resident of Albany, where he has taken a position in Burkhart's job office.
    Geo. S. Briggs, lately of East Portland, has located here and will engage in the nursery business.
    A curtain in the Medford House caught fire one day last week, causing some excitement for a while.
    H. E. Baker is putting his warehouse in shape and will be ready to store the new crop when it is threshed.
    A great deal of building is now going on in this place, and the large number of carpenters stationed here are all busy.
    A building has been put up in the eastern portion of John Noland's lot, which will be occupied by Mr. Clark, our new butcher.
    The new building lately erected in the eastern end of town, next to Mr. Purdin's blacksmith shop, will be used as a poultry store by newcomers.
    F. Hubbard, dealer in agricultural machinery and implements, wagons, etc., has done a big business during the season, selling nearly two carloads.
    Mrs. New, sister of Mrs. J. H. Barnum, was stricken with paralysis last Tuesday, and serious fears are entertained of her death, as this is the third time she has been afflicted.
    M. E. Beatty, the real estate agent, went to San Francisco to attend the meeting of the National Teachers' Association, and did some responsible talking in the interests of Rogue River Valley.
    Mrs. McClain, mother of Mrs. E. G. Hurt of this place, who fell downstairs last week and broke her hip, is somewhat better, though her health, which is usually feeble, makes it against her. Doctors Geary and Pryce are in attendance.
    The following is a list of the officers of Chester A. Arthur Post No. 47, G.A.R., recently mustered in here by D. Jessup of Newport and Gen. McCall of Ashland: M. S. Damon, commander; J. H. Faris, S. V. Com.; F. M. Poe, J. V. Com.; Isaac Woolf, surgeon; W. P. Wood, chaplain; W. G. Cooper, quartermaster; G. C. Noble, officer of the day; John Brantner, officer of the guard; R. T. Young, adjutant; W. D. Finnerty, sergeant-major; A. J. Florey, quartermaster-sergeant.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 26, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Palen has opened a new store on Front Street. Call and see him.
    The new butcher shop has been completed, and will open in a few days.
    Mrs. F. W. Clayton left last Sunday evening for a visit to her parents in Washington Territory.
    There is to be a wedding in town in the near future, so it is surmised. We congratulate you in advance, Charley.
    There is talk of having the streets sprinkled during the remainder of the season. It should be done by all means.
    G. W. Howard and B. F. Adkins, with their families, have gone to Crescent City on a pleasure trip. They will be gone about a month.
    The eldest child of Mr. and Mrs. B. Batley of this place died Wednesday afternoon of inflammation of the bowels. The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of the entire community in their affliction.
    In order to ease the mind of Mrs. J.R.W., of this place, your correspondent would say that he read the article in the Times of recent date written by her and signed "Several Ladies." Anyone that has ever met Mrs. W. knows she considers herself "Several Ladies," while those who know her best say that she is not even one.
Ashland Tidings, July 27, 1888, page 3



    A. P. Talent is building a neat residence at Talent.
    When in Medford visit Herrin, the leading photographer of southern Oregon.
    When others fail try  D. C. Herrin, the leading photographer of southern Oregon.
    Forty-seven cents net a bushel has been offered for good wheat at the Medford warehouse, which is somewhat of an advance. This price may improve soon.
    A. H. Sunderman, indicted for libeling Ward Douglas, and who was surrendered by his bondsmen, furnished new bonds at Medford last week, which prevented a trip to the county seat.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Look out for fire.
    New arrivals by every train.
    There is some sickness in town, mostly among children.
    Carpenters continue busy and improvements are numerous.
    Sells' circus will perform at this place on the last of this month.
    Jas. R. Cunnyngham has opened a stock of groceries at Ashland.
    Ed. Worman is on duty again, having recovered from his recent accident.
    P. H. Oviatt went to Grants Pass last week in order to dispose of his mines.
    Dave Herrin, our photographer, is making a business trip east of the mountains.
    Bentley & Co. will soon open their bank in this place, which will have ample means.
    H. F. Wood, an expert mechanic, is now a resident of Los Angeles, Cal., and doing well.
    Prof. H. G. Fairclo, who has been in Klamath County, returned home a few days ago.
    Mrs. McClain, mother-in-law of E. G. Hurt, who had her hip broken recently, is recovering.
    Childers' brick building is nearing completion. They will soon commence the erection of others.
    The youngest daughter of Geo. Sly died a few days since. We sympathize with the grief-stricken relatives.
    Mrs. New, sister of J. H. Barnum, who had another paralytic stroke last week, died from its effects not long afterward.
    Wm. Finch, father of Mrs. J. S. Higinbotham of this place, is paying her a visit, accompanied by his family. Their home is in Colusa County, Cal.
    Rev. E. McLean will hold services at the Presbyterian Church in this place Sundays, both morning and evening, excepting the third Sunday morning in each month.
    The first soiree of the Medford Social Club took place a few evenings since and proved a very pleasant one. Excellent music was furnished by the Jacksonville string band.
    The Medford correspondent of the Ashland Tidings was exceedingly personal in his last edition and grossly insulted a prominent lady of this place. "Look a leedle ond," sonny.
    Mr. Briggs, lately from East Portland, is building a dwelling house west of the schoolhouse, and another gentleman from East Portland is also erecting his future residence a short distance west of Dickison's new hotel building.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1888, page 3


DIED.
BAILEY--In Medford, July 25th, infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Byron Bailey.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1888, page 3


    H. B. Reed has sold his fence business at Ashland [to] H. S. Emery, who will conduct it in the best manner.
    The Chinese employed at the Grand Central Hotel at Medford have been discharged and white cooks from Portland have taken their place.
    D. C. Herrin, the Medford photographer, has just returned from San Francisco, where he has "taken in" all the latest styles of photography. Give him a call.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1888, page 3


    This place [Central Point] has not only the finest depot in the state, but also the longest and best railroad platform. Our citizens are to be complimented on their enterprise, and Sims & Carney and their employees for the good work they have done.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Sells Brothers' circus at Medford August 31st, 1888.
    Mrs. J. Goldsmith is visiting relatives at Eugene City this week
    The streets will be sprinkled after this week. They are very dusty and need wetting down very much.
    Medford needs a fruit cannery, and will offer liberal inducements to anyone who will start one here.
    Mrs. C. W. Wolters of this place left last Wednesday morning for a three weeks' visit to her parents in Siskiyou County.
    The Amethyst Club will give their second social party at Howard's hall this (Friday) evening. A pleasant time is anticipated.
    Threshing has begun around here, and the sound of steam whistles can be heard on all sides. The yield promises to be very large this year.
    The bank will open at this place on September 1st. Medford has needed a good bank for some time, and all are pleased to know that a good reliable one is to be opened here.
    A party composed of Mr. Birdsall of New York, J. H. Bentley and S. S. Pentz of this place left Wednesday for a trip to Crater Lake. They will be gone about three weeks.
    A most shocking accident occurred here Wednesday evening in which Tommie, youngest son of John Tice, of this place, received injuries which it is feared will prove fatal. The particulars, as near as can be learned, are as follows: Several of the boys here were running races on horseback in the road below town, and he was walking along the road driving a cow, when the boys came along full speed. The little fellow was unable to get out of the way and was run over by one of the horses, fracturing his skull, besides bruising him up very badly. It is to be hoped that all will be more careful in the future and try to avoid another such an accident.
Ashland Tidings, August 3, 1888, page 3


    THE BOY SKIPPED A SECOND TIME.--Several days since, a smart, well-dressed boy named Wallace Minch arrived here from Medford. He said his mother had driven him away from home and told him he must make his own living. The attention of Mr. Ira F. Powers was called to the boy. Mr. Powers deemed the story he told false and was inclined to place him in jail till his mother could be heard from, but not liking the idea of imprisoning the boy, took him into his employ, thinking he could keep him amused till his mother could be heard from. He wrote to Mrs. Minch at once and yesterday received an answer stating that the boy had run away and that if Mr. Powers would return him she would gladly pay all expenses. But the boy had run away from Mr. Powers before the letter came and no trace of him can be found.

Oregonian, Portland, August 4, 1888, page 5



    Medford Advertiser:--Our bank is at last an assumed fact. Mr. Bentley will personally attend to the business and have everything running in a short time. He will be assisted by Mr. Vawter, a Linn County boy of good ability and integrity.
"State News," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, August 6, 1888, page 1


    Already are heard the notes of preparation for the exhibit of fruits by the Southern Oregon Fruit Growers' Association at Heber Grove on the 29th of September. The enterprising members of the association should see to it that there is a full display of dried as well as fresh fruits, for the dried product of this valley, when properly handled, is not excelled anywhere. Southern Oregon dried peaches, plums and prunes will at no distant day become standard articles in eastern markets if they are placed before the public in proper shape.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 9, 1888, page 2


J. W. Short et al. to A. B. Seal, property in Medford; $125.
Martha C. Howard to Mrs. Martha B. Howard, property in Medford; $500.
Elizabeth A. Cummons to J. M. Cummons, property in Medford; $50.
I. J. Phipps to Mrs. M. B. Brown, property in Medford; $200.
W. Crawford to Clara M. Clayton, property in Medford; $75.
J. W. Short et al. to Sarah A. Guches, property in Medford; $100.
J. W. Short et al. to R. F.
Prael, property in Medford; $100.
Nannie Barr to D. J. Lumsden, property in Medford; $1500.
D. J. Lumsden to H. N. Lumsden, property in Medford; $100.
D. J. Lumsden to H. N. Lumsden, property in Medford; $500.
I. J. Phipps to Rhoda A. Crenshaw, property in Medford; $250.
O.T. Co. to G. S. Walton, property in Medford; $175.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 9, 1888, page 2


    A daughter was recently born to Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Dolson of California. Mr. D. is now in the East.
    Geo. W. Isaacs has sold 120 acres of land a few miles east of Medford to G. E. Briggs lately of East Portland, who will engage in the nursery business.
    Hon. R. A. Miller, president of the fruit growers' association, informs us that the grounds at the Heber Grove have been secured for the exhibition of fruit on September 29th.
    Already several persons have made overtures to secure the exhibition of fruit after the display of September 29th at Heber Grove. It is probable that it will be sent to the mechanic's pavilion at Portland.
    Ashland is enjoying a healthy, rapid growth that bids fair to continue. A leading citizen of that place estimates that there are at this time nearly 300 carpenters and bricklayers at work in the city.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 9, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. Martin, the dentist, has departed.
    The boys are getting ready for the 31st.
    M. E. Beatty, who has been quite sick, is recovering.
    A branch of the W.C.T.U. will soon be organized in this place.
    Medford has a tailor again, whose services were badly needed.
    The little child of Frank Galloway has been very sick for several days past.
    Mr. Berlin has returned from Portland, where he has been sick for some time.
    J. B. Riddle of Douglas County is making his many friends here a short visit.
    E. G. Hurt has received another carload of pickets and is kept busy building fence.
    The bank will soon be opened. It will be managed by Messrs. Bentley and Vawter.
    The stone foundation for Adkins & Webb's new brick building is now being cut.
    S. S. Pentz, Mr. Bentley and Dr. Birdsall of New York went to Crater Lake last week.
    J. T. Knight, agent for the Singer sewing machines, has returned from a trip east of the mountains.
    D. C. Herrin and family are at Linkville at present, where Mr. H. is doing a good business in his line.
    The new bell for the Baptist Church has arrived and was immediately put in position. It is a fine, large one, and has a sonorous tone.
    The agents for Sells' circus have built a big board wall alongside Baker's warehouse, upon which to paste their great colored posters.
    Tommy Tice was one day last week run over by a horse ridden by a playmate and knocked senseless. Fortunately his injuries are not severe.
    The Grand Central is doing a big business and the white cooks imported from Portland are giving general satisfaction. No Chinese help is now employed there.
    The business of the Medford depot has increased very much in the past two years, but C. K. Fronk, the clerk and efficient agent, finds no trouble in dispatching it.
    D. C. Herrin, the Medford photographer, has just returned from San Francisco, where he has "taken in" all the latest styles of photography. Give him a call.
    The Amethyst Dancing Club was recently organized, with nearly 50 members. Miss Elma Young is president thereof, Jas. Fowler secretary and Mrs. C. W. Wolters treasurer. Regular soirees will be held.
    The Republicans of this precinct organized a campaign club last Monday evening. The Democrats should not allow the grass to grow under their feet, but put new life in the club they formed last May. We have some of the best speakers in southern Oregon in this precinct.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 9, 1888, page 3


    Jos. M. Upham, lately from Santa Clara Valley, but now of Medford, was at the Times office on land business Monday morning.
    Hon J. H. Sears and P. W. Olwell of Eden precinct and Hon. J. D. Whitman and wife of Medford have gone to Jenny Creek on a pleasure trip, accompanied by their families.
    H. B. Reed, having disposed of his fence business at Ashland, has gone to Roseburg to engage in the same line. He is accompanied by A. H. Carlson.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 9, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    A. G. Epps, a first-class boot and shoe maker, is now in the employ of W. G. Cooper & Son of this place. Anyone wishing work in their line should call on them.
    Mr. Roberts threshed last week and his entire crop averaged 55 bushels to the acre, notwithstanding a great deal of it was knocked down by the late rains and he was unable to save it.
    Mr. J. R. West returned Wednesday evening from Kansas, where he has been during the last year. His many friends were o'er glad to meet him again, as he is one of our best citizens.
    Adkins & Webb have moved their stock of hardware into Childers' new brick building, and the carpenters are already at work moving the old building out of the way preparatory to the erection of their new three-story brick store.
    Mr. L. L. Angle bought several acres of land near town of C. Mingus, and will erect a fine two-story residence on the same during the summer. His wife and oldest son and family will arrive here from Pennsylvania this fall to make Medford their future home.
    Everyone visiting our town is surprised at the rapid growth it is making. Although not yet five years old it has a population of nearly 1200. New buildings are going up all the time, and almost every train brings someone to add to the list. A visit to town will find every house occupied and new buildings are being erected from one side of town to the other.
    The clever burglar from Ashland or some other town has at least reached this place. Wednesday night two men made a haul on the Grand Central Hotel and succeeded in getting off with considerable booty. A fine watch was taken from Mr. John E. Holmes, the second cook, and Mr. S. Boden, a commercial traveler from Louisville, Ky., was robbed of about $40, his pants and some other valuables that he had in the pockets. Mr. Boden heard a noise in the room and raised up and saw two men, one in the room and one standing by the window. The man in the room sprang out and Mr. Boden fired at him but was too late, as the man was out of range. No clue as yet has been discovered as to who the robbers may have been. The stolen pantaloons were found yesterday morning near the depot.
Ashland Tidings, August 10, 1888, page 3



Platforms Too Short.
    The long trains required now by the heavy passenger business between Portland and San Francisco were not provided for when the stations of the Oregon & California were built, and the consequence is that on the whole line between East Portland and Ashland there is only one platform long enough for the full train, unless it be at Albany and Medford. The platform at the new Central Point depot covers the entire length of the train and has room to spare, and the Salem platform (not yet finished) will do the same.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, August 14, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The dead walls are alive with circus bills, and the boys are saving their dimes and nickels for the 31st.
    Rev. F. S. Noel of Jacksonville in another place announces that he will receive bids until Aug. 25th for the building of a Catholic church at this place.
    Democrats should lose no time in reorganizing their club at this place and making a grand effort to increase the Democratic majority given in this county last June.
    L. L. Angle is preparing to erect a fine two-story residence on a tract of land recently bought from C. Mingus. His family will remove to Medford in the fall from Pennsylvania.
    The county commissioners will probably authorize the building of a bridge across Bear Creek near Medford. This structure should be built, by all means, as it is needed, especially in the winter.
    M. E. Beatty, the wide-awake real estate agent, was in Jacksonville last Tuesday, accompanied by Mr. Wilde, first cook at the Grand Central Hotel. The latter went over on peculiar business that will soon come to the surface.
    The Medford correspondent of the Tidings, who made an insinuating comment recently concerning a respectable lady of the Bear Creek town, seems to have had a vanishing glimpse of a double-barreled shotgun, judging from the card of "retraction" published in last week's Ashland paper.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888, page 2


Where Is That Fruit?
    A representative of W. R. Strong & Co., commission merchants of Sacramento, was in the valley in quest of Bartlett pears this week. He had been informed that he could obtain seven or eight carloads, and was disappointed at not getting even one carload where they were accessible. The prospects opening before the intelligent fruit-raiser in this valley, who will continue himself to a single specialty and produce only the best of its class, are bright indeed. Mr. Cronemiller, the agent referred to, was of the opinion that his house alone could handle a hundred carloads of southern Oregon Bartlett pears this year.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888, page 3


Fruit Growers, Attention.
    A convention of the Southern Oregon Fruit Growers' Association will be held at Heber's Grove, near Medford, Sept. 29th, 1888. An excellent programme for the entertainment of both ladies and gentlemen is being prepared. All members are requested to bring specimens of the finest fruit they can secure for exhibition. A basket dinner will be served on the ground, and everybody is invited to attend and bring baskets well filled.
C. B. MILLER, Sec.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888 et seq., page 3


Accidents.
    While driving near Medford last Friday evening Dr. Aiken and his daughter had a narrow escape from serious injury from a kicking horse. He was driving the spirited mare belonging to E. C. Brooks, and the line becoming fast under the animal's tail caused her to kick herself loose from the buggy. Neither the doctor nor his little girl were hurt, but both were considerably frightened.
    The stage running between this place and Medford, owned by E. Worman, was almost demolished last Monday morning at Medford by the horses running away. The team was a partially broken young span belonging to Mr. Angle, which were being exercised by Mr. Parsons, the driver of the stage. Becoming frightened while he was removing some baggage from the stage they ran furiously down the street towards Bear Creek, and when making the turn at the crossroads collided with a tree, which damaged the stage badly as well as breaking the harness to some extent. The horses were not badly injured.
Excerpt,
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888, page 3


Burglary.
    On Wednesday night of last week, after the Times went to press, the Grand Central Hotel was burglarized at Medford. The cook was robbed of his watch, and S. Baden, a drummer, had his trousers stolen, together with about $40 in cash and some valuables which he had in his pockets. His room was in the second story, and the burglars gained access to it through a window over the awning. He awoke as they were leaving and fired a shot at one of the vanishing figures, but probably failed to hit him. The pants were recovered near the railroad track below town next morning. Two tramps were discovered in a boxcar on the northbound freight train next day and were locked in by conductor Houston until Grants Pass was reached, when they were captured by the authorities with the assistance of L. C. Windom, a swift runner, just after they had effected their escape from the car by breaking down the door. An examination by District Attorney Colvig failed to show any connection of the tramps with the Medford burglary, and none of the stolen property was found on their persons. It was afterwards learned that a third tramp was secreted on the train, who escaped, and it is thought he had the missing goods in his possession.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888, page 3


    C. B. Carlisle has removed from Los Gatos, Cal. to Yreka.
    Catholic churches will be built soon at Medford and Ashland, and Rev. F. S. Noel of this place advertises for bids to build the same.
    B. C. Goddard, Jr. is engaged in moving his household effects to his recent purchase near Medford, where he will reside during the coming winter.
    Medford will probably soon be favored with the county bridge across Bear Creek she has long wished for, as the commissioners last week ordered W. C. Daley to view a site for the same.
    There seems to be a great demand for roads since immigration began flowing into the valley so rapidly. A great many have been established during the past two years, and several more have been proposed.
    The officers of the Southern Oregon Fruitgrowers' Association are receiving many enquiries relative to the exhibit to be given at the Heber Grove on September 29th. It could not come at a more opportune time for the fruit interests of this valley. It is now proposed to include canned and dried fruits in the exhibit.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888, page 3


BORN.
LUMSDEN--In Medford, Aug. 3d, to Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Lumsden, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888, page 3


Notice to Contractors.
SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED by the undersigned till the 25th of August, at 8 o'clock P.M., for the erection of two Catholic churches--one at Medford and the other at Ashland, Oregon. Plans and specifications can be seen at the pastoral residence in Jacksonville, Oregon. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids.
REV. F. S. NOEL, Pastor.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888 et seq., page 3


Medford Items.
    M. E. Beatty sold several choice lots in Beatty's addition to Medford during the past week.
    Mrs. Geo. S. Howard, of Jacksonville, has been visiting relatives at this place during the past week.
    A son of Mr. Wortman, of this place, came out from Portland last week and will make Medford his future home.
    Quite a number of farmers have disposed of their wheat crop to H. E. Baker of this place, who is paying 53 cents per bushel.
    The old building formerly used by Adkins & Webb has been moved away, and the excavation already commenced for the walls of the new three-story brick.
    Mr. Louis Webb, of Nebraska, a brother of I. A. and B. S. Webb of this place, is here on a visit and will remain for some time, looking over the country. He may conclude to locate here in the future.
    The bill posters of Sells Brothers' advertising car No. 1 were here last Saturday ornamenting the walls throughout the country with the wonderful features of Sells Bros.' enormous United Show. Car No. 2 will reach here about the 20th of this month.
Ashland Tidings, August 17, 1888, page 3



    Ed. Helms has resumed his seat on the Medford stage after a vacation of a few weeks.
    The Linkville Star says that J. P. Roberts and wife of that place have gone to Medford, taking their youngest daughter, Mary, intending to place her under the treatment of Dr. Geary, an oculist. Miss Mary is aged nine years and has been troubled all her life with crossed eyes.
    Some people assert that Jacksonville is decaying, but they never keep track of the improvements which are constantly being made. A number of buildings have lately been renovated and improved in a neat manner during the year, and many more improvements are under way and in contemplation.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 23, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Coulter, the painter, was in Jacksonville Tuesday.
    The Medford social club will give one of their enjoyable parties on Friday evening, Aug. 24th.
    Childers & Son's brick building is receiving the finishing touches. It has already been spoken for.
    Improvements continue on every hand, and quite a number of buildings are now in course of construction.
    C. W. Skeel has sold his property in town to R. H. Halley of eastern Oregon. The price paid was nine hundred dollars.
    Work on Adkins & Webb's new three-story building will soon be commenced. It will be one of the best in the county.
    J. R. West, who has been east for several months past, returned home a short time since and was warmly welcomed by his many friends.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 23, 1888, page 3


    Jacksonville must have a railroad soon.
    Ed Worman, the clever proprietor of the Union livery stable at Medford, has been in town several times during the week.
    It is high time we had rail connection with the main line of the railroad. Jacksonville must do something in this particular at once, or she will lose her prestige.
    Our citizens will heartily endorse anything the board of trustees may do toward rail connection with the main line of road. So let them do something for the benefit of the town at once.
    The board of trustees have employed an attorney to draft an ordinance whose object it will be to levy a tax for paying off the town's indebtedness and making improvements of a substantial character. The board seem favorable to encouraging anybody who will build a railroad or streetcar line to the main line in a substantial manner.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 23, 1888, page 3


MARRIED.
WILDE-DAVIS--At Medford, Aug. 17th by Elder G. G. Thomas, Wm. M. Wilde and Miss Cora G. Davis.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 23, 1888, page 3


    A convention of the Southern Oregon Fruitgrowers' Association will be held at Heber's Grove, near Medford, Sept. 29.
"News of the Northwest," Oregonian, Portland, August 28, 1888, page 6


A Fruit Growers' Convention.
    It is encouraging to note the increased attention being paid to orchards in this state, and the spirit of inquiry and cooperation among growers and shippers. Much advantage is to be reaped by friendly interchange of views. A convention of the Southern Oregon Fruitgrowers' Association will be held at Heber's Grove, near Medford, September 29.
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, August 29, 1888, page 3


The Glory Crowned Giant of the Show World !
A HUGE AND COMPLETE MIRROR OF WONDERLAND !
10 ACRES CROWDED WITH FASCINATING AMAZEMENTS !
TWO BIG, BRILLIANT AND BEWILDERING PERFORMANCES AT
Medford, Friday, August 31st.
    NOTE--The arrangements of the American Showman's Pooled League will prevent any other Circus from visiting MEDFORD this season--[Editor]
SELLS BROTHERS'
GREAT 3-RING CIRCUS, ELEVATED STAGE.
REAL ROMAN HIPPODROME
    And 5-Continent Menagerie.
All of Earth's Illustrious Mid-Air and Arenic Champions, Prairie Heroes,
Hippodrome Celebrities, Marvelous Human Phenomena and
Rarest Zoological Treasures Merged and Marshaled
in a Colossal and Unparalleled Unity.
$3,500,000 Invested for the Public's Delectation!  Actual Daily Expenses $4,200!
Human Imagination Confounded by its Stupendous Magnitude !

THE ONLY COMPLETE, PERFECT AND LAVISHLY SUMPTUOUS REPRODUCTION
---- OF THE ----
Races, Revels and Gladiatorial Combats of Ancient Rome
IN NEARLY 2,000 YEARS !
60 English and Kentucky Thoroughbreds in Soul-Stirring Struggles for Supremacy!
Enormous Race-Track--Four Times Around, One Mile!
Notably and Triumphantly Reinforced This Season with the Towering,
Kingly Figure of Western Romance,
C A P T.   A.   H.  B O G A R D U S !
Champion Wing-Shot of the World,
AND HIS GIFTED SONS !
Only Full-Grown PAIR OF BLOOD-SWEATING HIPPOPOTAMI on Earth !
"WE'VE GOT 'EM ON THE LIST !"
300 PHENOMENAL ARENIC ARTISTS! 90 DAZZLING ACTS!
Scotch Athletes, Arabian Meteors, Japanese Marvels and a Gigantic European
Vaudeville Combination, in Daring and Dashing Performances on the Huge
Theatre Stage. No Sere and Yellow Leaf Attractions!
Not a Chestnut on the Programme!
50 CAGES OF WILD BEASTS.  A UNIVERSAL REFLEX OF SAVAGE LIFE.
23 BAREBACK HORSES
Reined, ridden and driven by one man and that man THE GREAT O'DELL!
Greatest, Grandest, Most Famous and Best Trained Herd of Elephants
on American Soil--Including "Rajah," the Colossal, All-Overshadowing
Central Figure of His Race, "Sid," The Almost Human Clown Elephant,
and the Only Baby Elephant ON THE CONTINENT.
PEERLESS, POETIC, ROYALLY RESPLENDENT STREET PARADE
Appearing on the Public Thoroughfare at 10 o'Clock Every Morning.
USUAL PRICES OF ADMISSION--Performances at Customary Hours !
Cheap Round Trip Excursions on all Railroads !
SEE STATION AGENTS FOR PARTICULARS.
WILL EXHIBIT AT ROSEBURG, AUG. 30.  YREKA, CAL., SEPT. 1, 1888.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888 et seq., page 2


Now or Never.
    The board of trustees of Jacksonville, at its session Tuesday evening, passed to first reading the proposed ordinance which will be voted upon by the citizens of this place on Sept. 25, 1888, providing for the levy of a 3 percent tax, or so much thereof as may be necessary to construct a macadamized road or subsidize a streetcar line to connect with the railroad at Medford or Central Point. There is a strong, popular sentiment in favor of the measure, and it will doubtless be adopted. It is certainly high time that better means should be provided for reaching Jacksonville from the railroad, as hundreds of persons are called to the county seat every year, who are put to serious inconvenience by the present inadequate facilities for travel. If the town expects to maintain its commercial importance, it is absolutely necessary for our citizens to take immediate action to secure a share of the trade of the large number of newcomers as well as a portion of the transient visitors to southern Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888, page 3


A "Gilt-Edged" Show.
    Among the peripatetic exhibitions of the day there are none that have received a prominence more signal and pronounced than that of the Sells Brothers; nor are we able to record an instance of any tented exhibition giving more general and merited satisfaction. Its every act and feature is remarkable, and the majority can well be characterized as "phenomenal." As an adroit, sensation and entirely original act, that of riding, reining and driving twenty-three bareback horses, by William O'Dell, will commend itself to all lovers of the difficult and dashing in equestrianism. Of Mr. Showle's elegant and artistic bareback riding, and of William Sells' "hurricane hurdle riding" we have had occasion to speak in former seasons, and further commendation is now superfluous. So it is with the graceful, poetic and perfected bareback riding of Senorita Caroni. Of gymnastic and athletic exploits by a large company of acrobats and athletes, there is such a bewildering and sense-astounding multiplicity that comment is nonplussed, and to speak of the unqualified merits of each in detail would far transcend our limit. We cannot close this article, however, without brief mention of the champion wing, fancy and rifle shots of the world, Capt. A. H. Bogardus, "The Man Who Shoots To Kill," and his four remarkable sons, each of whom exemplify all the possibilities of the gun. The show will exhibit in Medford Friday, August 31st.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888, page 3


    The circus will take thousands of dollars out of this county tomorrow.
    Work has been commenced on the warehouse at Tolo. It will be managed by H. E. Baker of Medford this season.
    J. D. Whitman of Medford precinct is purchasing a large quantity of apples and shipping them to northern markets. He is paying a fair price for them.
    As will be seen in our advertising columns. Rev. F. S. Noel has decided to remove the Catholic church now at Eagle Point to Medford, and calls for bids for that purpose.
    Secure your seats for Medford next Friday in the band wagon before they are all taken. Large reductions on round trip tickets. Discount given families to the circus. Will make two round trips. Apply to W. G. Kenney, at the Union Livery Stable.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888, page 3


    A large quantity of melons are now being shipped from southern Oregon.
    J. S. Howard is now surveying the prospective town of Tolo and laying it off into lots.
    Ed. Wilkinson will engage in the butcher business at Medford, and will soon remove there with his family.
    The woods are afire in different portions of southern Oregon, and the atmosphere is being filled with smoke.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. John Dyar is ailing with an attack of erysipelas.
    Our town also revels in the luxury of a street sprinkler.
    Carlos Goddard has become a resident of Medford again.
    Judge Walton is now occupying his fine new residence.
    Mrs. J. R. West has recovered from her recent indisposition.
    Wm. Phipps is teaching school on Dry Creek and giving satisfaction.
    Ward Douglas is at Lakeview and will probably not return for some time.
    Josh Brown of Ashland precinct has been quite ill at the Grand Central.
    The Medford school will reopen on Sept. 10th, with a competent corps of teachers.
    Miss Genevieve Riddle of Douglas County is visiting her many friends in this place.
    Herrin, the photographer, is still busy at Linkville and doing a first-class business.
    Dr. Webb of Nebraska, a brother of Isaac, Ben and Geo. Webb, is paying us a visit.
    Adkins & Webb are occupying Childers' new brick, and will be there until their new building is completed.
    Isaac Woolf and wife returned last Sunday from a trip to Linkville, stopping at Crater Lake on the way home.
    Adkins & Webb's frame building has been removed, and work on their new three-story brick has been commenced.
    The circus will be here tomorrow, and no doubt our town will be full of people from every portion of southern Oregon.
    Mark Armstrong of Jacksonville may be found at the saloon of the Grand Central. He understands the business thoroughly.
    Mr. Goldsmith, one of Medford's enterprising merchants, was in Jacksonville during the week and secured a supply of bacon.
    A special school meeting was held a few days since and a seven-mill tax levied. The district clerk is now making the assessment.
    The Medford Bank will be in operation in a very short time. Mr. Bentley is making preparations for the opening, and will soon be joined by his partner, Mr. Vawter of Eugene City.
    J. H. Faris of the Medford Hotel has greatly improved the former management of that place and is building up a good business. He furnishes the best of meals and lodgings for 25 cents.
    Dr. C. Minnis, an excellent physician, has located in this place and opened an office in Childers' new brick building. He comes highly recommended, and will doubtless be well received.
    The party given by the Medford social club last Friday evening was an enjoyable and well-attended affair. Several couples from the county seat were there. Excellent music was furnished by the Jacksonville string band.
    Ed. Wilkinson, son-in-law of John Orth of Jacksonville, will take charge of Harris' butcher shop in this place on Sept. 1st. Mr. Harris will soon pay his old home in Canada a visit, but will return in time to cast his vote for Cleveland and Thurman.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888, page 3


Notice to Contractors.
INSTEAD OF ERECTING A NEW EDIFICE at Medford the undersigned has concluded to remove the Catholic Church from Eagle Point to said place. For that purpose bids will be received until
Thursday, Sep. 20, 1888.
For further particulars apply at the pastoral residence in Jacksonville, Oregon. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids.
    REV. F. S. NOEL.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888, page 3


C. MINNIS, M. D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D    S U R G E O N
Medford, Oregon.
----
    Office in Childers' brick block, Main Street. Residence on North Front Street.
    Calls promptly attended to, day or night.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888 et seq., page 3


COOPER & SON,
Cor. 7th and B Streets,
MEDFORD, OR.,
Manufacturer of and Dealer in
BUGGY, CARRIAGE and TEAM
HARNESS.
SADDLES AND ROBES
A Specialty.
All Kinds of Repairing Done.
----
A BOOT AND SHOE SHOP
Is connected with my harness shop. Having engaged the services of a first-class shoemaker, I am prepared to manufacture boots and shoes of the latest styles promptly.
    My prices in both departments will be quite reasonable and satisfaction guaranteed.
HAND MADE HARNESS
A Specialty.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888 et seq., page 3


A. G. Owen to Louisa J. Williams, lot 18, blk 20, Medford; $400.
G. H. Baker to A. G. Owen, lot 18, blk 20, Medford; $180.
C. W. Skeel to R. H. Halley, land in Medford; $900.
H. B. Miller & Co. to C. W. Skeel, land in Medford; $1.
G. H. Baker to J. E. Drucks, lot 1, blk 2, Medford; $500.
N. W. Chilcott to Mrs. L. J. Foster, lot 17, blk 21, Medford; $450.
G. H. Baker to Miss M. A. Thompson, land in Medford; $200.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 6, 1888, page 2


Commendable Enterprise.
    The enterprise shown by our neighboring city of Medford in providing an exhibit of the fruits and productions of the valley for presentation to the G.A.R. delegation which passed through the valley Monday night, was worthy of all praise. Two long tables were literally loaded with luscious fruits, and huge vegetables and specimens of corn and cereals were abundantly provided, and at the midnight arrival of the train the cars were raided and the sleepers were fairly overwhelmed with the bounty of the givers. Thus Medford will be remembered by hundreds as a "live town," and the doubting Thomases from California have received ocular and palatial demonstration of the superior character of the fruits of Rogue River Valley.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 6, 1888, page 3


    Baker's warehouse at Medford is said to have paid out about $10,000 for wheat on Monday.
    The price of wheat remains at 60 cents a bushel, and a large quantity has been sold at that figure and shipped out of the county.
    We learn that M. P. Phipps threshed 400 bushels of wheat from six acres of ground in the Bear Creek bottom last week, an average of almost 68 bushels per acre. Many yields are reported of 40 bushels and over.
    B. C. Goddard, Jr., will in a short time open in a real estate office in Medford. Probably no man in the county is better posted as regards character and quality of lands in this county than Mr. Goddard, and we predict a successful venture for him.
    The California delegation to the national encampment at Columbus passed through Medford at 12:30 o'clock Monday night, about eight hours behind schedule time. Telegraphic instructions had come forward for supper for 400 at the Grand Central, but the late arrival of the train deterred the delegation from getting the meal at that place. The passengers who were awake declared that the fruits with which the citizens of Medford presented them were the finest seen on the trip.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 6, 1888, page 3


    Ed. Wilkinson and wife have removed to Medford, Mr. W. having taken charge of the butcher shop at that place.
    David H. Miller, Medford's clever postmaster, was among the number who joined the G.A.R. excursion in this valley Monday night.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 6, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Jesse F. Simpson and family have become residents of Medford.
    As will be seen by notice elsewhere, the firm of Merrill & Baker has been dissolved.
    We are pleased to see that J. R. West, who recently returned to Medford, has improved in health a great deal.
    Last Friday was a big day for our town. Thousands of people from every portion of Southern Oregon were in town, and everybody did a big business.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 6, 1888, page 3


    Mr. Lewellen has traded his property in Medford for Jesse F. Simpson's house and lot in Jacksonville.
    The people of Butte Creek are protesting against removing the Catholic Church of Eagle Point to Medford.
"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 6, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Mr. Youngs has his large store and dwelling nearly completed.
    D. W. Crosby has been sick for several days, but is improving at present.
    The circus drew an immense crowd to Medford from all parts of the country last Saturday afternoon.
    J. S. Howard is surveying the new town of Tolo for the railroad company.
    D. H. Miller and wife left Monday for an extended tour through the eastern states, to be gone about three months.
    The foundation of Adkins & Webb's new building is about finished, and brick work will begin in a few days.
    Notwithstanding the late arrival of the excursion train last Monday night, quite a large crowd awaited its coming, and all had a very pleasant time. At the depot large tables had been prepared, heavily loaded with the products of the surrounding country, and the excursionists were invited to help themselves. The Medford Brass Band discoursed several fine pieces of music.
    The Millard concert will be a musical treat for the Medford people Saturday evening, Sept. 8th.
Ashland Tidings, September 7, 1888, page 3



    A mammoth squash at Medford, Ore., grew 5½ feet in length and 11½ inches in circumference in twenty-one days.
"Freaks of Nature," Marion (Ohio) Weekly Star, September 8, 1888, page 12


    When in Medford visit Herrin, the leading photographer of Southern Oregon.
    Sealed proposals for building a bridge across Bear Creek at Medford will be received by the county clerk until October 3d. See advertisement elsewhere.
    Many residents from the neighboring country and from the vicinity of Medford were on the ground by daylight on Tuesday morning, the fire [of several buildings in downtown Jacksonville] having been seen all over the valley.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 13, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Watermelons are a drug on the market.
    Our town is full of farmers delivering their wheat at the warehouse.
    Miss Eva Galloway of this place will resume her studies at the State University next week.
    Miss Mamie Judge of Ashland is in charge of the postal telegraph station at this place.
    Mr. Wortman, lately of Portland, has located here and is building a residence in the western portion of town.
    M. S. Damon, school clerk, is making an assessment of the district, a seven-mill tax having been levied a short time since.
    A. H. Bennett, who purchased land not far from this place, is making a number of improvements. He is well pleased with the country.
    Postmaster Miller and wife are in Iowa, visiting their old home, and will be gone several weeks. They went with the G.A.R. excursion.
    Prof. Dennison, principal of our school, obtained a first class certificate at the recent examination held by Supt. Mitchell at Jacksonville.
    H. L. Lewis, who recently arrived from California with some of the finest stock in the Northwest, has rented a farm in this precinct and will locate, we are glad to learn.
    Prof. H. G. Fairclo and his father returned from a trip to Crater Lake and as far as Lakeview recently. He has secured a school in Klamath County and will go back again soon to commence his duties.
    It is now a settled fact that a bridge will be built across Bear Creek, at the foot of 7th Street, this fall. The board of county commissioners are deserving of much credit for ordering this important improvement.
    D. S. Youngs is building a neat and commodious store building in this place, which he will stock with a large and first-class stock of goods. He is full of enterprise and will prove a valuable addition to our town.
    The case of E. E. Gore vs. the town of Medford has been dismissed. As will be remembered, an attempt was made to obtain a supply of water for town purposes from Bear Creek where it passes through Mr. Gore's field, to which he objected. It is believed that the matter will be satisfactorily adjusted.
    W. F. Williamson, who formerly practiced law at this place, is paying Southern Oregon a visit. He is now a resident of Yamhill County, where he is teaching school, but has lately returned from a trip to Missouri. Mr. W. is quite hopeful of the election of President Cleveland, and says the signs in the East point directly that way.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 13, 1888, page 3


    Ham and bacon are very scarce articles. The former is quoted at 16 cents a pound, and the latter at 14 cents.
    A new townsite has been laid out at Tolo by J. S. Howard, county surveyor, and lots will soon be offered for sale.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 13, 1888, page 3


Wrisley & Goddard.
    John B. Wrisley and B. C. Goddard, Jr., announce this week that they have formed a copartnership to do a real estate business at Medford. The gentlemen are both old residents of Jackson County--know all the old residents and know the land and its peculiarities in every part of the valley. They will start out with a fine list of choice farms and town property, and will do a good business. Strangers looking for farming lands down the valley would do well to call on them first thing.
Ashland Tidings, September 14, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Wheat has been pouring into the warehouses this week.
    The new waterworks will be a valuable acquisition to Medford.
    The new bridge across Bear Creek at this place is another improvement that will add to Medford's prosperity.
    R. H. Halley, recently from eastern Oregon, has opened a new tin shop in the city. He will soon put in a full stock of tinware.
    Real estate is not particularly rushing about Medford but it is steady, and real estate men report much inquiry from numerous strangers.
    Miss Eva Galloway leaves Sunday evening to resume studies at the state university at Eugene, where she has been pursuing a course for the past two years.
    Several offers to build the flour mill at this place are under consideration, and it is not likely that [the] $2200 bonus will be required to secure it after the new water ditch is completed.
    The Medford public school opened up Monday with a good attendance. Prof. A. B. Dennison is principal, with Miss Mary Coleman, Miss Creed and Miss Helen Strang as assistants.
    D. C. Herrin was in the city this week packing up his household goods preparatory to taking up his permanent residence in Linkville. Dave is a good photographer and will no doubt succeed in his new field.
    The Medford Harrison and Morton club now has about sixty members, with more coming, and holds meetings every alternate Tuesday evening--the next meeting will be at Howard's hall the coming Tuesday evening, when good local speakers will liven up things.
    J. S. Howard has been down at Tolo a day or two this week, finishing up the surveying of the town plat. Monday evening, in attempting to jump off the train which he thought was going to carry him past Tolo, Mr. Howard was thrown to the ground and had one side of his head and face considerably bruised up. The chances are that he will not try to beat the train to Tolo again very soon.
    The Jackson County Bank of Medford began doing an exchange and loan business the first of the present month. Upon the arrival of the full office fixtures in a few weeks, the new bank will commence doing a complete banking business. Mr. J. H. Bentley, the president, is a thorough banking man, and W. I. Vawter, the cashier, is a young man well qualified to fill his position. Both are acceptable additions to Medford's business men.
    Bids are advertised for up to the 25th inst. for constructing the ditch which is to furnish the new water supply for Medford. Everything is in readiness; the right of way was secured through the Gore place this week for $200, and the work will be pushed to completion. The ditch will take the water out of Bear Creek about the Gore place and will be 2½ miles long. In the western suburbs a reservoir will be built, from which pipes will lead over town.
    A 12-year-old Medford boy by the name of Minnick has lately obtained considerable notoriety by a journey which he recently took of his own accord all the way back to Iowa. Several weeks ago he was missed by his mother, with whom he lives at Medford, and it was afterward ascertained that he had boarded the northbound passenger and the next that was heard of him he was in Iowa, having made the entire journey alone and without a cent of money. The boy's father lives in Iowa, with whom he thought he would rather live. But arriving there the youngster did not meet with the hospitable reception he expected, the father not caring to keep him. So securing "six bits" from the parent, the young traveler started on his return journey, coming home by way of the Central Pacific--for a change of scenery--and reached Medford one day last week, the expense of the long journey being the six bits he got from his father.
BUILDING NOTES.
    It is estimated that there are no less than fifteen dwelling houses in course of construction at the present time in Medford, with numerous others in contemplation--a number of those in course of construction are nice and substantial structures, too. It is a noticeable feature that as the town grows older the buildings put up are much more substantial and look as if they were being built to stay. An estimate made this week of the value of the building improvements now going on in Medford places it at between $25,000 and $40,000, and those figures are doubtless nearly correct. This is an excellent showing for Medford.
    The foundation for Adkins & Webb's new three-story brick is completed, and the brick masons are at work. It will be a handsome structure and a credit to Medford--the first three-story business house in the city.
    Adkins & Webb have moved into the lower story of the Childers brick, the upper story of which will be fitted up for offices.
    A handsome veneered brick residence, being built for W. H. Barr in the western part of the city, is nearing completion.
    L. L. Angle is building a new residence west of the railroad.
    Judge Walton has his nice new residence almost completed.
    S. G. Wortman's new house is nearing completion
    Rev. Russ is putting up a residence on C Street.
Ashland Tidings, September 14, 1888, page 3


    Miss Mamie Judge of this place is now telegraph operator at Medford.
"News Notes from Ashland," Oregonian, Portland, September 18, 1888, page 3


NOTICE
To Bridge Builders ! !
----
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed proposals will be received at the office of the County Clerk of Jackson County, Oregon, in Jacksonville, up to noon on
Wednesday, October 3, 1888.
for building a bridge across Bear Creek, at Medford, Jackson County, Oregon, on the site selected by W. C. Daley, and furnishing all the material for the same.
    The bids shall be to build said bridge in accordance with the plans and specifications now on file in the County Clerk's office in Jacksonville, Oregon, and to be completed within ninety days from the date of signing the contract, the price to be paid in warrants drawn on the county treasurer of said county after the bridge is received and completed.
    Accompanying each bid there shall be a good and sufficient bond in the sum of one thousand dollars, conditioned, that the bidder will enter into a written contract with the county court to build said bridge in accordance with the plans and specifications thereof now on file in the clerk's office, if the contract should be awarded to the bidder.
    The county court reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
    By order of the county court, made at the September term, 1888.
J. R. NEIL, County Judge.
    MAX MULLER, County Clerk.
    Dated Sept. 11, 1888.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 20, 1888, page 2


An Important Measure.
    Next Tuesday the proposed ordinance for the levy of a three percent tax in Jacksonville for internal improvements will be submitted to a popular vote for approval or rejection. It is proposed, in the event of a favorable vote, to apply the proceeds of the levy to the improvement of one of the existing roads between this point and the railroad--either to Medford or to Central Point--or to the subsidizing of a streetcar line to one of these points. The measure should meet with the approval of our citizens, for it is high time that something was done to bring us into closer communication with the railroad, especially in the rainy season, when the present road to Medford, over which the mails and most of the freight for this place are transported, is well nigh impassable. Let us see to it that the proposition carries.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 20, 1888, page 3


    J. C. Jones of Medford moved on to a hay claim on Rogue River, above the mouth of Union Creek, near the old John Day road last week.
    A vast quantity of wheat has been sold in southern Oregon, and freight trains are taxed to their utmost in hauling it northward. No doubt the most of this and last season's crop will have been shipped before many weeks.
    Mrs. S. E. Ish, while walking in her orchard last Tuesday, fell and dislocated her right wrist, breaking one of the small bones of the forearm. It will cause only temporary inconvenience, the attending physician, Dr. Gill, thinks, but is a very painful hurt.
    Attention is called to the real estate card of Messrs. Wrisley and Goddard of Medford, among our new advertisements this week. Intending purchasers will do well to examine their lists and obtain information about the various sections of the county. They will at once take rank among the most energetic and reliable real estate firms in the county.
    Portland commission houses have been playing a shrewd dodge for several years in palming off, under southern Oregon brands, fruit and melons from California at a quality inferior to ours. As an instance, grapes purporting to be from Miller's near this city, have been on sale in Portland for two weeks past, whereas in reality the first shipment of the season from that vineyard was made last Sunday. There ought to be some way of reaching these precious fellows, the commission men, and making them subject to a severe penalty for such practices.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 20, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mr. Johnson, lately of Nebraska, has become a resident of this place.
    Childers & Son have commenced the brickwork of Adkins & Webb's new building.
    Bert Whitman is buying and shipping a large quantity of fruit in different parts of the county.
    Thos. A. Harris leaves this week for his old home in Canada, where he will spend several weeks.
    Miss Eva Galloway of this place has gone to Eugene city, to finish her studies at the State University.
    D. C. Herrin and family have returned from Klamath County. Dave took many first-class photographs while gone.
    J. Goldsmith has purchased the apple crops of R. J. Cameron, John Cantrall and other residents of Uniontown precinct.
    The Grand Central continues to do an immense business, and has gained an enviable reputation everywhere on the coast.
    The Advertiser says that there are several cases of scarlet fever near here. Every care should be taken to prevent the spread of this disease, especially at this time of year.
Democratic Times, September 20, 1888, page 3


C. W. Wolters to M. S. Damon, property in Medford; consideration, $350.
E. E. Gore to the town of Medford, right of way for water ditch; $200.
Hanley and Love to James Braden, right of way for water ditch; $1.
R. Luellen to S. J. Simpson, property in Medford; $250.
Nannie Barr to Milton Maule, property in Medford; $100.
A. J. Stewart to J. H. Stewart, land in Riggs' and Ball's donation claim; $50.
C. C. Beekman to F. M. Poe, property in Medford; $50.
F. M. Poe to R. C. Ford, property in Medford; $300.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 20, 1888, page 3


J. B. WRISLEY                                                    B. C. GODDARD, JR.
WRISLEY & GODDARD,
Pioneer Real Estate Firm.
----
TO ACCOMMODATE the growing demand for real estate, we have opened an office in the town of
Medford, Jackson Co., Ogn.
We claim to have as fine a line of property, and to be able to furnish as reliable information concerning real estate in Southern Oregon, as any other firm now doing business.
Correspondence solicited.
WRISLEY & GODDARD.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 20, 1888 et seq., page 3


Southern Oregon Fruit Exhibit.
    Hon. Robt. A. Miller, of Jacksonville, has been taking in the state fair. Before leaving for Portland, today, he told the Journal reporter of a big time they are going to have at Ish's grove, between Medford and Jacksonville, on Saturday, 29th inst. Southern Oregon proposes to spread itself in a grand, eye-opening fruit display which is to astonish not only the outsiders but the natives themselves. And they can do it. They have the climate and soil.
Evening Capital Journal,
Salem, September 20, 1888, page 3



Medford Items.
    The weather has been much cooler during the past week.
    Will Merriman has gone to Roseburg to work in the railroad office at that place.
    Brick-laying on Adkins & Webb's building has been commenced, and the work will be pushed as fast as possible.
    The Clarenden Hotel will open in a few days. It is to be a strictly first-class house, and will be deserving of a good share of patronage.
    C. W. Wolters and wife are in Salem attending the fair and visiting relatives. J. W. Fowler officiates as salesman at the bakery during their absence.
    R. A. Miller, of Jacksonville, has been shipping some fine grapes during the last few days. He says his crop is not as large as last year, but of much finer quality.
    Trice's minstrel troupe gave one of their popular entertainments at Howard's Hall, September 12. They are first-class in every respect and should be well patronized.
    Messrs. Bennett & Merriman are busy graveling West Seventh Street. It will, when completed, be much better, as nothing speaks more for a town than nice, well-improved streets.
    Thomas McAndrew has let the contract for the erection of several dwelling houses to be used for renting. Houses are in great demand. He will no doubt do well with them.
    Theo. H. Cooper of the firm of Cooper & Son, harness dealers at this place, left last Sunday for Kansas to visit relatives there, and will return early next spring.
Ashland Tidings, September 21, 1888, page 3


    Southern Oregon fruit growers will have a meeting at Ish's grove, between Jacksonville and Medford, on the 29th.
"Local Summary" [sic], Evening Capital Journal, Salem, September 24, 1888, page 3


Carried by a Large Majority.
    At the special town election of last Tuesday there were 88 votes polled in favor of levying a three percent tax for local improvements and 13 votes against the proposition. The vote was light, but was a pretty fair indication of popular sentiment on the subject. It is fortunate that our citizens took the right view of this matter, for radical measures are necessary to maintain the commercial importance of our town. Much good can be accomplished for Jacksonville if our people will now show the proper public spirit; and if we can secure better transportation facilities there is hope that such manufacturing projects as the proposed sawmill and sash and door factory in Jackson Creek will be established in the near future. The tax will be utilized in building a first-class turnpike to either Medford or Central Point; or perhaps some reliable parties will accept it as an inducement to build us some kind of a railroad to the main line.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1888, page 3


Progressive Agriculture.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart will, we learn, soon begin work underdraining the lower portion of his fine young orchard near Phoenix, having already placed his order for ten thousand feet of tiling with Henry Close & Son of Ashland. There can be no question but what judicious underdrainage would benefit large areas of land in this county, enabling farmers to start the plow much earlier in the spring, and reclaiming much land that is ruined for orchard purposes by standing water. But for his inability to obtain tiling at reasonable figures Mr. Stewart would have underdrained his orchard last fall, and would doubtless have saved many fine trees which were ruined by the standing water during the long continued wet weather of last season. He will lay six-inch tiling, principally, although much of a smaller size will be used. It is thought by those who have had experience with tiling that thorough underdrainage would enhance the value of adobe soil fully one hundred percent, as it then could be worked at will instead of at the caprices of the weather, as is now the case, besides being revivified and enlivened by being relieved of its surplus moisture in time to be heated into growing condition by the earlier spring sunshine.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1888, page 3


    There will be a Sunday school convention at Medford next Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 2 and 3.
    C. J. Armstrong will take charge of F. M. Plymale's farm in Medford precinct in a short time.
    Turpin & Dennis will this week finish a most successful season of threshing with the Matney and Adams crops, and last of all, Turpin's crop on the Ish farm. Bell & Cox were threshing for James Hamlin early in the week and will finish for the season in a week or ten days. J. Paterson's force is in the neighborhood of the Barneburg ranch this week and have almost three weeks' run ahead of them still. They have already threshed about 45 days, and have averaged about 1400 bushels of grain per day.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    School tax is now due.
    The Martin troupe performed here last week.
    W. M. Colvig speaks here Saturday evening.
    A member of the salvation army was in town last Tuesday.
    W. H. Barr is building a neat brick residence near this place.
    Dr. Martin, the dentist, has returned, accompanied by his wife.
    A vast amount of wheat is still being received at the warehouse.
    The Clarendon Hotel, west of the track, will be opened on Oct. 1st.
    J. H. Bentley's family arrived from the East a few days since.
    Mrs. Lucinda Justus of this place has been very sick, but is somewhat better now.
    The town is still full of strangers looking for locations here and other places in the valley.
    The Amethyst social club is in a flourishing condition and holds soirees regularly.
    John H. Bentley of the Medford band received a fine driving horse from Portland a few days since.
    The school clerk will receive bids until tomorrow for furnishing the school with 12 cords of wood.
    Turn out and hear the tariff and other leading questions ably discussed here next Saturday evening.
    The school board met at the office of the district clerk last Saturday, and sat as a board of equalization.
    Miss Maggie Tice has gone to Portland and will remain with Rev. J. V. Milligan and family for some time.
    Theo. Cooper, son of our popular saddler, has gone to Kansas to spend the winter. His health is not good, we are sorry to learn.
    T. A. Harris left last week for a visit to his old home in Canada. He will return in time to vote for Cleveland and Thurman.
    Wm. Ulrich, the wide-awake agent for the Farmer's and Merchant's Insurance Co., has returned from a successful trip to Josephine County.
    Street Commissioner Damon is graveling the road leading from this place to Jacksonville, we are glad to say. He should cover it as deeply as possible.
    We are sorry to learn that Dave Herrin, our popular and efficient photographer, will soon become a permanent resident of Linkville, the county seat of Klamath County. Success to him.
    Prof. Merritt and Judge Walker were announced to address the Republican club at this place last Wednesday, which caused a fair crowd to assemble. Mr. M. did not appear, however, and the meeting fell rather flat.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1888, page 3
 

    A vote was taken here yesterday whether or not the board should have power to levy a tax of 3 percent upon the city for the purpose of paying the indebtedness of the city and also to make improvements. The tax was carried by a large majority. It is understood that a portion of the funds arising from this tax will go to assist in building a streetcar line between this place and the railroad.
"From Jacksonville," Oregonian, Portland, September 27, 1888, page 2


Medford Items.
    Prof. Ganiard organized a dancing school at this place Wednesday night.
    Robert Cameron, of Uniontown, has been bringing some fine fruit to town during the week.
    Mrs. John H. Bentley arrived last Tuesday from Kansas, and will make Medford her future home.
    Goldsmith & Whitman are buying a large quantity of apples, which they are shipping in carload lots to Portland and Montana.
    The contract for digging the first mile of the ditch leading from Bear Creek to this place was awarded to J. N. Walters for $375. He will begin work immediately.
    A son of Claus Kleinhammer, who lives near here, was kicked by a horse last Saturday and sustained a fracture of the skull and a bad scalp wound. Dr. Pryce dressed his wounds and reports him doing well.
    Mr. Jackson, lately from Vermont, and M. S. Damon, of this place, have formed a partnership and will open a large boot and shoe store here in a short time. Mr. Jackson is a first-class mechanic, and they will also make all kinds of boots and shoes to order.
Ashland Tidings, September 28, 1888, page 3


    Medford's Christian denomination has in contemplation the erection of a church edifice.

"Occidental Jottings," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, September 29, 1888, page 2



    Jacksonville has an old and decayed appearance, for there is no new building going on to make an era of progress and development. The railroad gave it the "go by," to all intents and purposes. The mines that created the place and made it once a center of extravagant life and unusual prosperity have become exhausted. The creek that brought down gold in rich placers is worked out, and all its golden wealth is exhausted. It was possible, it is said, to have induced the railroad builders to have located their route near enough to Jacksonville to keep its health and prominence undisturbed, but they failed to appreciate the necessity, and nothing now can give animation and vitality to the place beyond the fact that some good country is tributary to it and must bring trade there.
    The fruit growers of Rogue River Valley met today in a grove between the two places--Jacksonville and Medford--and the occasion called out the beauty as well as chivalry of this section. Many families came with their lunch baskets, and the scene was enlivened by the presence of old and young inclined to make the most of the opportunity for enjoyment. There is a commendable display of harmony and interest manifest here in the fruit industry that must make the valley in time a center of wealth and prosperity. A year ago they feared prohibition would interfere with their business, but the "third party" did not pan out well last spring. Greatly as one might depreciate the manufacture and use of intoxicating liquors to excess, there is a legitimate use of the grape that has existed for all time.
    The extent of country adapted to fruit growing is really very great on Rogue River and its tributaries, even though it does not include the valley lands of this section. There is an immense scope of foothill land lying on the numerous tributaries and much of it facing the south, so as to be favorable for grapes and peaches. This land is so extensive in area that it must require many years to develop it for this purpose. Of course there is an advantage in nearness to transportation that will count in favor of the lands most available on that account, but as development continues roads will be constructed and the outlying fruit lands will be furnished with the necessary facilities.
    Speaking of Jacksonville, it was possible to locate the road through a gap on the north, so that it would be four miles shorter through the valley but this cutting would be expensive, though they claim here that the cost would be something in favor of the route by Jacksonville. Some here claim that the present route included a fine body of timber, I suppose in the limits of the land grant and this was as valuable to the company as the $40,000 subsidy asked of Jacksonville. But this is hearsay, the road is built, and Jacksonville is out in the cold with only a tolerably good courthouse to compensate for its other losses. This is their anchor to windward and they pin their hopes to it, thinking it will be many a day before Jackson County will feel able to throw this away and build another.
    Saturday morning we drove to Ish's grove, about two miles from Jacksonville and three from Medford, and found there assembled a crowd of moderate proportions, most of them engaged in displaying their fruits. The place was formerly located as a claim by Overbeck, and was bought by Mr. Ish, now deceased. His widow lives there, and the home lot is part of a beautiful, high prairie covered with grand oaks the Druids might have loved, if capable of so common a passion as human sympathy and affection.
    Druidical oaks they certainly were, and nowhere else in Southern Oregon did we meet with their equals. One feature that pleased was the presence of the red-barked evergreen laurel. There were grand oaks and laurels fully as grand and graceful too. These mingled their shadows and threw the same over the table spread with nature's prodigal gifts. To sum up the display, there were fruits covering a table one hundred feet long and all things shown there would be a credit to any country on the globe.
    After the tables were spread with the product of orchards and gardens the good people present went to their carriages and drew forth the lunch baskets, and bountiful supplies were laid out and everyone was included in the general hospitality. I shared in the hospitality of Mr. Prim and Mr. J. N. T. Miller, and the "jovial" party gathered around their spread had certainly an abundant feast. There is something appetizing in an al fresco feast like this that does not come in the ordinary course of a dinner service. This abundant feast was flavored with sundry bottles of Miller's wine that greatly assisted the digestion and did not hinder the hilarity.
Excerpt, "Fruit Growers of Southern Oregon Meet at Ish's Grove, Near Jacksonville," Oregonian, Portland, October 2, 1888, page 6


    OREGON APPLES.--A writer in the New York Nation says: "Indeed, neither in the East nor any part of Europe have I ever tasted apples to compare with those of Oregon. They have a richness and delicacy of flavor which must persuade anyone that if apples were less abundant they would be considered superior in taste and fragrance to those tropical and semi-tropical fruits which are most highly valued because of their scarcity in our latitude. In most parts of the East, an apple is an apple, and few people know or care about the names of the different kinds; but an Oregonian would no more eat certain kinds of apples than he would a raw pumpkin. An epicure is no more particular in regard to his brands of wines than an Oregonian is in the choice of his favorite variety of apples, and there are half a dozen kinds which I never saw in the East, and the systematic introduction of which in New York markets would make any dealer's fortune."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 4, 1888, page 1


    It is greatly to be regretted that there should have been so much petty vandalism at the fruit-growers' meeting last Saturday, as the beauty of some of the exhibits was very seriously impaired by the articles being handled and even eaten before the eyes of the exhibitors. Such an offense against decency and propriety is the more unpardonable because of the fact that any one of the parties who were guilty of it could have satisfied their gluttony free of cost by visiting any of the numerous vineyards and orchards within easy walking distance.
    Our citizens have reason to be proud of the fruit-growers' achievement last Saturday, as there was a wider range of excellence than is possible in the great fruit districts either north or south of us. It is true that the Willamette or Umpqua can show us fine apples, pears and prunes as were shown on Saturday, and it is also true that California can show us fine grapes, peaches, melons, almonds, etc.; but neither section can show the general excellence in all the varied products of the temperate and semi-tropical regions that the Rogue River Valley can boast of. This coast is destined in the not very distant future to be to America what the Rhine, Spain, and the Levant are to Europe in the production of the luxuries of existence, and the Rogue River Valley is just as surely destined to be one of the leading fruit sections of the coast with proper care in its development and by advertising its resources.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 4, 1888, page 2


Catherine Bourne to W. Ulrich, property in Medford; $100.
I. J. Phipps to I. W. Thomas, property in Medford; $125.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 4, 1888, page 2


JNO. H. BENTLEY, President.                            W. I. VAWTER, Cashier.
Opened Sept. 1, '88.
Jackson County Bank
OF MEDFORD, OREGON.
----

Does a General Banking Business and Buys and Sells Easter, Domestic
and Foreign Exchange. Collections a Specialty. Money Loaned.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 4, 1888 et seq., page 23


Medford Items.
    Wrisley & Goddard have the "boss" squash at their real estate office. It weighs just 188 pounds and was raised by J. H. Wrisley.
    The Clarenden Hotel opened Monday morning and is doing a good business.
    Charley Howard, chief of the railroad land examiners, spent last Sunday in town. They are at work on Butte Creek at present.
    You can buy anything you want at Palm's for 5 or 10 cents.
    Follett & Fowler received a fine lot of furniture during the week which they are selling at prices that defy competition.
    A large number of people from all parts of the country are in town attending the Sabbath school convention held at this place this week
    Ed. Hendricks of Applegate brought a four-horse load of onions to town Tuesday, which he sold to Angle & Plymale. Ed. says he raised 30,000 pounds of first-class onions on one-half acre of ground this year.
    M. E. Beatty, our live real estate agent, has just returned from a business visit to Klamath County, and may again be found at his office ready to assist anyone to find a location.
    A man carrying a hand organ and leading a monkey attracted considerable attention and several nickels one day during the week.
    Mr. Bentley, the banker, has one of the best buggy horses in town. He bought it in Portland recently.
    The new burglar-proof safe for the bank at this place arrived last week, and is one of the finest safes in Oregon. Its cost was $1024. It is one of Hall's automatic, bolt-work, double-combination time locks, and has no combination on the outside with which a burglar could tinker. Its double Howard movements prevent trouble with the time lock. One movement may stop entirely, but the other will throw the lock. Or if both should get out of order, the lock is thrown in consequence. The safe is of solid, chilled steel, and weighs 2750 pounds, though only 22x22 inches horizontal measurement, and 35 inches high, including the wheels. This safe, inside a fireproof vault, renders valuables as secure as they can be on this earth.
Ashland Tidings, October 5, 1888, page 2


Grand Democratic Rally.
    There will be political speaking at Howard's hall, in Medford, on Saturday evening, Oct. 13th. Hon. J. D. Whitman (the warhorse of Iowa Democracy) will reply to the speech of Hon. C. W. Fulton. All Democrats are expected to be present, while Republicans are cordially invited to hear discussed the issues of the campaign. The ladies are specially invited. The Jacksonville Democratic Club and Silver Cornet Band have been invited, and a rousing demonstration is expected.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 11, 1888, page 3


    The bulk of the apple crop of the valley has been sold at figures ranging from 30 to 60 cents per box, the last figure being for red winter apples of the Spitzenburg and Winesap varieties. Those dealers who came in at the eleventh hour failed to secure any first-class fruit at less than 50 cents per box. The future of the apple industry is bright indeed.
    The demand for lumber at the railroad towns along the O.&C.R.R. has been unprecedented this year, the mills of the valley being entirely unable to meet it. There are several new mills now being built, however, and it is thought that another season will not show the same condition of affairs. Rogue River Valley is making rapid strides in the march of improvement, and it is to be hoped that our enterprising citizens will not be handicapped by scarcity of building material again.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 11, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford has a new tinshop.
    Grand Democratic rally Saturday evening.
    Adkins & Webb will no longer sell groceries.
    Ask J. S. Howard about that composition on "birds."
    Mrs. E. C. Phelps is visiting her old home at Yaquina Bay.
    Dave Crosby has been visiting at Riddle's, Douglas County.
    Improvements and new buildings are noticeable on every hand.
    Our bank recently received a fine safe, weighing nearly 3000 pounds.
    The Clarendon Hotel, on the west side of the track, has opened for business.
    The infant son of Mr. Galloway died a few days since, we are pained to announce.
    J. W. Short's household has received an addition, a son making his appearance on the 18th ult.
    The Christian and M.E. churches contemplate building places of worship in the near future.
    Mr. O'Donnell, the painter, is building a new residence on some land he purchased of J. W. Short.
    J. H. Bentley was at the county seat last week, accompanied by a friend recently from Kansas.
    W. G. Zimmerman, the well-known mechanic, is building several buildings in this place for Thos. McAndrew.
    J. S. Howard has sold three lots in town, on which there are a number of fruit trees, to parties from abroad for $1500.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman will fairly pulverize Mr. Fulton's argument next Saturday evening. Turn out and see him do it.
    J. H. Faris of the Medford House has made a large number of improvements and keeps one of the best hotels in the valley.
    W. G. Cooper keeps a complete and first-class stock of harness, saddles, etc., and sells at prices that cannot but prove popular.
    The town having paid E. E. Gore $200 for the right-of-way of the proposed water ditch, J. N. Walter has been given the contract for digging 100 rods of it.
    A concert was given at the Baptist Church last Sunday evening, which was well attended and passed off pleasantly. A further account will be given in the next issue of the Times.
    Medford no longer revels in the luxury of the railroad eating house. After being accommodated here for the past few years, railroad passengers will stop at Ashland for breakfast and supper hereafter.
    The well-known firm of Cooper & Son, dealers in saddles, harness, etc., has been dissolved, W. G. Cooper continuing the business at the old stand. We are sorry to learn that ill health has necessitated the return of the junior member of the late firm to Kansas.
    Spencer Childers, Sr., has removed his family from his location on Dry Creek, west of the river, to the property recently purchased by him at Medford. He has rented his ranch to a German, who recently brought his family from Umatilla County to this valley, and who will winter about 80 head of cattle along the river.
    It is the intention of the school board to erect a $10,000 school house next spring. The schools are advancing rapidly to the front rank of culture and scholarship. It has now been four years, according to the statement of one of the directors, since the boys cleaned out the teachers, while some of the later ornithological compositions of the pupils are gems of thought and sentiment.
    We learn that some Kansas City capitalists were in Medford last week looking for a suitable location to establish a wholesale and retail dry goods depot. They made Mr. Noland an offer of $1,300 for his corner saloon property, but as he holds for a higher figure the trade was not consummated. The Kansas City men intended to erect a 3-story brick block on the premises if bought.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 11, 1888, page 3


L. Buensow to C. B. Rostel, property in Medford; consideration $200.
N. Slack to W. H. Pomeroy, property in Medford; $50.
M. L. Williams to W. A. Forbes, property in Medford; $600.
O.&T. Co. to Thos. McAndrew, property in Medford; $375.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 11, 1888, page 3
 

    Quoting the statements in the Oregonian that Jacksonville is to have a streetcar line to connect with the railroad, the Astorian
adds that "Astoria is going to have a railroad to connect with the streetcar line."
"General Notes and News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 11, 1888, page 4


Medford Items.
    The R.R. land examiners have quit work and returned home.
    R. T. Lawton has been quite low with typhoid fever, but is now convalescent.

    Bert Whitman had the misfortune to be thrown from a horse last Tuesday and received a very severe cut across the face, but otherwise was not much injured.
    Granville Sears had the finest load of grapes in town Wednesday that have been brought in this season. He had no trouble in selling them at 3 cts. per lb.
    The many friends of Miss Norah Plymale will be pleased to know that she is recovering from her recent severe illness and will soon be able to be around again.
    The contract for the bridge across Bear Creek at this place was let to the Pacific Bridge Company of San Francisco for $1450. They will begin work at once, and will have the bridge completed by December 1, 1888.
    Mr. Williams has moved into the Central Hotel building and has a fine display of fresh, homemade candies, which equals or exceeds any we have ever tried. He also has a soda fountain in connection with his candy factory.
    Clarence Hutchison and wife, of Indiana, nephew of our fellow townsman R. T. Young, arrived in town this week to spend the winter at any rate, and will perhaps locate here permanently. Mr. Hutchison's parents will also arrive here early in the spring.
    John Duranseau, the young man who was accidentally crushed between the cars at Tolo last week, proved to be much worse injured than was at first supposed, having received internal injuries besides having his leg crushed. Dr. Pryce, assisted by Drs. Geary and Pickel, amputated the limb above the knee last Sunday morning, but he was too badly crushed to recover and died the following night.
Ashland Tidings, October 12, 1888, page 2


    The Union Labor Party of Oregon has now a state organization and three nominees for presidential electors, as follows: E. P. Hammond, Medford, Jackson County; H. R. Wilson, Albina, Multnomah County; J. F. Hendricks, Harrisburg, Linn County.
"State Items," Daily Morning Astorian, October 16, 1888, page 3


    The infant child of Ed. Redfield received painful injuries by falling from the porch in front of his jewelry store at Linkville, which is five feet above the ground.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 18, 1888, page 2


C. W. Broback to A. M. Woodford, property in Medford; $125.
M. R. and D. T. Lawton to E. F. Walker, et al., property in Medford; $125.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 18, 1888, page 2


Tariff Talk at Medford.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman addressed a large audience at Howard's hall in Medford last Saturday evening on the subject of the tariff, and held their closest attention through a two hours' argument, replete with facts, figures and pleasing illustrations. There were a number in attendance from Jacksonville; also a liberal percentage of farmers from the surrounding country. All are eager to obtain light on the tariff question, for men of every shade of political opinion are convinced that radical reform is necessary. Fortunately Mr. Whitman is well posted on the subject, and none went away dissatisfied with his presentation of the two issues now before the people.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 18, 1888, page 3


Catholic Churches.
    In our advertising columns will be found a notice to contractors calling for sealed bids for the construction of a Catholic church at Ashland, to be built according to plans and specifications already decided upon. Bids will also be received for a Catholic church in Medford. Plans and specifications have not as yet been made out. All information can be obtained at the parochial residence at Jacksonville, Rev. F. S. Noel, pastor.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 18, 1888, page 3


    It is thought that not less than 50,00 boxes of winter apples will be shipped out of the valley this fall.
    A. W. Presley, who has been engaged in merchandising in Washington Territory, had his store destroyed by fire not long since.
    Old-fashioned emigrant trains continue to arrive in Rogue River Valley from California, eastern Oregon and Washington Territory.
    Dr. J. P. Welch, of Orland, Cal., formerly of this county, lost his dwelling, office and barn, together with most of its contents, by fire a short time since, we are sorry to say. The loss is estimated at $3000, and there is no insurance on it.
    A number of those who attended Sells' circus thought the magnificent shooting done by the Bogardus family was a sham and that no bullets were used. That they were mistaken a dispatch from San Diego, Cal., proves, as during a recent performance there on the 13th, Bogardus, Jr., while firing eighteen shots in eighteen seconds, missed the target and sent a bullet through the leg of Miles Silverthorne, 23 years old. It is a bad wound.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 18, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    This place will have a Catholic Church in the near future.
    J. H. Redfield of Linkville spent a while in town last week.
    M. Purdin, the genial blacksmith, spent a few days in Portland last week.
    D. T. Lawton, the real estate agent, is recovering slowly, though still quite ill.
    Prof. Ganiard's dancing class, recently organized here, is in a flourishing condition.
    A niece of Hon. J. D. Whitman, who resides in California, is paying this section a visit.
    Hanley & Wilkinson's meat market is doing a lively business. The choicest of meats are always kept there.
    E. G. Hurt, manufacturer of the celebrated combination fence, is furnishing a large quantity to our farmers. It cannot be excelled.
    M. A. Brentano, landlord of the Grand Central, has been at Portland, where he laid in a large quantity of supplies for that caravansary.
    Anvils and fireworks added much to the enthusiasm prevalent here last Saturday night, when Mr. Whitman addressed the people on the tariff question.
    Lou Savage is assisting C. K. Fronk, manager of the Medford warehouse, business having increased so fast as to require the attention of several men.
    Dave Herrin's post office address is Bonanza, Klamath County. He has left this place indefinitely, being offered better inducement at his new location.
    Some careless hunters shooting in the vicinity of W. L. Roberts' farm came near killing that gentleman's wife one day last week. Mr. R. now forbids any hunting on his premises.
    A wedding, in which one of our prominent young men and an amiable young lady residing not far from this place will be the contracting parties, is announced to take place soon.
    J. W. Plymire and family, Chas. Wilkinson and Wm. Richardson returned last week from an extended tour to Fort Klamath, Linkville and Crater Lake. They had fine weather, no dust and no smoke on their trip, and recommend October as the proper time to visit the mountains.
    A considerable stretch of the Medford and Jacksonville road has now been graveled, and it is thought the road will not be nearly so bad as last winter, when the rains set in. It will require an immense amount of gravel to prevent the "bottom falling out" during January and February, however.
    The Democrats strung a handsome banner on 7th Street, between the Grand Central and Noland's, which attracts much attention. The Republicans have followed suit, flaunting their streamer some distance farther east. Probably for lack of something better, the adherents of Harrison and Morton have painted the meaningless phrase "Protect wool as well as sugar" on their banner.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 18, 1888, page 3


Medford Correspondence.
    The Woman's Missionary concert at the First Baptist Church of this place a few evenings since was a grand success. The house was crowded to overflowing, yet there was almost perfect order. The address by the pastor, G. G. Thomas, was short and rich, and, as is usual with him, he had the undivided attention of the congregation. The music was exceptionally good, and the little ones did grandly. One could see by the cheerful faces of the women, who are banded together to aid the missionaries of foreign lands, that they were very much pleased by the attentive congregation. Many, who were not directly interested, did much toward making it a success. When shall we be treated to another? Medford is constantly making improvements. There are heights she cannot reach; yet her people will ever be found laboring for success and progress in all things good.
Oct. 8, 1888.                                                                                          VINDEX.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 18, 1888, page 3


    Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, an able expounder of Democratic principles, will speak at various points of the Willamette Valley between now and election day. He will no doubt explain the tariff question clearly to those who will be convinced.
    Sam. Van Dyke, one of the promising young men of this valley, and Miss Kate Kleinhammer, were united in matrimony last Sunday. They have the congratulations and best wishes of a host of friends.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 18, 1888, page 3


MARRIED.
BETTS-GREENWOOD--In Medford, Oct. 8th, by Rev. E. McLean, Thomas C. Betts and Miss Olive Greenwood.
VAN DYKE-KLEINHAMMER--In Medford, Oct. 14th, by Rev. E. McLean, S. G. Van Dyke and Miss Cathrine [sic] Kleinhammer.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 18, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Go to Goldsmith, Medford, for groceries.
    Cash paid for produce at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    Don't fail to call on Goldsmith for prices when in Medford.
    Wheat still continues to come in for storage at the Baker warehouse.
    Wanted--Cash custom for groceries and crockery at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    The new houses of L. L. Angle, Levi Wortman and others are about completed.
    C. W. Skeel, the contractor and builder, is figuring upon several new buildings this week.
    Mr. Vawter's brother is helping him at the bank, during the temporary absence of Mr. Bentley.
    Groceries and crockery sold cheaper at Goldsmith's, Medford, than any place in Jackson County.
    Work is progressing upon the Medford water ditch, and it is expected that ditch will be finished by the last of December.
    M. E. Beatty has sold out the last of his forty-nine lots in Beatty's addition to Medford, and has realized a fair amount of profit.
    Building continues, and there are a large number of dwellings in course of construction. More building would be done but for the scarcity of finishing lumber.
    In addition to the thriving business of his bakery and confectionery store, C. W. Wolters does a good trade as general agent for newspapers and periodicals of all kinds.
    Meeker's addition to Medford, eight acres adjacent to town on the north, is to be surveyed and platted by J. S. Howard, as soon as he can find time to do it.
    County Surveyor Howard is constantly rushed with work for the county, the town and private parties. He is selling lots rapidly for the railroad company. Last week he sold $805 worth, and the week before about the same number.
    Major Jackson [sic], whose arrival here from Vermont was mentioned recently, is having plans of a store and dwelling made by Street Commissioner Damon, and as soon as the building is completed will open business with a fine stock of boots and shoes.
    D. A. Huling, who came here recently with his family from Phillipsburg, Kansas, reports that he has already discovered in this valley fourteen people from the same county (Phillips) in that state, and Marshal Short he remembers as sheriff of Decatur, a neighboring county.
    Rev. E. McLean, pastor of the Presbyterian church, who built a dwelling house here--doing the carpenter work himself--is now constructing a small building, 12x12 feet, for a library and study. A peculiar feature of it will be two windows joining in one corner, the object being to give plenty of light in every corner of the room.
    Mr. S. H. Hull, of California, a careful business man who has looked well through that state and other parts of the coast, is greatly pleased with this valley and town, and shows his faith in both by investing liberally in real estate here. The judgment and example of such men as Mr. Hull will count effectively in the development of the country.
    Medford has had a Republican and a Democratic speech recently. Judge Walker made a rattling good speech for Harrison and Morton and protection, and Hon. J. D. Whitman made one of his free trade speeches in answer to C. W. Fulton. Mr. Whitman's arguments are plump against the principle of protection, but of course he, like other Democrats since the June election, would object to being called a free trader.
    The Democrats stretched a banner across Main Street and informed the public that the labor candidates are Cleveland and Thurman, whose portraits are shown. The Republican club, not to be outdone, has stretched a longer and larger banner across the street bearing the portraits of Harrison and Morton on each side, and on one side the inscription: "Protection to American Industries and Labor," on the reverse: "Protect American Wool, as Well as Sugar."
    The following real estate sales are reported this week: L. L. Angle has sold an 8-acre tract of his land west of town to a newcomer at $75 per acre . . . Judge Charles Walker has sold 40 acres two miles west of town to Lucia R. Gise, of California; con., $900 . . . R. T. Lawton has sold for W. H. Barr 40 acres southwest of town . . . J. W. Simpson has sold 8 acres west of town to J. N. Traylor . . . Wrisley & Goddard report the following sales: Judge Crawford to S. H. Hull, lots 11 and 12, block 66, Medford; cons., 165. Lots 15 and 16, block 20, with building on it (the old store of Miller & Strang) to S. H. Hull; con., $1200. I. M. Harvey to S. H. Hull, 23 75/100 acres adjacent to Medford; con., $1600.
Ashland Tidings, October 19, 1888, page 2


A Crazy Chinaman.
    Sheriff James G. Birdsey of Jackson County arrived in this city this morning bringing with him John Chinaman, an unfortunate son of the flowery kingdom who had been adjudged insane and was committed to the asylum here. The Chinaman is twenty-four years of age and was found at Medford chanting Chinese opera and acting in such a manner as to cause the citizens to have him taken charge of, as he was considered too insane to roam at large. He entertained the passengers of the overland through the silent vigils of the night with choice selections of Chinese operatic airs.
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, October 20, 1888, page 3



Another Insane.
    A crazy Chinaman named "John" was brought up from Medford last Tuesday by Marshal Woolf, and after a hearing before Judge Neil was adjudged insane and taken to the asylum on Friday evening's train by Sheriff Birdsey.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 25, 1888, page 3


Wild Oats.
    Four hundred bushels of wild oats for sale. Just the thing for mountain ranches, as the yield the best of hay. Apply at the Tip Plymale ranch, near Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 25, 1888, page 3


    J. H. Redfield, Sr., who has been paying Linkville a visit, passed through the valley a few days since, en route to his home in Cow Creek Valley.
    A. Alford, ex-county commissioner, has returned from Butte Creek Valley, Cal., accompanied by his wife, and will spend the coming season at Medford.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 25, 1888, page 3


Grand Central Hotel.
MEDFORD, OREGON.
M. A. BRENTANO, Proprietor.
FIRST-CLASS HOTEL IN EVERY PARTICULAR.
----------
Terms $1, $1.50 and $2 Per Day.
----------
Special Attention Paid to Commercial Travelers.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 25, 1888 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Lola Collins lectured at this place one evening last week.
    Our school is well attended, there being an average attendance of 150.
    The new brick residence of W. H. Barr is approaching completion.
    The railroad company is making some changes in the platform in this place.
    Mrs. L. J. Sears and Miss Jennie Wilcox have formed a partnership in the millinery business.
    The W.C.T.U. hold meetings at the Presbyterian Church every Tuesday evening at 2:30 P.M.
    The Amethyst Club holds regular soirees at Howard's hall. The last was held one evening last week.
    The finishing touches are this week being put upon the second story of the Adkins & Webb building.
    Childers' new brick building is completed and several persons have located their offices in the upper story thereof.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman went to Roseburg Friday, where he opened the campaign the following day. He is a first-class speaker.
    Follett & Fowler carry the largest and best stock of furniture in Jackson County. If you need anything in their line, give them a trial.
    O. Holtan, our tailor, has been detained at his mountain ranch on Long Branch for the past six weeks, owing to a fall sustained by Mrs. Holtan.
    Ed. Worman, our enterprising liveryman, is always making improvements. He has ornamented his premises with a neat street lamp.
    Wm. Slinger, one of our most prominent citizens, was elected school director a short time since, to fill a vacancy. He will fill the position well.
    Mr. Vawter of Halsey, Linn County, who has been visiting his brother, the cashier of the Jackson County Bank, returned home a few days since.
    M. E. Beatty & Co., the real estate agents, have removed their offices to Childers' building, upstairs. So have Dr. Minnis and S. S. Pentz, Esq.
    Speakers of different political parties seem to forget that Medford is one of the largest towns in Southern Oregon. The committees who make their appointments should bear this in mind.
    Medford has the principal railroad office in Southern Oregon, which does a large business. It has lately been made a coupon ticket office, and hereafter Mr. Fronk, the popular agent, will sell tickets to any portion of the United States.
    I. M. Harvey has built a fine barn and has the material on the ground to erect a dwelling house on his property near the line of the Medford and Jacksonville road. He disposed of his former residence and barn with the property sold recently to S. H. Hull.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 25, 1888, page 3


    Dr. Clark has left Eagle Point, and will probably locate at Medford.
    Frank Kasshafer has returned from Medford and will take care of Capt. Barnes, whose health is poor, we are sorry to say.
    J. B. Riddle and wife have just returned from a two months' visit to Indiana and were welcomed home by their many friends. They spent a few days in the valley before returning to their home at Riddle.
    Jas. Hamlin and Judge Walker of Medford have wagered $300 each on the result of the presidential election. Uncle Jim always had a weakness for taking advantage of every opportunity to make money.
"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 25, 1888, page 3


NEW FURNITURE STORE ! !
MEDFORD, OREGON,
FOLLETT & FOWLER, Proprietors.
----
THE LARGEST STOCK IN JACKSON COUNTY !
----
    We have just received and are receiving new goods every week direct from the manufacturies which will be sold for at
BED-ROCK PRICES FOR CASH.
    Bedroom suits $20, $25 and upwards, with large, German plate looking-glasses and wire and wool mattresses.
    Parlor sets, black walnut, covered with red, worsted plush, new and beautiful patterns; marble top tables; bedsteads from $2.50 to $5; chairs from 90c to $2.50.
Large Assortment of Carpets from 50c to $1.00.
Gilt wallpaper, splendid patterns, and everything usually found in a first-class furniture establishment.
    The citizens of Jackson County are respectfully invited to call and examine our stock before purchasing elsewhere.
FOLLETT & FOWLER.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 25, 1888 et seq., page 3


Medford Items.
    A light shower fell Tuesday night.
    L. L. Angle's new dwelling will be ready for the plasterers in a few days.
    Born--At this place, October 20th, 1888, to Mr. and Mrs. William Phipps, a son.
    Quite a number went over to Jacksonville Monday night to hear Col. Effinger speak.
    Adkins & Webb's store is ready for the lower joists, which will be put on as soon as possible.
    Col. Effinger spoke at Stanley's hall Wednesday evening to a large and appreciative audience.
    C. W. Savage and family, of Los Angeles, Cal., will move here in a few days to make Medford their future home.
    F. M. Plymale's two-story frame building has been raised, and carpenters are busy finishing outside and in.
    W. G. Zimmerman has just completed a number of houses for Thomas McAndrew. They will be used to rent.
    D. S. Youngs has opened a large second-hand store on C Street, and buys any kind of goods in that line. Call and see him.
    Hon. Robert McLean spoke here Tuesday at 2 o'clock to a large audience. He is a fine speaker and made an excellent address.
    Mr. Beatty, of Seattle, brother of M. E. Beatty of this place, is here on a visit, and may conclude to remain in this part of the country.
    H. C. Turpin made a 53 days' run with his threshing machine this year, and threshed 50,000 bushels. About 40,000 bushels of this was wheat. Quite a good aggregate for the season.
    The aged father of J. S. Howard died at his home at Kewanee, Illinois last Monday. A telegram was received Tuesday, and Mr. Howard being at Portland it was sent to him at once.
    Three or four newcomers are erecting large and substantial dwellings in Barr's addition to Medford, and three new houses are being built on the tract formerly owned by Mingus.
    A gentleman from Illinois is visiting J. H. Stewart, he being an old friend and schoolmate. He is very much pleased with our town and vicinity, and is thinking of coming here to locate.
    The railroad carpenters have removed the platform along the track on the opposite side from the depot and added it to the one on the depot side. It was done to accommodate passengers on the long trains now being run over the road, so they could get off without having to get in the mud.
Ashland Tidings, October 26, 1888, page 2


State, Place and Capitalization:
ORE., MEDFORD, $25,000
Bank or Banker:
John H. Bentley, P.
Cashier and N.Y. Correspondent:
Wm. I. Vawter, Cas., Corbin Banking Co.
"New Banks, Bankers, and Savings Banks," The Bankers' Magazine and Statistical Register, November 1888, page 393


William Ulrich to I. J. Phipps, lot in Medford; $50.
I. J. Phipps to Sarah J. Queen, lot in Medford; $50.
D. T. Lawton to Jane Beek, lot in Medford; $100.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 1, 1888, page 2


Far from Home.
    In the hope of alleviating the suffering of a loving wife and mother, Hon. T. R. North and family of Adel, Iowa, came to Rogue River Valley last week. The mother, Mrs. N. E. North, was stricken with consumption some three months ago at her Iowa home, and her life was despaired of before leaving there. She expressed such a longing to try the effect of a removal to the Pacific coast, however, that the attending physicians, in the vain hope that nature could stay the course of her disease where science failed, advised her family to accede to her wishes. She survived but a few days after her arrival at Medford, and, though dying among strangers, had her family about her in the last dark hour. Her death occurred on Thursday, October 25th, at 1:35 P.M., at the residence of Hon. J. D. Whitman in Medford, and her remains were interred in the beautiful Jacksonville Cemetery on Sunday afternoon, Rev. R. McLean officiating, assisted by Rev. J. W. Miller. Deceased was born in Illinois Aug. 24, 1848, and was married to T. R. North at Adel, Iowa, Dec. 31, 1864. Her husband and six children survive her; the youngest child an infant of two years. The bereaved family have the sympathy of our people, and will probably remain permanently in Jackson County.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 1, 1888, page 3


An Able Speaker.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford addressed a fair-sized audience in the courthouse last Saturday evening. He discussed the tariff question from a Democratic standpoint and proved beyond a question that a high protective tariff is a "robber tariff," and very disastrous to the interests of the laboring classes, simply fostering monopolies and robbing the poor. He quoted from several different Republican authors stating that during low tariff periods the country was most prosperous. He argued the question from a farmer's standpoint and proved conclusively that protective tariff works hardships to the farmer. His speech was fair, honest, logical and devoid of all abuse.--[Roseburg Review.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 1, 1888, page 3


Notice.
    TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Whereas I made a statement privately that others made public, that I saw Geo. L. Webb playing cards in a saloon on a certain occasion, but, after learning more, I admit that I was mistaken in the person.
J. W. MILLER.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 1, 1888, page 3


    Three separate brass bands at Medford Saturday evening.
    Remember the Democratic rally at Medford next Tuesday evening.
    Fall in with the procession at Medford and hurrah for Cleveland and Thurman.
    B. Bailey, who now has possession of the Isaac place on Bear Creek, was in town since our last issue.
    E. J. Pool of Medford precinct raised sixty thousand pounds of potatoes from less than four acres of ground. He found Early Goodrich and White Elephant to be the best yielders.
    Fred Barneburg of Medford precinct was in town yesterday, just having returned from a trip up the river after cattle for stall-feeding this winter. He will feed over a hundred head and will probably ship to the San Francisco market.
    We haven't had much chance to show our Democracy in the way of parades and torchlight processions this year in Southern Oregon, but will make amends at Medford on Saturday evening. An immense crowd will be in attendance.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 1, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Vote for Cleveland and Thurman.
    Work is progressing rapidly on F. M. Plymale's new residence.
    S. H. Hall is building a neat residence near Mr. Hurt's residence.
    A. Alford of Siskiyou County, California, will this winter reside in Medford.
    Numbers of our citizens are contemplating hunting trips in the mountains.
    Three brass bands will dispense music at the parade next Saturday evening.
    Some little opposition is expressed to the moving of the depot from its present site.
    Gracie Foster, who has been quite sick with typhoid fever, is reported mildly better.
    Mrs. P. E. Cheney departed last Thursday for her home in Humboldt County, Cal.
    Do not fail to visit our city and take part in the grand Democratic rally next Saturday.
    P. B. Beatty, of Seattle, W.T., is visiting his brother M. E. Beatty, and will remain some time.
    The boys are making some bets on the election, mostly in small sums which they can afford to lose.
    Traveling men are unanimous in declaring Medford to be one of the liveliest towns on the line of the O.&C. railroad.
    Our active and energetic real estate agents are doing good work for the county in encouraging newcomers to settle with us.
    All of our Willamette Valley exchanges speak in complimentary terms of the tariff speeches delivered by our fellow townsman, Hon. J. D. Whitman.
    Jackson County tobacco took the first premium at the Mechanic's Fair; why not establish a tobacco factory in Medford as the Advertiser suggests? Every condition is favorable.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 1, 1888, page 3


    The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Geary died at Medford yesterday.
    Nervy citizens of Medford are now betting "even up" on Oregon going Democratic.
    Wind up a dull campaign with a whoop, by going to Medford and taking in the rally Saturday night.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 1, 1888, page 3


DIED.
NORTH--At the residence of J. D. Whitman, in Medford, Oct. 25th, of consumption, N. E., beloved wife of T. R. North, of Adel, Iowa; aged 40 years, 2 months and 1 day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 1, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Coupon tickets for all points in the East can now be obtained at the R.R. office at this place.
    Frank Galloway is improving slowly, and will be brought home as soon as he is able. He and his father are both at Seattle yet.
    Bert Whitman, of this place, has been appointed agent for the Woodburn Nurseries. Persons intending to plant orchards should see him before purchasing.
    Hons. Bilyeu and Siglin spoke to a large audience at Stanley Hall Tuesday night. They are both very pleasant speakers, but we have heard of no one that they have converted to Democracy at this place.
    The father, brother and sister of Rev. Geo. Black of Grant Pass arrived here Monday from the East. They disposed of their property before they left there, and will make Medford their future home.
    E. J. Smillie has sold his variety store on Fourth Street to Messrs. Baker & Ford, two young men from W.T. The new proprietors are thorough business men, and we bespeak for them a good share of the trade in their line.
    Our old friends R. V. Beall and wife returned Saturday evening from their extended visit East. Vint said he saw a whole lot of country while they were gone, and does not like any of it near so well as Jackson County.
    Alice E. Geary, youngest child of Dr. E. P. and Mrs. Geary, died at the family residence Thursday night of typho-malarial fever, aged one year 11 months. The remains were taken to Eugene City on Wednesday night's train by the sorrowing parents.
    Mr. John Clark died at his home in this place Wednesday, and was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery here the following day. Mr. Clark was a good Christian man and had many friends here, all of whom extend their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family.
Ashland Tidings, November 2, 1888, page 3



Hymeneal.
    Henry E. Baker, the well-known and popular proprietor of the warehouses at Medford, and Miss Sophenia Ish, one of the most highly esteemed young ladies of Jackson County, were united in matrimony last evening. The house of Mrs. S. E. Ish, the bride's aunt, was the scene of the festivities and Rev. M. A. Williams officiated. But a few immediate friends of the contracting parties were present, together with the relatives of the bride. We tender our congratulations and wish the happy couple a prosperous and blissful journey through life.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 8, 1888, page 3


    John Clark, a well-known citizen of Medford, died on Wednesday, Oct. 31st, and was buried next day.
    The Republicans tried to eclipse the Democratic parade at Medford on Monday night, but their retainers did not enthuse worth a cent.
    During the past year Central Point has made as much advancement in proportion to its population as any other town in the Rogue River Valley.
    We regret very much to hear of the serious illness of George Nichols of Chimney Rock precinct. Dr. Pryce is attending him and will doubtless bring him around all right.
    Messrs. Taylor & Taylor of Grants Pass have secured the contract for furnishing lumber for the new Medford bridge. This enterprising firm is rapidly coming to the front in their lines--lumber, sash, doors, blinds, etc.
    From returns now in it is evident that the Democratic majority in Jackson County will not be over 140. The light vote polled everywhere, except in a very few places, is accountable for it to a great extent, and the bulk of the immigration in Ashland and Medford precincts is doubtless Republican.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 8, 1888, page 3


    L. L. Savage and family have located at Medford.
    Geo. Hull is employed at the Medford livery stable.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 8, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Daniel Wilson of Butte Creek was here a few days ago.
    Mr. O'Donnell, the painter, now occupies his neat, new residence.
    F. M. Plymale's new building is being painted in fine style by M. Maule.
    Mrs. A. A. Cunnyngham and family have removed to Ashland to reside.
    Ed. Hendricks of Applegate has been furnishing this market with fine vegetables.
    The Medford brass band has been reinforced and will soon be in front rank again.
    H. H. Goddard of Wagner Creek is assisting C. W. Skeel to erect several buildings.
    The brick work on Adkins & Webb's building has progressed as far as the third story.
    Burrell Miller, who has been with the government surveyors for some time past, has returned.
    Wilkinson & Hanley are doing a large business and furnish this market with the choicest of meats.
    Jackson & Damon's two-story building is nearing completion. It will be a neat and commodious one.
    Baker & Ford, lately of Washington Territory, have purchased E. J. Smillie's variety store and will enlarge the stock.
    Wm. Slinger, one of our most prominent citizens, returned Sunday evening from a trip to his old home in Southern California.
    The Democrats and Republicans held political demonstrations, with torchlight processions, etc. They were both well attended and enthusiastic affairs.
    Mr. Follett, of the firm of Follett & Fowler, the enterprising furniture dealers, has returned from Portland, where he has been laying in a large stock of the best goods in their line.
    Childers & Son have the contract for building Jones & Horn's brick store and hotel at Hornbrook, Cal., which is a fine, large structure. The outside work will soon be completed.
    The death of little Alice Geary cast a gloom over the whole community. Her remains were taken to Eugene City for interment. We sincerely sympathize with the grief-stricken parents.
    Mrs. Lewis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Crystal, who has been visiting Medford, recently returned to her home at Chetco, Curry County, accompanied by her sister, Miss Fannie Crystal.
    Rev. F. S. Noel has secured four lots near the Baptist Church in Medford from the railroad company, at half price, upon which will be erected a neat Catholic Church edifice. Work will probably be commenced at an early day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 8, 1888, page 3


DIED.
GEARY--In Medford, October 30th, Alice C., infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dr. E. P. Geary, aged 1 year and 11 months.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 8, 1888, page 3


NOV. 10, 1888
    I arrived at Medford on the express last night and secured field notes to Carrey from J S Howard, then stayed at Dickensons Hotel, and this morning took freight train for Gold Hill arriving there I met Mr Blevins who took me in his wagon to his place and we Met Mr P O Wilson and Wm Cook and proceeded to survey their Claims we worked all day and did not get done and as they have scruples about working on Sunday, I will have to lay over to morrow.
Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent


    There were thirty-seven parties at Medford last week who were looking for locations, but on account of there being no houses in town, at least half of them were unable to stop. They all spoke well of our city, and expressed a great desire to remain.--Advertiser.

"Occidental Jottings," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, November 10, 1888, page 4


Amelia Furry to Donna Furry, lot in Medford; $350.
M. E. Beatty to H. Wahlers, property in Medford; $200.
G. W. Howard to A. E. Woods, lot in Medford; $50.
D. H. Miller to S. H. Hull, property in Medford; $1200.
J. W. Short to S. S. Pentz, lot in Medford; $40.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 15, 1888, page 1


    Many of the newcomers in the railroad towns find it difficult to get comfortable winter quarters, owing to a scarcity of houses to rent.
    Several carloads of apples have been shipped out of the valley lately. The exportation of this fruit is much heavier this year than ever before. It is more evidence that it will pay to plant plenty of apple and pear orchards.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 15, 1888, page 3


    Jacob Wrisley, who is now a resident of Grant County, will spend the winter in the valley, having arrived not long since.
    Dr. G. H. Aiken, formerly of this place, has purchased the [omission] of the best drug stores in Oakland, Cal. We wish him the fullest measure of prosperity.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 15, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Go to the 5 and 10 cent store.
    Homeseekers are abundant here.
    Improvements continue on every hand.
    The 5 and 10 cent store is the place to get bargains in many lines.
    L. L. Savage talks of going into the commission business.
    Heaps of new goods, just from Chicago, at the 5 and 10 cent store.
    The Amethyst Club gave another pleasant party last Friday evening.
    John Robinson has again become a permanent resident of this place.
    O. H. Johnson, the well-known painter, is now a resident of Garfield, W.T.
    John Swenning and family have gone to Iowa, but will return in the spring.
    McQueen's wood-sawing machine dispenses with the buck and saw here.
    Fred Stutz has opened a shoemaker's shop here. He hails from Sisson, Cal.
    D. Reynolds and family of Meadows precinct have become residents of this city.
    Rev. M. A. Williams is preparing to erect a comfortable dwelling in the spring.
    A magnificent stock of holiday goods will soon be displayed at the 5 and 10 cent store.
    M. Purdin, the enterprising blacksmith, has just received a carload of Baltimore stone-coal.
    The prices as well as the quality of the goods at the 5 and 10 cent store are astonishing everybody.
    C. K. Fronk, our clever railroad agent, made his relatives at Eugene City a visit not long since.
    Last Sunday was Bible Day at the Sabbath school. The exercises were quite interesting.
    A meeting of the Ladies' Aid Society was held at the residence of Mrs. J. R. West last Friday.
    A large and first-class stock of glassware, tinware and other goods is being displayed at the 5 and 10 cent store.
    Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Baker are spending their honeymoon in California. We wish them a pleasant journey.
    Goods were never sold as cheaply in southern Oregon as they are being sold at the 5 and 10 cent store.
    The next quarterly meeting of the M.E. Church will be held at Medford next Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 17th and 18th.
    E. G. Hurt has just received another carload of pickets and is filling several orders for the celebrated combination fence.
    Call at the 5 and 10 cent store and be convinced that the best of goods can be sold at eastern prices. No humbug there.
    A number of our Republican friends went to Ashland Saturday to assist in celebrating the election of Harrison and Morton.
    Frank Galloway has returned from Seattle, W.T., accompanied by his father. We are glad to learn that he has fully recovered from his recent illness.
    Our friend E. J. Smillie will not leave Medford, but intends resuming business at his old stand before long. We are glad to learn that he will remain.
    D. S. Youngs has opened a place of business here, where second-hand articles of all kinds are bought and sold. He already feels much encouraged with the outlook.
    Dr. C. Minnis has a pleasant office in Childers' brick building. Although here but a short time, through his skill and uniform courtesy he is gaining a good practice.
    The Republicans of this place and vicinity have abandoned the idea of holding a celebration over the result of the recent election, and will join in the jollification at Jacksonville next Saturday.
    R. H. Halley keeps a full and first-class assortment of tinware, etc., and is building up a large business. He is expert in executing new work and also in repairing, and never fails in giving satisfaction.
    Wrisley & Goddard, the real estate agents, are selling considerable property, notwithstanding the dull times. They have a nice list of farms for sale, and Carlos knows how to rustle up purchasers.
    Jackson & Damon, who are putting up a new building in this place, will open a boot and shoe store in a portion of it. Baker & Ford will occupy the balance of the lower story, and will carry a full line of provisions, groceries, etc.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 15, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Enough rain fell during the week to enable farmers to begin plowing.
    Myron Skeel, who has been very sick with typhoid fever, is getting much better, we are glad to say.
    The N.Y. Aquarium car was in town Tuesday, and was well patronized. It is all it advertises, and all were well satisfied.
    Miss Katie Van Dyke has charge of the Postal Telegraph office in place of Miss Mamie Judge, who has gone to Chico to take an office there.
    The Medford Amethyst Club will give a grand ball at Howard's Hall Thanksgiving evening, Nov. 29th, to which a cordial invitation is extended to all.
    When Mr. Joseph Clift, who lives near Phoenix, was working in the garden one day during the week, tramps entered his house and stole $60 from a trunk. No trace of them has yet been found.
RECEIVED TOO LATE FOR LAST WEEK.
    D. T. Lawton, who has been sick for some time past, is up and around again, we are pleased to say.
    Frank Galloway and father arrived Tuesday morning from Seattle. Frank looks quite bad, but is improving slowly.
    Medford polled three hundred and forty-seven votes Tuesday, a gain of one hundred and thirty-one over the June election.
    The plasterers are at work on Howard's Hall, plastering it throughout, and when completed it will be one of the finest halls in the country.
    Mr. John Angle, youngest son of L. L. Angle, arrived from the East this week and will make Medford his future home. He likes this valley better than any he has seen.
    The young folks of this place organized a Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle one night last week, with quite a number of members. Mr. H. E. Baker was elected president and Miss Katie Van Dyke sec. They meet every week at the Presbyterian church. It is a good society and should be well patronized.
    Cornelius Armstrong has rented F. M. Plymale's large farm near town and moved his family there already. Mr. Plymale will move to town as soon as his dwelling is completed, which will be before long.
DIED.
MORGAN.--In this city, November 10, 1888, of typho-malarial fever, Jesse L., youngest son of J. S. and C. J. Morgan, aged 17 months.
He is sleeping, sweetly sleeping,
    Our darling little Jesse, dear.
He has gone to rest with Jesus,
    We no more his voice can hear.

He is sleeping, sweetly sleeping,
    Can we wish to wake him now,
When not a trace of care or sorrow
    E'er can mark his peaceful brow?

Knowing what we know of sadness,
    Knowing what we know of tears,
When memory turning, takes us backward
    O'er the past few years.

Would we wake him from that slumber,
    Call him from that rest with God,
Back on earth to travel with us
    In the path our feet have trod?
Ashland Tidings, November 16, 1888, page 3
 

Treat Them Well.
    The Times fears that too little attention is paid to the newcomers. Especially is this true of the ladies who have but recently arrived. There have been numerous complaints that the wives and daughters of gentlemen who have in the last few months located in this section have received absolutely no attention. In many instances this is no doubt due to their being entirely unknown, but this is not always so. People who come without letters or other introduction cannot complain if they are not immediately taken up by those who have an established position to sustain, but when the respectability and social status of the later arrivals is satisfactory, they should be made to feel at home at once and every attention paid to them by the older residents. True gentility should dictate this, and the neglect of the newcomers can only be excused on the ground that they are coming so rapidly they cannot be sought out and visited as promptly as they should be under any other circumstances. To the ladies of Jackson County must this important matter be delegated. The gentlemen are all employed and have as yet but little time for the amenities of life outside of business hours. The good name Jackson County people have achieved as a warm-hearted, sociable class must not be permitted to deteriorate. It must be sustained and added to until the very name Jackson County shall become a synonym for sociability.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 22, 1888, page 3


Church Contract Let.
    The contract for building the new Catholic Church at Medford was let by Rev. Father Noel last week to W. G. Zimmerman, the well-known contractor, who will at once begin work on the structure. It will be a neat frame building, 26x40 feet in the clear, and it is expected that it will be ready for occupancy not later than the 15th of January next.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 22, 1888, page 3


    H. Hollingsworth of Uniontown precinct has invested in a few acres of land near Medford, for which he paid $100 an acre.
    Empty houses are quite scarce in Jacksonville. This does not look like the county seat is becoming depopulated and decaying.
    O. Harbaugh this week commenced work on a large barn on his place on the Medford road. It will be of 2x8 stuff, and bolted together throughout with iron bolts. This style of building is not only more quickly constructed, but is stronger and cheaper than the ordinary framed barn, the principle being the same as that employed in shipbuilding, i.e., to utilize the full strength of every piece of timber.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 22, 1888, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Newcomers continue to arrive here.
    School tax will be delinquent on Dec. 2d.
    Heaps of new goods, just from Chicago, at the 5 and 10 cent store.
    Justice Angle's fine, new residence will soon be ready for occupancy.
    Our bridge across Bear Creek has not materialized as yet. What is the matter?
    Some of our streets need crosswalks badly. The trustees should attend to this at once.
    The union Sunday school met at Stanley's Hall last Sunday morning. Regular meetings will be held hereafter.
    Notwithstanding the inclement weather, several buildings are under course of construction and more are contemplated.
    J. R. Purdin, formerly of Eden precinct, has returned from Sisson, Cal., with his family and invested in town property here.
    Quite a number of our Republican residents were in Jacksonville Saturday evening and participated in the jollification.
    Medford will soon have a neat Catholic Church building in its midst. A fair will soon be held here to raise funds to assist in its construction.
    A Martha Washington supper was given at Stanley's hall last Thursday evening, which was greatly appreciated by the many who partook of it.
    The Union livery stables, under the management of Ed. and Shorty, are steadily becoming more popular, and do a large business.
    Dr. S. Danielson has had several cases under treatment lately and is giving entire satisfaction. He is a practitioner of the physio-medical school.
    The regular quarterly meeting of the M.E. Church for this circuit was held here last Saturday and Sunday. Rev. S. P. Wilson, presiding elder, and several of our local ministers were in attendance.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 22, 1888, page 3


BORN.
BENTLEY--In Medford, Nov. 10th, to Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Bentley, a daughter.
HILL--Near Medford, Nov. 11th, to Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Hill, a son.
DIED.
MORGAN--In Medford, Nov. 10th, Jesse Leonard, youngest son of J. S. and C. J. Morgan, aged 1 year and 5 months.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 22, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    Miss Jennie Wilcox is sick with fever.
    Clark's butcher shop has been closed this week. It will be opened again in a few days.
    Work has been resumed on Adkins & Webb's building, and it will be pushed to completion.
    Wrisley & Goddard sold several fine pieces of land this week, to parties who have come to make this valley their home.
    Jackson & Damon will open their boot and shoe store in a short time. They are going to have a good building when they get it completed.
    Charley Wolters has received a fine lot of toys and a general assortment of Christmas goods. Don't forget to call on him, for you will be sure to find something to please the little ones.
    Supt. Woods, of the Pacific Bridge Co., came up from San Francisco Monday, to begin the bridge across Bear Creek at this place. He has the timbers mostly on the ground, and a full force of carpenters will begin next week and soon finish the work.
Ashland Tidings, November 23, 1888, page 3


    Medford will soon have a Catholic church.

"Occidental Jottings," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, November 26, 1888, page 4


O.&T. Co. to I. W. Thomas, property in Medford; consideration, $1400.
O.&T. Co. to E. W. Starr, property in Medford;
$40.
John R. Morrison to J. C. Jones, property in Medford;
$400.
J. S. Dilley to J. A. Black, property in Medford;
$450.
Philip Haught to
L. L. Angle, property in Medford; $600.
W. A. Forbes to P. C. Scott, property in Medford; $500.
Willard Crawford to S. H. Hull, property in Medford; $165.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1888, page 2
 

    D. Reynolds and family have not gone to Medford, as was reported in "Medford Squibs" last week. They are living on the hill ranch, 270 feet above high-water mark, surrounded by peace and plenty. They know when they are well fixed.
"Meadows Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1888, page 3


    H. C. Turpin was in town Saturday from Medford, having recently removed to that stirring town.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1888, page 3


    Land around Central Point sells for a bigger price than nearly anywhere else. It is the genuine productive, never-wear-out soil, however, and has no superior.
    Central Point boasts of the best townsite in Oregon, summer or winter, and is rapidly building up. In the winter season particularly, the good roads leading to the town do much to concentrate business here.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1888, page 3 


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. Pryce is kept quite busy attending to his extensive practice.
    Our physicians are kept busy vaccinating residents of this place and vicinity.
    Miss Kate Van Dyke is now in charge of the postal telegraph office at Medford.
    Improvements continue on every hand, notwithstanding the inclement weather.
    Jake Wrisley and C. Goddard will open another variety store in this place soon.
    Some of our streets need graveling. The authorities should look after this matter.
    J. C. Corum is building a neat residence on the land he purchased near his place.
    Wm. Clark has sold his butcher shop and tools to John Dyar and quit doing business.
    The local fruit buyers are still receiving and storing fruit in the expectation of higher prices.
    Judge Crawford returned last Saturday from his trip to Salem, where he has been attending the Supreme Court.
    Another blacksmith shop has been opened in this place by a young man lately from the Willamette Valley.
    H. Richards and family left Medford precinct last week for Michigan, where they will reside in the future.
    The place to get your harness, saddles, etc., is at W. G. Cooper's. His goods are the best and prices the lowest.
    H. E. Baker and wife have returned from their trip to California and were warmly welcomed by their many friends.
    Mr. Scott of Sisson, Cal., a capitalist, has a house and lot in this place, and will probably become one of our residents soon.
    F. W. Clayton, our jeweler and watchmaker, has received a large and very fine stock of jewelry, watches, etc., for the holidays.
    Roberts & O'Neil have sold a portion of their land near this place. They got $40 an acre; the piece in question being hill land.
    Dr. Pickel is kept busy attending to the wants of his numerous patients. He is enjoying a good practice, which is constantly growing.
    The town authorities have done considerable work on the road leading to Jacksonville, but much more gravel could be put there very handily.
    T. A. Harris, who recently returned from his trip to Canada, has gone to Astoria. He has as yet not determined where he will permanently locate.
    Mr. O'Donnell has quit the painting business and may be found at the Monarch Saloon, where the best of wines, liquors and cigars may always be found.
    Our bank is steadily gaining in favor and doing a good business. The officials, Messrs. Bentley and Vawter, are courteous and reliable gentlemen, and are deservedly popular.
    Our clever friend, David T. Sears, will open a complete and magnificent stock of dry goods in a few days. The ladies will then have no trouble in being suited and need not send off for their dress or fancy goods.
    Follett & Fowler sell more furniture than any other firm in Southern Oregon, because they keep a nice and larger stock and sell cheaper. "The proof of the pudding is in the eating," so call and judge for yourself.
    Work on the bridge across Bear Creek, at this place, is not progressing as well as it ought to. The contractors have as yet been unable to plant the piers of the proposed structure, as the waters of the stream prove very troublesome.
    Postmaster Miller and wife are on their way home from Iowa, where they have been visiting relatives and friends for some time past. Their return has been greatly delayed by the illness of Mrs. M., who was dangerously ill for several weeks with typhoid fever.
    Childers & Son, having finished the construction of Horn & Jones' large brick building at Hornbrook, Cal., have brought their bricklaying force here and put them to work on Adkins & Webb's three-story structure. They have been quite successful as contractors, doing most of the best work in southern Oregon for the past few years.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1888, page 3


    Several of our merchants have ordered their goods sent to the Central Point depot, as they fear that the road to Medford will be next to impassable this winter.
    L. A. McQueen of Medford visited Jacksonville yesterday, for the purpose of obtaining contracts for sawing wood with his steam machine. His rates are quite reasonable.
    Nothing will be done toward building macadamized wagon roads or a street railway from Jacksonville until the town charter is amended. The present roads will be repaired at once, however.
    Granville Naylor, who owns a fine farm near this place, is exhibiting some apples, the second growth on one of his trees, which are nice specimens of fruit. They may be seen at Jas. Goldsmith's, Medford.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1888, page 3


Medford Items.
    The nights have been quite frosty this week.
    Miss Purcell is quite sick at the Clarenden Hotel.
    Several newcomers arrived during the week to spend the winter.
    Newt. Jacobs, of the Record, was in town Saturday, accompanied by his wife.
    The Advertiser will move into one of the upper rooms of Jackson & Damon's new building next week
    W.F. & Co.'s route agent, Mercer, has been in the valley during the week checking up the different offices.
    E. Russ intends starting a large nursery at this place in the spring. He has purchased the land of Roberts and O'Neil.
    Jacob Stroble and daughter, of Walla Walla, who have been visiting Chas. Strang at this place, left for home last Tuesday evening.
    The bridge builders are having a good deal of trouble digging the pits for the mud sills on account of water, but have got a pump rigged now that assists them, so that they will soon have them done.
    The grand ball to be given by the Medford Amethyst Club, Thanksgiving night, promises to be a fine affair. The supper will be served at the Medford House, and the proprietor, Mr. Faris, will spare no pains to set the best the market affords.
    D. H. Miller and wife returned Wednesday evening from the East. Mrs. Miller is improving from her severe illness, and stood the return trip well. They report having a fine trip, but had Mrs. Miller kept well they would have had a much more pleasant time.
Ashland Tidings, November 30, 1888, page 3


    Notary's commissions were granted yesterday to S. C. Benjamin, Grass Valley; Frank Snow, Lexington; X. N. Steeves, Portland; J. S. Howard, Medford.

"Occidental Jottings," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, December 1, 1888, page 4