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Medford News: 1889

Only one issue of a Medford newspaper from 1889 survives. Below are Medford-related news items from 1889, mostly gleaned from other towns' papers. Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.



Looking southeast in 1889 from the railroad water tower or windmill--
the approximate location of today's 1910 depot.


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The best tinware at Halley's.
    M. Skeel is again on our streets.
    The Catholic Church building is nearing completion.
    Lew Hale has returned from his trip to the Willamette Valley.
    Mrs. H. T. McClallen of Roseburg is paying her sister, Mrs. E. Wilkinson, a visit.
    Religious meetings have been held every evening for some time past at the Presbyterian Church.
    Mr. Carter, who recently purchased five acres of land in Barr's addition, spent Wednesday in town.
    Prof. Dennison has resigned his position, and our school is without a principal. We have not learned the cause of this dissatisfaction.
    The bridge across Bear Creek has been completed and was received by the county judge a few days ago. It is an excellent structure.
    Dr. Minnis was at the county seat last Saturday. He is a fine physician and surgeon, and we are glad to learn that he is building up a good practice.
Thomas Harlan, April 23, 1902 Oregonian
April 23, 1902 Oregonian
    The Advertiser, in its last issue, announced its suspension. It will soon be supplanted by the Mail, which will be conducted as a Republican paper by Thos. Harlan.
    The remains of John Noland, one of the pioneer citizens of Medford, were buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery Sunday. Quite a number of our citizens attended the funeral.
    Articles of incorporation of the First Christian Church of Medford were recently filed in the office of the secretary of state. D. H. Miller, J. S. Higinbotham and B. S. Webb are the trustees.
    A citizens' meeting was held here last Friday evening and the following candidates for town offices nominated: Mayor, Judge Crawford; trustees, Wm. Slinger, M. Purdin, W. Ulrich, J. W. Short; recorder, B. W. Powell; treasurer, W. I. Vawter; marshal, John S. Miller.
    The town election held last Wednesday was an interesting one, and called out a good vote. The question of licensing the business people of town was the main one, and resulted in favor of license, by a very meager majority. I. A. Webb was elected mayor, defeating Judge Crawford by one vote. Wm. Slinger, M. Purdin, H. U. Lumsden and D. T. Lawton were chosen as trustees; B. W. Powell, recorder; Chas. Strang, treasurer; John S. Miller, marshal.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1889, page 2


What Jacksonville Needs.
    Something which would benefit Jacksonville as much as anything else would be a straight line from the courthouse to Medford. It would increase the value of the property through which it would pass threefold, and owners of land on each side of it would find no trouble in selling their real estate at $100 an acre. Sooner or later a motor road would be built on it, the benefit of which improvement cannot well be computed just now. The people of Jacksonville are awakening from their lethargy, and propose taking steps to be included in the boom which will certainly strike southern Oregon in the near future. Much of the choice fruit lands lying around the county seat in vast quantities will soon be placed on the market in parcels to suit purchasers. As there is no doubt of the good quality and adaptability of the soil to fruit and vine culture, why it should not be utilized as well as anywhere else, if offered at reasonable figures, is not at all apparent. It remains entirely with the people of Jacksonville whether they will take hold with a will and make their town what it ought to be.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1889, page 3


Another Old Pioneer Gone.
    John Noland of Medford died at his residence last Friday afternoon, after a brief illness. He had been a resident of Jackson County for many years, and was one of the first settlers of the town in which he lived. Mr. N. was a native of Ireland, but left there when quite young. Energetic and upright, his word was well respected, while his generous and urbane manners made him many friends. A wife and four children mourn the loss of an affectionate husband and father. The funeral took place on Sunday and was largely attended.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1889, page 3


    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    For the best turnouts for all occasions call at the Excelsior livery stable in Jacksonville. Plymale's prices are quite reasonable, and he never fails in giving satisfaction. You will also do well to patronize his stage line running between this place and Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1889, page 3


    B. C. Goddard, Jr., of Medford, the well-known real estate agent, is quite sick with lung trouble, we are sorry to learn, and may go to southern California for the benefit of his health.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1889, page 3


    John Hull and family have removed to Medford.
    Lew Johnson's colored minstrels gave performances at several points in the valley. It is a good troupe.
    On every hand we see people planting trees or making preparations to do so. Southern Oregon will be one vast orchard or vineyard before many years.
    The proposed straight road to Central Point would prove not only of great advantage to the traveling public, but to the owners of the land through which it will pass, as it would greatly enhance the value of their property. We are therefore surprised that some should oppose this improvement, as it injures none and benefits all.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1889, page 3


BORN.
WOOD--In Medford, Dec. 25th, to Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Wood, a daughter.
STEWART--In Medford, Dec. 25th, to Mr. and Mrs. S. Stewart, a son.
DIED.
COOK--In Medford, Dec. 22d, Annie Laurie, eldest daughter of Mrs. J. C. Morgan; aged 13 years, 11 months and 2 days.
NOLAND--In Medford, Dec. 28th, John Noland; a native of Ireland, aged 54 years.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1889, page 3


3 Jan 1889     I started to Medford to try to get my Compass fixed   I found an old gentleman named Strait that was able with my help to fix the Compass and then I got Mr. J. S. Howard to try it and I guess it will work all write. I am staying in Medford to night, at Dickisons’ Hotel.
Diary of Welborn Beeson


  
  Thomas Harlan has bought the Medford Advertiser newspaper plant, and will continue the publication of the paper under the name of the Medford Mail, in accordance with the prospectus referred to last week. The new editor has our best wishes for his success, and we trust the paper will improve and prosper.
    The following officials have been elected at Medford, to serve the city for the ensuing year: Mayor, I. A. Webb, Trustees, M. Purdin, William Slinger, D. T. Lawton, D. J. Lumsden; Recorder, B. W. Powell; Treasurer, Chas. Strang; Marshal, John S. Miller.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 4, 1889, page 3



    D. T. Lawton of the real estate firm of R. T. Lawton & Son, Medford, Oregon, in renewing his subscription to the Vindicator, says the weather is very fine in Oregon this winter; different varieties of flowers are in blossom in his yard, and the leaves are green on some of the trees. He is just recovering from an attack of typhoid fever that has lasted him nearly two months. Other members of the family well.
Northern Vindicator, Estherville, Iowa, January 4, 1889, page 5


    Every town in Rogue River Valley thinks it ought to have a cannery, which is a foolish idea, as Southern Oregon offers inducements for just one. No doubt one well-regulated institution of that kind, backed by ample capital, would prove a good investment. In the future, probably more could be operated to advantage. The Times would like to see such an enterprise commenced. It would bring a considerable amount of money into this section and give employment to many.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1889, page 2


M. E. Beatty and G. H. Baker to Sophenia I. Baker, property in Medford; $1.
J. E. Drucks to A. B. Drucks, an undivided one-half interest to property in Medford; $3200.
J. M. Cummons to Wm. Slinger, property in Medford; $406.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1889, page 2


    Henry Smith, the capitalist, who has stores at Wolf Creek and Medford, will soon open another store here, and has the lumber already on the ground for a new building.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1889, page 3


    Drummers continue abundant.
    The country is full of bilks, so look out for them.
    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    For the best turnouts for all occasions call at the Excelsior livery stable in Jacksonville. Plymale's prices are quite reasonable and he never fails in giving satisfaction. You will also do well to patronize his stage line running between this place and Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1889, page 3
   

MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mr. Flindt of Albany is in town and may locate here.
    Barnum's factory has shut down for a short time.
    D. A. Huling has opened a new hardware store here.
    The new town officers took their seats Tuesday evening.
    Meetings were held every evening at the Baptist Church recently.
    Mr. Beek's nice dwelling house in Barr's addition is about done.
    A number of new sidewalks are being built. A very good idea.
    It is reported that our town is over $3000 in debt. Is this a fact?
    Adkins & Webb's fine three-story brick building is nearing completion.
    Geo. L. Webb has succeeded John W. Curry at Wells, Fargo & Co.'s office.
    J. C. Corum is now engaged in the butcher business and runs a delivery wagon.
    Dr. Jackson of Jacksonville, the dentist, is paying our town a professional visit.
    Our town is full of strangers, many of whom locate here and in this vicinity.
    Lee Rosenburger has resigned his position as night watch and special policeman.
    Our town election has caused somewhat of a muddle, but it will not be of long duration.
    Follett & Fowler, of the new furniture store, are doing a good business. They always lead.
    Jackson & Damon's new building is finished and they are displaying a large stock of boots and shoes.
    Mrs. R. H. Halley is gaining an enviable reputation as an artist, and has many fine pictures in her studio.
    If you want your property sold quickly, at the best figures, call on M. E. Beatty at his real estate office in Medford.
    The daughter of Mrs. Bettie Tyler of this place died last Friday of brain fever. She was nearly three years of age and a bright child.
    Medford's new paper, the Mail, appeared last week for the first time. Thos. Harlan, lately of Nebraska, is editor and publisher.
    We are very much pleased to see Dr. Pryce, the skilled physician and surgeon, on our streets once more. He has returned from Portland much improved in health.
    M. E. Beatty has gained a reputation as a disciple of the "manly art" as well as a real estate agent. He believes in "knocking 'em right out."
    For sale at a bargain--a cozy dwelling house not far from the center of the town of Medford. For particulars enquire of R. T. Lawton, real estate agent.
    "Squibs" erred last week in giving some of the candidates for town officers. Cashier Vawter of the bank was not a candidate for anything, although he would make a good officer.
    The late John Noland was a member of the A.O.U.W. at the time of his death, and his family will consequently receive the usual insurance of $2000 placed on all Workmen's lives.
    Dr. Geary, assisted by several of our physicians, performed an operation upon the six-year-old son of Frank Galloway, who has been suffering with membranous croup. It is not often that tracheotomy is performed so successfully.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has reopened the saloon formerly kept by A. H. Carlson, thoroughly refitting it and making many improvements. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call for he will treat you well.
    The recent town election was hotly contested, and none of the successful candidates got a large majority. About 175 votes were polled. The following is a summary of the result as declared by the judges of the election: Mayor, I. A. Webb, 88; W. Crawford, 87; councilman, M. Purdin, 97; W. Slinger, 95; D. T. Lawton, 84; A. Childers, 83; Wm. Ulrich, 82; J. W. Short, 81; G. W. Isaacs, 80; recorder, B. W. Powell, 97; G. S. Walton, 77; marshal, John S. Miller, 93; Wes Johnson, 79; treasurer, Chas. Strang, 91; G. H. Haskins, 84. The issues involved was whether the revenue for carrying on the town government shall be raised by licensing the business houses or by direct taxation.
    The town council, in canvassing the vote cast at the late election, decided that the judges had no right to throw out a certain ballot that had been voted, and proceeded to count the same. This gave Judge Crawford one more vote for mayor, or 88 votes in all; the exact number which his competitor, I. A. Webb, had received. As the law gives the council authority to act in the matter of a tie vote, two of the members and the mayor cast their votes in favor of Mr. Crawford and two voted for Mr. Webb. The former was then declared the new mayor and awarded the certificate of election; Mr. Webb and his friends have not accepted this matter as final, however, and propose contesting the matter, having retained Messrs. Prim, Hanna and Pentz to represent them in the courts.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1889, page 3


    J. H. Whitman of Medford, the well-known abstracter, was at the courthouse on business one day this week.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1889, page 3


Jacksonville to Medford.
    Patronize the only wagon that connects with every train, rain or shine, and carries the U.S. mail and Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express. Satisfaction guaranteed.
ED. HELMS, Driver.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1889 et seq., page 4


Municipal Election Contest.
    The Medford city election of last week has resulted in considerable bitterness of feeling between opposing sides, and is to figure in the courts before it is decided. The chief question at issue was whether a license shall be imposed upon business houses, as in Ashland, to help defray the expenses of night police, etc. The vote was exceedingly close, and in the case of mayor, there was a tie vote between Crawford (for license) and Webb (against license) except that for Crawford two ballots were found together. The objection board threw out these two ballots, which gave Webb the election by one vote. When the city council came to canvass the vote, they concluded to "go behind the returns," and, upon the ground that the two ballots were evidently stuck together unintentionally, and in such a way as to preclude the supposition of attempt at fraud, they counted them as one vote. This made a tie, and by the charter the council was then compelled to make the election. To bring matters to a still finer point, the council stood two for Crawford and two for Webb. The mayor then cast the deciding vote in favor of Crawford. The losing side then promptly procured a temporary injunction restraining the recorder from issuing a certification of election to Crawford, and the case is thus pending in court. The pro-license side has a majority of the new council.
Ashland Tidings, January 11, 1889, page 3


E. Russ to H. Flindt, property in Medford; $1300.
I. J. Phipps to Nettie McGee, property in Medford; $50.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1889, page 2


    The new year opens very auspiciously in southern Oregon.
    Business of all kinds is increasing rapidly in Jackson County.
    The weather is colder now than at any time during the winter, there being a heavy frost every night. During the day it is cool but clear and bracing.
    N. Stinit, who is known nearly everywhere in Oregon, is now infesting this valley. He was induced to leave Medford by Marshal Miller, who wanted to collect license from him, as he claimed to be a real state agent, and is in Ashland at present. Look out for him.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Pryce of Medford was in town Monday, and is in the best of health, we are glad to say.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1889, page 3


    There are several bilks in this neighborhood, who have lately arrived here and are living upon the people, obtaining credit of them without the least intent of ever paying their honest debts. Look out for them.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1889, page 3


DIED.
TYLER--In Medford, Jan. 3d, of congestion of the brain, Fair Mabel Tyler; aged 2 years 11 months and 18 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Surprise parties are numerous.
    Mrs. Dr. Geary has recovered from her recent illness.
    O. Holtan, our tailor, has removed to his farm on Dry Creek.
    There is some sickness in town, but no serious cases at present.
    The new town officials took their seats last week, and all is serene.
    The brick work of Adkins & Webb's new building has been completed.
    N. O'Connell is putting up draw lime kilns near here. Something new.
    The wife of J. H. Brantner, who has been sick some time, died one day last week.
    Finley Dixon is the new principal of our school, and is giving entire satisfaction.
    Rosenthal always did keep a fine, large stock of goods and sells very cheap. Give him a call.
    Dr. Jackson, the Jacksonville dentist, has been here for the past several days, and is doing well.
    E. F. Lewis and wife, lately of Medford, are now comfortably located at Port Orford, Curry County.
    The infant child of Jas. W. Simpson died a few days since, and was buried beside its mother.
    The Lumsden property, just south of town, will be cut up into lots and put upon the market at once.
    The Grand Central is doing a big business, which is constantly increasing. Max knows how to run a popular house.
    The Jackson County Bank's business is increasing right along. It is a first-class institution and its officers are quite clever.
    R. N. Baker, the tailor, has opened a shop at Medford. He is a first-class mechanic and should be liberally patronized.
    Several of our citizens were at the county seat one day last week, having been called thither by the proceedings in the mayoralty contest.
    J. E. Drucks has sold his interest in the Grand Central Hotel building to his brother. We are sorry to learn that he may leave us in a short time.
    Messrs. Slinger, Follett and Palm have purchased considerable property in the western portion of town, which they are selling reasonably on the installment plan.
    The special license tax passed by the old council seems to be unpopular with some. Miss F. E. Russ, the milliner, announces that she has closed her shop on account of it.
    The ditch which our citizens are bringing to town, for the purpose of furnishing a sufficient water supply in case of fire, etc., is nearing completion. The contractor has done good work.
    Chas. O. Damon of this place was recently married in Douglas County to a popular young lady. The happy couple have arrived here, and are the recipient of many congratulations.
    Our Odd Fellows lodge has received many accessions recently. The members sat down to a splendid collation, spread by the lady members of Ruth Rebekah degree lodge, recently.
    Fair Mabel Tyler, the three-year-old daughter of Mrs. B. Tyler, died on the 4th inst., and was buried the following day in the Jacksonville Cemetery. She was about three years old and a promising child.
    The following are the new officers of Medford's lodge of the A.O.U.W.: Dr. E. P. Geary, M.W.; Charles Strang, foreman; W. H. Barr, recorder; J. N. Walter, overseer; J. N. Hockersmith, guide; John Morton, I.W.; J. C. Corum, O.W.; J. W. Plymire, receiver.
    A Chinaman was arrested last Tuesday, charged with robbing the laundry of one of his cousins of $3 in money and some other articles. He had an examination in Justice Angle's court, who held him to answer before the next grand jury. In default of bonds he was sent to the county jail.
    The following list of officers of Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., were installed Jan. 5th, by A. D. Helman, D.D.G.M.: I. Woolf, N.G.; M. Purdin, V.G.; G. L. Webb, Sec.; B. S. Webb, P.S.; L. L. Angle, Treas.; J. T. Kelly, R.S.N.G.; D. Wilson, L.S.N.G.; T. W. Johnson, W.; Frank Amann, C.; E. G. Hurt, R.S.S.; Samuel Murray, L.S.S.; L. M. Lyon, I.G.; B. F. Adkins, R.S.V.G.; H. E. Baker, L.S.V.G.
    The mayoralty contest, so far, has resulted in favor of Judge Crawford, who has received the certificate. A petition for a mandamus directing the old council to reverse its previous action in this matter was presented to Judge Webster by the attorneys for Mr. Webb, the contestant, last Thursday. To this a demurrer was filed, which, after argument by counsel, was sustained by the court. Mr. Crawford is in possession of the office; but we have not learned whether proceedings will stop here.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1889, page 3


That's What Ails Jacksonville.
    An exchange gently intimates that more towns die from want of confidence on the part of some men and lack of public spirit than from the rivalry of neighboring towns or adverse surroundings. When a man in search of a home or business location goes to a town and finds people brimming with hope and enthusiasm over the prospects of the place and earnestly at work to build up the town, he soon becomes imbued with the same spirit.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1889, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Health is improving here.
    Mayor Crawford spent Tuesday in Jacksonville.
    J. S. Howard has sold a number of railroad lots here recently.
    Attorney Pentz has lately received a fine library from the East.
    J. H. Whitman of this place has been appointed a notary public.
    The railroad company has raised the price of its lots in this place 25 percent.
    Walter Anderson and wife of Crescent City, Cal., are paying their old home a visit.
    A bill to amend our town charter has been introduced by Representative Bowditch.
    Prof. Hickman delivered an interesting lecture on the Arctic regions on the evening of the 18th.
    Several new enterprises are in contemplation here, and Medford promises to boom during 1889.
    Frank Galloway's team took a spin on their own account on Tuesday of last week, but did no serious damage.
    G. W. Crystal was thrown from his wagon while returning from Jacksonville one day last week and severely bruised.
    The religious meetings being held here are attracting considerable attention, and a number of converts are reported.
    Mrs. S. M. West, the artist, has recently completed some very fine paintings, which are highly spoken of by all who have seen them.
    The O.&T. Co. has presented the Christian Church with two lots, upon which a church building will be erected in the near future.
    Carlos Goddard has gone to California for the benefit of his health. S. H. Hull is filling his place as "rustler" for the firm of Wrisley & Goddard.
    Wrisley & Goddard, the live real estate agents, are selling considerable land right along, even though it is winter. Of course they advertise in the Times.
   
Our public school has 220 pupils on the roll and is being well managed by Prof. Finley Dixon, assisted by Misses Mary Coleman, Helen Strang and Mate Creed.
    The ladies' aid society lately elected the following officers: President, Mrs. R. T. Young; vice-president, Mrs. S. M. West; secretary, Mrs. S. H. Hull; treasurer, Mrs. M. Strang.
    Our brass band have just received a supply of handsome caps, lamps and plumes, and hope to get a full set of uniforms next season. They also have a fine bandwagon under way.
    J. W. Williams and Irvin C. Terry, representing the American Building and Loan Association of Minneapolis, were in town last week for the purpose of establishing a branch here.
    The citizens of Medford, with their accustomed enterprise, have made arrangements with parties from Minneapolis, Minn., to establish a fine, large flouring mill, with the latest improvements, in our town. This will no doubt prove of great benefit to southern Oregon in general.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1889, page 2


    O. Harbaugh is selling several small tracts off his farm near Medford.
    This pleasant winter weather surprises the newcomers, who hardly know what to make of it, but duly appreciate it as the same time.
    A few inches of snow fell during the past week, which laid on the ground several days. Sleighing was indulged in for a short time.
    Slides have been interfering somewhat with the regularity of railroad trains, which have been several hours late on different occasions.
    In our opinion, the greatest immigration to Oregon ever known will commence in a short time, and southern Oregon will get its share, despite the efforts of Portland's so-called state board of immigration. Even now newcomers are not scarce.
    Wrisley & Goddard of Medford, real estate agents, report the sales of the following property: Jesse Richardson's farm in Central Point precinct, 160 acres, $4,800; 18 acres off Judge Walker's place, near Medford, $720; two five-acre tracts and one of 15 acres off O. Harbaugh's farm, at $45 an acre.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1889, page 3


    S. A. D. Higgins had a severe attack of the smallpox in San Francisco not long [ago] but has fully recovered from it. He is now sojourning at Bartlett Springs, Cal., and will probably return to Jackson County soon
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1889, page 3


    Henry Helms has gone to Medford to take a position in C. W. Wolters' bakery.
    The county jail has one boarder--the Chinaman held to answer for robbing a landlady at Medford.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1889, page 3


    In the Medford mayoralty case taken into the circuit court recently, Judge Webster decided that he had no jurisdiction, and no further steps in contesting the election of Judge Crawford have since been taken, Judge Crawford, in accordance with the decision of the old council, at once assumed the office and duties of mayor of the city.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1889, page 3


O.T. Co. to C. A. Clark, property in Medford; $195.
C. A. Clark to Belle Clark, property in Medford; $1.
O.T. Co. to Lucy E. Langley, property in Medford; $50.
O.T. Co. to S. G. Wortman, property in Medford; $130.
O.T. Co. to Mrs. S. G. Wortman, property in Medford; $15.
L. L. Angle to R. H. Harper, property in Medford; $230.
W. Crawford to C. A. Burnett, property in Medford; $235.
J. W. Short et al. to T. W. Johnson, property in Medford; $100.
T. W. Johnson to A. D. Scott, property in Medford; $100.
G. W. Howard to A. P. Talent, property in Medford; $200.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889, page 2


It Ought to Pass.
    The following is the full text of the bill Senator Stanley has introduced, providing for an appropriation for building a railroad between Jacksonville and Medford. There is no more meritorious a bill before the legislature than this, and we hope that it will pass:
    A bill for an act entitled an act to aid Jackson County in the construction of a railroad from Jacksonville to Medford.
    Be it enacted by the legislative assembly of the State of Oregon:
    SECTION 1. There is hereby appropriated out of the general fund of this state the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars for the purpose of aiding the county court of Jackson County in constructing a standard gauge railroad from Jacksonville to Medford in said county.
    SEC. 2. Whenever the county court of Jackson County shall certify under the seal of said court to the secretary of state that said railroad is completed, then it shall be the duty of said officer to draw a warrant on the treasurer of state for the amount hereby appropriated in favor of Jackson County.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889, page 3


A Proper Step.
    A meeting of our citizens was called last Monday evening for the purpose of appointing a committee to confer with a like committee from Medford on the subject of soliciting state aid toward building a road between the two places. Henry Klippel, D. Linn, J. Nunan, Max Muller and D. L. Curtis were appointed as such committee, and on the following day met at the town hall with Willard Crawford, W. Slinger, G. R. Follett, M. E. Beatty and F. M. Plymale, the committee from Medford. A set of resolutions addressed to the members of the legislature from this county, asking an appropriation of $10,000, were adopted and will be forwarded to Salem at once. They were not handed us in time for publication in this issue of the Times, but will appear next week. In no place in Oregon is a good road needed more than between these two places, and it is to be hoped that our legislature will act fairly in the matter and afford the aid solicited.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889, page 3


Settling Up Fast.
    O. Harbaugh, C. Mingus and others are disposing of their land along the main road between Jacksonville and Medford in small tracts at prices ranging from $45 [per acre] upwards. Quite a settlement is springing up and at no far-off day the whole distance between the two places will be filled with residences, orchards and gardens, providing those owning the land will cut it up into five- and ten-acre tracts. The greatest portion of the soil there is first-class, being easily cultivated and very productive. We sincerely hope that the landowners in question will assist the good work of settling the valley, by selling their possessions in quantities to suit at reasonable rates. It will not only be a great benefit to the towns alone, but to themselves as well.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889, page 3


    Conrad Mingus has sold a parcel of his land near Medford. He received a very good figure for it--$6000, we learn.
    Immigration to southern Oregon seems to have commenced already, as there are many at present looking for homes.
    The business of the S.P.R.R. at the Medford office has more than doubled during the last twelve months, and is still on the increase.
    Will we have any winter this year? Here it is after the middle of January, and hardly a cold day has been experienced. The grass is green, stock has required little feeding, vegetables are growing, flowers are in bloom, and nature smiles pleasantly in Oregon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Health is improving.
    We are glad to state that F. Galloway's family is now convalescing.
    Mrs. R. Stinit is recovering under the treatment of Dr. Danielson.
    Twenty thousand bushels of grain remain in the warehouse at this time.
    J. H. Faris of Medford has been appointed a notary public by Gov. Pennoyer.
    Dr. J. S. Walter of Ashland, the dentist, is paying Medford a professional visit.
    Dr. J. M. Taylor, the well-known dentist, is located at Medford for the present.
    Several persons have been baptized by Rev. Mr. Thomas during the past fortnight.
    Rev. F. S. Noel will hold mass at the residence of Mrs. Noland on Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
    R. H. Gardiner, the photographer, is still here and doing considerable work in the country.
    S. Owings has received several vehicles and will probably open Dickenson's stables to the public.
    Wortham Bros., lately of Nebraska, are building a residence in Barr's addition and propose locating.
    A big grist mill for Medford is one of the certainties. Hurrah for the enterprise of our leading citizens.
    Medford is full of strangers seeking homes in the valley, and our hotels are filled to overflowing.
    Our board of trade proposes doing some good work in the way of advertising this place and its vicinity abroad.
    Mr. Murphy of San Francisco is here, looking after the case of Rehart vs. Rehart, brought from Lake County.
    J. T. Taylor of Grants Pass, of the well-known lumber firm of Taylor & Taylor, Grants Pass, was here last week.
    Rev. Mr. Adkins, lately from the East, has been assisting Rev. Mr. Thomas in conducting the revival going on here.
    The town council did well in appointing A. M. Woodford as street commissioner, as he will make an excellent official.
    A. G. Johnston, the real estate agent, was at the county seat last week, accompanied by several new arrivals from Iowa.
    Fred Marks of Kansas City, Mo., a nephew of Dr. Minnis and a first-class mechanic, will soon open a planing mill and factory here.
    Messrs. Short, Morey and others were at Jacksonville Tuesday for the purpose of receiving deeds to property they purchased of O. Harbaugh.
    Those indebted to the estate of John Noland, deceased, will save costs by settling at once with Willard Crawford, attorney for said estate.
    C. W. Palm will deal extensively in wagons, agricultural machinery, implements, etc., and is building a large warehouse near the Clarenden Hotel.
     A. A. Davis of Albert Lea, Minn., is the gentleman who proposes putting up a patent roller mill here, and has already purchased considerable real estate.
    The union Sunday school meets regularly in Howard's hall, which has been finished and made quite comfortable. Ninety-eight persons were in attendance last Sunday.
    The stock in the Noland saloon at the time of the proprietor's death has been sold to Mr.--------- for $600, who has already commenced business at the old stand.
    Elder Peterson held services at Howard's hall last Sunday, and will officiate there every fourth Sunday until further notice. He was greeted by a good-sized congregation at his last meeting.
    Representative Bowditch has introduced a bill to amend our charter, so that the town can issue bonds to a certain amount and extend its limits. Some substantial improvements are necessary, and this change will enable us to make them.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889, page 3


    D. S. Youngs, proprietor of the second-hand store at Medford, made us a call Saturday,.
    M. A. Brentano, the genial host of the Grand Central Hotel at Medford, made our town a pleasant visit last Tuesday.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889, page 3


    Elder M. Peterson, who keeps posted on this as well as other subjects, reports that the lowest point the mercury has reached this season is 24 degrees above zero and the deepest snow was 2½ inches, but it did not remain long at that depth.
    The carload of Durham cattle brought from Missouri by Wm. H. Holmes arrived at Medford Tuesday evening last, and the stock is now at W. H. Barr's ranch--the Plymale place--near Medford, where they will remain until animals sold on orders are delivered. The cattle came through in good shape, considering the long journey, but few of them suffering any injury.
    The people of Jacksonville and Medford have made a move in the right direction, in petitioning the legislature for state aid in making a good road between the two places. There is more travel on this thoroughfare than on any other in southern Oregon at present, and it is almost impassable during the winter season. The public is generally interested in this enterprise, and an appropriation of several thousand dollars could not be more justly or appropriately made.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889, page 3


Second Hand Goods Wanted.
    D. S. Youngs, proprietor of the second-hand store at Medford, will pay the highest price for second-hand furniture and goods of any kind. If you have anything in this line, address him, in care of lock box 88.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889 et seq., page 3


BORN.
CURRY--In Medford Jan. 19, to John W. Curry and wife, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889, page 3


O.&T. Co. to J. Van Sickle, lots 5 and 6, block 12, Medford; $175.
G. H. Baker to Sophia Kitzlinger and W. H. Norman, lot 3, block 18, Beatty's addition to Medford; $75.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1889, page 2


A ROAD PETITION.
    The following is a copy of the petition sent to our delegation at Salem and other members of the legislature:
At a meeting of the two committees representing Jacksonville and Medford, respectively, held at Jacksonville on January 29, 1889, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted, ordered printed and forwarded to the Jackson County legislative delegation at Salem:
    1. That in the opinion of your committee it is an absolute necessity that a good wagon road be built between the towns of Jacksonville, the county seat of Jackson County, Oregon, and Medford, situated on the line of the Southern Pacific railroad.
    2. That the convenience of the people of Ashland, Talent, Phoenix, Eagle Point, Little and Big Butte, Sams Valley and all points north of Rogue River, also Central Point and Gold Hill, in order to reach the county seat of said Jackson County, require the immediate construction of said road.
    3. That no appropriation from the state of Oregon has ever been given Jackson County to aid said county in the building of roads, bridges or otherwise. That said Jackson County is unable without state aid to construct said road, and respectfully ask that our senator and representatives use their utmost influence to procure the appropriation of such sum as may be necessary to build and construct said wagon road.
    4. That the length of said wagon road will be about four and one-half (4½) miles, and can be constructed at the cost of ten thousand ($10,000) dollars, and we hereby ask the aid of the state of Oregon in that sum to build said wagon road.
    5. That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to our senator and each member of the legislature from Jackson County, and ask that they present a bill to the people of the state of Oregon to carry out the provisions of these resolutions at as early a day as possible.
    Each resolution was adopted separately by the unanimous vote of the committee.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1889, page 3


Had It Substituted.
    Senator Stanley writes to the Times that he had his railroad bill indefinitely postponed and the bill for a wagon road, drawn up by Judges Prim and Crawford for the citizens of Medford and Jacksonville, was substituted therefor by him. This action is quite right, as there is every probability that the bill will pass the legislature if our representatives do their duty, while there was much doubt if the railroad bill would be favorably acted upon. A first-class wagon road between the two places will be speedily followed by a railroad, something we need badly. Senator Stanley thinks that there will be no trouble about passing the present bill through the senate.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1889, page 3


    J. C. Corum of Medford will deliver meat in town once a week.
    The fine weather has brought the genus tramp to Southern Oregon.
    O. Harbaugh has sold 60 acres of light land off the old Tice farm near Medford, in small tracts, at $45 an acre.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our real estate agents are busy.
    R. A. Seibert has become a resident of this precinct.
    Adkins & Webb's fine three-story brick is nearly completed.
    Many improvements are being made and more are projected.
    Miss Genevieve Anderson is again a resident of this town.
    Property in this place and vicinity is bringing very high figures.
    Strangers are numerous here and are becoming more so every day.
    Jas. Fowler, having closed his art school at Ashland, is among us again.
    F. M. Poe and others will soon commence an extensive kiln of brick.
    Chas. Brous is the name of the person who has reopened Noland's saloon.
    Work has commenced on the foundation of Angle & Plymale's new brick store.
    Mrs. Parson, lately of Los Angeles, Cal., a dressmaker, has located at this place.
    Real estate transactions continue numerous, and much property is changing hands.
    There are many candidates for postmaster of Medford under the new administration.
    Dr. Geary was called to Eugene City last week by the serious illness of his aged mother.
    Mr. Reed, a resident of California, died here last Saturday and was buried the following day.
    The Catholic Church building is about completed and will soon be ready for occupancy.
    Mrs. A. Hall has been called to Washington Territory by the serious illness of her sister.
    H. Flindt, lately a well-known business man of Albany, will open a mercantile establishment here at once.
    Miss M. Coleman, an excellent teacher, has resigned her position in our school, and is succeeded by Miss M. Merriman.
    The waiting room at the depot should be enlarged, as it does not accommodate the people who now leave on the trains daily.
    Judge Walker has returned from his trip to Arizona and California, well satisfied that this is the best country after all.
    "Shorty" Hamilton, the popular manager of Worman's livery stable, is kept busy looking after his many customers' wants.
    The Medford board of trade will hold an important meeting next Monday evening, Feb. 11, 1889. A full attendance of members is requested.
    Articles of incorporation were filed in the secretary of state's office on the 5th by the Methodist Church of Medford; R. H. Halley, C. H. Hoxie, D. T. Lawton, E. T. Walker and I. J. Phipps incorporators. Value of property, $1376.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1889, page 3


    Levi Morris of Winters, Cal., who bought the Amerman farm in Eden precinct, has been in the valley lately.
    R. T. Lawton, the Medford land agent, was in town yesterday, accompanied by Mr. Huff, lately from Nebraska.
    H. B. Reed, the combination fence man, who is now in business at Portland, passed through the valley last week, en route to California.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1889, page 3


    A small quantity of the celebrated Siberian seed wheat may still be obtained by calling on either H. E. Baker or W. H. Barr at Medford.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1889, page 3


    The Red Front store has been closed and the goods it contained shipped to Medford. The proprietor had given a chattel mortgage on the stock and fixtures, to secure a loan made to him by the Jackson County Bank, and the cashier of that institution has taken possession. Quite a number of creditors are thus left in the cold.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1889, page 3


    The valley is full of strangers.
    Baseball is attracting some attention again.
    Two large petitions, bearing hundreds of names, have been addressed to our legislative delegation, asking that they do their utmost in behalf of Senator Stanley's bill for a wagon road between Jacksonville and Medford.
    The tide of immigration is gradually being turned toward southern Oregon, and if owners of large tracts of land will so conduct themselves and be awake to their interests as to encourage the location of immigrants among us, we will soon have a fully developed agricultural country, followed by manufacturing industries and the consequent train of wealth and prosperity.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1889, page 3


    Finley Dixon, principal of the Medford school, paid our town a visit recently. He is an excellent teacher and gives general satisfaction.
    J. H. Faris and Volna Webster of Medford called during the week. The latter has been a resident of Umatilla County, but this week purchased a farm and will permanently reside in Rogue River Valley hereafter.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1889, page 3


    The state senate will no doubt pass the Medford-Jacksonville wagon road bill, as Senator Stanley is doing his best for the measure, and has much influence in that body. As our representatives have done nothing but antagonize the Portland delegation, its fate in the House is quite uncertain.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our post office needs more boxes badly.
    L. L. Savage may now be found at the Railroad Saloon.
    The board of trade held an important meeting last Monday evening.
    There will be a party at Howard's hall this (St. Valentine's) evening.
    Follett & Fowler have just received a fine, large stock of furniture.
    Medford will be away ahead of her present position before the end of 1889.
    Follett & Fowler are furnishing the Central Point Hotel with furniture, etc.
    J. C. Cowles, formerly of this place, is engaged in the furniture business at Red Bluff, Cal.
    Judge Crawford and Wm. Ulrich have gone to Salem to assist measures affecting our town along.
    Revs. E. McLean and G. G. Thomas hold services regularly at the Presbyterian and Baptist churches.
    Miss Maggie Minnis has been called to Kansas by a telegram announcing the serious sickness of her sister.
    J. C. Elder, whose store was closed by an attachment issued at the instance of Wm. Ulrich, has resumed business.
    New buildings are constantly going up, and our town is rapidly improving and filling up with a desirable population.
    Stanley hall will be renovated and put in first-class condition by its new and enterprising proprietors, Follett & Fowler.
    This is probably the liveliest real estate market in Southern Oregon. A large amount of town and country property is changing hands weekly.
    Dr. Geary has returned from Eugene City, whither he was called by the serious illness of his mother. We are glad to learn that she is now convalescent.
    Mrs. J. Kellogg, lately of East Portland, who came to southern Oregon for her health last year, and has been living on Griffin Creek with her husband, is seriously ill here at present.
    The people of this section want to know if representatives Prim, Miller and Bowditch are going to remain idle and allow our wagon road bill to die. They have already done much to injure it.
    J. C. Elder, who refused to pay his license, was arrested and brought before Recorder Powell, who fined him $15 and costs. He has retained Judge Hanna and J. H. Whiting and appealed the case to the circuit court.
    Our new charter will give the board of trustees ample power to make needed improvements and also allows them to create a considerable indebtedness to accomplish many good things. The town limits are also extended.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1889, page 3


BORN.
WEEKS--Near Medford, Jan. 29th, to Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Weeks, a daughter.
DIED.
REED--In Medford, Feb. 2d, of typhoid fever, Wesley Reed, aged 11 years and 1 month.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1889, page 3


    According to the Mail, Medford is to have a flouring mill, the same to be built by A. A. Davis, of Albert Lea, Minn. Says the Mail: Arrangements have been completed and bonds entered into between Mr. Davis and the town of Medford to the effect that the city gives Mr. Davis the right of way and 400 miners inches of water from Griffin Creek flume, and he is to erect a flouring mill, first-class in all of its appointments, and put in the latest improved patent roller process machinery with a capacity of fifty barrels per day. He also places in said mill a 50-horsepower steam engine and double boilers, to run in case of shortage of water. This mill will cost fifty thousand dollars.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 15, 1889, page 3


    Stanley, for $10,000 for road from Jacksonville to Medford; first reading.
"House: Monday p.m. Session,"
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, February 19, 1889, page 3


    Senate bill to aid Jackson County to build a wagon road from Jacksonville to Medford; read once.
"House Proceedings," Oregonian, Portland, February 19, 1889, page 2


A SHAMELESS BILL
    The senate has passed a bill appropriating $10,000 for a wagon road from Medford to Jacksonville, and now the precious measure takes its turn in the house. Medford and Jacksonville are not over five miles apart, and when Jacksonville wants to be in the center of business, its people claim it is only four miles. The track lies over a level prairie, much of the way being gravelly so that nature has left nothing for man to do but fix up the swales and gullies. Towards Jacksonville it is rich bottom land, worth a large figure, and the best alfalfa land in the state. Jacksonville has made roads since 1852, and one would think such an old settled country, every acre valuable for fruits, meadow or grazing with a prosperous community peopling it, would be too proud to put itself on a par with the outskirts of the state--the struggling and sparse population of the Goose Lake country, the people of Tillamook, shut off by huge mountain ranges, or of Wallowa, who have neither river nor railroad, and struggle with impassable highways. To such as these the state owes consideration, but for Jacksonville, the county seat of a rich and prosperous county, to ask state aid to make its own common roads, is as absurd and improper as it would be for Portland to ask the state to make a wagon road to Mount Tabor, or for Hillsboro to demand $10,000 to establish a connection with Forest Grove. The governor can yet earn the plaudits of the state if he will veto this preposterous bill in case it shall pass. Jacksonville will stand better as a self-respecting community if its representatives will quietly shove this bill where it will fail of further recognition. To play the mutual admiration game is not safe in legislation. You tickle my bill and I will vote for yours is not admissible, if sometimes it is successful. There is such a thing as running a measure into the ground, and this road to Jacksonville has that appearance.
Oregonian, February 20, 1889, page 4


    A good deal of brotherly love is said to be severely strained in Medford over the prospect of a change in the management of the post office. It is the earnest hope of the Times that the cordial confluence of feeling which has ever distinguished the Republican business men of our neighboring town will not be changed into rivers of gall over the little federal patronage which Bre'r Harrison will be called upon to dispense in this section. If the good of the G.O.P. requires that nine should eat crow where one eats quail, we trust that our friends the enemy will remember that we Democrats indulged to an equal extent in the pleasures of hope during the first three years of Cleveland's administration, and when the jig was up the "left nine" always congratulated the "lucky one," and by look and word strove to impress upon an admiring world, not only that crow is edible, but that it is really nutritious and otherwise salubrious when consumed in the proper spirit. Therefore, brethren, profit by our example and go in to win, but with a steadfast determination that, however, much of a monkey and parrot of a time you may have before the appointment is made, that you will purge your hearts of venom and resentment after that day of sorrow, just as we did, and be ready to do all that in your power lies to further the interests of your fortunate competitor at the next general election, treasuring the thought in your hour of woe that he will probably have to contribute a year's salary to the next Republican campaign fund, while you will only have to carry a second-hand torch when whooping things up for Harrison's second term. Behind every cloud there is a silver lining.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1889, page 2


New Charters.
    The Medford, Central Point and amended Jacksonville charter bills have passed both houses and will doubtless receive the governor's signature.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1889, page 3


    Newell Harlan of Cheyenne now has charge of the composition room of the Medford Mail.
    Hammon Bros. nursery has been removed to Medford, where they will do business for the future.
    Wm. Ulrich of Medford, district agent for the Farmers' and Merchants' Insurance Co., was sent to Washington Territory last week as a special agent for the company.
    It is the general impression that the winter has been entirely too open for good health, and that the prevailing epidemic of bad colds is largely attributable to that fact.
    As will be seen in another place, Mr. W. I. Vawter of the Medford bank was married at Eugene city on Sunday, February 7th, to Miss Etta Hill, a charming lady of that town. We congratulate.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1889, page 3


    The Jackson County relief bill failed to pass the lower house.
    Under the new charters Jacksonville and Medford are brought very close together.
    "Ask and ye shall receive" don't apply where Jackson County is concerned. We get very little that we ask for from the legislature, but we'll keep on asking just the same.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Henry Hollingsworth's new house is nearing completion.
    The public schools will soon have a new organ, the gift of liberal citizens.
    B. W. Powell is contemplating a trip to the eastern states to revisit his old home.
    The board of trade appropriated $75 towards improving the city park at its last meeting.
    The Medford board of trade will encourage the organization of a local loan and building association.
    The Mail
is improving in size and appearance and seems to be well patronized by Medford's citizens.
    Every day sees new ground cleared for building operations, and many residences will be erected before summer.
    Plans for the new M.E. Church at Medford, designed to be 43x57 feet in dimensions and seat 400 people, have been received from a Philadelphia architect. The edifice will be the finest church building in southern Oregon, it is claimed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1889, page 3


Our Loved One.
( In memory of little Lora Cottrell. )

We laid her away in the cold, cold, ground,
    With her hands so dimpled and white;
Oh, lonesome it is when we glance around,
    And see not our loved one in sight.

We weep all alone for the loved one gone,
    For we never can see her more;
She has left us all for a better home,
    On the beautiful, golden shore.

Her place at the table is vacant now,
    And empty her little chair;
No more sweet smiles steal over her brow,
    From under her golden hair.

But, when we go to that happy place,
    Where friends we hope to meet;
There will be the dear little face,
    With her smiles and dimples so sweet.

Medford, Or., Feb. 20, 1889.                             M. P. C.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1889, page 3


DIED.
TYLER--In Medford, Feb. 19th, at 6 o'clock P.M., of typhoid fever, Delbert, son of Mrs. Betty Tyler; aged 5 years, 2 months and 24 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1889, page 3


O.T. Co. to R. D. and Margaretta Foster, lots in Medford: $70.
O.T. Co. to D. H. Miller et al., in trust for First Christian Church, lots in Medford; $1.
Thos. McAndrew to Miss Mary Chavner, lots in Medford; $250.
J. E. Drucks to G. H. Baker, lot in Medford; $525.
O.T. Co. to Jos. Dame, lots in blk 39, Medford; $200.
Plat of Galloway's addition to town of Medford.
B. W. Powell to John Brinegar, lots in blk 9 in Park addition to Medford; $500.
A. H. Johnston to A. L. K. Kaize, lots 1 and 2 in blk 6, Park addition to Medford; $97.50.
J. C. Cowles to same, lots in blk 1, Park addition to Medford; $100.
J. C. Cowles to W. H. Simmons, lots 1 and 2, block 2, Park addition to Medford; $120.
Anna F. Berry to Verlinda Miller, lot 10, block 13, Medford; $40.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1889, page 3


    A. A. Davis is now at Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon, where we understand he has purchased a mill site.
"County News," Freeborn County Standard, Albert Lea, Minnesota, February 21, 1889, page 16


    The new irrigating ditch to take water from Bear Creek near the Gore place to Medford is being pushed toward completion. Excavation work has been carried from Medford for a mile and a half up the creek.
    Work on Angle & Plymale's new brick building has been commenced. It is to be three stories high, 50x76 feet, and will have two stores on the first floor, an opera hall on the second floor, and probably lodging rooms on the third.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 22, 1889, page 3


    Complaint is made of a number of bilks who "did the town" recently and skipped out without paying their bills.
    D. S. Youngs and Isaac Woolf of Medford passed through Jacksonville Monday on the way to Williams Creek, where they will spend two weeks in top-grafting one of the old orchards in that vicinity.
    The Southern Oregon Fruit Growers met in Jacksonville last Saturday, Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, chairman pro tem., and Hon. S. S. Pentz secretary pro tem., and adjourned to meet in regular session at Medford on the last Saturday in March. No business of importance was transacted.
    J. B. Coyle went to Medford last week to take a look at that new railroad town. He reports that he finds Medford one of the thriving towns. The people are going ahead with public works, investing money and making the town boom. They are erecting a big flour mill and will have an electric light plant before the summer is over.--[Roseburg Plaindealer.
    We venture the prediction that in six months from this time Rogue River Valley agricultural lands will have enhanced in value at least fifty percent, over present prices. The whole East is full of homeseekers whose eyes are turned toward the far Northwest, Washington and Oregon. They are not adventurers, but men of families with moderate means and from every direction comes the news that they are coming, thousands strong.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 28, 1889, page 3


BORN.
JOHNSON--In Medford, Feb. 26th, to Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Johnson, a daughter.
GOLDSMITH--In Medford, Feb. 24th, to Mr. and Mrs. James Goldsmith, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 28, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. R. Brinegar was at the county seat not long since.
    J. E. Drucks, one of our prominent citizens, visited Jacksonville this week.
    The M.E. Church, South, will hold a quarterly meeting at this place Saturday and Sunday.
    M. E. Beatty has been in Portland and Salem lately. He wants to be deputy collector of internal revenue under the new administration.
    You can always find the best of wines, liquors and cigars at the Railroad Saloon. Mr. Brous leaves nothing undone to please his customers.
    Our charter has been amended, so that town limits have been extended considerably and privilege given to make several necessary improvements.
    The M.E. Church of Medford have secured the temporary use of Howard's hall for the second and fourth Sundays of each month. At present they are conducting a protracted meeting in the hall with considerable success. Elder Peterson kindly gave way for them last Sunday night.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 28, 1889, page 3


Medford Items.
    A pork packing establishment is one of the latest enterprises of importance talked of for Medford for the coming season.
    The foundation for the large new grist mill is now being laid, and the rock is all on the ground. The mill site is on D Street, facing the railroad track, one block south of the depot.
    Baker & Ford have moved from D around to C Street, opposite the printing office.
    Mr. Gardiner, the photographer, left Wednesday morning with a wife for Yreka, after having done a large amount of work in this and neighboring towns.
    Ed. C. Phelps, the printer, left Wednesday morning for Siskiyou County, on a business prospecting tour.
    C. W. Wolters has enlarged and improved the interior of his bakery and confectionery store, and increased his fine groceries and other goods.
    The plastering of Adkins & Webb's three-story brick is under way.
    Medford continues to steadily improve, and real estate is continually advancing in value.
Ashland Tidings, March 1, 1889, page 3



    A. J. Weeks, who purchased the Standard mill property at Phoenix, which has laid idle so long, will turn it into a box and furniture factory.
    Dr. E. P. Geary, as will be seen under the head of "new this week," has opened up an office in Hamlin's Block and will be prepared to answer all calls for professional services. He recently performed a very successful operation in removing a cataract from the eye of Mrs. Rummell of Antelope. The doctor has a coast reputation as an oculist while he is unexcelled in general practice.
    Fred. Barneburg this week delivered the remainder of the stall-fed cattle which he bargained last fall to Sacramento, Cal. parties. They were a very fine lot of steers, sixty-four in number, and averaged over 1260 pounds per head. Owing to having contracted them last fall he did not suffer as some of our other local feeders did, by the decline in prices this spring.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889, page 3


    W. H. Barr was up from Medford last Tuesday and reports business good in the town of booms.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889, page 3

MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Much real estate is still changing hands.
    Jas. Fowler has gone to southern California.
    Miss Effie Tice has returned from Portland.
    Dr. Pryce was at Grants Pass during the week.
    Intending settlers continue to arrive on every train.
    The lumber famine still continues, so builders say.
    Dr. Pickel reports the health of Medford as much improved.
    H. Flindt's new store is now open and doing a good business.
    The annual school meeting, last Monday, was well attended.
    The scarcity of lumber delays building operations here very much.
    Mrs. Loder of western Oregon is visiting her brothers, the Messrs. Halley.
    Chas. W. Wolters has enlarged his premises and increased his stock of goods.
    The recent revival meetings here have resulted in a number of converts.
    S. S. Pentz Esq., of Medford has one of the finest libraries south of Salem.
    The sheriff will be here on the 8th inst., for the purpose of receiving taxes.
    C. W. Skeel is erecting a new cottage residence on Front Street to cost about $1500.
    Messrs. Follett & Fowler will take possession of their new store building on Front Street this week.
    Earl B. Babcock, son of Claire and Mary Babcock, died one day last week, aged eleven years.
    Baker & Ford have removed their goods to the building on C Street adjoining R. H. Halley's tinshop.
    W. L. Halley is now a permanent resident of Medford and has become interested in his brother's business.
    Water was turned into the new ditch a few days ago and work on same will be completed in a short time.
    The G.A.R. propose giving a grand entertainment here on the 15th. Further particulars will soon be given.
    Dr. M. J. Patten, lately of Portland, has located here. The medical fraternity is very well represented in Medford.
    The social and oyster supper recently given by the ladies' aid society netted a neat sum and was an enjoyable event.
    Heine, the blind violinist, and McFadden's Uncle Tom's Cabin Co. performed here last week. Neither gave the best of satisfaction.
    The Medford band has one of the handsomest band wagons in the state, and may justly feel proud of it. They are making commendable progress.
    Dr. Geary, the successful and skillful physician, surgeon and oculist, will remain in Medford a while longer. Everybody is glad to learn that.
    The business of the town is increasing so rapidly that it will be necessary to expand across the railroad track or build business houses along Front Street in a short time.
    Work has been begun on the new flouring mill near the stock yards, and it will be ready for business by next harvest. It will be equipped with modern machinery throughout.
    Arthur Conklin of Grants Pass was here a few days since, for the purpose of consulting A. J. Weeks of this precinct concerning the plans of the proposed Baptist Church at the county seat of Josephine County.
    Mr. Davis, who with Jos. France is engaged in putting up the grist mill at this place, has gone to Minnesota for the purpose of settling up his business affairs, and will return in a few months. Meanwhile the construction of the building will progress.
    It is announced that Wm. Slinger, H. E. Baker, W. H. Barr,  B. W. Powell and J. W. Short have formed a partnership for the purpose of conducting a packing business at this place; also that they have purchased some real estate of J. B. Riddle and will erect a brick building on it soon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889, page 3


E. P. GEARY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Medford, Oregon.
----
Office in Hamlin's block. Residence on C Street.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889 et seq., page 3


Emma Justus to J. R. Evans, 33 acres in Heber donation claim; $1500.
Eva E. Howland to Emma Justus, 33 acres in Heber donation claim; $25.
O.T. Co. to Mrs. Etta Zimmerman, lot 13, block 23, Medford; $50.
G. W. Howard to W. R. Higinbotham, lot 10, block 18, Medford; $80.
C. M. and F. Clayton to F. O'Bryant, lot 10, block
66, Medford; $100.
A. E. Suckan to R. C. Ford, lots 1 and 2, block 61, Medford; $100.
C. M. Meeker to E. P. and Lucinda Purcell, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8, block 7, Medford; $1000.
J. J. Rowland to A. S. Johnson, 33 acres in F. Heber donation claim; $800.
Robert Kercherd to L. L. Angle, 2 acres in Medford; $100.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889, page 3


State Board of Horticulture.
    Governor Pennoyer today appointed the following named gentlemen as members of the State Board of Horticulture, which board was created by the recent legislature: Dr. J. R. Cardwell and Henry E. Dasch, of Portland; R. S. Wallace, of Salem; J. D. Whitman, of Medford; James A. Varney, of The Dalles, and James Hendershott, of Cove.
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, March 13, 1889, page 4


    In another column will be found an advertisement calling for plans, specifications, etc., for the building of a new town hall
at Medford.
    The Lucy farm, situated between this place and Medford, has been divided and a portion of it is offered for sale. It is a fine body of land.
    John Dyar has succeeded Ed. Helms as driver of Worman's stage running between this place and Medford, and is becoming popular with the public.
    Fruit trees are not much further advanced than is usual at this time of year, in spite of the great amount of sunshine that we have had. The reason is said to be the very small amount of moisture in the ground.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1889, page 3


    Miss Viola Freil, who has been stopping at Medford for some time past, has gone to Grants Pass.
    J. R. Evans, who not long since moved into the Rogue River Valley from Washington Territory and is now improving his recently purchased farm near Medford, was in town last Monday and paid the Times
office a call. He is well pleased with our country.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Boulon company will be here March 20th.
    Mrs. Frank Sutter has returned from Portland, where she has been quite sick.
    The public health is comparatively good, there being few cases of sickness now.
    The marshal is now the duly constituted night watch at a salary of $50 a month.
    H. U. Lumsden, who has been attending circuit court at Grants Pass, returned home.
    The county tax collector visited us last Friday and took away a considerable sum of money.
    A grand ball will be given at Medford by the proprietor of the Grand Central on May Day.
    Medford is getting more than her share of shows. Several snide ones [sic] have performed here lately.
    The board of trustees have purchased lot 5 in block 21, on which the new town hall will be built.
    Work on the flouring mill is progressing rapidly under the supervision of one of the proprietors, Jos. France.
    The city council will soon issue bonds with which to raise funds to make important public improvements.
    Strangers continue to be abundant, although the spring rush of immigrants has not commenced as yet.
    Medford is growing rapidly and spreading over a great deal of ground. Many buildings will be erected during 1889.
    Williams & Hemworth have formed a partnership and are canvassing the county for the sale of a fence-making machine.
    The school clerk found 358 children--207 males and 151 females--between four and twenty years of age in this school district.
    M. Purdin and his assistants are kept busy because they are first-class blacksmiths and turn out only the best of work.
    D. Landis, formerly of this precinct, is now at Sisson, Cal. He writes that Mount Shasta is covered with snow, and the foothills are also white.
    D. J. Lumsden, who was elected as a member of the board of trustees, failed to qualify, and J. W. Short has been appointed to fill the vacancy.
    D. T. Youngs, who has had much experience in grafting and budding, is in the Applegate section, accompanied by Isaac Woolf, on a business trip.
    The ditch leading from Bear Creek to this place, which will furnish our town with a fine supply of water, is nearly completed. It will prove of much benefit to our town.
    Our city council proposes building a brick town hall and invite specifications for it. It will be a neat, commodious building, such as will reflect credit on our growing city.
    Miss Susie M. West is prepared to fill orders for landscape, oil, pastel and crayon painting at reasonable rates. She is a first-class artist, never failing to give satisfaction.
    Mason Long, the "reformed gambler," who is now preaching morality for an admission fee everywhere, held forth at the Baptist Church on the evening of the 8th. We have not learned that he made many converts.
    Dr. S. Danielson was elected school director at the annual meeting held in this district, and M. S. Damon was reelected clerk. W. H. Barr and I. W. Thomas are the other directors.
    Dr. Adkins' fine brick building will soon be ready for occupancy. We learn that H. H. Wolters of the Monarch Saloon will occupy Childers' building as soon as Adkins & Webb vacate it.
    Chas. Nickell will in a few days plat his land, lying on the edge of Medford, and offer it for sale in five-acre tracts at reasonable rates. There is a large body of it and much of it is of superior quality.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1889, page 3


Notice to Architects and Builders.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Town Trustees of Medford, Oregon, solicit plans, specifications and propositions for the building of a Town Hall in said town, the same to be a 12-inch brick wall, 14 feet in height in the clear, laid upon a substantial stone foundation, 25x50 feet in size.
    Address:                                                        B. W. POWELL,
                                                                                Medford, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1889, page 3


Medford Items.
    A. A. Davis left last Tuesday for Chicago, where he goes to purchase the machinery for the flour mill.
    Angle & Plymale have their brick building ready for the joists, the first story having been completed.
    Curtis B. Miller, formerly of the Sardine Creek nurseries, is now assistant foreman of Hammond Bros. nurseries of this place.
    F. M. Poe & Co. started their brick machine in earnest last Monday. They are turning out about 12,000 first-class bricks per day.
    H. E. Baker has sold the stable on the corner of A and 7th streets to a stranger, who will shortly open a large livery and feed stable.
    Hon. Henry Klippel of Jacksonville has rented a room in Adkins & Webb's new building and will move his office here in the near future.
    The business of the Medford Fence Factory has grown to such an extent that two sets of hands are employed, and the factory run to its full capacity night and day.
    Adkins & Webb are now busy moving into their fine new building. It is one of the finest buildings in the county, and the proprietors are to be complimented on this improvement to the town.
Ashland Tidings, March 15, 1889, page 3


Jacksonville to Medford.
    Patronize the only wagon that connects with every train, rain or shine, and carries the U.S. mail and Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express. Satisfaction guaranteed.
JOHN DYAR, Driver.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889 et seq., page 1


B. W. Powell to Mrs. M. F. Babcock, lots 1 and 2, block 3, Park addition to Medford; $50.
Volna Webster to Clark P. Babcock, part of lots 1 and 2, block 8, Park addition to Medford; $150.
J. H. Caruthers to G. W. Isaacs, part of block 6, Galloway's addition to Medford; $600.
J. B. Riddle to C. W. Skeel, lots 5 and 6, block 19, Medford; $500.
C. W. Skeel to W. Slinger, et al., same property; $500.
J. M. Shadle to W. Slinger, et al., lot 9, block 32, Medford; $25.
M. J. Patton to W. Slinger, et al., lots 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, block 17, Medford; $500.
John Brinegar to C. I. Hutchison, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8, block 9, Park addition to Medford; $850.
C. Mingus to Chas. W. Palm, lot 5, block 51, Medford; $50.
M. J. Patton to D. L. Leanton, lots 1 and 2, block 9, Medford; $225.
M. J. Patton to town of Medford, lot 5, block 21, Medford; $300.
M. S. Patton to B. W. Powell, lot 6, block 21, Medford; $250.
E. P. Purcell to Minerva A. Meeker, all of block 7 and lots 1, 2 and 3, block 23, Medford; $2500.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 1


J. C. Cowles to Lavinia R. Briggs, north half of block 2, Galloway's addition to Medford; consideration, $300.
Frank Galloway to same, quitclaim to land adjoining block 2, Galloway's addition to Medford; $1.
G. W. Howard to Catherine E. Crystal, lot 4, block 15, Medford; $75.
C. W. Broback to same, lot 3, block 15, Medford; $100.
Angle, Plymale and Short to A. B. Seal, lots 6 and 7, block 1, Cottage addition to Medford; $200.
W. Slinger to A. S. Jacobs, lots 4 and 5, block
52, Medford; $600.
H. U. Lumsden to D. J. Lumsden, undivided ½ of lots 1, 2 and 3, block 1, Lumsden addition to Medford; $150.
D. J. Lumsden to H. U. Lumsden, part of lots 1, 2 and 3, block 2, same addition; $10.
G. W. Howard to H. U. Lumsden, property in Medford; $
400.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 2


Railroad Washouts.
    There have been a number of washouts on the California and Oregon division of the Southern Pacific during the past week, and for four days no mail reached here from the south. From Chico to the Siskiyous there was a succession of slides and washouts, which made traveling extremely hazardous and causes great delay even yet in the running of trains. During Sunday afternoon and night there were three belated passenger trains which came through to Ashland, including eighteen coaches filled with climate hunters. The heavy rains of the past ten days in northern California have done more to demoralize the service on the railroad than all the earlier storms of the season together.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


Railroad Prospects.
    Once more it is rumored that responsible parties have been enlisted to undertake the construction of a tap-line of railroad to the county seat from Medford or Central Point, and that, if the matter is favorably received by our people and proper assistance given, we are assured that the road will be built this season. There can be but one opinion among our citizens relative to this matter, and we trust there will be a spontaneous effort made to secure the road and open the best agricultural district and the most beautiful portion of the valley to direct rail communication with the outside world. Let every man put his shoulder to the wheel and we can yet secure the coveted boon. We have the present prosperous condition of Yreka to spur us up to united effort. Her branch line railroad has revived the town's business as nothing else could have done.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


Church Dedication.
    On Sunday, March 31st, Rev. F. S. Noel will hold dedicatory services at the new Catholic Church in Medford, beginning with high mass at 10:30 o'clock in the forenoon. Much interest has been taken in the construction of this handsome church building by the members of the congregation, who have shown great liberality in contributing to its erection.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


    Curtis Miller is now employed in Hammon Bros.' nurseries near Medford.
    O. Harbaugh has sold over 60 acres of his farm, near Medford, in small tracts.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart has sold 22 acres of his farm in Eden precinct to S. H. Sykes, lately from the East, for $3000. It is planted in fruit trees.
    One of the events of the season will be the May Day ball at Medford. No pains will be spared to make it a grand affair. Everybody should attend.
    A number of cars of fine beef cattle were shipped from Medford to Portland on Tuesday last, and several carloads also passed up the road from points below.
    The valley is full of peddlers, who should be discouraged, as they interfere very much with legitimate business men who reside here and help support the country in every manner.
    The arrivals of immigrants from the East at Portland average about 1000 per day, and the rush is just beginning. There won't be a quarter-section of public land in Oregon unoccupied by a year from now.
    There is every probability that Jacksonville will soon take a new lease of life and take front rank among the most flourishing towns in the valley. Railroad connection during the next twelve months is not at all improbable.
    We learn that Hon. J. H. Stewart successfully experimented in the line of producing sun-dried raisins last season from Muscat of Alexandria grapes, grown on his place near Phoenix. The raisins were of good quality and well cured.
    Newcomers to the valley should secure sufficient land to pasture a goat and raise a few vegetables before the rest of the valley is laid out in town lots. The surveyors are the busiest men in the county at present, and land is being "platted" in every direction.
    Roberts & O'Neil, last Thursday, sold twenty acres of fine fruit land from their holdings near Talent to Wm. Addison for $2,000, and sixteen acres adjoining to Isaac and S. M. Rhodes for $1,000. One hundred dollars per acre seems to be the going price for fruit land contiguous to the railroad in the heart of the valley.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


    Rev. G. W. Quimby and family have become residents of Medford, where they will reside for a while at least.
    Jesse Richardson, J. N. Hockersmith and E. H. Hoag, who reside near Medford, were in town Saturday on land business.
    E. S. Hamlin of Medford called on us on business last Monday. He is lately from California and well pleased with our country.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Angle and Plymale's new brick building is looming up.
    Judge Walton preached in Howard's hall last Sunday.
    Elder M. Peterson will hold services in Medford next Sunday.
    Adkins & Webb have removed into their fine, new building.
    There were 227 pupils on the public school roll last month.
    Real estate transactions are numerous, notwithstanding the dull season.
    C. W. Skeel will supply the public with Glendale lumber in a short time.
    M. E. Beatty is being visited by his brother, who resides at Seattle, W.T.
    Jos. Johnson, late of California, will soon have his new residence on 8th Street ready for occupancy.
    Messrs. Oliver, Poe and Branhier have commenced the manufacture of pressed brick here.
    J. O. Johnson, lately from California, is the latest recruit to the ranks of the festive real estate agent.
    Rumor has it that Frank Kinley, late of Nebraska, will put up a planing mill at Medford in a short time.
    Nickell's addition to Medford will soon be on the market. It will be sold in 5-parcel tracts at reasonable figures.
    The members of the M.E. Church at Medford have begun operations which will end in giving them a handsome church building.
    The concert given by the W.B.F.M. Society last Sunday was a very pleasant event and duly appreciated by the many in attendance.
    The tasteful cottage of Mr. Kellogg, three miles from Medford, is almost finished and will be one of the most comfortable residences in the neighborhood.
    We are sorry to learn that M. E. Beatty, the popular real estate agent, is settling up his business, with the intention of going to Seattle, W.T.
    Henry Klippel, of Jacksonville, the well-known real estate agent, will conduct a branch office at Medford soon, having many bargains to offer.
    E. J. Smillie writes that he was compelled to leave Medford through no fault of his, and that he will settle all he owes. D. W. O'Donnell is settling his business.
    Everybody is going to the May Day Ball which will be given by the proprietor of the Grand Central at Howard's opera house. The best of music and supper will be provided, and everything done to ensure a first-class time.
    Follett & Fowler, the leading furniture dealers, have removed their large stock of goods to the building formerly known as Stanley hall, where they will be pleased to see their numerous customers.
    The livery stable formerly conducted by D. Payne, in the eastern portion of town, has been sold by G. H. Baker to a gentleman from California, who will open it in in a short time. The price paid was $1500.
    J. H. Whitman spent several days the past week in Salem and Roseburg, transcribing records of public land entries and school land sales. He will be furnished with monthly and weekly reports from the land office and from the clerk of School Land Commissioners hereafter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


MAY-DAY BALL ! !
Given by the proprietor of the Grand
Central Hotel at
Howard's Opera House !
Medford, Or.,
WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 1st.
----
    RECEPTION COMMITTEE--W. I. Vawter, J. O. Johnson and Wm. Slinger.
    FLOOR MANAGERS--I. L. Hamilton, M. E. Beatty, R. T. Young, T. A. Harris and E. M. Furman.
    Grand March at 9 o'clock sharp.
    First-class music will be furnished by J. E. Taylor's Elite Orchestra, and a fine supper will be served at the Grand Central Hotel.

A Cordial Invitation Is Extended to All.
    Tickets, including Supper, $2.50.
M. A. BRENTANO, Prop'r.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


BORN.
JACKS--Near Medford, March 5th, to Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Jacks, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


    More tramps are working their way north over the railroad than ever known before. The northwestern "boom" attracts them by thousands. As many as fifty have been sighted from the cars on the S.P. railroad at one time. They are a dangerous, predatory element.
"General Notes and News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 4


James Hamlin to T. J. Hamlin, et al., lands in secs. 7 and 24, and part of donation claim No. 57, all in tp 38S, R2W; consideration, love and affection.
Same to Eliza J. Hamlin, lots in Medford and Phoenix and one-half of donation claim No. 47, tp 38S, R1W, containing 320 44/100 acres; same.
G. H. Baker et al. to E. M. Furman, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, block 4, Cottage addition to Medford; $375.
G. W. Howard to Hattie Anderson, lots 15, 16, 17 and 18, block 18, Medford; $250.
W. S. Gore to E. E. Gore, one-half interest in lots 7 and 8, block 19, Medford; $125.
J. C. Cowles to Jacob R. Erford, lot 2, block 7, Park addition to Medford; $50.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1889, page 2


Let Us Wake Up.
    In every town along the railroad there are today dozens--yes, hundreds--of enquiring immigrants investigating the relative merits of this or that point as a place of residence or desirability as a business point, and almost every town is experiencing a revival of business resulting from the influx of new blood and new capital that is very gratifying to all concerned. Here in Jacksonville we know nothing of what is going on; not that we are without natural advantages, but because we are without railway connection with the overland road. When Jacksonville was virtually Jackson County every visitor to this section necessarily passed through the historic old town, and our fame went abroad throughout the world. Now, however, thousands go through the valley and admire its beauty who never even hear of the county seat, notwithstanding the fact that the land contiguous to town is the best in the state. This can all be readily changed by showing the proper degree of faith in our own resources, subsidizing a motor or cable railway and proving to the world that we are still alive. Let the first spike be driven in a continuous rail from here to the railroad, and the degree of interest which it would excite in the outside world would only be equaled by the enhancement of local values of real estate.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1889, page 3


Ho, for Central Point.
    The undersigned has fitted up a stage, which will make regular trips between Jacksonville and Central Point, connecting with all trains, from and after April 1, 1889.
W. G. KENNEY.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1889 et seq., page 3


    The Times office last week issued a handsome horseograph for I. J. Phipps' fine Clydesdale-Morgan stallion, which will make the present season in this valley.
    Messrs. Faris, Scott and Kinley of Medford have purchased five acres of land of Beekman & Linn, on Jackson Creek, on which is situated a good lime quarry. They will develop it at once. The price paid was $500.
    Yreka's branch railroad has created a demand for 200,000 brick in Siskiyou's capital. Jacksonville should profit by the example and not deny a moment the building of a branch line to the O.&C. The increase in our business would excel that of Yreka within three months after its completion.
    District Attorney Colvig, who owns a nice home here, has bought some very desirable residence lots in Medford and will soon purchase a residence site in Central Point. Mr. Colvig believes that very few know what the future may bring forth in this valley, consequently he is ready for lightning to strike anywhere.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Pryce was at the county seat Tuesday. He is kept busy with professional calls.
    J. C. Coker of Klamath County is visiting his father, C. W. Coker of Central Point precinct, who has been quite ill.
    D. McCarty, the popular engineer, makes his regular runs between Ashland and Grants Pass, his health being much better than for some time past.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1889, page 3


    John Dyar and family are again residents of Jacksonville.
    Henry Hollingsworth, lately of Uniontown, is building a residence at Medford.
    Kenney's line between Jacksonville and Central Point will be well fitted up with vehicles and horses.
    The new Central Point stage line will prove a great convenience to many. It will connect with all trains.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    H. Flindt's new bakery is now in operation.
    Dr. Walter, the dentist, visits us now and then.
    Burb Brockway was in Roseburg last week on business.
    Our streets and sidewalks are being lengthened and improved.
    A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. John W. Curry last week.
    Rev. G. W. Quimby is following his trade, that of a carpenter, here.
    B. C. Goddard, Jr., is still in California. His health is somewhat improved.
    Mr. Skeel is building a pretty residence here, which is almost completed.
    The Grand Central is now provided with a fine, large sample room for travelers.
    Remember the May Day ball at Howard's opera house. It will be a grand affair.
    David Brown and family of Roseburg have located permanently in Medford.
    The ladies will give an entertainment in honor of the old settlers in a short time.
    D. T. Lawton, of the well-known firm of Lawton & Son, is in Portland on business.
    Jas. Mabee has gone to Washington Territory. His health is somewhat improved.
    The Medford ditch is about completed and water will soon be turned on.
    The grist mill is moving steadily forward. The stone foundation is already finished.
    Surveyor Howard has been at Grave Creek, Josephine County, during the week.
    Mrs. Beek is quite ill, and her daughter has come from Portland to wait on her.
    Services will be held at the Catholic Church next Sunday morning by Rev. F. S. Noel.
    We were glad to learn that Frank Galloway and family, who have been quite sick, are all convalescent.
    T. A. Harris has sold his interest in the butcher business at Ashland to his partner, David Payne, and returned to this place last Friday.
    I. B. Nichols of Riddle station, after sojourning for some time in Medford for his health, has returned home. He is one of Douglas County's most substantial citizens.
    Mrs. E. W. Ogan is canvassing for a relief spring to sewing machines, which is quite a convenience to those who use them, as it lessens the work.
    Nickell's addition to Medford will soon be on the market. It comprises 35 choice tracts of land, all well located and on the edge of town, each of them containing five acres.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1889, page 3


The Motion Seconded.
    In enlarging on the Journal's idea to station an advertising man at Medford to induce immigration to stop at Salem, the Medford Mail says: The great influx of travel to the Pacific coast in which Oregon is interested in ticketed to Portland, and when this immigration travel looks the cities over, much of it leaves the state without seeing the inducements that the state offers to immigrants. The Salem scheme is a good scheme for Salem. Take them at Medford and drill them for a stopoff at Salem.
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, March 29, 1889, page 4



    The recent sale of the limestone quarry on Jackson Creek has attracted much attention to the merits of the foothill region about the county seat, and many of our citizens are sanguine now who were despondent of a return to prosperity a few months ago. The transfer itself is not so important as to warrant an inflation of values; but taken in connection with the fact that a force of men is already at work developing the quarry and building kilns, and the further fact that there is an immediate prospect of an extensive sawmill and box factory at an early day, it gives the assurance of an output of manufactured prospects that will warrant the construction of a tap-line railroad before many months.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1889, page 2

Fruit Growers Association receipt, 1889

Fruit Growers' Meeting
    An adjourned meeting of the Southern Oregon Fruit Growers' Association was held at Howard's hall, Medford, on Saturday, March 30th.
    Minutes were read and approved and the society proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year.
    The following officers were elected; President, R. A. Miller; secretary, S. S. Pentz; treasurer, J. D. Whitman. One vice-president was elected from each of the several districts of Jackson and Josephine counties.
    After adding several new members to the list, the time for holding the regular meetings was changed from meeting once a month to three meetings per year, in March, August and November, the day to be fixed by the president, so as to favor the finest exhibition of well-ripened fruit.
    The election was followed by a general and very interesting and profitable discussion of fruit interests until a somewhat late hour.
    Adjourned to meet at the call of the president in August next.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1889, page 2


L. and T. A. Harrison to E. Wilkinson,
et al., lot 14, block 13, Medford; $900.
G. W. Howard to A. J. Fredenburg, lots 11 and 12, block 52, Medford; $100.
W. R. Higinbotham to [C. E. Wilkinson], lots 10, block 48, Medford; $100.
O.T. Co. to E. Russ, lot 6, block 17, Medford; $
85.
Same to same, lots 4 and 5, block 17, Medford; $
120.
A. T.
Hafto to J. Holbin, lots 2, 10 and 11, block 32, Medford; $450.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1889, page 2


    Spring fights are abundant.
    Improvements continue at a lively rate all over the valley.
    Jos. Dame, from the Coquille country, has been investing in town property in Ashland, Medford and Grants Pass.
    Many of the gardens in southern Oregon are already full of blooming flowers and early vegetables. This section against the world.
    Oliver McGee, lately of Klamath County, has bargained with G. W. Isaacs for 80 acres of land on the east side of Bear Creek.
    Kenney's stage line between Jacksonville and Central Point is being well patronized, considering that it has just been established.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct has been appointed a member of the southern district agricultural society, established by the last legislature. A better appointment could not have been made.
    J. C. Whipp has planted fruit trees on that portion of his ten-acre tract of land fronting on the Medford-Jacksonville road, which others owning land along the same thoroughfare should emulate. The benefit which will accrue therefrom will manifest itself in the near future.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford now has three livery stables.
    Heaps of lumber is arriving in town again.
    M. E. Beatty has gone north to permanently locate, we learn.
    A. Garrick, lately from California, has opened a tailor shop at Medford.
    Mrs. F. M. Plymale and children are recovering from a severe spell of sickness.
    The firm of Baker & Ford has suspended, their creditors having closed them up.
    John Brinegar has gone to his old home in Iowa to wind up his business affairs there.
    Dr. O. F. Demorest, a first-class dentist, has located in this place, and should be liberally patronized.
    The fruit growers' meeting, held here last Saturday, was well attended, and much interest was manifested.
    Prof. Dixon, the efficient principal of our school, and Dr. Adkins have recovered from their recent indisposition.
    A very large congregation attended mass at the new Catholic Church here last Sunday, and the capacity of the building was tested to the utmost.
    Messrs. Skeel and Barnum purchased eleven carloads of that fine yellow pine lumber Fred H. Rowe is manufacturing at his mill in Josephine County.
    The city council has passed an ordinance establishing a dog tax, and hereafter owners of each festive canine must provide a collar and tag and pay a tax of $1.75 a year.
    J. G. Wiley now conducts the restaurant formerly owned by Mr. Williams, in the Central Hotel building, and is well patronized. He is well patronized, for he provides the best of meals.
    Henry Klippel has rented a room in the immediate vicinity of the Grand Central, where he will soon be ready to furnish the immigrant particulars where he can get any kind of land he wishes.
    Julius Goldsmith returned to Eugene last week. The ceremony of circumcision was performed on his infant son Monday. Mrs. Goldsmith will visit in Eugene for a month or more.--[Eugene Guard.
    Wm. Ulrich, the energetic agent of the Farmers' and Merchants' Insurance Co., one of the safest and best corporations of the kind, has returned from a successful business trip to Washington Territory and eastern Oregon.
    Several of our citizens have been called to Jacksonville to tell the grand jury what they know about a certain game of dice where $50 changed hands in less time than it takes to tell it.
    It is expected that Rev. A. B. Wade of Oakland, Oregon, will hold meetings at Medford on the second Sunday in April, and it is hoped he will have a large congregation. He is an eminent divine and all who can should turn out and hear him.
    W. L. Webster has been engaged in hauling timber for several days past to build a house on his recently purchased lots in Medford, and will remove his soda manufactory here before going to Linkville for the summer.
    Medford Lodge No. 88, I.O.O.F., will dedicate their fine new hall on the 26th of April, the great anniversary day of the order, and will have a grand parade and banquet on that occasion. Not the least of the attractions will be the presence of the various brass bands of the county, who will assist in making the parade a success. The Jacksonville and Ashland boys have been secured, and the Central Point band is also expected to attend. A large concourse of visiting Odd Fellows will be in attendance, a number of excellent addresses are promised, and the occasion will be a memorable one in secret society annals in southern Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1889, page 3


    Geo. Bloomer left for Portland last Tuesday. Success to him.
    Doctors Minnis and Danielson, two prominent physicians of Medford, made us a call the forepart of the week.
    Arthur Langell of Klamath County is in town. He recently sold his fine stallion to I. J. Phipps of Medford.
    Hon. J. H. Whitman drove up last Monday from Medford, in quest of a specimen of red scale, the great California fruit pest, which he had heard had secured a lodgement in this neighborhood.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    C. C. Smith (1888) has removed to C Street.
    Poe & Brantner are now proprietors of the new brick yard.
    Arbor Day will be appropriately observed by our school tomorrow.
    M. E. Beatty has become a resident of Portland. Success to him.
    Fred. O'Bryant, our popular jeweler, was at the county seat recently.
    The board of trade held an interesting meeting last Monday evening.
    L. L. Angle has laid off a half-mile track on his premises near this place.
    Improvements have taken a new start since lumber became more plentiful.
    Henry Klippel will be established in the real estate business here in a few days.
    Real estate transactions are numerous, considering that immigration is not active.
    Miss Lenna Lloyd, of California, sister of Mrs. J. O. Johnson, is paying Medford a visit.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman has been at Portland attending the meetings of the state agricultural society, of which he is a member.
    Recorder Powell intends making a visit to his old home in the East, and has rented his barber shop to Fred. Luy, Jr., of Jacksonville.
    J. R. Brinegar is now at his old home in Lucas, Iowa, where he is closing his business preparatory to becoming a permanent resident of this valley.
    Mrs. John Noland of Medford last Saturday received $2000 from the A.O.U.W. upon the benefit policy held by her late husband in that order.
    D. T. Sears, the clever dry goods dealer, was in Jacksonville one day last week. So was Ed. Worman, the genial proprietor of the Union Livery Stable.
    J. W. Short and Wm. Angle were at the county seat last Tuesday. They sold the last 12 acres of their addition to Medford this week, for $80 an acre, to a newcomer.
    H. Kinney, the pioneer painter, has returned from southern California and will relocate here. He is a first-class mechanic and will no doubt build up a good trade.
    J. H. Bentley, president of our bank, has been with us for a short while. He has started a bank at Centerville, Umatilla County, and we are glad to state that he is doing well.
    B. C. Goddard, Jr., who recently returned from California, is suffering acutely from nasal catarrh, and his health is in a critical condition, his lungs being somewhat affected by the disease.
    M. A. Brentano has changed the date of his grand ball, which will take place on the anniversary of Odd Fellowship--April 26th--instead of May Day. Nothing will be left undone to make it the event of the season.
    Last Sunday evening, while H. E. Baker and wife were at church, some miscreant robbed their dwelling and stole about $4 in cash and a few other small articles. There were about 15 tramps congregated about the Medford depot that evening, any one of whom looked equal to such a crime.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1889, page 2


C. C. Beekman To Sylvia Tomlinson, lots 3 and 4, block 56, Medford; $125.
B. W. Powell to John R. Kennedy, lot 10, blk 9, Park addition to Medford; $150.
Wm. Angle to Elizabeth C. Wait, lot 3, blk 2, Cottage addition to Medford; $125.
Sarah A. Guches to J. H. Dobbin, lot 9, blk 1, Medford; $120.
Rose S. Robinson to Roberts & O'Neil, lot 1, blk 19, Medford; $400.
Wm. Angle, et al., to Elmer W. Dusenbury, lots 1 and 2, block 2, Cottage addition to Medford; $980.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1889, page 2


    Fred Luy, Jr., has gone to Medford to take charge of B. W. Powell's barber shop.
    Medford Odd Fellows will dedicate their hall on the 26th, and will be joined by many of their brethren in southern Oregon.
    The unexcelled draft stallion "Jack Sampson" will be at Medford, Phoenix and Ross' ranch during the season. Look out of his biography in the next issue of the Times.
    Max Brentano has changed the date of the May Day ball at Medford from May 1 to April 26th, when the fraternity of Odd Fellows intend to have their grand celebration at that place.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct has 15,500 choice fruit trees growing nicely on his farm, and his son-in-law, A. J. Weeks, also has a young orchard containing about the same number of trees.
    S. L. Bennett of Medford precinct informs us that Isaac Merriman was severely hurt by a fractious cow which he was milking. For several days his life was in danger, but we are glad to say that he is now improving.
    The tract of land adjoining Chas. Nickell's farm near Medford on the east, belonging to the heirs of Mrs. John Lacy, containing 119 acres, has been sold to a Mr. Ralston for $40 an acre.
    It was currently reported in town last evening that it had been decided to extend the Medford water ditch to the northern portion of town, and that Chinese labor would be employed in the work. It is also stated that there is considerably excitement among the laboring men of that place in consequence and trouble is anticipated.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1889, page 3


    J. E. Keene and wife of Washington Territory are here visiting their uncle, I. M. Harvey of Medford precinct.
    E. G. Hurt and E. W. Starr, well-known citizens of Medford, made the Times a pleasant call last Monday.
    Dr. Geary of Medford was here Tuesday, to hold a consultation over the case of Col. Ross with Dr. Sommers.
    Bishop Morris and Rev. F. B. Ticknor of the Episcopal Church were in the valley last week, viewing the field with reference to establishing churches of that denomination at various points in southern Oregon. It is probable that Mr. Ticknor will be placed in charge of the missionary field embracing Jackson and Josephine counties.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1889, page 3


    Owing to washouts on the Oregon line, Oregon and Washington Territory mails were forwarded by way of Ogden until the other road was put in order.
"All Sorts," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1889, page 4


    OBITUARY NOTICE.--Sarah Melissa Shaw died April 1st, 1889, at Medical Lake, Washington, of catarrhal consumption, aged 27 years 3 months and 22 days. Sister Shaw was the oldest child of Joseph and Ruth Bever. She was born in Dallas County, Iowa, December 9, 1861. She lived in Iowa with her parents until the fall of 1885, when she came with them to Medford, Jackson County, Oregon. She was converted at the age of 16, at a meeting held on Desoto Creek, by a lady evangelist, a Miss Leonard. She united with the M.E. Church and continued a faithful Christian, being active in church work both in Iowa and Oregon. Bro. Wellburn was the beloved pastor who gave Brother Bever and his family their church letters from Iowa. On their arrival in Oregon they immediately gave their letters to Rev. W. G. Simpson. Sister Shaw while remaining in Oregon was an active steward in the church. On the 4th of January, 1887, she united in matrimony with W. F. Shaw, formerly of Washington County, Iowa. Her husband is an excellent Christian man, a member of the Presbyterian Church. He tenderly loved and faithfully cared for his wife. Only Christ can speak the word of comfort to his broken heart. Immediately after their marriage they came to their new home, near Pullman, Whitman County, Washington. On the 25th day of June last she became the mother of a little son, whom they named Leon Franklin. After the birth of her child she began to decline rapidly, and in September her husband brought her to her father's house in Cheney, where they spent the winter. About a month ago her husband took her to Medical Lake, but all in vain; death claimed her. When told she must die it was hard for her to give up her husband and darling boy, but victory came; she commended her dear ones to God and said, "His will be done." The day before she died, the writer, assisted by Rev. M. H. Marvin, in her presence and at her request, dedicated their babe to Christ in baptism, and on the day of her death administered to her the holy communion. Her last utterance was "Glory!" Her father, who had been on a business trip to Iowa, arrived at his home in Cheney the day she died, but did not reach her bedside till after she was gone. Besides the dear ones mentioned, she leaves two brothers and sisters to mourn her loss. The funeral was conducted by the pastor and the writer, and we uttered from our hearts, "Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord."
N. E. PARSONS, P.E.       
The Herald, Pullman, Washington Territory, April 13, 1889, page 3


    The Medford Mail has hatched another railway rumor. This time it says it is currently reported that parties in the interest of the Chicago and Northwestern railroad are viewing a line from Ellensburg, via the Applegate, thence to Jacksonville, Medford, Eagle Point and Deskins, thence to Fort Klamath, to learn the feasibility of a road through the pass at the head of Rogue River and the Umpqua.

Evening Capital Journal, Salem, April 13, 1889, page 2



JACKSONVILLE
    Jacksonville, the shire town of Jackson county, is the oldest town in Southern Oregon. It dates its existence from about 1851. For many years it was one of the most important trading points on the north Pacific coast, being the base of supplies for the mines of the southern portion of the state. Since the advent of the railroad, which left Jacksonville to the west five miles, the place has lost much of its former prestige. At present it shows evidence of a new life. A movement is on foot to divide some of the large farms near the place into small fruit tracts and encourage increased population. A railroad to the Southern Pacific line at Medford is contemplated, which no doubt will be built. The very best farming land in the valley lies adjacent and tributary to Jacksonville. With judgment and energy there is no reason why this town, so beautiful for situation and so rich in local historic lore, should not stand abreast of the other growing towns of this region. Jacksonville has long been noted for its excellent schools, both public and private, while social advantages are of a high order. The Democratic Times, published here by Charles Nickell, is one of the leading journals of the state. It is ably edited and a very valuable business property. It has done very much for the development of the valley and would do credit to a much larger town and more populous vicinity.
    Jacksonville's business houses are substantial, carrying large stocks. A new lumber mill is to be erected that will work up the valuable sugar pine tributary to the place, which will be quite a factor in the new growth of the town. The county courthouse situated here is an imposing edifice and one of the most substantial structures in the state of Oregon. It is a credit to Jackson County.
MEDFORD
    On the railroad, five miles east of Jacksonville, is growing very fast. Numerous new buildings are being erected and the whole place has on an air of substantial and permanent growth. The Medford Mail is published here by a Mr. Harlan, recently from the Western States.
CENTRAL POINT
    Situated on the railroad, in the heart of the valley, has had a remarkable growth in the past two years. It is an energetic town and aspires to be the county seat at no very distant day.
    The view from this place is most enchanting. Mount Pitt is to the east, towering its snow-capped head into the heavens. Table Rock, the scene of the lamented General Joe Lane's memorable fight with the Rogue River Indians, lies to the north of the town.
    Woodville, Phoenix, Talent, Tolo, Brownsboro and Gold Hill are all growing towns.
Excerpt, E. A. Swope, "The Rogue River Valley," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1889, page 1


    "Progress" is the watchword in the Rogue River Valley now. Ashland is assured of her cannery in time for the next fruit crop; Medford's packing house and flouring mill will be completed before summer is over; Jacksonville's lime quarries are being developed rapidly, and her tap-line railroad bids fair to materialize soon. Hundreds of new settlers are coming into the valley, and substantial improvements are going up on every hand. There is nothing ephemeral or transient about the improvements, either. This will unquestionably become one of the garden spots of earth in a very few years, if the high character of our present immigration continues.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1889, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Hammon's nursery near here is looming up nicely.
    Don't fail to call at the 5 and 10 Cent store at once.
    J. O. Johnson's addition to this place is now on the market.
    W. B. Roberts will soon build a handsome residence on C Street.
    The board of trade held another meeting on the evening of the 15th inst.
    Arbor Day was quite appropriately observed here by the public school.
    Newcomers continue to arrive, and real estate constantly changes hands.
    The adopted child of Rev. C. H. Hoxie of this precinct died a few days since.
    The Society of Earnest Workers meet every Wednesday at Grandma Webb's.
    Paul Chartrand has taken possession of his recent purchase in Barr's addition.
    H. F. Wood, the expert mechanic, has returned from California, and will remain.
    B. W. Powell will remain in Ohio for some months before returning to Medford.
    Fred H. Rowe is still disposing of much of the output of his mill to Medford builders.
    New goods and new bargains in every line at the 5 and 10 Cents Store. Call and see.
    Henry Klippel is now stationed at this place, and has opened an office next door to the Grand Central Hotel.
    Millinery goods--new, handsome and fashionable--at the 5 and 10 Cent Store, at prices that will astonish you.
    W. L. Webster will soon take possession of his new frame residence on C Street, where he will locate his soda factory.
    Rev. G. W. Quimby is superintending the building of the new M.E. Church here, of which he will be in charge when completed.
    R. H. Harper, the Medford blacksmith, will probably locate in Ashland, not having seen anything to induce him to settle in the Sound country.
    On certain days of the week Medford resembles a mammoth horse ranch this season. It is rapidly becoming the center of the horse interest of this valley.
    It is reported that Everett Mingus, who has been attending the state university, will become a druggist and enter the employ of Haskins & Lawton of this place.
    D. T. Sears was last week appointed to fill the unexpired term of recorder of Medford made vacant by the resignation of B. W. Powell. It is a first-class appointment.
    I. M. Harvey, who resides near here, on the Jacksonville road, has one of the neatest places in the county. He has lately built a nice residence, a new barn and outbuildings.
    D. T. Sears & Co. of Medford have just received a fine, large stock of ladies' dress goods, fancy goods, millinery, etc., to which they invite inspection. Prices as low as the lowest, and quality unexcelled.
    The Odd Fellows and Rebekah degree lodges are now occupying their new hall in the I.O.O.F. building. It is elegantly finished and equipped with all modern appliances for capricornican exercise.
    Elsewhere will be found the announcement of the marriage of Mr. Fred O'Bryant to Miss Carrie L. Lumsden of this place. The Times joins their many friends in wishing them long life and happiness.
    Some of our residents proposed doing bodily harm to the Chinese working on the ditch extension, but the town authorities appointed five special policemen to preserve peace, and they were successful in doing so.
    Wm. Ulrich, the live special insurance agent, spent ten days in Grants Pass recently, soliciting for the Farmers and Merchants Ins. Co., and invested in some opera house stock while there. Ulrich knows a good thing when he sees it.
    Austin North and two sisters left last week for Iowa, to join their father at their old home, where they will remain until Mr. N. can dispose of his possessions there, when the family will probably return to Medford for a permanent residence.
    Rebekah Degree Lodge No. 28, I.O.O.F., of Medford, will give a basket dinner in the grove near Medford on the 26th, and have invited all neighboring I.O.O.F. and degree lodges to join them. The ladies may be depended upon to do their best in maintaining the enviable position which the Odd Fellows now occupy among kindred societies in southern Oregon, as regards membership and prosperity.
    While it is greatly to be deplored that Chinese labor should have been employed on the extension of the water ditch in the present condition of Medford, there seemed really no other alternative for the town council than to award them the contract, in view of the fact that their bid was the only one put in, in response to the board's advertisement for proposals. The individual members of the council each expressed himself in favor of awarding the contract to white men at a higher figure had other bidders competed.
    Considerable amusement was caused here over Brother Harlan's proposed route for a railroad from Ellensburg to Fort Klamath. It is currently believed that a mule would have to have wings in order to traverse the route as laid down, but there have been such wonderful triumphs of engineering skill in the Rockies of late years that capital may yet succeed in bridging the canyons and surrounding the cliffs of the lower Rogue River and Applegate valleys in order to tap Bro. Harlan's timber claim at the head of the former stream.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1889, page 2


I. J. Phipps to J. Holm, lots 7 and 8, block 9, and lots 3 and 4, block 25, Medford; $100.
D. T. Lawton to Jason Kellogg, lots 1, 2 and 3, block 11, Medford; $300.
Flora A. Murray to M. Maule, lot 3, blk 1, Medford; $350.
R. H. Harper to F. Amann, part of lot 20, blk 20, Medford; $500.
C. C. Beekman to W. E. Davison, lot 7, block 38, Medford: $15.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1889, page 2


Arrested.
    A girl residing in Medford, who is about sixteen years of age, was arrested a few days since, charged with stealing a dress-skirt from a party in town. As she pleaded guilty when brought before Justice Plymale of this precinct, he inflicted the lowest penalty, a fine of $25, which was paid by some relatives. The girl seems to be a kleptomaniac and hardly responsible for her acts. She should be properly looked after by her parents.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1889, page 3


    W. L. Webster is today removing his household goods to Medford.
    Henry Klippel has established his headquarters at Medford, next door to the Grand Central Hotel, where he is prepared to furnish bargains in real estate. For further particulars, see his advertisement in another place.
    The graphic description of the Rogue River country, which we reproduce on our first page this week, is from the facile pen of E. A. Swope, who has been rusticating in the valley a good deal during the past season, and who is thoroughly conversant with its history and character.
    Jackson County is again behind the procession. No steps are being taken to advertise its immense resources and the manifold inducements which are more enterprising in this regard will reap the benefits of the great rush of homeseekers to the Northwest.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
O'BRYANT-LUMSDEN--In Medford, April 12th, by Rev. E. McLean, Fred. O'Bryant and Miss Carrie L. Lumsden.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1889, page 3


    The Medford Mail is responsible for the latest railway rumor. It reports that parties in the interest of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad are viewing a line from Ellensburg, Or. via the Applegate thence to Jacksonville, Medford, Eagle Point and Deskins, thence to Fort Klamath, to learn the feasibility of a road through the pass at the head of the Rogue River and the Umpqua.
Oregonian, Portland, April 19, 1889, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The lumber for our grist mill is on the ground.
   
Medford comes to the front with a divorce suit or two.
    Jas. R. Elder has gone to Redding, Cal., to engage in business.
    S. S. Pentz' law office is now located in Dr. Adkins' big brick building.
    Improvements continue on every hand, and our population is steadily increasing.
    Dr. Pickel has a neat new office in Adkins' fine building. He deserves success.
    Elder M. Peterson will hold services at Howard's hall next Sunday, at the usual hour.
    The nice tracts in Nickell's addition to Medford are attracting much attention.
    Rev. G. G. Thomas, who has been ill for some time past, is now convalescing, we are glad to learn.
    The nicest and most fashionable dress and fancy goods, etc., can always be found at D. T. Sears'.
    Don't forget the grand ball at Howard's hall tomorrow evening.
    Medford is the point of departure for most of the timberland hunters at the head of Rogue River.
    Rowe's mill in Josephine County is supplying the Medford lumber yards with much fine lumber.
    Medford's streets are crowded daily with farmers from the country surrounding and strangers seeking homes.
    More ornamental shrubs and trees have lately been planted in our park, which will soon be a handsome resort.
    Fred O'Bryant and his newly made wife were serenaded by our band a few evenings since, playing several airs quite nicely.
    The board of trade are talking of having a preliminary survey made to ascertain the most feasible pass over the Cascade Range.
    Willard Crawford and J. N. Phillips, both experienced and able attorneys, have formed a partnership for the practice of law. They make a strong team.
    We are sorry to learn that Dr. C. Minnis has some intention of going to the coast for the purpose of seeking a permanent location. His many friends wish him success wherever he may go.
    The Odd Fellows' celebration here tomorrow (Friday) will be a handsome affair, as no pains are being spared to make it such. There will be a large crowd from every portion of southern Oregon. One of the main features will be the dedication of their fine new hall.
    Rev. M. A. Williams of Medford and Elder C. Gaddis of Roseburg will represent the presbytery of southern Oregon in the Presbyterian general assembly, which is to meet in New York May 16th. Mr. Williams will be accompanied by his wife, who will revisit the scenes of her youth for the first time since leaving the Empire State.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1889, page 2


Rhoda A. and L. J. Crenshaw to Loretta V. Gilmore, lots 4 and 5, blk 22, Medford; $
600.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1889, page 2


I.O.O.F. Celebration.
    The seventieth anniversary of the Independent Order of Odd Fellowship will be celebrated at Medford tomorrow, April 26th. The following is the programme: 1. Members of the order will meet at hall at 9:30 o'clock, A.M. 2. Form in order and leave hall at 10 o'clock. 3. March to the grounds. 4. Music by Medford band. 5. Prayer by Chaplain. 6. Song by choir, "Choir Salutation." 7. Anniversary ceremonies. 8. Song by choir. 9. Prayer by Chaplain. 10. Song by choir, Thanksgiving anthem. 11. Address of welcome by W. H. Gore. 12. Music by Jacksonville band. 13. Oration by Rev. W. B. Adkins. 14. Music by Medford band. 15. Refreshments. 16. Music by Jacksonville band. 17. Speech by Judge DePeatt of Ashland. 18. Music by Medford band. 19. Speech by Judge Day of Jacksonville. 20. Music by Jacksonville band. 21. Speech by Bro. --------- of Grants Pass. 22. Speech by Bro. --------- of Kerbyville. 23. Music by Jacksonville and Medford bands. Adjournment. The members of the order will meet at the hall at 8 o'clock P.M., where an evening's entertainment will be given. Any friends, not members of the order, wishing to take part in the day's entertainment are cordially invited to attend. "Bring baskets well filled." By order of
THE COMMITTEE.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1889, page 3


    Henry Klippel, the real estate agent, offers several new and first-class bargains. See his advertisement for particulars.
    Wm. Wilson of Table Rock precinct has bonded his property to J. O. Johnson of Medford, and will probably leave the valley soon.
    The Catholic congregation of Medford are under obligations to Dr. R. Pryce for his donation of the fence posts in their new church enclosure.
    One of the events of the season will be the ball at Medford tomorrow (Friday) evening. Great preparations are being made therefor, and no doubt it will be a grand success in every particular.
    Emigrants step off every train that passes through the valley and inspect our fruit and grain lands. Far too many of them are allowed to leave the valley without investing, but most of them will remember it as the prettiest place they have seen in all their travels.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1889, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct made us a pleasant call Tuesday. He is looking after business connected with the southern Oregon agricultural fair association.
    Rev. F. S. Noel departed on the evening train on Tuesday for the Willamette Valley and Portland. He will visit his brother, a prominent miller at Dallas, Polk County, before returning to Jacksonville.
    J. D. Whitman of the state horticultural board was up from Medford last Saturday, inspecting trees infested with the scale bug in this vicinity. He reports the pest not nearly so prevalent in the country as at first supposed, and is very much encouraged at the prospect for eradicating it.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1889, page 3


DIED.
HOXIE--Near Medford, April 11th, Sarah F., adopted daughter of C. H. and L. M. Hoxie, aged 2 years, 4 months and 7 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1889, page 3


    Medford and Jacksonville are only five mile apart, and the country is level, yet the legislature appropriated $10,000 for building a wagon road to each place.
Daily Morning Astorian, March 1, 1889, page 3


A Successful Entertainment.
    The anniversary entertainment and dedicatory exercises of the Medford Odd Fellows last Friday were not only highly creditable to the order in that place, but served to maintain the high reputation for hospitality and liberality which this kindred society in Southern Oregon have long maintained. The place was full of visitors from all the neighboring towns of Southern Oregon, all of whom were royally entertained, and yet many basketfuls remained from the feast. At the appointed hour large delegations from both Ashland and Jacksonville arrived, the latter being accompanied by the Silver Cornet Band. The air was filled with melody for the balance of the day. The programme was carried out in full and a number of the addresses were exceedingly good, notably those of Rev. W. B. Adkins and Judge DePeatt. The subject of Odd Fellowship is fruitful of sentiment, and it was handled by able hands at Medford last Friday. The ball in the evening at Howard's opera house was well attended and an enjoyable time had.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Nickell's addition is attracting much attention.
    Mrs. Kitty Webb and a lady friend visited Jacksonville Wednesday.
    Judge Crawford has come intentions of opening a law office at Portland.
    Dr. Danielson is building himself a neat frame residence in the Lumsden tract.
    The stone foundation of the M.E. Church building is nearing completion.
    A large packing house is one of the next enterprises which will be started here soon.
    A number of changes are privately discussed among the legal fraternity of this section.
    Water has been turned into the Medford ditch and the enterprise is much of a success.
    C. W. Wolters has invested in a nice delivery outfit, which shows enterprise and foresight.
    J. O. Johnson has returned from California and may be found at his real estate office again.
    A pleasing entertainment was given by the union Sunday school at Howard's hall last Tuesday.
    More building is anticipated in Medford this season than last, provided lumber and material can be procured.
    Peter Henderson, the tonsorial artist, well known at Yreka, Cal., and Linkville, has opened a shop here.
    G. E. Anderson and John Robinson, who have been conducting a delivery business, have dissolved partnership.
    A. Alford, who has been living here for several months past, will return to Butte Creek valley, Cal., in a few days.
    Messrs. Harris and Rhinehart were at the county seat yesterday. They have finished their contract on the water ditch.
    Our Odd Fellows' hall, which was dedicated last Friday, is pronounced one of the handsomest in southern Oregon.
    Our real estate dealers should wake up and do more advertising. That is what they and the whole country need to make it boom.
    Miss L. Lloyd and Mrs. Hall were thrown from a buggy one day last week, but fortunately sustained no serious injury.
    Great bargains in choice land are being offered by Henry Klippel, the live real estate dealer. See his advertisement for further particulars.
    Rev. Mr. Thomas was treated to a surprise party and a purse of $20. A set of dining room chairs, and lot of provisions, etc., were presented him.
    Owners of residences in the southern part of town suddenly began to take a very lively interest in the subject of fire insurance after the location of Standard Oil Company's tank there.
    On Monday last work was begun on the framework of the new grist mill. It will be rapidly pushed to completion, and it is thought will be ready to handle a portion of the growing grain crop this season.
    Right of way having been granted by the S.P.R.R. and the town council of Medford to the Standard Oil Company for that purpose, a stub switch will be constructed by the oil company at an early day to their tanks, to be built south of town.
    J. H. Dickenson last week sold the Clarenden Hotel house, fixtures and furniture to a gentleman from Los Angeles. Consideration, $5500. Mr. D. will probably remain in Medford, having already partially contracted for a frame residence at an early day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1889, page 2


    Mrs. S. E. Ish has nearly 2,000 head of fine sheep, clean and fat, which she offers for sale at a reasonable figure. See advertisement for further particulars.
    All the frost that can possibly come now can do no more than a little much-needed thinning out of the surplus fruit that hangs in such profusion on the trees throughout the valley. The crop this year will be beyond all precedent in yield, and in most instances of fine quality, as the younger orchards now coming into bearing have most of them received careful and intelligent cultivation, and consist of choice varieties of budded fruit.
    Many of the orchards in southern Oregon are afflicted with the pests which are proving so injurious in California and the Willamette Valley, and nothing should be left undone to thoroughly eradicate them at once, before it is too late. The State Horticultural Society promises to render valuable assistance in the matter.
    Ward Douglas, the lightning special agent of the New York Life Insurance Company, who worked up such a fine business for his company in southern Oregon last season, has been breaking his own record recently about Walla Walla and Pendleton. He has been giving special excursions to patrons of the company in that section, in appreciation of their favors, and succeeded in writing 116 policies in Pendleton alone. He is spoken of as the most successful special agent on the northwest coast at this time. His energy and enterprise seem to have no limit.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1889, page 3


    J. D. Whitman, B. F. Adkins, R. T. Lawton, J. S. Howard, L. L. Angle, and a number of other citizens of Medford were in at the fair association meeting last Saturday.
    Miss Emily Brown of Eagle Point departed Wednesday evening for a visit to her sister, Mrs. Jas. Guerin, at The Dalles.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1889, page 3


Lost.
On April 18th, between Jacksonville and Medford, a yellow goatskin robe. The finder will be suitably rewarded by leaving the same at the Times office or at J. O. Johnson's office in Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
BEATTY-MORRIS--At the residence of Rev. M. A. Williams--the officiating minister--near Medford, on April 27th, Matthew Edwin Beatty and Miss Cora Dell Morris.
MINNIS-TYLER--In Medford, on Monday, April 29th, by Elder Geo. S. Walton, Dr. C. Minnis and Mrs. Betty E. Tyler.
BORN.
ULRICH--In Medford, April 27th, to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ulrich, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1889, page 3


Sheep for Sale.
1800 HEAD OF WELL-BRED SHEEP, all healthy, and in fine order. They are said to be one of the finest bands of sheep in the county, and this is a fine opportunity for anyone wishing to engage in the sheep business. Apply to
MRS. SALLIE E. ISH,
Jacksonville, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1889, page 3


    The great tide of immigration continues to pour into Oregon and Washington, with no apparent diminution of numbers, although California is not attracting as many newcomers this season as usual. There is room in the great Pacific Northwest for many hundreds more. Let them come and welcome.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889, page 2


Mary R. and Ed C. Phelps to G. W. Howard, lots 1, 2 and 3, block 3, Medford; $600.
Ella Zimmerman to S. H. Hull, lots 12 and 13, block 23, Medford; $300.
O.T. Co. to J. R. Evans, lots 4 and 5, block 55, Medford; $160.
C. C. Beekman to Chas. Nickell, blocks 63 and 81, Medford; $600.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889, page 2


    Medford rejoices over the flowing of water through its new irrigating canal, which taps Bear Creek about two miles above the town. The water was turned into the ditch last week for the first time.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 3, 1889, page 3


Stricken in His Prime.
    After a lingering illness, which he fully realized must terminate fatally, B. C. Goddard, Jr., peacefully breathed his last at twelve o'clock on last Monday night, at his home near Medford. With patient fortitude he endured the suffering incident to that most terrible disease, consumption, and when death came it was but to relieve his earthly tenement from pain. Deceased was among the oldest pioneers in the valley, having resided here since infancy, and one of the most familiar figures in the county. Ever affable and genial, a warm-hearted friend and a true citizen in the highest meaning of the words, he leaves behind him only the pleasantest of memories and vain regrets that he should have been so early called away from life. He leaves surviving a widow and three little children to mourn the loss of a kind and indulgent husband and father. Carlos was two days less than thirty-eight years old at the time of his death. A large concourse of friends followed the remains to their final resting place in the beautiful Jacksonville Cemetery on Wednesday.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889, page 3


    Herrin, the photographer, has located permanently in Lakeview.
    Numerous residents of Medford and vicinity attended the funeral of Carlos Goddard at the Jacksonville Cemetery yesterday.
    Observe F. Hubbard's advertisement of farming implements, etc. Mr. Hubbard has succeeded in building up a fine business at Medford in the agricultural machinery line and deservedly stands high among the farmers of the valley for square dealing. His leaders are the Norwegian Plow Co.'s goods and "standard" mowers. Examine his stock before purchasing elsewhere.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. E. Wilkinson and son are quite ill.
    Johnson's addition will soon be on the market.
    Work will begin at once on Dr. Danielson's handsome cottage.
    There seems to be considerable domestic infelicity in these parts.
    C. W. Skeel is finishing the Standard Oil Co.'s building at this place.
    Vernon Phillips, a first-class job printer, has leased Phelps' job office.
    G. W. Quimby has commenced work on the new M.E. Church building.
    W. J. Zimmerman, the carpenter, has left these parts, without leaving his address.
    A neat residence is being built in town for A. A. Davis of Minnesota, the mill man.
    Several brick structures are in contemplation. The building boom shows no signs of abating.
    G. W. Williams, formerly of this place, passed up the road a few days since, bound for Roseburg.
    Henry Barneburg and bride are temporarily residing here. They have the best wishes of all.
    Rev. F. B. Ticknor, lately of Walla Walla, will be in charge of the Episcopal Church here.
    H. Kinney, the best painter in town, has the contract for painting J. B. Riddle's new hotel at Riddle.
    Lumber for the big grist mill is being hauled from Welch's in Meadows precinct and is rapidly put into the building.
    C. W. Skeel has the contract for erecting several buildings in this place, some of which have already been commenced.
    E. C. Phelps and family, who have been residents of this place for some time past, have returned to their old home at Yaquina Bay. Success to them.
    The suit of J. C. Elder against Medford, which was dismissed on a technicality, has been renewed. Judge Prim has been employed to represent the town.
    Dr. Minnis and Mrs. B. Tyler, who were married here a few days since, started north at once. They have the congratulations and best wishes of a host of friends.
    Nine carloads of lumber from Josephine County were unloaded here last Tuesday. This is only one evidence of the great amount of improvement going on in this place.
    Milton Harlan, who has been in Cheyenne, Wyoming Territory, for some time, arrived here during the week and will take charge of the mechanical department of the Mail. He is a son of Thos. Harlan.
    Dr. C. Minnis has located at Roseburg, where he found many persons who knew him east. He is a first-class physician and surgeon and a thorough gentleman, and we have no hesitancy in recommending him.
    Judge Crawford has closed his business here and will leave Portland this week, to engage in the practice of the law with Judge DePeatt. We are sorry to lose them, as they are both valuable acquisitions to any community.
    A marriage license was issued by the county clerk a few days ago to Ira A. Phelps and Miss Effie Tice of Medford, and they have since been married. The happy young couple have many friends in the valley and elsewhere who wish them much joy and prosperity.
    Sometime during last night Angle & Plymale's store was entered by burglars through a rear window, and the contents of the money till, amounting to about $10, together with several pairs of shoes and other articles were stolen therefrom. No clue to the thieves has been found at the time we go to press.
    A well-known citizen of Medford left for parts unknown during the week, and it is currently reported that the cause of his flight was a report that reached here to the effect that his first wife, from whom he had not been divorced, had discovered his whereabouts and was preparing to prosecute him for bigamy. Numerous creditors mourn his hasty departure.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889, page 3


    We were mistaken in regard to the dedication of the Odd Fellows hall in Medford on the 26th ult. It will be dedicated by representatives of the grand lodge of the I.O.O.F. of Oregon at an early day.
"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889, page 3


Sweet Potato Plants.
    The undersigned, living near Medford, has 60,000 sweet potato plants, which he offers for sale in quantities to suit and at a reasonable figure. Call on or address.
D. R. HILL, Medford, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889 et seq., page 3


MARRIED.
BARNEBURG-COMSTOCK--Near Medford, April 28th, by Rev. C. H. Hoxie, D. H. Barneburg and Miss O. Comstock.
DIED.
GODDARD--At the family residence near Medford, at midnight on Monday, May 6th, of consumption, B. C. Goddard, Jr.; aged 37 years, 11 months and 29 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889, page 3


F. HUBBARD,
MANUFACTURER'S AGENT FOR
Standard Mower
The Celebrated STANDARD REAPER and MOWER,
With Serrated Guard, Drive Wheels interchangeable and Tilting Lever. The upper side of the cutter presents a perfectly smooth surface over its whole length, and is the ONLY Mower made that way, with Sickle Edge Guard Plates, which prevent the grass from slipping forward when the section strikes it, besides having the only Guard that sharpens itself, giving the STANDARD MOWERS the greatest cutting power with less draft than any other mower, as thousands can testify to. Also the STANDARD STEEL WHEEL HAY RAKE, which has no equal.
    Am also agent for the

Buffalo Pitts Threshing Machines and Engines,
Hodge's Lightest Draft and Most Durable Header made, WITH SELF-ADJUSTING KEEL, the Deering All Steel Twine Binders, with improved steel bundle carriers, sawmills, all of which machinery is too well-known to need comment; also the Newton Wagons, Carriages and Hacks.
    Call and see for yourselves before purchasing.         F. HUBBARD, Medford, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889 et seq., page 3


    J. N. Phillips, late of Chippewa Falls, has located at Medford, Oregon, where it is reported he will engage in the practice of law.
"Personal and Social," The Free Press, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, May 11, 1889, page 3


A. GARRICK,
Merchant Tailor
And Importer of
Foreign and Domestic Woolens, Etc.,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
A FULL LINE of the best and most fashionable cloths, finishings, etc., constantly kept on hand, and nothing but first-class work turned out.
    All orders filled promptly at reasonable rates and satisfaction guaranteed.
A. GARRICK.   
Medford, May 13, 1889
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1889 et seq., page 1


    Prof. H. G. Fairclo, the well-known educator, has taken charge of the Bonanza school and will spare no pains to make it the leading school in Klamath County. He always gives satisfaction.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1889, page 2


A MUSICAL TREAT.
    Last Monday was a field day for Jacksonville and deserves to be marked with a white stone by Oregonian Pocahontas Tribe No. 1 of the Improved Order of Red Men. A more successful musical and social entertainment was never given in the county under the auspices of any order, and while the Red Men have heretofore prided themselves upon their hospitality, they may now rest easy as regards wearing the laurels, for in some respects they are unapproachable. Every preparation had been made and every detail was successfully carried out.
    Early on Monday morning the town was astir and visitors from all parts of the county began coming in every style of vehicle, until by noon there was an assemblage of not less than 1500 besides our own citizens. About nine o'clock the Central Point band and Close Bros.' band of Ashland arrived in town, and were followed shortly afterwards by the Medford band, equipped with tasty uniforms and in their fine new band wagon, drawn by four richly caparisoned bay horses, decidedly the most striking turnout of the day. From this time forward there was a concord of sweet sounds until long after nightfall.
    The enrollment of the various bands was as follows:
    Medford--Charles W. Wolters, 1st cornet leader; Fred. Luy, Jr., clarinet; Bert Whitman, 2nd cornet; M. W. Skeel, solo alto; Arthur Nicholson, 2nd alto; E. Langley, 1st tenor; Wm. Halley, 2nd tenor; A. Weeks, baritone; Ira Phelps, tuba; Cecil Youngs, snare drum; Robert Faris, bass drum.
    The Medford band concluded the contest with their second selection, the "Sweet Dreams" serenade, of Southwell. The boys play well together, and have but to keep up their organization a few months longer in order to equal the best. Nothing daunted by their failure to win prize money, they drove out of town with colors flying.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1889, page 2


C. C. Beekman to Chas. Nickell, lots in block 58, Medford; $200.
R. C. Ford to J. R. Evans, lot 5, block 56, Medford; $262.50.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1889, page 2


    We are informed that Roberts & O'Neil have sold the balance of their farm in Eden precinct to a relative of A. P. Talent for $16,000.
    Attention is called to the card of A. Garrick, the merchant tailor of Medford, who keeps a large, first-class assortment of foreign and domestic woolens, etc. He is a first-class mechanic and spares no pains to suit everybody. Our citizens will now find no excuse to send their orders out of the county.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our grist mill is looming up nicely.
    Mrs. R. C. Ford has returned from her visit to Texas.
    Judge Crawford and wife are now residents of Portland.
    The board of trade held an interesting meeting a few evenings since.
    Charley Wolters is delivering bread to patrons in different portions of town.
    Dr. J. B. Wait has gone to his old home in Neligh, Neb., but will return soon.
    Geo. F. Merriman is beautifying his premises, which are among the neatest in town.
    Mrs. W. G. Zimmerman is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Turner of Grants Pass.
    Medford was very well represented at Jacksonville on Monday, when the band contest took place.
    C. W. Skeel, the well-known contractor, has established headquarters near the Clarenden Hotel.
    Frank Galloway has sold his residence in the western portion of town to Mrs. Lucinda Wilson and Mrs. Windom.
    George H. Haskins went to Kalama, W.T., last week, having been called thither by the serious illness of his father.
    "Shorty" Hamilton has also made an addition to our town, dividing his land on the west side of Medford into acre tracts.
    A. Z. Sears of Jacksonville is improving his property in this place. He is now building a neat new fence about his premises.
    Our band boys are making rapid progress, and had they had as much experience as some of the other bands they would have stood a good chance for the first prize.
    H. Klippel last week sold six lots belonging to Judge Crawford to Fred. Meinhard, a newcomer, who has already commenced improving three of them. The price paid was $300.
    Rev. M. A. Williams of this precinct has gone to Philadelphia, to attend the general assembly of the Presbyterian Church. A. J. Weeks, the architect and builder, is now engaged in building a handsome residence for him.
    G. W. Coulter, the scientific painter, has been doing some extra jobs in his line lately. The handsome painting and lettering on Hanley & Wilkinson's new butcher wagon is a sample of the good work he is doing.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1889, page 3


    Mr. Fischer, a brother-in-law of T. J. Cress of this place, arrived from Iowa a few days since.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1889, page 3


    Medford post of the G.A.R. will observe Memorial Day in an appropriate manner, decorating the graves of their comrades who lie interred in Jacksonville Cemetery.
    Several foot-races were indulged in by the visitors to the band contest on Monday. The most exciting was a dash of seventy-five yards, $50 a side, between John Armstrong and young Downing, both of Central Point precinct, the former winning. Chas. Milligan of Medford and Lafe Lewis of Roseburg also tried conclusions at 100 yards and at 40 yards. The first-named was much the speedier.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1889, page 3


A. GARRICK,
Merchant Tailor
And Importer of
Foreign and Domestic Woolens, Etc.,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
----
A FULL LINE OF THE BEST AND MOST fashionable cloths, finishings, etc., constantly kept on hand, and nothing but first-class work turned out.
    All orders filled promptly at reasonable rates and satisfaction guaranteed.
A. GARRICK.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1889, page 3


    Some fine specimens of Italian marble are on exhibition at Medford, near which city a vast ledge of this beautiful stone exists. It can be traced with the eye for a half mile, and there is no telling what wonders a pick and shovel might disclose.

Evening Capital Journal, Salem, May 21, 1889, page 2


Conrad Mingus to Janet Garrick, lots 5 and 6, blk 75, Medford; $100.
D. T. Lawton to E. S. Hamlin, lots 1 and 2, blk 54, Medford; $250.
D. Van Horn to Delphine Goldsmith, lots 5, 6, 7 and 8, blk 43, Medford; $
274.
O.T. Co. to C. C. Beekman, lots 14 and 15, block 42, Medford; $100.
M. E. Beatty to W. R. Newman, lot 6, blk 4, Cottage addition to Medford; $70.
Sarah and L. A. McQueen to Albert Alford, lots 1 and 2, blk 6, Medford; $150.
Wm. Angle et al. to Edward T. Meade, lot 5, blk 1, Cottage addition to Medford; $100.
O.T. Co. to J. B. Walden, Jr., lots 17 and 18, blk 78, Medford; $110.
Geo. S. Walton to Frank Galloway, lots 5 and 6, block 23, Medford; $500.
O.T. Co. to E. W. Starr, lot 11, blk 57, Medford; $50.
A. B. Drucks to John Charles, undivided half of lots 5, 6 and 7, block 20, Medford; $4,000.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1889, page 2


Memorial Day.
    The following is the programme of the decoration services to be held at Medford and Jacksonville on May 30th, 1889:
    The members of the Grand Army posts and all ex-soldiers are requested to meet in the Grand Army hall in Medford, May 30th, at 9:30 o'clock sharp. At 9:45 the post will form in front of the hall and march to the Presbyterian Church in Medford, where the following will be observed: Invocation, by Rev. G. G. Thomas; song by the choir, "My Country 'Tis of Thee"; programme as laid down in G.A.R. service book; song by the choir, "Blest Be the Ground"; address by W. H. Gore; song by choir, "Cover Them Over with Flowers"; At 2 o'clock P.M. "sharp" the post will meet at the hall and proceed to Jacksonville Cemetery and decorate the graves of all soldiers buried there. All members of Chester A. Arthur Post are expected to report in person and take part in this service. All ex-soldiers and any citizens who feel so disposed are most cordially invited to join with us in this beautiful and impressive service.
J. H. FARIS,
Com'd. G.A.R. Post.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1889, page 3


    John S. Miller, formerly of Ashland, now living in Gilroy, Cal., passed through the valley one day last week on his way to Washington Territory.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1889, page 3


    Hobson Bros. have returned from their trip east of the mountains, where they purchased several head of horses. They will remain in Medford precinct, being satisfied with Rogue River Valley.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    John Robinson has moved to Crescent City, Cal.
    I. A. Webb has declined to fill the office of mayor.
    M. Van Sickel and family have gone to Missouri on a visit.
    John Fischer, an expert painter and paper hanger, lately from Iowa, has located here.
    G. H. Haskins, the popular druggist, has returned from his trip to Washington Territory.
    E. W. Starr, the well-known contractor and builder, is kept busy. He does the best of work.
    A. E. Matson is now in charge of the Redden blacksmith shop, formerly occupied by G. W. Crystal.
    Fred Luy, Jr., the tonsorial artist, is building up a good business and giving general satisfaction.
    The pioneer real estate firm is still in the field and doing well. It will be known as Goddard & Co. hereafter.
    Preparations are being made for the erection of several brick store buildings. Medford is fully up with the procession.
    An effort is being made to establish a Masonic lodge at Medford. Quite a number of Masons reside here and in the vicinity.
    See real estate transactions printed elsewhere for the numerous sales of property in our town and its vicinity. We are doing well.
    J. G. Grossman, the well-known wheelwright, has let the contract for putting up a brick building on his lots in the eastern portion of town.
    Mr. Fanning of the Clarenden Hotel was at the county seat last Saturday, accompanied by Mr. Follett. He is building up a good business.
    It is stated that one of Medford's quondam residents has gone to hunt Zimmerman, leaving a large number of debts behind, but not his future address.
    Vawter & Whitman have started a loan agency at this place, and elsewhere announce that they have a large sum of money to loan on long time and at low rates.
    Angle & Plymale's two-story brick building is looming up nicely already. J. A. Whiteside has bought their frame building and removed it to the western portion of town.
    The "Young People's Societies of Christian Endeavor" will hold the first strawberry festival of the season in Childers' block next Tuesday evening. Everybody is invited to attend.
    John Charles, lately of Albany, Linn County, has purchased A. B. Drucks' half interest in the Grand Central Hotel property and the buildings adjoining. The consideration was four thousand dollars.
    The Mail indulges in a lengthy and uncalled-for diatribe against Judge Crawford and those who assisted him into the mayor's office. There is a great deal more venom and prejudice than logic and justice in that article. Whatever objection there may be to Mr. Crawford, none can deny that he was enterprising and had the best interests of our town sincerely at heart. Had he finished his term of office, his services would have been great and appreciated by all fair-minded citizens.
    Notice is hereby given that memorial services will be observed in the Baptist Church of Medford, Oregon, Sabbath morning, May 26th at 11 o'clock A.M. Services will be conducted by Rev. E. McLean, assisted by Rev. G. G. Thomas and others. Members of the G.A.R. will attend in a body. All ex-soldiers are requested to meet with the Chester A. Arthur Post at their hall at 10:30 o'clock A..M and march to the church. By order of Commander.
                            J. H. FARIS.
    M. S. DAMON, Post. Adjt.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1889, page 3


$100,000 TO LOAN.
MONEY TO LOAN ON LONG TIME at Low Rates on Real Estate Security. Call on or address
VAWTER & WHITMAN,
Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1889 et seq., page 3


Medford Items.
    The M.E. church building is being raised and improved.
    Work is fast progressing on Jas. Roberts' new house in the southern part of town.
    Frank Galloway purchased the Harris property on C Street this week. The price paid was $2000.
    Mr. Briggs is opening a gents' furnishings establishment in Jackson & Damon's building on C Street.
Advance Thresher    Jos. Patterson and Rufus Cox have each purchased a new "Advance" thresher of the agent, Mr. A. Slocum.
    The new M.E. Church is being rapidly pushed to completion, and will be ready for the plasterers in the near future.
    The many friends of Gabe Plymale will be pleased to know that he is rapidly recovering from his recent severe illness.
    A. A. Davis' new residence in the western part of town has been completed. It is one of the finest buildings in town.
    Angle & Plymale have sold their old store building to Messrs. Wood & Whiteside, who will use it for a carpenter shop.
    The outlook for an abundant harvest was never better in Rogue River Valley than it is this year. Both in fruit and grain.
    C Street has been graded nicely from 7th Street north for a distance of two miles, which makes one of the finest drives in the country.
    Mr. L. G. Wortman has sold quite a number of the celebrated "Ware" pumps during the past few days. For a deep well they have no equal.
    Poe & Co have their second kiln of brick nearly ready to burn. The first kiln turned out first-class brick, which are all sold already.
    Work on the new opera house will soon begin in earnest. The brick are being hauled, and everything will be gotten ready before the brick laying begins.
    The frame building on the lot of Angle & Plymale was moved to the western part of town this week, to make room for their new three-story brick building.
    Mr. A. Alford and wife, who have been spending the winter and spring in Medford, will return soon to their ranch in the Butte Creek country, Siskiyou County.
    C. W. Wolters has purchased a fine new delivery rig, and now delivers goods free to all parts of the city. He also supplies Central Point and Phoenix with first-class bread.
    Medford has determined not to have a 4th of July celebration this year, and her people will join with their neighbors of other places in the valley in observation of that day.
    Medford boasts the only full three-story brick business block in the county--that of Adkins & Webb. Angle & Plymale's building adjacent to it will be of the same height.
    The water ditch has been completed, and the water was turned on for the first time Wednesday. This is a valuable improvement for the town and one that will be of great benefit.
    A. B. Brooks, who bought the A. S. Jacobs half interest in the Grand Central Hotel building, sold the same this week to John Charles, recently from the Willamette; consideration, $4200.
    The Clarenden Hotel, under the new management, is having a large patronage, The proprietor, Mr. Fanning, takes great pains to please his guests, and all are sure of good treatment while there.
    The work on the new grist mill is progressing nicely. The siding is all on and the roof, which is to be of iron, will be put on the first of next week. The machinery is expected to be here by the 10th of June.
    The four years' term of the present incumbent of the Medford post office will expire with the last of June, but as yet it is not known who will be his successor. Numerous applications for the appointment have been made.
    F. H. Rowe, the enterprising sawmill man, shipped nine carloads of first-class lumber to this place by Monday's freight. Since starting his yard here, a little over three weeks ago, he has sold over 100,000 feet of lumber at this place.
    Rev. McLean, of the Presbyterian Church, will preach the memorial sermon next Sunday, union services having been agreed upon by the several churches. On Monday Mr. McLean will go to Grants Pass, to assist in the memorial ceremonies there.
Ashland Tidings, May 24, 1889, page 2


In the Eyes of Others.
    The Mail winds up an argument to advertise Medford with these words: "We expect Medford to be heard from until its name will be as familiar as Kansas City, Omaha, Wichita, Denver, Cheyenne, Sacramento, Portland or Salem." Just see how he rates Salem!
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, May 24, 1889, page 4


Besieged with Credentials.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart, the county agricultural association's representative on the district agricultural board, is having honors thrust upon him. Before the organization of a local society the county court appointed him to represent this county on the board. At the primary organization of the Jackson County Agricultural Society Mr. Stewart was appointed as its representative on the district board, and, upon its incorporation under the name of the Jackson County Agricultural Association, Mr. Stewart was declared to be its accredited representative on the board; and now we learn that he will carry credentials from still a third local agricultural society organized at Medford a few days since. In common with the rest of us, who have the good of the county at heart, Mr. Stewart deplores the differences, but will do all in his power to secure the location of the district fair in the county, if possible to do so. It is to be hoped that he and Mr. McDonough will be successful in securing the fair; but they would have had a much easier task if there had been anything like cooperation among the residents of our enterprising railroad towns in this matter. The county at large will not endorse any effort on the part of anyone to play the marplot, when it comes to depriving this valley of so desirable a boon as the district fair.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889, page 3


    Geo. R. Justus and wife, lately of Foots Creek, are now at Medford.
    G. W. Howard of Medford is at present engaged in soliciting in Lake County for the State Insurance Co. of Salem.
    Both Medford and Central Point will give way to Jacksonville this year, many residents of which towns will join us in making Independence Day glorious.
    Attention is called to the announcement of School Superintendent Mitchell of a teacher's institute to be held at the Medford school house on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, June 20, 21 and 22. Every teacher in the county should attend and profit by the exercises.
    We are gratified to learn that J. O. Johnson, the gentleman who recently purchased the Wilson ranch north of Rogue River, will fence the entire place with a substantial board fence, build a handsome residence and make other improvements this summer. He will also put up a portable sawmill for working up the hardwood timber on his holdings into first-class wagon material.
    In view of the leading position taken by Dr. E. P. Geary of Medford as an oculist, the residents of the valley are to be congratulated on the fact that he has finally abandoned his purpose of removing to Seattle, and will remain permanently in Jackson County. He has won the confidence of all by his skill in his specialty and his uniform success in the general practice of medicine.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman, in his efficient investigation of the fruit pests--the woolly aphid and the San Jose scale--has ascertained that the latter is going to be susceptible of control much more easily than was at first supposed. In some localities in the valley trees that are known to have been infested by the scale for some years have not communicated the disease to other trees but a few yards distant; and the fear of a rapid spread of the infection over the entire valley seems to be without foundation. That the application of caustic washes will kill the scale at some stages of its growth is beyond doubt, and constant vigilance will, we hope, yet rid the valley of the nuisance.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889, page 3


    See advertisement of J. O. Johnson of Medford, who has $100,000 to loan at 6 percent.
    Charley Wolters, the Medford baker, was in town during the week with his nice delivery wagon.
    The basket picnic held by the Medford and Enterprise Sunday schools on Griffin Creek last Saturday was a very pleasant event. The attendance was good.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889, page 3


    Judge Willard Crawford, recently from Medford, has moved to this city, and formed a co-partnership with Judge DePeatt, at No. 45 Washington Street, for the practice of law. Both of the gentlemen have a large acquaintance throughout the state. They are a desirable addition to the population of the metropolis.--[Portland World.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
DUNCAN-HUTCHINSON--At the residence of Noah Allen in Eden precinct, May 24th, by M. V. B. Soule, J.P., Charles Duncan and Miss Mary Hutchinson.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Russ is visiting her old home at McMinnville.
    G. W. Isaacs is having a fine residence erected here.
    Medford will join the county seat in celebrating Independence Day.
    Fourteen carloads of freight were received at Medford in one day.
    Our citizens are subscribing liberally to a county fair fund in this vicinity.
    The machinery for the big grist mill is expected to arrive next week.
    J. O. Johnson has a large sum of money to loan at a very low rate of interest.
    A new arrival from Kansas is lying very sick at the Pioneer Restaurant.
    Numbers of fine fish have been caught in the ditch since the water was turned on.
    Burt Dickenson, who has been dangerously sick, is getting better. Dr. Danielson is in attendance.
    The strawberry festival on the evening of the 28th proved an enjoyable affair. The net proceeds amounted to a neat sum.
    Frank Galloway, one of our best citizens, would like to secure the appointment of deputy revenue collector for this district, and is well endorsed for the position. He would fill it acceptably and well.
    The city council has under consideration the proposition of Mr. Cornish to put water mains in Medford for supplying the city from Bear Creek, at a cost of $4800. The water is running in the ditch, and public sentiment is in favor of utilizing it to the utmost.
    The council last week elected M. Purdin to the vacant mayoralty, and he at once qualified and was sworn in. It is fortunate for the town that so clearer-headed and conservative a man, as Mr. Purdin has proved himself to be, should have been elected to so responsible a position. D. A. Huling was elected to the vacancy on the board caused by the promotion of Mr. Purdin.
    Dr. Lewis' fine trotter was severely injured the forepart of the week. The doctor was driving him towards the western portion of the county, and while on the bridge across Jackson Creek near Central Point, the horse got scared by a tramp suddenly emerging with his pack from under the structure, and jumped in the stream, tearing his tendons in a fearful manner.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889, page 3


FINE PHOTOGRAPHS.
----
    The Great Eastern Photo and Advertising Co. will be in Medford for two weeks only, commencing on May 27, 1889.
    All who desire pictures can now be supplied in the way of FIRST-CLASS PHOTOGRAPHS. Remember that a Thing of Beauty is a Joy Forever, and a good Picture of a dear friend is memory's greatest Souvenir. We are prepared to do just as fine picture work as can be done in San Francisco or Portland, at prices ranging from $3.50 to $4.50 for the best cabinet photos ever made in Rogue River Valley. Remember we do not tarry. When our time is up we go. And how often said and yet how true, that you will never miss the music until the sweet-voiced bird has flown.
    We guarantee satisfaction in every respect and give TWO SITTINGS. Don't think, because we are in tents, that we do inferior work, as this is not so. The best of light can be obtained in a tent if you know how to work them. From long experience in scientific photography, and with superior instruments, [we] can do as fine work as produced in the best photograph galleries. Positively we will be in this place but two weeks. Don't miss this chance; come and see for yourselves. Do not stop for rainy or cloudy weather, but come and bring the babies early in the day.
A CHANCE FOR THE LADIES.
    $10 in cash will be presented to the best lady subject out of 50, during our two weeks' stay in Medford. No work done on Sundays.
    Will be at Eagle Point for one week, commencing Monday, June 10, 1889.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889 et seq., page 3


$100,000 TO LOAN.
AT SIX PERCENT PER ANNUM. For particulars enquire of
J. O. JOHNSON,
Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889 et seq., page 3


Medford Items.
    The foundation for the front of the "new opera" was laid Wednesday.
    M. S. Miles, of Morrow County, an acquaintance of R. H. Halley, is in town with a view of locating here.
    Mrs. Sophia Helms, of San Francisco, a sister of C. W. Wolters, will arrive in a few days for a long visit with relatives here.
    G. H. Haskins, our popular druggist, has refitted his drug store and now has one of the finest arranged stores in the county.
    Willie Young, of Tacoma, W.T., an uncle of Fred Luy, is in Medford on a visit to his nephew. He likes our town very much and has concluded to remain here during this summer.
    Prof. J. E. Taylor has returned from an extended visit east and says he thinks more of Medford than any city he visited during his trip. He intends locating here and will have a fine residence erected during the summer.
    Geo. E. Youle, formerly of Ashland, who is now representing Arthur & Warner, wholesale machinists of Portland, spent a day in town this week. He was on his way to Lake County, where he will remain for some time in the interest of his company.
Ashland Tidings, May 31, 1889, page 2



    The question of a branch railroad to Jacksonville is much discussed, and it is probable that if such a road is built it will start from Central Point. Everything indicates a prosperous career for this thriving young town.
Excerpt, "The Town of Central Point," The West Shore, Portland, June 1889, page 327


    A ROLLER MILL FOR MEDFORD.--Work has been commenced on a roller mill of a daily capacity of sixty barrels, and it is expected that the mill will be ready to grind the coming crop. Power will be supplied at a cost of several thousand dollars, which will run the mill for at least eight months in the year. Steam will have to be relied upon at other times.
The West Shore, Portland, June 1889, page 348.  Steam ran the mill at all times.


An Ex-Convict's Trouble.
    Frank Warner had no sooner concluded a term in the pen than he burglarized a store at Medford and was arrested and taken to Jacksonville. He tried to escape from jail by burning that structure down. A big fire was kindled by himself and two other prisoners a few days ago and they came near going up with the jail.
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, June 3, 1889, page 4


O.T. Co. to Winnie Crosby, lot 10, blk 10, Medford; $50.
Plat of Whitney add. to town of Medford.
O.T. Co. to C. O. Damon, lots 3, 4, 5 and 6, blk 61, Medford; $110.
J. C. Cowles to J. S. Hagey, eight lots in blk 2, Park add. to Medford; $350.
Chas. Tice to Margaret Tice, lots 11 and 12, blk 11, Medford; $1000.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1889, page 2


Installation Services.
    On the evening of June 2d Rev. Eneas McLean was installed pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Medford. There was a large attendance. The sermon was preached by Rev. Robt. Ennis of Jacksonville. Rev. F. G. Strange of Ashland propounded the constitutional questions, giving the charge to the church. Rev. Robert McLean of Grants Pass gave the charge to the pastor. The Lord's Supper was observed in closing the services.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1889, page 3


    Citizens of Central Point, Medford and other places are subscribing liberally toward the Jacksonville celebration fund.
    We have so many calls for information concerning Southern Oregon that we this week publish on our first page an article descriptive of this section, collated from various sources.
    Although immigration has not yet set in toward Southern Oregon, still there are quite a number seeking for homes. There is no boom, but a steady change of real estate taking place.
    One of the finest pieces of growing barley in southern Oregon may be seen in Nickell's addition to Medford. There are over 30 acres of it, and it is estimated that it will yield about sixty bushels to the acre. This illustrates the productiveness of the soil, especially as the season has been unusually dry.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    L. Jones has removed to Josephine County.
    Medford is clamoring for new public school buildings.
    A council of Chosen Friends was organized here last week.
    H. von der Hellen took out naturalization papers on Tuesday last.
    The citizens of this place will celebrate our natal day with Jacksonville.
    Dr. Wait has returned to Medford after his visit to the Platte Valley, Neb.
    Rev. G. G. Thomas has resigned the pastorate of the Baptist Church in Medford.
    Strangers are numerous again in this section, and considerable real estate is changing hands.
    Charley Strang goes to Portland in July as our representative to the grand lodge of the A.O.U.W.
    We learn that the project of holding an agricultural fair at Medford has been abandoned for the present.
    Davis & France's fine, large mill building is finished, and the machinery will be received in a few days.
    Thos. Harlan of the Mail has accepted an invitation to deliver an address at the county seat on July 4th.
    Eight carloads of lumber from Rowe's mills in Josephine County arrived at Medford depot not long since.
    Innis & Dodson are busily at work on the Episcopal Church building, and the M.E. edifice is also under way.
    The Standard Oil Co.'s warehouse will be ready to supply all demands in a few days, Mr. Blanders, the Portland agent, informs us.
    J. D. Whitman and J. S. Howard attended the meeting of the southern Oregon district agricultural meeting at Grants Pass.
    The memorial exercises here on Decoration Day were of an unusually interesting character. The address of Wm. Gore was well spoken of.
    The vestry room of the Episcopal Church at this place is being pushed to completion and will be utilized for parochial meetings until the church is finished.
    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    Mrs. Susie M. West seems to be the most prominent candidate in the contest for Postmaster Miller's place. She would make an excellent official.
    No new firm has started out under better auspices for a long time than F. M. Mingus and T. A. Harris, who this week open up an agricultural implement warehouse in Medford.
    Our board of trade has appropriated $100 toward advertising the valley at the Milwaukee grand army encampment. Ashland has subscribed $150 toward the same purpose.
    Henry Klippel sold a choice lot in Nickell's addition in Medford this week to a carpenter named Trump, who will commence building a new residence at once. There are seven acres in the tract and $520 was paid for it.
    Frank Galloway, having sold his residence to Mrs. Lucinda Wilson and Clarinda Collins, has purchased the Harris property, held in trust by Judge Watson. Fourteen hundred dollars was the price paid for the last-named property.
    Persons desiring to see a nice piece of barley this dry season should feast their eyes on the 30 acres growing in Nickell's addition to this place. It shows what the soil there will produce, as it is good for about 60 bushels to the acre.
    Dr. Lewis, besides having his trotter badly injured last week, lost his veterinary tools and about $240 in gold. J. H. Thompson, who has Ragsdale's farm rented, also lost a horse by the episode, the animal he mounted in order to go to Mr. L.'s relief falling and breaking its neck.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1889, page 3


    J. O. Johnson, one of Medford's leading real estate agents, was here Tuesday on business.
    J. W. Mattox of Medford made us a call a few days since. He has lately built himself a neat residence.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1889, page 3


    The contest over the opening of the road petitioned for by G. Naylor and 123 others in Jacksonville and Medford precincts bids fair to be very interesting. The county court this week appointed T. Cameron, Phil. Gleaves and H. E. Ankeny viewers, to meet the county surveyor at the clerk's office on the 19th inst., and proceed to view and survey the proposed road. A heavy remonstrance will be filed, we learn, after the report of the viewers is in.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman informs us that the committee appointed to make arrangements for sending an exhibit of Southern Oregon products to Milwaukee [Wisc.], to be displayed during the meeting of the G.A.R., will convene at Medford on Wednesday next to arrange the preliminaries. No doubt this will attract much attention and do us much good.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
HASELTON-DIGNAM--In Medford, Just 1st, by Rev. G. G. Thomas, Allen L. Haselton and Miss Lorena Dignam, both of Eagle Point.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1889, page 3


Medford Items.
    Mrs. Stanley has let the contract for the erection of a brick building on her lot in the rear of the bank building. It will be 25x40 feet, one story high, fronting on C Street. G. W. Connell has the contract.
    Thos. McAndrews' new building on Main Street has been completed and is already occupied by Mingus and Harris. They have the largest stock of machinery, etc. of any house in Southern Oregon. Success to them.
    Messrs. Courtney, Gray and Randles of upper Butte Creek have each brought their spring clip of wool to market this week. They had no trouble disposing of it to parties here at 18ct. per pound.
    Haying is now in full blast throughout the valley, and good hands are in demand. The hay crop is better than for years.
    Born--In this city Wednesday, June 5th, to Mr. and Mrs. Chas. W. Wolters, a daughter, weight 11½ lbs. Mother and child both doing well and father, although very low at this writing, it is thought that he may recover.
    The authorities have made it a $10 penalty for riding or driving faster than a walk over the bridge across Bear Creek at this place.
    Burt Jones, the evangelist, is engaged in holding meetings at this place. He is an interesting speaker, being of the Sam P. Jones style, and draws good congregations each evening.
    The ice cream festival Wednesday evening in Childers' block was a great success. The hall was tastefully decorated, and the ice cream and strawberries were excellent. There was a large attendance, and everyone was well pleased.
    "Pap" Robinson was severely injured last Saturday by falling from the dray. Although no bones were broken he was bruised so badly as to confine him to his room several days.
Ashland Tidings, June 7, 1889, page 3


    The Medford Mail is responsible for the latest railway rumor. It reports that parties in the interest of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad are viewing a line from Ellensburg, Or., via the Applegate, thence to Jacksonville, Medford, Eagle Point and Deskins, thence to Fort Klamath, to learn the feasibility of a road through the pass at the head of the Rogue River and the Umpqua.
Oregonian, Portland, June 7, 1889, page 4


M. E. Beatty to J. C. Muhlenberg, lot 1, blk 4, Beatty's add. to Medford; $55.
M. E. Beatty to Basil Morris, lot 2, blk 4, Medford; $60.
F. Galloway to Lucinda L. Wilson, 1.23 acres in Medford; $1000.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1889, page 2


    Hot.
    It's smoky.
    Roads dusty.
    The warm weather is driving everyone into the mountains.
    The air is getting somewhat hazy, the result of fires in the mountains.
    G. Naylor this week sold forty acres of fine timber land near the valley to Roberts & O'Neil of Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    S. H. Murry has taken his band of sheep to the mountains.
    Teachers institute next Thursday. All teachers should make it a point to be present.
    Thomas Harlan will be one of the speakers at the Jacksonville Fourth of July celebration.
    Mr. France is of the opinion that the flouring mill will be ready for business by August 1st next.
    David Crosby of Medford was in town Tuesday, en route to Yaquina Bay, says the Roseburg Review.
    Prof. Finley Dixon and Miss Creed have obtained schools elsewhere and will not teach in Medford next season.
    The W.C.T.U. national organizer, Mrs. Skelton, lectured at the Presbyterian Church on the evening of the 6th inst.
    Fred H. Rowe of Leland spent several days in this place last week, on business connected with his extensive lumber yards here.
    The Medford district schools will be under the supervision of Prof. Crawford of McMinnville as principal, at a salary of $85 per month, next year.
    The total loss by the burning of the Edwards barn two weeks ago was 1200 bushels of grain, 8 tons of hay, a threshing machine and other implements, besides the loss on the building itself.
    The city council has contracted for the printing of a descriptive circular, 10,000 copies to be issued, setting forth the merits of Medford as a commercial center. Our people are never behind the times in such matters.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1889, page 3


BORN.
WOLTERS--In Medford, June 5th, to Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Wolters, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1889, page 3


Medford Items.
    I. A. Webb has almost completed the fine new residence of Henry Barneburg, near town.
    Mrs. W. I. Vawter is at Eugene, having gone down to visit relatives and attend the university commencement exercises.
    W. R. Porter, representing the well-known boot and shoe house of Porter, Slessinger & Co., was interviewing our merchants this week.
    The band boys will erect a grandstand near the depot in a few days. This will be nice, as the boys will then give us music quite often.
    Henry Smith is erecting a twenty-five-foot front building adjoining his store, and will use the two together, giving double the sized store he has now.
    Ed. Worman is building a large addition to his livery stable, their business having grown to such an extent that they are compelled to make more room.
    Miss Hattie Galloway is lying low with spinal meningitis at the home of her parents in this place. She was reported improving at last account, and her many friends hope to see her well again in a short time.
    The City Council, at its last regular meeting, created the office of night police and appointed W. G. Noble to fill the office. This is a move in the right direction, as we long have needed a good night watch, especially at this time of the year.
Ashland Tidings, June 14, 1889, page 2


M. S. Damon to W. I. Vawter, part of lot 10, blk 14, Medford; $900.
W. I .Vawter to Josiah N. Phillips, bond for deed for lot in Medford.
David Minnick to Catharine Minnick, lot in Broback's reserve, Medford; $100.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1889, page 2


    Ward Douglas, the well-known life insurance agent, is going to build a large hotel at Walla Walla, W.T. He is full of enterprise and will no doubt succeed in his project.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The infant child of Byron Bailey died last Saturday, aged one day.
    Rev. F. B. Ticknor of this place preached to a good-sized audience at Grants Pass last Sunday.
    Miss Hattie Galloway, who is quite ill with cerebrospinal meningitis, is reported somewhat better.
    A. A. Davis and family arrived from Minnesota this week and will become permanent residents of Medford. They were accorded a hearty welcome.
    The Jackson County teachers institute will convene at our public school building today and continue in session three days. It will no doubt prove a success.
    The machinery for Davis & France's grist mill has nearly all arrived and is rapidly being put into position. We will soon have the finest mill in southern Oregon.
    Dr. E. P. Geary left for the Willamette Valley on Sunday evening to attend the funeral of his aged mother, who died that day. He has the sympathy of all in his bereavement.
    The new Methodist Church in this place will be ready for occupancy about August 1st next, provided there is no further delay occasioned by lack of lumber. The tower is about roofed in.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1889, page 3


Medford Items.
    J. G. Grossman will also erect a brick this season.
    Attorney S. S. Pentz leaves Thursday morning for San Francisco, to be gone a week.
    Wm. Halley left this morning for Pendleton on a business visit. He will be gone about a month.
    There were fifty-two tickets sold here last Sunday morning for Colestin. Everyone reports having a nice time.
    Miss Elva Galloway returned from Eugene last Saturday, having been called home by the serious illness of her sister.
    Misses Ora Adkins, Jessie Worman and Mamie Jacobs intend going to Eugene this fall to attend the state university.
    Miss Hattie Galloway is still very low, but is improving slowly, and her many friends hope soon to see her well again.
    The machinery for the new grist mill has arrived, and has already been placed in position. Mr. Davis returned with his family Wednesday.
    Mrs. Dr. Lewis left Monday for Ohio on a visit with her parents. She will also visit her sister in Johnstown, Pa., who lost her husband and five children in the late flood at that place.
    Dr. Adkins and Mr. I. A. Webb will erect a two-story brick building, the excavation for which has already begun, 50x75 feet., on their lot on 7th Street. This will be another ornament to the place, as it will be well built and nicely furnished.
    Everett Mingus, now in the employ of G. H. Haskins, will leave for Philadelphia about the first of September, to enter upon a two years' course in pharmacy. He is one of our most promising boys, and we bespeak for him a good record in his new field.
Ashland Tidings, June 21, 1889, page 2


L. C. Minnick to E. J. Montague, lots 5 and 6 in blk 26, Medford; $300.
C. C. Beekman to John R. Evans, lot 6 in blk 56 in Medford; $100.
J. I. Knight to trustees M.E. Church, lot in Phipps reserve, Medford; $150.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1889, page 2


    The stage on the mail line between here and Medford has been painted by Cress & Fischer and presents a very nice appearance.
    We are glad to learn that there are only two cases of spinal meningitis in the county--Miss Hattie Galloway of Medford still being afflicted with it; also a child of Prof. Dean of Wagner Creek.
    Owing to the illness of School Superintendent Mitchell and the excessively warm weather, the teachers' institute at Medford last week held but two short sessions and adjourned. Another institute will be arranged for during the latter part of the summer, we learn.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Bond election next Monday. Don't fail to vote aye.
    A daughter was born to J. N. Walter and wife on the 18th.
    The trustees have raised liquor license to $400 per annum.
    A brother of Dr. Adkins arrived from Indiana last week, accompanied by his family.
    Miss Louise Follett of New York is paying her father, S. R. Follett of this place, a visit.
    J. G. Grossman is preparing to build a brick business house on his lots on Main Street.
    H. C. Stock of Eden precinct, a good workman, has several building contracts at this place.
    Henry Smith's store not furnishing room enough, an addition is being built thereto, on S. H. Hull's lot.
    Dr. Lewis' fine trotter, who was seriously injured by jumping off a culvert near Central Point, is recovering.
    Prof. Crawford of McMinnville, who will be principal of our school during the coming scholastic year, comes well recommended.
    Messrs. Adkins and Webb are pushing things on their new two-story brick building on 7th Street, which will be 50x75 feet in size.
    A number of teachers met here last week, but the institute did not last as long as advertised, although one interesting session was held.
    The mechanics are putting in the elevator and conveyor system in the new grist mill, which will soon be ready to handle the crops in this vicinity.
    The entertainment given at Howard's hall by the young folks of Jacksonville, assisted by the Silver Cornet Band of that place, was much of a success and netted nearly $30.
    The Standard Oil Co.'s warehouse here is ready for business and will be a convenience to those desiring coal oil in this county, besides saving considerable freight, as the company ships by the carload to this point.
    The widely felt Johnstown disaster came personally home to Mrs. Lewis of this place, who had a sister living in the ill-fated town, whom the flood robbed of her husband and three little children. Mrs. L. is now visiting the bereaved woman in her eastern home.
    The board of trustees have called an election for July 1, 1889, for the purpose of voting on the proposition to issue bonds and raise money thereon, for establishing water works and making other improvements. We learn that a majority of our citizens favor the project.
    J. C. Elder, who refused to comply with our ordinance requiring business men to take out a license, was again brought before the town recorder and fined. He has appealed the case to the circuit court, where the validity of the aforesaid law will be fully tested. Judge Prim represents the town.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1889, page 3


    H. B. Reed, the combination fence man, who is a resident of The Dalles, spent awhile last week at Helman's White Sulphur Springs in Ashland. He is troubled with rheumatism, which the waters of the spring greatly alleviate.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1889, page 3


    J. K. Fisher and family departed Monday for Medford, Oregon, where they intend to make their future home.
"Our County Mirror: Caldwell," Waukesha (Wisconsin) Freeman, June 27, 1889, page 5


    The Medford Band has been induced to come to Ashland for the 4th, and a large number of Medford residents will spend the day here, and, we trust, will be hospitably entertained by our citizens.
"Fourth of July!"
Ashland Tidings, June 28, 1889, page 2


Medford Items.
    Henry V. Helms, who has been in the employ of Chas. W. Wolters for the past eight months, left Monday for 'Frisco.
    The work on the Opera House and J. G. Grossman's new building is progressing rapidly.
    Poe & Co. and Childers & Son each finished burning a large kiln of brick last week. The demand for brick is so great that they will erect another kiln at once.
    Mrs. C. O. Damon, who has been visiting her parents at Elkton for the past two weeks, is expected home next Monday morning.
    The band boys intend giving an ice cream and necktie festival in the Childers hall this (Friday) evening. This is the first entertainment given by the band, and it should be well patronized.
    James Brandenburg and George Isaacs each have their fine residences on 6th Street nearly completed.
    The benefit entertainment Tuesday evening in Howard's hall by the Jacksonville young folks was well attended and approved by everyone present. The declamation of Wm. L. Miller was a general favorite and was exceedingly well delivered. The "Tramp's Story" by E. R. Reames was also well rendered. The most enjoyable part of the program was the Broom Brigade. The Jacksonville band furnished some excellent music at intervals during the evening and, taken all together, it was one of the most enjoyable entertainments that has visited us for a long time. We hope the time is not far distant when we may be allowed another treat of the same kind.
Ashland Tidings, June 28, 1889, page 2


Teachers' Institute.
    The call for a teachers' institute for Jackson County to be held at Medford, June the 20th, 21st and 22d, was responded to by about thirty teachers from various parts of the county. Supt. H. H. Mitchell being ill, Prof. G. H. Watt was appointed deputy and succeeded at a late hour on Thursday in appointing a committee for Friday's program. The subjects assigned were as follows: "Arithmetic," Levi S. Loomis, Woodville; "Primary Reading," Prof. J. S. Sweet, Ashland; "Language Lessons," Miss Hattie Newbury, Jacksonville; "Composition," S. C. Sherrill, Woodville; "Geography," Prof. G. H. Watt, Jacksonville; "Educational Psychology," Prof. J. S. Sweet, Ashland; "Morals," Rev. E. McLean, Medford. We have been unable to get a complete report of the proceedings, but understand that all acquitted themselves creditably, considering the fact that no one had been notified to prepare upon any subject, and that the efforts were all impromptu. No session was held on Saturday. There is no reason why Jackson County could not have a good county institute, and we understand that a committee has been appointed to prepare a suitable program for the one next year.
Ashland Tidings, June 28, 1889, page 3


    The Vigor of Life concert company, traveling southward, gave a concert at Medford, but, from some family row, quit the business before reaching Ashland. They went to 'Frisco, but said they would be back to begin here again.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 28, 1889, page 3


    The citizens of Medford will vote next Monday, July 1st, upon the proposition to bond the city for $20,000, to construct water works.
Ashland Tidings, June 28, 1889, page 3



Low Water.
    The streams everywhere are lower than ever known in the history of this section since first settled by white men, at this season of the year. Rogue River itself is a mere creek compared with its usual June volume, while Bear Creek is well-nigh dry, and the lesser tributaries are but reminiscences of water courses.
Excerpt,
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1889, page 1


Jos. Teeson to Priscilla S. Brown, lot 12, blk 16, Medford; $75.
Plat of the Nickell addition to Medford, Ogn.
H. G. Cooper to Margetta Cooper, lots 4, 5 & 6 in blk 10, Medford; $500.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1889, page 2


    Southern Oregon has had no boom save the construction of the railway main line and opening up of that region to secure the settlement of the country and opening up of its wonderful resources. But now we hear more railroad building is to be commenced. A letter from headquarters of the Oregon & California Railroad says a road is under consideration from Grants Pass to Crescent City, in California. That route will open up some good country down the coast and do a good work for all who are within reach of the route. This will be a beginning only, and there will follow feeders in every direction to bring the whole region into connection with the Southern Pacific's system.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1889, page 3


A Strong Team.
    Peter Henderson and Fred Luy, Jr., both popular and expert tonsorial artists, have formed a partnership and will hereafter be found in the barber shop opposite the Grand Central Hotel at Medford. If you want a nice, clean shave or shampoo, or your hair cut in a fashionable, scientific manner, give them a call.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1889, page 3


    It was with sincere regret that the community heard of the death of Elder Martin Peterson at his home in Central Point on Tuesday. He was taken with inflammation of the bowels upon returning home from a pastoral visit to Josephine County last Monday morning, and died on Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock. The funeral took place yesterday from the Baptist Church in Central Point. We will publish an extended obituary in our next issue.
"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. H. Redfield of Linkville, formerly of this place, has been visiting friends here.
    Mr. Kennedy and family, who have been residents of this place for some time, have removed to lower Applegate.
    Mr. Baker, lately of this place, has accepted a position in J. W. Howard's general merchandise store at Grants Pass.
    Will. Farra is lying quite ill at the residence of his mother Mrs. Starr, and it is feared that he is afflicted with cerebrospinal meningitis.
    J. G. Wiley was at the county seat on Monday making arrangements to put his soda fountain on the celebration grounds on the 4th.
    Medford now has four churches and two more in course of construction. The attendance is good at all of them, which speaks well for our community.
    After the quarterly meeting services last Sunday, Presiding Elder Wilson united in matrimony W. B. Adkins and Miss Mate V. Creed of Medford precinct, who received the congratulations of their many friends during the day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1889, page 3


Medford Soda Works.
    Persons desiring soda water of all kinds in quantities to suit can leave their orders with John Dyar or the undersigned and they will be filled promptly. Families also furnished at the most reasonable rates.
W. L. WEBSTER, Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
ADKINS-CREED--At Medford, June 30th, by Presiding Elder Wilson, Rev. W. B. Adkins and Miss Mate V. Creed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1889, page 3


    Enyart Bros., of the North Side Grocery, have sold their grocery store to Mr. Dan'l Zook, and Mr. Jess Enyart will start with his family in a couple of weeks to Medford, Oregon, where he will locate permanently.
Logansport Journal, Indiana, July 9, 1889, page 8


David Lumsden to Samuel Danielson, lots 4 and 13, block 1, Lumsden's add. to Medford; $190.
E. S. Hamlin to D. T. Lawton, lots 1 and 2, block 54, Medford; $275.
M. S. Damon to Chas. Strang, lot 4, block 16, Medford; $250.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Invest in Nickell's addition to Medford.
    B. S. Webb soon takes charge of his new residence in Barr's addition.
    Work has been begun on a  $1500 residence for Rev. M. A. Williams.
    We indulged in a creditable display of fireworks on the evening of the 4th.
    Julius Goldsmith, the grocer, spent the 4th of July at his old home in Eugene City.
    S. R. Follett, the popular dealer in furniture, spent a day at the county seat lately.
    Chas. Strang has contracted for a neat residence to be built on C Street, to cost $1000.
    Geo. Yaudes is again a resident of this place, having returned from Sterlingville lately.
    Col. Jacob Johnson of Trail Creek precinct has bought a lot in Medford and will hereafter reside here.
    The recent necktie festival given under the auspices of the Medford brass band was an enjoyable event.
    Will. Farra, who was stricken with spinal meningitis, is recovering steadily. Dr. Pryce is in attendance.
    H. H. Wolters, the clever mixologist, was in Jacksonville a few days since, accompanied by his sister, Mrs. Sophia Helms.
    The water in the Medford ditch was raised considerably by the cloudburst in Wagner Creek district Tuesday evening.
    Frank X. Musty is now a resident of Trail Creek precinct, having last week bought Col. Johnson's fine place on Rogue River.
    This place was well represented at the Jacksonville celebration, and everyone returned home well pleased with the hospitality extended them.
    Mr. Wallace, a recent arrival, has purchased the brickyard of Poe & Brantner near town, and will continue the manufacture of a superior quality of brick.
    Parties desiring to invest in cheap tracts of land adjoining Medford should take a peep at Nickell's addition to this town. They are both cheap and desirable.
    The proposed road, which would have placed this place in direct connection with the Griffin Creek country, was "knocked out" at the last term of the county court.
    A party, consisting of J. H. Faris and family, Walter Scott and family and John Jones and wife, are taking the usual summer trip to Crater Lake, having left Medford for a ten days' outing on Tuesday of last week.
    The Fourth was rendered memorable to a number of persons directly interested at Medford by a pleasant double wedding at the residence of Rev. E. McLean on that day. One of the contracting couples were Mr. A. L. Penwell and Miss Lillie J. Manwell, and the other couple Mr. E. A. Johnson and Miss Frances I. J. Manwell.
    The question of issuing bonds for water works in Medford was sensibly and emphatically decided in the affirmative at the election held on Monday, July 1st, 121 out of 142 votes cast being in favor of the proposition. It is said that they will be floated at an early day at a premium of 2 percent, when we may look for an effective water system to be in operation here.
    After wavering betwixt life and death for many weeks, the end came for Miss Hattie Galloway last Thursday. The terrible suffering incident to meningitis was endured patiently, and death was but a relief from unendurable agony. Deceased was a leader in our social life and will be sadly missed by her large circle of friends. Her family, whom misfortune has thus visited, have the sincere sympathy of all. The funeral from the Baptist Church last Friday was largely attended.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 3


    Forest fires are reported from every side in the hills surrounding the valley.
    Such dry, warm weather was never experienced in Southern Oregon before.
    The fireworks at Medford and Jacksonville last Thursday evening were quite attractive, viewed from the foothills.
    Capt. A. L. Kidder of Meadows precinct was here on Tuesday. He has been assisting in the construction of the Medford flouring mills.
    The first peach shipments from the valley went north last week, and despite the dry weather, there will be much fruit sent out by our orchardists this season.
    The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of Jackson County filed articles of incorporation with the secretary of state last week,  Trustees, J. H. Russell, G. W. Isaacs and S. J. Day.
    Among the notable figures at the Jacksonville celebration last Thursday was that of the patriarch Jesse Wilson, of Medford precinct, now nearly 91 years of age, but still hale and hearty as many men twenty years his junior.
    We are sorry to learn that Faris & Co. of Medford, who proposed to engage extensively in the manufacture of lime in Jackson Creek district, have given up the project for the present, the quarry on their land not proving as extensive as expected.
    E. G. Hurt, formerly of this place but at present of Medford, writes that his mother-in-law, Mrs. McClain, who had the misfortune to fall down a pair of stairs on the 15th of last July, has ever since been a helpless invalid.--[Gold Beach Gazette.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 3


    M. E. Beatty, the well-known real estate agent, is now a resident of Portland, with headquarters at the Holton House.
    Amos Miller, of Plymouth, Marshall County, Indiana, brother-in-law of O. Harbaugh of this place, was visiting in the valley last week and inspecting our resources from the crop and timber standpoint. Coming from a state where hoop-poles are the principal timber, Mr. Miller was naturally strongly impressed with the giant pines and firs of Oregon.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 3


    Julius Goldsmith of Medford was in town yesterday, looking for fruit.
    Many newcomers are still arriving in Southern Oregon, a goodly portion of whom find locations.
    Vegetables are not so plentiful this year as usual, water for irrigating purposes being rather scarce.
    The hegira to the mountains has commenced in earnest. The mountain resorts are well patronized.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
WILSON-GRIFFIN--At the residence of the officiating minister on July 4, by Rev. C. H. Hoxie, J. L. Wilson and Miss Josephine Griffin.
PENWELL-MANWELLE--At the residence of the officiating minister, July 4th, by Rev. E. McLean, A. L. Penwell and Miss Lillie J. Manwelle.
JOHNSON-MANWELLE--At the residence of the officiating minister, on July 4, by Rev. E. McLean, E. A. Johnson and Miss Frances I. J. Manwelle.
DIED.
GALLOWAY--At Medford, July 4, of cerebrospinal meningitis, Miss Hattie Galloway, aged 16 years.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 3


    It is terrible to be "just famous enough to have your name spelled wrong in the paper." Medford has just been located in Grant County by the Portland Oregonian.
    Dr. Geary of Halsey on last Thursday removed the remains of his sister from the graveyard near Brownsville to Eugene, where he reinterred them by the side of other relatives buried there, says the Albany Herald
of June 26th. On digging into the grave the corpse, which had been buried over twenty-four years, was found to still retain some features by which it could be recognized.
"General Notes and News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 4


Medford Items.
    Sam. Furry is erecting a large new dwelling on his fine farm east of town.
    Chas. Strang left Monday for Portland to attend the A.O.U.W. grand lodge at that city.
    Wm. Edwards has started his threshing outfit already, which is perhaps the first one to start in the valley.
    Mrs. M. E. Beatty, of Portland, is visiting her mother of this place. She expects to remain about two months.
    E. Peil, of this place, now a resident of Sacramento, is in town this week looking after his real estate interests near here.
    H. E. Battin, the well-known commission merchant of Portland, is in the valley this week looking after the coming fruit crop.
    A great deal of interest was shown here in the Sullivan-Kilrain fight, although but very little money changed hands on the result.
    E. G. Hurt has sold his fence business at this place to Messrs. Galloway and Barr for $1350. He intends starting in business again in Lake County.
    Not enough rain fell here during the showers of Monday and Tuesday to lay the dust, although very heavy rains fell around us. Tuesday evening Bear Creek raised over eight feet in an hour at this place, the result of heavy rains on Wagner Creek. Great damage is reported in that locality both in grain and fruit crops. One section of the trestle near Talent washed out, causing a delay in the passenger train of six hours, awaiting repairs. The train backed down to the depot here, and the passengers enjoyed themselves looking over town until the track was repaired.

Ashland Tidings, July 12, 1889, page 2


IN MEMORIAM.
    It is seldom that a good man is more generally missed from his accustomed haunts than is Martin Peterson, whose sudden death was chronicled last week. He was a central figure in the community, about whom were attracted those who appreciate the better ways of life, and revere goodness for its own sake. Simple and unassuming of manner, diligent in season and out of season in his Master's work, making no promise that he could not fulfill, he was ever ready to mourn with the sorrowing, to sympathize with the distressed and rejoice with those who rejoiced. For twenty-five years he has labored in his chosen field with the zeal of an apostle, visiting the sick, admonishing the unwary; ever ready to respond to the cry of his parishioners in their need. For a quarter of a century he has officiated at the baptismal font, the marriage rite, the funeral obsequies of a large district--a veritable minister of grace. Two generations have listened to his teachings and will cherish his memory as one of the elect of earth, who have "rendered with their precepts less the sum of human wretchedness." Born of sturdy pioneer parentage in the state of Indiana in October, 1820, and becoming a pioneer of this coast himself when in the meridian of life, he lived to see the fruition of his hopes and the full appreciation of his ministration by his parishioners, and died in the happy reflection resulting from having consistently followed out the course prescribed by his Master, as he was permitted to see it. He was stricken while in the pulpit, expounding the Word, but lived to reach his home and died, surrounded by his family, on Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock, July 3d. If his faith was well-founded--and who can say that it was not--he but goes from sounding his Master's praise on earth, to singing hosannas in heaven. The cortege which followed his remains to the place of interment was one of the largest funeral processions seen for many months in the valley. May his ashes rest in peace; his soul has but gone to its reward.
A FRIEND.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1889, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. S. Griffis has become a permanent resident of this place.
    J. N. Phillips, the attorney, was at Ashland Monday evening on business.
    E. G. Hurt intends establishing a combination fence manufactory in Lake County.
    Thos. Harlan has gone to his land claim on Rogue River, where a portion of his family is located for the present.
    C. O. Damon is at Jacksonville, putting the furniture, carpets, etc. Follett & Fowler recently sold to John A. Love in place.
    When you are in Medford visit Charley Brous at the Railroad Exchange, who keeps the best of everything in his line and never fails to please all who call.
    Dr. C. Minnis of Roseburg has sold his residence in this place, for $350, to E. J. Montague, lately of Douglas County, who also purchased the two lots adjoining of Paul Chartrand.
    H. Klippel, the live real estate agent of Medford, reports the following sales during the past week: J. F. Ragsdale to J. A. Cochran, 100 acres near Tolo. Consideration, $1000. Chas. Nickell to Jacob Johnson, lot in Medford. $50.
    The only son of Julius Goldsmith and wife died at this place Tuesday morning and was buried in the Jewish cemetery at Jacksonville, the following day, a large number of our people being in attendance. Rabbi Jacobs of Jacksonville officiated at the ceremonies.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1889, page 2


    Be careful of fire.
    P. Foster and his son Ed. were in town last Tuesday, having come up from Medford in the forenoon.
    Jack Montgomery went to Grants Pass this week, but will return soon. He is now residing on O. Harbaugh's farm near Medford with his family.
    S. S. Pentz of Medford, who was Harry Hoover's attorney, was on his way to the county seat last Friday to sue out a writ of habeas corpus in behalf of his client when he heard of his death.
    John Orth of this place and Hanley & Wilkinson of Medford this week received 40 head of fine young cattle from Clopton & Potter of Bonanza, Klamath County. They were on the road about a week.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1889, page 3


    R. L. Ish came in on Tuesday morning with a detachment of soldiers from Fort Klamath, to escort the paymaster and inspector general of the Department of the Columbia to Fort Klamath from Medford. The party took the Rogue River route to the fort, much the pleasantest route for traveling at this season.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1889, page 3


DIED.
JACKSON--In Medford, Wednesday, July 10th, Alfred H. Jackson, a native of Vermont.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1889, page 3


Medford Items.
    Wm. and John Olwell, of Phoenix, have both been very sick with fever, but are now improving under the skillful treatment of Dr. Pryce.
    Mrs. Dr. Lewis returned from his extended visit East last Tuesday.
    T. W. Johnson was called to Colusa, Cal. Monday by the serious illness of his father.
    The health is better in town now than for some time. A few cases of fever are still reported, but all are improving.
    E. M. Farnam, who has been over in Del Norte County, Cal. for some time, returned Tuesday. He sold quite a number of pianos and organs on the trip.
    The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Goldsmith died Tuesday of inflammation of the bowels. The interment took place Monday in Jacksonville Cemetery. The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of many friends in their sad bereavement.
    Capt. Carpenter, commander at Ft. Klamath, came in with an escort this week to meet a party from Vancouver, who are taking a pleasure trip to Crater Lake. The party was composed by General Inspector J. C. Machlenberg and wife and child, Paymaster S. Summer and wife and H. S. Hostetter. They will be gone about a month.

Ashland Tidings, July 19, 1889, page 2


OFFICERS OF MEDFORD LODGE.
    No. 83, installed July 5, 1889, by D.D.G.M. Helman:
    M. Purdin, N.G.; W. H. Gore, V.G.; E. B. Pickel, R.S.; B. S. Webb, P.S.: L. L. Angle, Treas.; F. Amann, Warden; S. Rosenthal, Cond.; H. G. Kinney, I.G.; I. A. Webb, R.S.N.G.; L. W. Johnston, L.S.N.G.; E. P. Geary, R.S.V.G.; W. I. Vawter, L.S.V.G.; S. B. McGee, O.S.; A. C. Nicholson, R.S.S.; L. M. Lyon, L.S.S.
"I.O.O.F. Installations," Ashland Tidings, July 19, 1889, page 3


I. J. Phipps to J. N. Banks, lot 4, blk
58, Medford; $25.
J. N. Banks to Mary D. Allen, same property; $235.
Mary D. Allen to Jacob Johnson, land in Medford; $600.
G. W. Howard to Mary R. Phelps, bond for lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 3, Medford; $1200.
O.&T. Co. to Standard Oil Co. of Iowa, lot 3, blk 33, Medford; $30.
Sarah A. Bateman to Rose Bateman, lots 1 and 2, blk 31, Medford; $60.
Same to
Ida Bateman, lot 7 and 8, blk 18, Medford; $500.
Paul Chartrand to E. J. Montague, lots 7 and 8, blk 26, Medford; $100.
O.&T. Co. to Mrs. Malinda Haught, lots 6 and 7, blk 45, Medford; $100.
O.&T. Co. to Samuel R. Follett et al., lots 1, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, block 33, Medford; $240.
Same to D. T. Lawton, lot 10, blk 12, Medford; $100.
Chas. Nickell to Jacob Johnson, lot 3, blk 58, Medford; $50.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889, page 2


    Peddlers, corn doctors, scissors grinders and like itinerants, to say nothing of the genus tramp, never were so numerous in southern Oregon as now.
    Chas. J. Howard of Grants Pass, who is surveying for the railroad company, bought some horses at Medford a few days since and is now at work in the vicinity of Roseburg.
    Grain warehouse charges will be the same as last year. Good merchantable wheat is quoted at 55 cents, barley at 40 cents, and oats at 37½ cents per bushel, respectively, by H. E. Baker.
    Judge DePeatt, who has been in the valley for the past week, in company with his partner, Judge Crawford, returned north yesterday. The firm have decided to leave Portland and locate at Athena, better known as Centerville, a growing town in Umatilla County.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Wes. Johnson was called to California last week by the serious illness of his father.
    J. G. Grossman, the well-known wheelwright, is occupying his fine brick building on Seventh Street.
    Geo. W. Isaacs' fine two-story brick residence is nearing completion. It is one of the nicest in town.
    H. E. Baker is getting his warehouse ready for the storing and shipping season, and will no doubt do a big business.
    According to Judge Webster's decision in the Elder case, our ordinance authorizing the levying of a license tax is void.
    Geo. S. Howard has built himself a dwelling house in Medford, and removed here with his family this week to permanently reside.
    J. C. Elder of this place, who was fined for refusing to pay his town tax, appealed to the circuit court for a writ of review and won the case.
    Thos. Morine, lately of Redding, Cal., is in this section and will probably locate here. He recently conducted a large feed and sale stable at the county seat of Shasta County.
    Frank Stuttz and Sandy Hauser of this place were the victims of the train robbery near Sacramento last week, the former losing the contents of his pockets and the latter a valuable watch.
    Arthur Wilson, while boring a well on his place near the foot of Roxy Ann, last week struck a two-foot vein of coal at a depth of 50 feet. This is the thickest vein so far discovered in the county.
    The following is a list of the officers of Medford lodge No. 83 [I.O.O.F.], which were recently installed by A. D. Helman, D.D.G.M.: M. Purdin, N.G.; W. H. Gore, V.G.; E. B. Pickel, R.S.; B. S. Webb, P.S.: L. L. Angle, Treas.; F. Amann, Warden; S. Rosenthal, Cond.; H. G. Kinney, I.G.; I. A. Webb, R.S.N.G.; L. W. Johnson, L.S.N.G.; E. P. Geary, R.S.V.G.; W. I. Vawter, L.S.V.G.; S. B. McGee, O.S.; A. C. Nicholson, R.S.S.; L. M. Lyon, L.S.S.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889, page 3


    The business card of J. N. Phillips, attorney at law, Medford, Or., appears under head of "new this week." Business entrusted to him will receive careful attention.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889, page 3


    Wm. Jones, living near Medford, has been prostrated for some time with typho-malarial fever. Dr. Pryce of Medford is attending him, and the worst stage of the disease is past.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889, page 3


J. N. PHILLIPS,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
Medford, Oregon.
Office in Phillips & Jackson's block on C Street.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889 et seq., page 3


    In the case of the City of Medford vs. J. C. Elder, appealed from the recorder's court of Medford, Judge Webster last Saturday reversed  the decision of the lower court. J. C. Elder, who is doing business in Medford as a merchant, refused to pay the license required by the city laws. He was arraigned before the recorder for violation of the city ordinance, convicted and sentenced to a term of imprisonment in the calaboose. Judge Webster reversed the decision of the lower court upon the ground, chiefly, that the city charter of Medford doesn't give authority for imprisoning a man in such a case. Possibly the Medford authorities will find some other manner of effective legal penalty for the violation of their license ordinance.
    Dodge Bros. bored through a vein of good coal in sinking a well on the farm of Mr. Wilson, east of Medford. The Mail concludes that this is the first strike of coal in the county, but it is mistaken. Good coal has been found in various places in Jackson County in years past, the first about twenty years ago, but no prospecting of consequence has been done. Judge Tolman has spent some money in prospecting a coal land claim in the foothills east of Bear Creek, but did not prosecute the search to a satisfactory conclusion, though the prospects were good. It costs money to prospect coal fields in this  country. The Mail will have to get over the idea that such things have never been thought of in this country till this year, or that discoveries which it happens to hear of recently are all raw and new. It made the same mistake in announcing the discovery of "the first marble ledge found in Southern Oregon" a short time ago; whereas J. H. Russell quarried out marble in Josephine County and sawed it, chiseled it and carved it into tombstones here in Ashland twenty years ago.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 26, 1889, page 3


An Insane Man.
    John M. Otter of Medford was brought to the asylum today. His age is twenty-three years and he is very weak. He believes he is a pugilist and insists that the title of champion of the pugilists is vested in him.
Evening Capital Journal,
Salem, July 31, 1889, page 4


    Work has commenced on the fine brick structures Dr. Adkins and I. A. Webb propose building.
    We learn that there is an abundance of blackberries and huckleberries at the head of Rogue River, which attracts many tourists to that section, as it is quite a desideratum to be able to put up the winter's supply of fruit, in a year of scarcity like the present, in addition to obtaining mountain air, water and scenery.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1889, page 1


    W. L. Webster's soda works at Linkville are well patronized by every portion of the county. Mr. W. will bring his family from Jackson County in the near future, to permanently reside.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1889, page 2


Seriously Hurt.
    On Monday morning last, at about daylight, Ashland people were startled at the report that Max Brentano of Medford had been robbed and foully dealt with. He was found lying on the railroad track two miles south of Ashland, in a semi-conscious condition, with several bad bruises and contusions on his body, his clothing badly torn and his watch and pocketbook missing. Louis Pankey first discovered him and Chas. W. Logan and Sheriff Birdsey went after him as soon as the news was received, and brought him to Ashland, whence he was conveyed to Medford on Tuesday evening. He is recuperating from his injuries under medical treatment at the latter place. Mr. B. was seen on the night before fully five miles from Ashland on the railroad at about 11 o'clock, and stated when found in the morning that he "started for the mountains." He was evidently suffering from a temporary aberration of mind and his clothing bore evidences of long continued wandering, being badly torn where he had crawled through a wire fence, apparently. The fact that his watch was missing led to the conclusion that he had been robbed while unconscious. A pair of sleeve buttons and a gold ring were still on his person when found, and he says himself he lost his watch.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1889, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dave Crosby no longer is a fixture of Medford.
    France & Davis will soon have their new mill running.
    Almost half the population of Medford are seeking recreation in the mountains.
    H. E. Baker's new residence is about completed, and will be a handsome one.
    Vernon Phillips left Medford last week for Puget Sound to investigate timber land.
    A. G. Johnston and family of Medford are sojourning at the McAllister soda springs.
    Rev. F. B. Ticknor and Ira Phelps have embarked in the job printing business at Medford.
    J. N. Phillips, the attorney, and Mrs. Jennie Bailey were made one at Yreka, Cal., recently.
    Ira Phelps has resumed charge of the job printing office recently, conducted by Vernon Phillips.
    E. A. Hoag will visit his aged parents east of the Rockies this summer and will be absent several months.
    E. J. Montague is building an addition to his residence north of the Catholic Church, recently owned by Dr. Minnis.
    It is rumored that M. A. Brentano has leased the Grand Central Hotel, but will continue to manage the saloon annex.
    Mrs. Hazel, lately of Minnesota, is now in this place, and may become one of the proprietors of the Clarenden Hotel, now so successfully managed by J. N. Fanning.
    The M.E. Church building in this place is nearly completed and presents a neat appearance. Cress & Fischer of Jacksonville, the expert mechanics, will commence painting it next week.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1889, page 2


Rose S. Robinson to D. T. Lawton, lot 11, blk 13, Medford; $
300.
M. P. Phipps to A. and S. Childers, lot 20, blk 21, Medford; $250.
Nannie Barr to E. J. Montague, lot 3, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford; $500.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1889, page 2


    The weather has moderated somewhat.
    D. W. Crosby, who has been a resident of this place and Medford for a long time, has gone to Washington Territory, but is not likely to stay long.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart has resigned his position as a member of the state agricultural board for southern Oregon, and Gov. Pennoyer will be called upon to fill the vacancy.
    The Medford Mail tells the boss fish story of the season when it says that "Tom Kahler caught forty-five trout in forty-five minutes, some of which were a foot long." We submit that this is taxing human credulity too far--the length of the minutes, we mean.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1889, page 3


More Patients for the Asylum.
    SALEM, Or., July 31.--John Notter, of Medford, was brought to the asylum today. He came to Medford three months ago, and imagines he is a noted pugilist. He is aged 23 years.
Oregonian, Portland, August 1, 1889, page 1


Medford Items.
    Chas. Strang's new dwelling on South C Street is fast nearing completion.
    The new M.E. church is nearly ready for the plastering. It is to be well finished throughout, and when completed will be a great credit to the town.
    A Mr. Hazel, late of Minnesota, has leased the Grand Central Hotel and took charge yesterday.
    The brick work on the opera house has reached the top of the third story, and the carpenters are now engaged framing the crosses for the roof.
    The foundation of the Webb & Adkins new building is nearly completed, and the brick work will begin Monday.
    Henry Griffis, of Gold Hill, was in town Wednesday. He reports doing a good business with his new sawmill.
    The new grist mill steamed up for the first time on Tuesday. They will begin grinding the first of next week. Medford can now boast of the finest roller mill in Southern Oregon.

Ashland Tidings, August 2, 1889, page 3


    A few days ago Max Brentano, of Medford, was found lying on the railroad track two miles south of Ashland in a semi-conscious condition, with several bad bruises and contusions on his body, his clothing badly torn and his watch and pocketbook missing. He was evidently suffering from a temporary aberration of mind and his clothing bore evidence of long continued wandering, being badly torn where he had crawled through a wire fence. The fact that his watch was missing led to the conclusion that he had been robbed while unconscious.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, August 5, 1889, page 7


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The cool weather is bringing in mountain tourists.
    The M.E. Church edifice will soon be completed and ready for occupancy.
    N. H. Spencer of Griffin Creek delivered the first wheat at the new mill last week.
    The work of roofing on Angle & Plymale's new building has been going on the past week.
    Mr. Stinnett and family departed for the Willamette Valley to locate last week, traveling by team.
    Postmaster Miller and wife and brother-in-law, Chas. Brous, are sojourning at Dead Indian Springs.
    Davis & France are receiving wheat at their new mill. They will soon have a warehouse in operation also.
    The new dwellings of H. E. Baker and Chas. Strang add much to the appearance of the residence portion of town.
    The ladies of the Medford W.C.T.U. gave a pleasant lawn social at the residence of Mrs. Stanley last Friday evening.
    A. Z. Sears is preparing to build a neat residence in a few weeks on his 8-acre tract west of the tank, near the Jacksonville road.
    W. D. Bain of this place, who has been engaged in harvesting about Marysville, Cal., has returned to Medford, and now has a berth at Worman's stables.
    Jesse Enyart and family, just out from Indiana, visited the family of J. Hutchinson this week. The newcomers intend to establish a permanent residence in this valley.
    The new board of trade pamphlet descriptive of Medford and surroundings is being issued from the Mail office and is spoken of by that paper as being a credit to the printer's art.
    Dr. E. B. Pickel's team escaped from him last Thursday night, upsetting his buggy near Col. Ross' place, and were captured next morning, "hung up" on a tree. But little damage was done beyond a broken buggy tongue.
    On Monday's train a fine stock dealer unloaded an extra good cow of the Durham breed of cattle and a fine trotting horse at this place which he will exhibit at the district fair to be held at Central Point during the last week in September.
    The Mail last week was mistaken about the large Medford contingent at Cinnabar. The only Medfordite at the springs at the time referred to in last week's Mail was a representative of Worman's stable which a Jacksonville man rode to camp.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1889, page 2


    L. Shideler moved his family to Medford last Monday, where they will remain temporarily.
    J. H. Stewart has had 4000 feet more of tiling hauled to his fruit farm from Close Bros.' brick yard near Ashland.
    J. H. Stewart, of Eden precinct, will tile drain a portion of his orchard this fall having had very satisfactory results from his first venture in that line.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1889, page 3


    Fred Luy, Jr., last Monday accepted a chair in one of the leading tonsorial parlors of Tacoma, where he will ply his vocation in the future.
    Citizens from this county who have visited Walla Walla recently report that Ward Douglas, the insurance man, is the most prominent man in the town.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1889, page 3


[O.&T. Co.] to W. R. Dickison, lot 10, blk 45, Medford; $80.
O.&T. Co. to P. T. Fairclo, lot 5, blk 1, Medford; $90.
J. G. Birdseye, sheriff, to A. J. Fredenburg, sheriff's deed to lot 7, blk 20, Medford; $150.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1889, page 3


    IN OPERATION.--The new flouring mill at Medford is in full operation. About a week ago the machinery was in place and the engine steamed up for a trial of the machinery, and after a few hours' running to get the different bearings regulated, the mill commenced work first on chop, then on the manufacture of flour. There are four floors, including the basement, which is occupied with a boiler and engine and heavy pinion wheels that turn the machinery above. The first floor proper contains the complete roller machinery, made by E. P. Allis, and takes the place of the old burr. There are four of these mills, which are equal to four run of burrs. There are no burrs in the mill. The second floor contains the purifying machinery, which takes the place of the old bolt, under the burr and bolt system of making flour. This machinery is called the scalper and cyclone. The third floor contains the machinery that cleans the grain, and takes the place of the old-time fanning mill and smutter, and the grain passing through this apparatus is divested of all foreign substances, such as grains of oats, smut, cheat, shrunken and imperfect grains of wheat, leaving the grain absolutely clean and pure, ready for the rollers. L. Rouse and his brother D. Rouse are the millwrights who built this mill and placed the machinery.--Mail.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1889, page 1


A. J. Fredenburg to John Charles, undivided ½ of lot 7, blk 29, Medford; $400.
C. H. Hoxie to Town of Medford, quitclaim to 72/100 acres in T37S, R1W; $1.
W. H. Jacks to same, quitclaim to 37/100 [acre] in same tp.
M. A. Williams to same quitclaim to 65/100 acre in same tp.
O.&T. Co. to Frederick Meinhard, lots 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, blk 70, Medford; $240.
John Charles to Jas. Gaines, undivided ½ lot 7, blk 20, Medford; $500.
W. R. Dickison to J. N. Fanning, lots 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14, blk 45, Medford; $5,500.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1889, page 2


    Wm. Trimble, once a resident of Medford, is now at Smith River, Cal.
    Old residenters [sic] recall the fact that the summer of 1868 was similar in many respects to the present season.
    Rev. M. A. Williams preached at Eagle Point last Sunday morning for the first time after returning from the East. The village choir welcomed him back with song service this preceding evening.
    Several citizens of the old shire town of Jacksonville take exceptions to the statement of the author of Ashland's write-up in the West Shore that the Granite City has always been the chief town of this valley. Before the advent of the railroad Jacksonville made some pretensions in that line herself.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1889, page 3


    Frank Kasshafer is assisting H. H. Wolters in the management of the Monarch Saloon at Medford.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1889, page 3


Patent Flour.
    Messrs. Davis & France, of the Medford Roller Mills, yesterday presented the Times office with a sample sack of the fine flour which they are making, and an inspection by experienced hands proves it to be of the finest quality. The neat and attractive packages in which it is put upon the market will doubtless help to make it what its name implies, "Hard to Beat." It is manufactured by the straight roller process--gradual reduction--no burrs being employed. Look out for their advertisement next week.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1889, page 3


    Geo. R. Yaudes has returned from Medford to his old home at Sterlingville.
    Fred Meinhart, who settled at Medford last spring, made our town a visit last Monday.
    H. B. Reed, who is engaged in making combination fence at The Dalles, has been making this valley a visit.
    Rev. F. S. Noel has returned from his pastoral trip to Lake and Klamath counties, and services will be held at the Catholic Church as usual.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. H. Barr is shipping a large quantity of baled hay to Grants Pass.
    M. A. Brentano is sojourning at Colestein for the benefit of his health.
    J. S. Higinbotham, the wheelwright, is dangerously ill with congestion of the brain.
    Our new brick buildings are looming up nicely, and some of them will be completed soon.
    The Seventh Day Adventists have pitched their camp in town and are holding a series of meetings.
    Our new mill is manufacturing a superior quality of flour, which is highly spoken of by all who have used it.
    S. Rosenthal is still at the front with a complete and first-class stock of general merchandise. It will pay to call on him.
    Wm. Jones, who has been prostrated with typho-malarial fever so long, is about again and was seen on the streets of Medford last Tuesday.
    Look out for the advertisement of Galloway & Barr, who now conduct the fence factory formerly owned by E. G. Hurt. They are doing a big business.
    D. T. Sears & Co. keep the nicest and best stock of ladies' fashionable goods and sell at prices that defy competition. Let the fair ones call and see their new styles soon.
    M. Purdin's blacksmith shop is constantly crowded with orders, because the best of work is done there and reasonable rates are charged. Farmers should give him a call whenever needing anything in Mr. P.'s line.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1889, page 3


E. M. Forman to Ollie Brentano, lot 1 in blk 4, Cottage add. to Medford; $100.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 2


    Jacksonville and Medford are connected by both the Western Union and Postal lines. The rates are 25 cents per ten words.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 3


    Attention is called to the combination fence advertisement of Galloway & Barr of Medford, who will continue the business lately conducted by E. G. Hurt.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 3


    N. D. Young and family have removed to Medford, where Mrs. Y. is conducting a restaurant.
    Wm. Finch, of Gemantown, Cal., a brother of Mrs. J. S. Higinbotham of Medford, is paying the valley a visit. His sister will return to Colusa County with him.
    Miss Otelia Brentano arrived from Oakland last Saturday, being summoned home by the news of the death of her father, M. A. Brentano. Miss Otelia returned to Oakland on Tuesday last.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 3


DIED.
HIGINBOTHAM--At Medford, August 14, of brain fever, Jacob S. Higinbotham, a native of Ohio, aged 44 years, 8 months and 10 days.
BRENTANO--At Medford, August 15th, of apoplexy, Max A. Brentano, aged about 70 years.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 3


Another Pioneer Gone.
    M. A. Brentano, whose death occurred last Thursday evening at Medford, while he was being shaved, was one of the pioneers of southern Oregon. The immediate cause of death was apoplexy or softening of the brain. He was enterprising and generous, and had been engaged at various times in mining and merchandising enterprises in the valley. For the past year Mr. B. has had charge of the Grand Central Hotel and saloon at Medford, retiring from the management of the hotel a few weeks ago because of impaired health. The deceased had many friends, and his funeral on Friday was largely attended. The remains were interred in the Jacksonville Cemetery.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Frank Kinley and family have returned to Nebraska.
    E. G. Hurt is in Josephine County on mining business.
    Frank Eichelman is visiting relatives in Ohio this week.
    Mrs. Morris, the photographer, has removed to Portland to reside.
    A. S. Jacobs has been engaged hauling baled hay to Medford during the week.
    A. F. Hale has succeeded Mrs. Morris in the management of the photograph gallery.
    J. N. Phillips, the lawyer, has removed to Ashland for the practice of his profession.
    Some of the full-blown "regulars" created quite a stir in town last Friday and Saturday.
    The gospel tent of the Seventh Day Adventists has sheltered large audiences during the week.
    A horse-power velocipede has furnished entertainment to the young folks of Medford during the week.
    Dr. Pryce returned last week from his mountain trip to the Dead Indian country, much improved in health.
    Considerable baled hay is being delivered by James Bigham of Big Sticky at the Medford yards for shipment.
    Dr. Geary has fitted up a new office in Mrs. Stanley's building, where he will henceforth make his headquarters.
    A. J. Daley exhibited peaches in Medford last week weighing 12¾ ounces, and measuring 11½ inches in circumference.
    Everybody is talking artesian water at Medford, and it is thought the experiment will be made to bore for it before long.
    The last of the Fort Klamath troops, who were ordered to Vancouver barracks, passed up the road from Medford last Saturday.
    D. T. Lawton this week ordered 500 rods of combination fencing of Galloway & Barr to be placed about his ranch on Big Sticky, east of Medford.
    Much wheat is being contracted for by Messrs. Davis & France, who expect to build up a fine trade in the product of their new roller mills.
    A great many of the pamphlets issued by the Medford board of trade will be distributed at the G.A.R. encampment at Milwaukee this month.
    W. H. Barr last Saturday returned from Gold Hill, where he bought 150 tons of hay from J. B. Dungan for baling and shipping to distant markets.
    Work on Angle & Plymale's new store building is progressing rapidly, and the structure will soon be complete. It will be one of the best buildings in the county.
    The east wall of the building in which the Mail office located has "bowed out" badly, and it is feared by some that the house will collapse when wet weather sets in.
    A. H. Houston and his two sons-in-law, John Roberts and John Wright, recently from Missouri, are in Medford and looking for a location on which to settle permanently in this county.
    Mrs. D. T. Lawton suffered severe dislocation of the knee joint one evening last week, while preparing to mount a horse from a horse block some miles out of town, but has about recovered at this writing, we learn.
    J. S. Higinbotham, one of our wheelwrights, died last week of congestion of the brain after a short illness. He had been a resident of this county for a long time past, and was highly respected by all who knew him. A wife and several children, as well as many friends, mourn his loss.
    Messrs. Cress & Fischer, the Jacksonville artists, have been in town since Tuesday painting the M.E. Church at this place. The structure will be about the best church building in southern Oregon; and that it will be handsomely finished goes without saying when the above firm do the work.
    The pamphlet issued from the Mail office by the board of trade of Medford has finally appeared and is a most creditable production, being gotten up in a neat, artistic style, while the subject matter of the document is well chosen, being a fair, conservative statement of the climate, soil and resources of the valley, calling particular attention to the advantages offered by Medford to the homeseeker from the East. Ten thousand copies of the book will be issued and its publication is a most judicious measure and shows Medford's business men to be possessed of great foresight.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 3

BARR AND GALLOWAY
MANUFACTURERS OF
CELEBRATED UNIVERSAL COMBINATION FENCE !

View of Fence in position.

It's Especially Adapted for Farms, Ranches, Orchards, Gardens and Lawns.
----------V----------
NEAT, DURABLE, STRONG AND CHEAP.
Correspondence Solicited
BARR & GALLOWAY,
Medford,                                                  Oregon
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889 et seq., page 3


Arnold Childers, et al., [to] J. O. Johnson and S. Childers, Sr., interest in lot 20, blk 21, Medford; $10.
John Cox to A. J. Fredenburg, lot 3, blk 28, Medford; $50.
Susanna Whitney to S. A. Sutter, lot 4, blk 2, Whitney add. to Medford; $30.
Lucinda L. Wilson to Isaac Skeeters, 1.23 acres in twp 37S, R2W and lot 3, blk 1, Short's add. to Medford; $3275.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1889, page 2


    Mount Pitt looms up as natural as ever when the smoke clears away.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The new semi-weekly paper is announced for next week.
    Medford merchants are anticipating a good fall trade.
    The waterworks question is bothering the city council.
    Another newspaper is among the probabilities at Medford in a short time.
    The ladies all praise the new roller process flour made by the Medford mills.
    Medford artists intend to contribute largely to the success of the district fair.
    The Medford roller mills shipped their first carload of flour to Yreka last Friday.
    Dr. Geary's fine ranch on Griffin Creek is this year yielding some exceedingly fine fruit.
    New arrivals are daily seen on our streets. Medford offers superior inducements to immigrants.
    Dr. Pryce has attractive office apartments on the second floor of Mrs. Stanley's new building.
    W. G. Cooper of this place is having his fine Vermont trotter developed at the Jackson County fair grounds.
    Prof. W. Crawford, of McMinnville, the new principal of the Medford schools, has been in town for ten days past.
    Wheat is rolling in rapidly at Medford, principally for storage. Baker has upwards of 140 carloads on hand already.
    R. Westlake, late of Shasta County, California, last week took charge of the Clarenden Hotel, and will conduct it in the future.
    Mrs. D. T. Lawton, who was so seriously injured in an accident at the Siskiyou Mountain, is recovering very slowly, we learn.
    Many Medford people are preparing exhibits for the district fair, and quite a number of our merchants will have booths on the ground.
    W. B. Adkins is lecturing in northern Oregon and Washington Territory on the themes "What Is Man?" and "What America Most Needs."
    E. F. Walker, who has been laid up for four weeks with a badly sprained ankle, is able to be about again but still suffers much inconvenience from his hurt.
    The wife of Frank Davis and two daughters arrived from Minnesota a few days since to reside permanently in Medford, where Mr. Davis has been for some time.
    One of our physicians, whose practice extends over the county, last week had sixteen cases of fevers and summer ailments of various kinds. Health is improving at present, however.
    J. H. Bentley will open a real estate office in Pendleton soon. He formerly resided in Medford. His little son Eddie recently won renown as a hero in rescuing a baby from a campfire in which it was toppling, burning his own feet severely in making the rescue.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Interest continued last week in the gospel tent services.
    A. Z. Sears of Jacksonville will soon move down to Medford.
    C. M. Parker has relocated in Medford after a residence at Riddle station.
    George Anderson is about again, having nearly recovered from his recent accident.
    Two carloads of fine flour were shipped from the roller mills to Grants Pass last week.
    Chas. Strang this week takes possession of his handsome new residence on C Street.
    The new roller mills are securing the cream of the wheat that comes to this market.
    A. Stinnet recently sold his property here and went north. "Good riddance to bad rubbish."
    The roller mills are compelled to run 15 hours per day to keep up with the demand for their fine flour.
    W. H. Barr, the hay merchant, is shipping considerable hay to Manistee and other points south.
    Everett Mingus will probably leave next week for Philadelphia, Pa., to attend the school of pharmacy at that city.
    J. O. Johnson and S. Childers, Sr., now own the brick building in this place formerly owned by A. Childers & Son.
    The new Christian Church, which will soon be completed, will add another to the list of fine churches for which Medford is noted.
    The first number of the semi-weekly News appeared yesterday. It is a six-column folio, published by F. B. Ticknor and Ira A. Phelps.
    O. A. Sterling of the Ellensburg (W.T.) State Register was in Medford, accompanied by Miss Laura Harrison of Ashland, one day last week.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman is canning the product of his peach orchard of two and three-year-old trees, and will have at least 2000 cans of choice fruit for sale. He is convinced that canning is a much safer and surer method of marketing fruit than shipping the green article.
    Marshal Carroll surprised a burglar in Angle & Plymale's store on Sunday night of last week, but the rascal fled before the officer could intercept him at the rear door. Nothing was stolen from the store, the man having just effected an entrance. The establishment was burglarized some two months ago to the tune of $20.
    Miss Mollie Merriman, who has been teaching the lower Trail Creek school for some months, recently left for the Willamette Valley, to take charge of a school in Polk County, near Dallas, where she will wield the baton for the coming ten-months term. Miss Mollie is one of our best teachers and a credit to Jackson County.
    It has not yet been definitely decided whether or not the town will rely on the ditch for water supply, or construct large wells from which to pump water to the tower in the park. The project of boring for artesian water has not by any means been abandoned, but uncertainty attending it leads many to advocate the digging of large wells of moderate depth, which can be relied on to furnish a supply of fairly good water.
    The town board last Monday let the contract for constructing the new system of waterworks for Medford by Messrs. Adkins & Webb, whose bid of $6,647.50 was nearly $1200 lower than the competing Portland firm. The contract calls for a six-inch water main with connecting hydrants on the main streets. Power will be furnished by a 35-horsepower engine stationed near the center of town, and pressure will be afforded by a 50-foot tower, to be located in or near the city park, the contract for building which was let separate to Wood, Whiteside & Co., for $3500. To meet the emergency of a sudden conflagration, arrangements will be made for attaching hose to the engine direct, although the pressure afforded by the tower in its proposed location will throw water from the hydrants over most houses in town. The board acted wisely in letting the contracts to local firms.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1889, page 2


    The Ashland, Medford, and Central Point schools all began their fall terms this week.
    The contract for building the new Gold Hill school house was let to C. W. Skeel of Medford last week. The building will be 40x26 feet and will be an ornamental structure.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1889, page 3


    M. Volk, the well-known civil engineer who has been in the employ of the O.&C.R.R. Co. so long, was in Jacksonville a few days since.
    Mrs. Cornelius Armstrong, living on F. M. Plymale's farm near Medford, was stricken with paralysis on Saturday of last week, necessitating the summoning of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Borough from Josephine County. Mrs. A. is somewhat better at this writing, however.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1889, page 3


    Attention is called to the new advertisement of the flouring mills at Medford. The proprietors, Davis & France, are pushing the product of their mill into every market in southern Oregon and northern California, and its superior quality warrants the prediction that it will fully meet the demand of their trade and hold its own wherever introduced.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1889, page 3


BORN.
AMANN--In Medford, Aug. 18th, to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Amann, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1889, page 3


Medford Roller Mills.
MEDFORD, OREGON.
DAVIS & FRANCE,  -  -  -  Proprietors.
WE HAVE NOW ONE OF THE BEST-EQUIPPED FLOUR MILLS IN THE STATE, and the
ONLY FULL ROLLER PROCESS MILL
in Southern Oregon. These mills are now manufacturing the best grade of flour ever offered to the trade in this section and are prepared to fill all orders for flour, mill feed, etc., on short notice. All orders by mail or in person will receive prompt attention.
Test the Flour and You Will Use No Other.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1889 et seq., page 3


    Rev. F. B. Ticknor and Ira Phelps, of Medford, printed this week the first issue of their new paper at that place. It is a six-column paper, one side patent, issued semi-weekly, and the first copy is neatly printed and newsy.
    Fruit commissioner J. D. Whitman is canning the peaches of his orchard near Medford, and will put up 2400 cans this season as a trial of the profits of thus disposing of the peach crop here. He has a canning outfit which cost only about $50, but which, if worked to its full capacity with twelve hands, could put up 800 cans a day.
    The Medford city council, at a meeting Monday evening, let the contract for the completion of the contemplated water works for that place to Adkins & Webb for $6,647.50. A contract for $3580 for tank and tower had been let before. The bid of Adkins & Webb, a home firm, on the main contract, was about $1150 less than that of John Barrett, of Portland, the only other bidder.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 6, 1889, page 3


A Sensational Item.
    A woman who claims to be the widow of Hoover, one of the prisoners who were suffocated in the burning of the county jail, arrived at Medford last week with a little daughter, and the Mail has one of its peculiar, sensational, hydra-headed reports as a consequence of an "interview" with her. It is generally understood at Medford that S. S. Pentz, the attorney who is now figuring in the capacity of a defendant in a state case in circuit court, is largely responsible for the trip of the woman and her daughter to this place, he having held out to her the probability of money being obtained from the county as damages. The Mail said she would sue the county, but the nearest approach to it thus far is an appeal to the county court for money for the widow, and to pay the expense of removing Hoover's body from the Jacksonville Cemetery to Michigan.
Ashland Tidings, September 6, 1889, page 3


MUSIC LESSONS.
    Mrs. Ticknor is now prepared to give music lessons, both instrumental and vocal, at her residence in Medford.
Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 1


    Medford is the largest shipping point south of Albany. Large quantities of hay, grain, pork, beef, wool and fruits are being shipped from this place every week. Medford will be the center of traffic made by opening up the lumber interests of Rogue River Valley, and she is destined to remain the commercial center of the valley.
"Knowledge,"
Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 2


    Remember I. A. Webb, the furniture store, in the rear of the new store.
----
WILL TRAIN HORSES.
    N. C. Boynton will train horses on the new track at the fair grounds for parties desiring to prepare horses for the coming races at reasonable rates. Call on or address him at Central Point. Will train trotters or runners. He has an experienced trainer in employ.
----
    Horseshoeing and general blacksmithing at Turner's, C Street.
----
LIME.
    First-class lime at reasonable rates. Put up in barrels, in any quantity. Apply at John D. Chappell's, Gold Hill.
Medford Mail,
September 7, 1889, page 2


BRICK!
C. H. Wallace & Sons,
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
    Having purchased the Poe & Brantner brick yard, in the west part of Medford, are prepared to furnish any amount of brick and do all manner of work in
BRICK STONE and PLASTERING.
    Our charges are reasonable. By honest and fair dealing and prompt attention to business, we hope to merit a portion of the patronage of our fellow citizens.
Place of Business: BRICKYARD
Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 2


LITTLE THINGS.
    Cash paid for country produce at Goldsmith's.
    For fancy and staple groceries go to Goldsmith's.
    Full line of crockery and glassware at Goldsmith's.
    Before purchasing lumber or building material, call and see Huff & Whiteside.
    Kingsbury & Allen offer great bargains in fruit lands near Tolo. The Kingsbury & Allen colony tract.
    E. W. Starr, contractor and builder, does all kind of building and guarantees satisfaction. Office corner H and Fifth street
    All persons wishing ornamental painting or sign painting done can have the same executed in first-class style by leaving their orders with John Fischer, in rear of the Medford Shaving Parlors.
    For good, fresh, country-cured smoked bacon, go to Goldsmith's.
    FOR SALE--Lots in the famous Ish addition; price from forty to seventy dollars per acre, easy terms. Apply to H. E. Baker.
    Go to Elder's and try a big can of baking powder, the best and cheapest in the market.
    I will give 20 percent discount on all orders given to me for the next sixty days, where the orders are accompanied with the cash.
A. GARRICK,
Merchant Tailor,
Main Street, Medford, Ogn.
    John A. Love, the well-known livery man of Jacksonville, has put a regular stage on from Jacksonville to Central Point, to connect regularly with all trains.
    Haskins has received a large assortment of stationery.
    If you want a new sign painted call and see John Fischer at his shop on Main Street alley.
    For a good job of painting or paper hanging call on John Fischer, back of Henderson's barber shop.
Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 3


Real Estate
    C. W. Palm sold six lots yesterday to San Francisco parties who bought to hold for speculation.
    Real estate in Medford is becoming very desirable, and many parties from the cities are securing interests here.

Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 3


    At Henry Smith's you can get a fine suit of clothes for from 16 to $20.
----
    At the Jacksonville Hotel, Ryan's building, California Street, you may obtain the best of meals and lodging at the lowest rates. Mrs. L. Chappell and Miss Sarah Knowles are proprietresses and no Chinese are employed.
----
NOTICE.
    The time for exchanging school books is at hand, and those in School District No. 49 who have the old book should give attention to the matter without unnecessary delay. Agents have been appointed with a stock ready for exchange. For terms apply to G. H. Haskins.
M. S. DAMON, District Clerk.
----
    Hats from 50c to $5 at Henry Smith's.
----
    Homeopathic medicines at G. H. Haskins' drug store.
Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 3


Another Ordinance.
    Ordinance No. 89 was passed at a recent meeting of the Town Board, which is an ordinance to provide for the prevention of fires and the protection of persons and property endangered thereby. The fire limits in said ordinance are as follows:
    Commencing at the corner of East Eighth Street and D Street, thence along the line of said D Street northerly to the intersection of said D Street with East Sixth Street, thence easterly along the center line of East Sixth Street to the middle of Bear Creek, thence southerly along the center line of the bed of said stream and to where East A Street intersects A Street [sic], thence northerly along East Eighth Street to the place of beginning.

Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 3  The fire limit was defined by Sixth and Eighth streets, Front Street and Bear Creek.


Flippers.
    There are a lot of boys in Medford who are armed with an instrument which they manufacture with a forked stick and a rubber strap, with which they shoot out window lights, fire into unprotected dogs and in various other semi-harmless ways amuse themselves at other people's expense.
    The Mail would like to see their parents have to pay for property destroyed, and they might in this way be gently reminded that it is not a good idea to destroy too much property.

Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 3


REGULAR MEETING.
The Board of Trade's Annual Next Monday Night.
    The Board of Trade will hold its regular meeting at the city hall next Monday evening for the purpose of transacting the regular business which will come before said body.
    The Board of Trade of Medford has for some time contemplated the advertising of our city to the intending immigrant and it is safe to say that much of our prosperity heretofore enjoyed can be directly attributed to this enterprising body of men.

Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 3


SUMMER SAVORY.
Stray Squibs Sought by a Sauntering Scribe.
Blundering Brieflets Boiled for Busy Bodies.
    The latest railroad news from Linkville [says] the road will go down the Rogue River Valley.
    George Anderson, who had his collar bone broken some time ago, is recovering rapidly.
    E. P. Hammond has his new house nearly enclosed. It will be, when finished, a very fine residence.
    D. Van Horn, of Albany, will be in Medford in a few days and will tune and repair pianos for parties desiring the same.
    The opera house being erected by Angle & Plymale is nearing completion and adds largely to the fine appearance of Main Street.
    G. L. Davis, the young and affable feed store proprietor, is doing a rushing business. If you wish anything in the line of flour, feed, fruits or vegetables, he can accommodate you.
    T. J. Smith, from California, is in Medford looking up a location for a flouring mill. A. G. Johnston takes a party today to Eagle Point where, we are informed, a company will be formed to build an extensive flouring mill with the latest improved machinery.
    Owing to the absence of the pastor, who has been called away to attend meetings in the presbytery, there will be no services except Sunday school at the Presbyterian Church, of this place, Sunday, September 8.
E. P. Geary, Clerk of Session.
    C. J. Montague and son take charge of the lumber yards on the west side, formerly operated by Huff and Whiteside. The Messrs. Montague come to Medford well recommended from their former home in the Willamette country and are worthy of a liberal patronage.
    Elmer Jones, son of W. R. Jones, met with a serious accident last week while sawing wood with a buzz saw. He accidentally let his hand come in contact with the saw, whereby three of his fingers on his left hand were severely bruised, and though badly lacerated, Doctor Geary hopes to save them.
    The Semi-Weekly News, vol. 1, no. 1, published in Medford, comes to our table under date of Sept. 4th. It is a neat six-column folio, edited and published by Ticknor and Phelps, and though a venture in the sea of journalism the Mail hopes that it may "live long and prosper." The aggregation of business in a place always helps the place, and we hope that there is room enough in town for us all. The managers of this enterprise are men worthy of success.
    Go to C. W. Palm's and examine the ladies' sailor hats just brought in.
    The town Board of Trustees was in session Thursday evening for the purpose of fixing the bonds of Adkins & Webb, the successful bidders on the water works contract. The business was postponed to another date.
    D. T. Sears, being desirous of changing his business, will sell off his present stock of goods at greatly reduced rates. Call and let him offer you some good bargains.
    The school board was in session yesterday to make arrangements for putting a pump in the well at the school house.
    Francis Fitch, Esq., city attorney, has had some neat folders printed to send to parties who deal in bonds and commercial paper setting forth the law under which the bonds are issued. Mr. Fitch is a bright young attorney and will by merit make a good record.

Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 3


EXTORTION.
The Queer Way a Lawyer Replenishes His Woodpile.
    On last Wednesday S. S. Pentz was arrested on an indictment found by the grand jury for attempting to extort money by threats. He pled not guilty, was placed under $500 bail to answer the charge.
    Valley Record: The grand jury has found a true bill against S. S. Pentz, an attorney at Medford, for extorting money by threats to prosecute for the commission of a crime. A man who hauls wood into Medford took up a horse he thought belonged to a friend of his and used him for twelve days, when Pentz discovered that the animal belonged to Mr. Childers, said he was Mr. Childers' agent and was going to prosecute him. The wood hauler was frightened and signed articles of agreement to pay Pentz $55 in cash and $160 in wood to keep him from prosecuting.

Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 3


PERSONAL MENTION.
    Mrs. R. C. Fielder, of Central Point, has moved to Medford.
    Mrs. S. A. Owens left for a visit to Kellogg, Iowa, on Wednesday.
    Kress and Fischer are painting the new M.E. Church at this place.
    John Fischer's family, wife and two children arrived in Medford from Iowa last week.
    Judge Crawford of Portland is in Medford and Jacksonville these days on legal business.
    Mrs. McLean, Mrs. Hurt's mother, is in quite feeble health, with the chances largely against her recovery.
    G. W. Bashford, recently from Iowa, called at the Mail office and sent papers back to friends in the Hawkeye State.
    Mrs. I. A. Webb left for the East last Monday via Sacramento. She goes to Iowa, Indiana and Ohio visiting friends and relatives. While at her parents' home in Indian the family expect to enjoy a reunion. Mrs. W. will be absent from home about three months. Mr. Webb accompanied her as far as Montague, Cal., returning the following days.
    Mrs. Simpson and Miss Ida Wilcox, sister of Miss Wilcox of the firm of Sears & Wilcox, is in the city for a day or two.

Medford Mail, September 7, 1889, page 3


    That the fruit interests of Oregon are of no little importance in our state's welfare none will dispute. That they are growing daily with an almost incredible rapidity is especially evident to him that finds time to study the subject in southern Oregon. The stir and bustle seen there during this season of the year would make the head of the average Willamette Valley fruit grower swim; that is, providing he should presume to keep the same pace there that he is accustomed to while at home. That southern Oregon has an untold wealth in her fruit interests none will deny; yet there is no especial advantage to her soil, her climate, her position; it lies at present in her enterprise, her industry and her new blood.--Portland Rural Spirit.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1889, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Col. Johnson is improving his property at Medford, and it will soon present a nice appearance.
    Dr. J. B. Wait is now a resident of Gold Hill, having purchased Dr. McCoy's drug store and practice.
    Cress & Fischer have completed the painting of the new M.E. Church building and did good work.
    Round trip tickets from Medford to Central Point will be on sale for only 20 cents during fair week.
    Judge Crawford has sold his remaining lots in this place to Wm. Ulrich, the live insurance agent, for $195.
    S. P. Bennett accidentally cut himself in the face with a knife while engaged in marking a hog last Monday, but fortunately not seriously.
    The Medford public schools opened on Monday of last week with an enrollment of over 100 pupils. Prof. Crawford, lately from the East, is principal.
    W. D. Finnerty has purchased a farm near Cottage Grove, Lane County, and will soon take charge thereof. The will take his fine draft stallion "Jack Sampson" with him.
    Allen Bish, lately of Ashland, is now a resident of this precinct, and is building a neat residence for Mr. Woody, lately from Iowa, who purchased a portion of his brother's farm in Eden precinct.
    S. S. Pentz, Esq., who was indicted by the grand jury last week for extortion, was honorably and promptly acquitted by the jury empaneled to try the case. He is the recipient of the congratulations of his many friends, who believe that he has not been treated justly by some of the authorities.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1889, page 2


    W. L. Webster lost a lot of bottles and articles connected with his soda works at Linkville in the fire last week, besides his personal effects at the Linkville hotel.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1889, page 3


    B. F. Stephenson, who is in charge of Dr. Geary's farm on Griffin Creek, is doing good work. He has obtained a large supply of water from the side hills and is still looking for more.
    Geo. Noble informs us that the crops on the Ish farm have turned out well, almost as good as last year. W. R. Jones, who had about 140 acres of it rented, threshed 3606 bushels of wheat therefrom.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
DEVAUL-STANFIELD--At the Grand Central Hotel in Medford, August 26th, by Rev. C. H. Wallace, E. M. Devaul and Miss Minnie Stanfield.
BORN.
STRANG--In Medford, Sept,. 11th, to Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Strang, a son.
ARMSTRONG--Near Medford, Sept. 9th, to Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Armstrong, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1889, page 3


Medford Items.
    S. A. Owings sold out his livery stable to Mr. Jake Wrisley.
    Mrs. Merriman is having an addition to her house and will soon take up her residence in town.
    Frank Mingus is to build a neat frame residence on the west side of town. C. W. Skeel has the contract.
    Although their church is not fully completed, the Methodists expect to hold their first service in it next Sunday.
    Mr. J. O. Johnson and family returned from California last Saturday and will spend the winter on their Table Rock farm.
    A man from Los Angeles, Cal. has bought a half interest in Frank Wade's coal mine in Antioch precinct. He was much elated at the prospect of the mine. [News, Sept. 11.

Ashland Tidings, September 13, 1889, page 2


    The Medford public school opened with Prof. Crawford as principal and Miss[es] Strang, Merriman and Hay as assistant teachers.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, September 13, 1889, page 3


Rose S. Robinson to D. T. Lawton, lot 11, block 13, Medford; $300.
E. J. Montague to Geo. B. Montague, east half of lot 3, block 3, Barr's add. to Medford; $250.
Same to John G. Montague, one-half acre in lot 3, block 3, Barr's add. to Medford; $25.
A. J. Fredenburg to Ollie E. Stanley, lot 3, blk 28, Medford; $75.
John R. Kennedy to J. E. Enyart, lot 10, block
9, Park add. to Medford; $175.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1889, page 2


    George Yaudes, an old and respected resident of this county, died at Sterlingville yesterday morning of consumption, aged about sixty-five years. He will be interred at Sterlingville Cemetery today. Mr. Y. had many friends, who will miss him from his accustomed haunts. He was strictly honest and a good citizen and neighbor.
"Death of Three Pioneer Citizens," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1889, page 3


    J. H. Lacy has built a neat residence on his land near Medford.
    The train was over an hour late yesterday evening, and the stages consequently did not leave until after dark. While between Medford and this place Plymale's wagon upset, bruising his occupants somewhat, but fortunately no serious injury resulted.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1889, page 3


    J. H. Hoffman has been at Medford roofing with tin the big brick buildings being put up there.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Elma Young is reported quite sick.
    Frank Mingus this week finishes up his new barn.
    Frank Mingus is getting ready to build in town soon.
    D. T. Sears, recorder, is busy with the town assessment.
    Sam'l. Furry is building a fine residence on his ranch near town.
    The plasterers are ready to begin work on the opera house block.
    An engine house is being built in the rear of Baker's warehouse.
    The Harris divorce case was on trial in the circuit court yesterday.
    Several hacks will run to the district fair grounds from Medford next week.
    Myron Skeel will build a residence soon on his 5-acre tract adjoining town.
    A. J. Fredenburg will soon build a comfortable brick residence west of the railroad.
    H. E. Baker will soon take possession of his fine new residence in the northern suburb.
    Mr. Clark is conducting the Gem Saloon in first-class style, assisted by Mark Armstrong.
    S. Childers recently sold his Shetland pony to the manager of the N.Y. aquarium cars.
    Dr. E. P. Geary ships a large quantity of grapes, grown on his Griffin Creek farm, every day.
    Sam. Richardson has returned from Wolf Creek, where he has been clerking for Henry Smith.
    Edward Gore and his sister Miss Ella are attending the State University at Eugene City this year.
    The town council has called for bids for boring an artesian well, to supply the new system of water works.
    Thos. Green, who is foreman of a gang of men working for the railroad, has been visiting his old home here.
    The Mail reported last week that J. S. Howard's commission as postmaster would arrive before the week was up.
    Miss Donna Furry has returned home to her father's, after teaching the school at Shake for the past three months.
    Editor Ticknor of the News was in Portland on business connected with the Episcopal Church during the week.
    Miss Jennie Jackson of Jacksonville officiated at the postal telegraph office during the absence of Miss Van Dyke.
    Wm. Ulrich, agent for the Farmer's and Merchants' Ins. Co., has gone to Linkville to adjust the loss his agency sustained.
    C. A. Wallace and family of Medford left on Wednesday of last week for Junction City, where Mr. W. has a building contract.
    J. G. Wiley has placed his fixtures in position at the district fair grounds, preparatory to running a restaurant there next week.
    Mrs. Merriman contemplates removing to town in a short time, having already begun improving her dwelling house here with that end in view.
    Judge Walton made an enviable record as a fisherman while up Rogue River last week, having defeated Tom Kahler in an even-handed "catch as catch can" contest.
    S. Rosenthal, the well-known merchant, held a ticket in the last drawing of the Louisiana lottery and got $50. Rosy is elated over his success and will probably play for a bigger prize next time.
    Davis & France are already enjoying a first-class business, which is constantly growing. They make a superior article of flour and spare no pains to please, hence find no trouble in disposing of their goods.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1889, page 3


BORN.
WALKER--In Medford, Sept. 11th, to the wife of Clay Walker, a son.
BARR--At Medford, Or., September 16th, to Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Barr, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1889, page 3


    The Mail man was surprised to find that the Central Point people remembered his unkind strictures on their town for showing the necessary enterprise to organize the local fair association, when he came 'round begging our merchants for support for a fair daily [newspaper] last week. Naturally they failed to put much confidence in his earnest professions of a change of heart, whereat he squeals gloriously in his last issue.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1889, page 2


J. C. Corum to F. W. Hutchison, lots in Park add. to Medford; $1,700.
Edward Brace to Thomas J. Carder, lots 3 and 4, block 3, Galloway's add. to Medford; $100.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1889, page 2


    The day, the hour, the railroad.
    Now for the motor line to the railroad.
    Hurrah for the railroad and the electric lights.
    Jacksonville and Medford will soon have electric lights and a railroad propelled by electricity.
    Jacksonville will soon be a railroad town itself. The county seat will then take on a new lease of vigor and prosperity.
    It is quite evident that we are going to have railway connection at last in Jacksonville, and all property owners here will be vastly benefited in consequence.
    The wind blew away the smoke which has been hovering over Southern Oregon so long; but as fires are still burning in some portions of this section the atmosphere is becoming quite hazy again.
    Buhlmayer Bros. will hold an auction sale at the old Davison [sic] place, near Medford, next Monday, and will sell many articles of value at that time. See their advertisement for further particulars.
    Jacksonville has determined to be left out in the cold no longer, and will be connected with the main line of the road in less than six months. All honor to the enterprising citizens who have brought about this result.
    Attention is called to the Buhlmayer Bros.' sale of personal property at the Davidson [sic] ranch near Medford next Monday, when some very desirable stock and farming implements will be knocked off to the highest bidder. See advertisement elsewhere.
    Several of our citizens met the board of trade last Monday evening to discuss the building of the electric motor line. A large number of people were in attendance, and much enthusiasm was manifested. The Medford council was requested to meet the board of trustees of Jacksonville next day and make a proposition to assist in the consummation of the enterprise, which was accordingly done. There seems to be no doubt now but what the two places will be joined by railroad and lighted by electricity besides.
    The irrepressible Ward Douglas is still doing the "rustle" act east of the mountains. An exchange recently received contains the following: "Last Friday Ward Douglas, the life insurance agent, submitted a proposition to the board of trade of Walla Walla that if $1,000,000 of life insurance be guaranteed from that county, the New York Life Insurance Company would build, as soon as possible, a $25,000 hotel in Walla Walla. A committee was at once appointed to form a plan looking toward acceptance of the proposition, as it is believed to be entirely practicable."
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The business of the roller mills is increasing rapidly.
    The Medford hotels are well patronized by visitors to the fair.
    Mrs. Thos. Harlan is recovering from her recent indisposition.
    Neil and Herman West have returned from their visit to California.
    Sam Rosenthal is in San Francisco laying in a new supply of winter clothing.
    Fred Cohen of San Francisco was inspecting his Medford town property last Friday.
    Medford has more booths and stands on the fair grounds than any other town in the valley.
    The new sixty candlepower lamp of the Episcopal Church illuminates the interior in fine style.
    Rev. Henry A. Barden, the new pastor of the First Baptist Church of Medford, is living among us now.
    J. H. Bentley of Athena, Or., formerly of this place, has leased the Stine house, which will be managed by G. O. Coffman of Los Angeles.
    The gospel tent meeting conducted by Rev. Isaac Morrison and William Potter west of the railroad track for over a month past were closed last Monday.
    The safe of Davis & France of the Medford roller mills was blown open by burglars Wednesday night but the box, containing but $40 as luck would have it, was captured by the burglars. Citizens should exercise unusual caution during the coming week. There are always a number of cracksmen following the fairs on the circuit.
    Medford is to have a water works. In reply to a circular sent out by an insurance company to each town in the state asking what facilities they have for extinguishing fires, the agent at Medford says they have none. The town is putting in a system of water works, and as soon as this is completed a fire company will be organized. The plan proposed is to lay 4000 feet of four- and six-inch pipe throughout the principal streets, with twelve hydrants, to get a duplex pump and boiler, sink a large well, and put up two tanks, of a capacity of 30,000 gallons each, on towers fifty feet high. In case of fire the water in these tanks is to be used, while steam is being got up in the boiler. A hose cart and 500 feet of 2½-inch hose is to be provided.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1889, page 3


    E. B. Stone, one of the earliest pioneers of southern Oregon, and who took a prominent part in the Indian wars which raged here in former days, is in town and will probably make it his future home, after having spent many years in traveling the length and breadth of the Pacific coast. He started the Mariposa Chronicle in 1850, which was the second paper published in California.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1889, page 3


IN THE SWIM AT LAST.
    Realizing the necessity that exists for placing the county seat in direct communication with the railroad and thus rendering it easier of access to the great tax-paying element in the valley, the people of Jacksonville have finally taken definite action looking to the subsidizing of a motor line to Medford. Such was the unanimity of sentiment existing concerning the project, and such a general opinion prevailed that the time for action had come, that there was virtually no opposition expressed to the measure. Our people had gradually crystallized their minds into the determination to offer a bonus to the first responsible man who appeared with a business proposition in hand; and when F. B. Converse of Portland, representing the Westinghouse Electrical Company of Pittsburgh, appeared on the scene last Saturday, accompanied by a representative of Chicago capital, -------- Eddy, of the garden city, and made a proposition to put in and operate an electrical motor line to Medford, together with an electric light plant to supply both towns, in consideration of street franchises to be granted and a bonus of $20,000 to be given by the residents of the two places, a meeting of citizens was held at the town hall on Monday afternoon and largely attended by our people. Earnest addresses were made by Hon. H. K. Hanna, Judge Webster, District Attorney Colvig, Hon. James R. Neil and others, and the town council was recommended to offer the full bonus of $20,000 asked for, on certain conditions, and requested to grand the required franchise and right of way in the streets. A special meeting of the council was called Monday evening and action taken in accordance with the will of the people, as will be seen in our legal columns. At a conference held with the Medford council on Tuesday morning $7500 of the bonus was assumed by that energetic town, and Jacksonville will raise the remainder, $12,500, by issuing $5000 in bonds, as provided in the new charter, and city warrants for the remainder. A definite contract for the construction of the road will be entered into in due time, and we learn that local capital will be given an opportunity to take stock if desired. The road proposed to be built and operated will be of such a character that it can follow the existing route and grade of the public road between this place and Medford; but a project is now under consideration to secure right of way for an air line 100 feet wide, on which the track of the motor railway will be laid. The plant will probably be located midway between the two places, in order to economize power, and will be equipped with a 100-horsepower engine and the requisite dynamos. The roadbed will be intermediate between wide and narrow gauge, with steel rails weighing about 35 pounds to the yard, and will be furnished with a Pullman passenger coach of the latest style and finish, having seating capacity for 50 passengers and carrying 75 when necessary. Three combined flat and box freight cars will also be used. The maximum passenger tariff will be 35 cents one way, or 50 cents for the round trip. The freight tariff will probably be $1.80 per ton. The electric light plant will be in operation by Jan. 1, 1890, and the roadbed completed and in operation within three months thereafter. The payment of one-half the bonus will be exacted upon the completion of the light plant, the balance to be paid when the railroad is completed. It is proposed to light both towns at figures little if any in excess of the present coal-oil lamp system. The propelling power will be communicated from an overhead wire, connected with the coach by a standing rod. The schedule time between the two towns will be from twelve to fifteen minutes each way, and as many trips will be made each day as the traffic requires.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1889, page 3


Safe-Crackers at Medford.
    Burglars entered the flouring mill at Medford and blew open the office safe at some time between Wednesday evening and yesterday morning. They obtained some $40 in cash for their trouble, and up to last evening no clue to the identity or whereabouts of the thieves was reported.
Ashland Tidings, September 27, 1889, page 3


Electric Motor Road for Jacksonville.
    The latest news of interest in the way of public enterprise is the prospect to put in an electric motor road between Jacksonville and Medford, and an electric light plant for both towns. A company represented by Mr. Converse has made a proposition to do this, provided a bonus of $20,000 be given by the people of the two towns. On Tuesday the city trustees of the two places met in conference to consider the proposition, and an agreement was reached that the towns should be divided in the proportion of $12,500 for Jacksonville and $7,500 for Medford. Citizens of both places are sanguine that the bonus will be raised and that the scheme will materialize soon. The company ask that half the bonus be paid when the electric light plant is put in operation (probably about Jan. 1st) and the remainder when the railroad is ready for business. The road is to have a solid substantial track of steel rails, on which a speed of 20 miles an hour (or greater) may be made with perfect safety.
    This enterprise, if successful, will be a feather in the cap of Jackson County, and a great benefit to the people of Jacksonville and Medford and the country between and about them, as well as a convenience to people from along the S.P.R.R. who have business at the county seat.
Ashland Tidings, September 27, 1889, page 3



    Rev. Eneas McLean, '75, of Medford, Oregon, delivered the charge at the installation of his brother, Rev. Robert McLean, '76, as pastor of Bethany Church, at Grants Pass, Oregon.

The Hamilton Literary Monthly, Clinton, New York, October 1889, page 75


    D. Cronemiller and wife have returned from their trip to Jackson County, where they were warmly welcomed by their many friends. Mr. C. took several premiums at the district fair at Central Point, as also did Mrs. J. W. Hamaker. They were about the only exhibitors from this section.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 2


What Is Possible.
    Since railroad connection is reasonably certain, steps have been taken to secure a straight route to the S.P.R.R., going through several farms on the way. Nearly all of those owning land on the proposed air-line speak favorably of the project. They well known that an electric railroad running through their possessions would at once double the value thereof, with a great probability of a still larger increase in value. The time would not be far off when the entire route would be studded with nice residences a few acres apart. What a handsome picture would then be presented! No section in the state would compare therewith, and prosperity would go hand in hand with beauty and enterprise. The electric road must and will be built.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 3


Benefit Raffle.
    A good saddle horse and saddle, bridle, etc., will be raffled off in a short time for benefit of the Catholic Church at Medford. There will be 100 chances at $1 a chance. The winner will be decided by lot whenever numbers are all taken. Apply to Rev. F. S. Noel, in Jacksonville, for chances before all are sold.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 3


    Don't forget the electric railroad.
    Jacksonville must have the electric motor line without fail.
    Buhlmayer Bros., who have had Chas. Nickell's big farm near Medford rented for the past four years, will leave this section soon. Their auction sale last Monday was well attended and good prices were realized in most instances.
    The motor road has given a new impetus to trade at the county seat, and our merchants are stocking up heavily for fall and winter. Jacksonville business men carry some of the largest and best assorted stocks of goods in the county, and it pays to trade here.
    Many thousands of bushels of apples have been sold in Southern Oregon lately, most of which were captured by California parties. A Montana agent secured a large amount, however. Prices range from forty to sixty cents a bushel.
    J. S. Howard, surveyor, Thos. Curry, W. J. Rogers and C. H. Pickens viewers, have been engaged in laying out and locating a new route for the Ft. Klamath wagon road along Rogue River, between Elk Creek and Long Branch since Monday last.
    Since the prospects of railroad connection are so good the citizens of both Jacksonville and Medford feel highly elated and are projecting new enterprises and improvements. There is no denying the fact that much benefit would accrue from the inauguration of this electric railroad.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Flindt has returned from her trip to Albany.
    For groceries, crockery, glassware, etc., go to Goldsmith's.
    Spencer Childers is in charge of his uncle's farm on Dry Creek.
    Dr. Pryce is getting about again from a severe attack of typhoid fever.
    O. Angle will open a clothing store in the building just vacated by Julius Goldsmith.
    Chas. Hamilton has returned to Medford after residing in California for three years.
    Wm. Ulrich has purchased a half interest in M. Purdin's blacksmith shop and business.
    B. S. Webb, of the firm of Adkins & Webb, has returned from his trip to California.
    Call and see Goldsmith at his new store. He is making a nicer and larger display than ever.
    H. Kinney, the well-known painter, is painting J. A. Anderson's fine house in Eden precinct.
    Geo. R. Justus is conducting the stables owned by Dr. Lewis, who is now a resident of Tacoma, W.T.
    The firm of Klippel & Fitch now occupy handsome new quarters in the second story of the Childers block.
    The new roller mills has shipped a fine lot of flour to Roseburg, which is there finding a ready market.
    The water rises to within two feet of the surface in a well recently dug on the Huff farm, out in the valley.
    George J. Wrisley, the new proprietor of the Owings livery stable, is stocking up with new horses and vehicles.
    E. F. Walker of this section captured the blue ribbon at the district fair for his yearling Durham heifer and bull.
    The well being bored on L. L. Angle's place is progressing nicely and is now down about 80 feet, in a formation that betokens artesian water.
    Sam McCaslin, formerly of Salem and Linkville, now holds forth at the Union livery stable. He understands his business thoroughly.
    S. Rosenthal is visiting relatives and friends in San Francisco. This is his first absence from Medford since he came here several years ago.
    Ira Phelps has sold his interest in the newspaper and job printing business in this place to his partner, F. B. Ticknor, who will continue the publication of the News.
    This section has been considerably victimized by a sleek-looking buckaroo named George ---------, who has been riding horses in this vicinity. Several lost more or less through him.
    A subscription list is being circulated to raise funds for the removal of the bodies interred in the Odd Fellows burying ground to a better place. We are glad to hear this, as the present site is not a good one, by any means.
    The editor of the Mail can't catch the gait of the local fish stories. He has the effrontery to state that a little salmon trout minnow of 8 pounds weight is the largest ever caught with a hook in this section. He evidently hasn't been around much. Even the smaller boys pity his ignorance in piscatorial lore.
    Julius Goldsmith, the popular grocer, has rented the lower story of Childers' brick building, and is now displaying a fine, large assortment of groceries and provisions of all kinds, glassware, crockery, etc. He keeps only the best goods and sells at prices that defy competition. When in Medford don't fail to give him a call as he will please you.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 3


Everything Favorable.
    Mr. Kirkwood, representing the company that proposes to construct the electric motor line between this place and Medford, has been in the valley this week looking over the field and examining the legal aspect of the proposed issue of bonds and city warrants. He has obtained the opinion of two of the most prominent lawyers in the county, one residing at this place and the other at Medford, who both agree that such action can legally be taken by the respective town councils. Mr. K.'s mission was entirely satisfactory in its issue, and we may expect to see work begin on the road in a very short time. The citizens of this place and Medford are thoroughly in earnest, and realize that the building of the road will inaugurate a new era of prosperity in this section.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 3


    Mrs. Stone, wife of Dr. E. B. Stone, arrives from Washington Territory this week. We are glad to learn that they will become permanent residents of Jacksonville.
    Ira A. Phelps and wife of Medford spent Monday at the county seat. They will become residents of Jacksonville, Mr. P. having secured employment in the Times office.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 3


D. J. Lumsden et al. to S. S. Pentz, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, block 3, Lumsden add. to Medford; $100.
M. J. Patton to W. I. Vawter and A. A. Davis, lot 2, block 5, Galloway's add. to Medford; $300.
M. E. Beatty to Chas. F. Declere, lot 4, block 9, Beatty add. to Medford; $55.
I. J. Phipps to G. M. Pierce, lots 7 and 8, block 22, Medford; $100.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 3


    Ira C. Phelps has sold his half interest in the Medford News to his partner, Mr. Ticknor.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 4, 1889, page 3


    Medford [I.O.O.F.] lodge No. 83 is the banner lodge in number of initiations, sixteen.
"Among the 'Three Linkers'," Oregonian, Portland, October 6, 1889, page 7



Jacksonville to Boom.
    Jacksonville, which at one time was the most important town in Southern Oregon, and in fact in the state south of Salem, has for the past few years been laboring under the disadvantages of being sidetracked. When the O.&C.R.R. was building south the officials of that company wanted a bonus of $25,000 to take the railroad into the town. [The bonus would have run the line three miles closer, not through town.] The citizens, however, thought this too much and that the road would have to come to the place; but it didn't. The company left Jacksonville to the west five miles and started Medford as a rival point. [Medford was platted not as a rival to Jacksonville, but as "Jacksonville's depot" town.] The citizens of the place have girded their loins and have determined to have railway communication. They have a project to put in an electric motor road between Jacksonville and Medford, and an electric light plant for both towns. A company has made a proposition to do this, provided a bonus of $20,000 be given by the people of the two towns. Recently the city trustees of the two places met in conference, to consider the proposition, and an agreement was reached that the bonus should be divided in the proportion of $12,500 for Jacksonville and $7,500 for Medford. Citizens of both places are sanguine that the bonus will be raised and that the scheme will materialize soon. The company ask that half the bonus be paid when the electric light plant is put in operation (probably about Jan. 1st) and the remainder when the railroad is ready for business. The road is to have a solid substantial track of street rails, on which a speed of 20 miles an hour (or greater) may be made with perfect safety.--[Portland World.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1889, page 1


M. Purdin to Wm. Ulrich, ½ interest in lot 16, blk 3, Medford; $300.
O.&T. Co. to John Miller, lots 7, 8, 9 and 10, blk 21, Medford; $
800.
Same to same, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 45, in Medford; $270.
O. Van Horn to J. A. Whiteside, lots 17 and 18, blk 43, Medford; $225.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1889, page 2


The Railroad More than a Probability.
    Messrs. Kirkwood and Converse, representing the company who propose to build the electric railroad between Jacksonville and Medford, are here at present for the purpose of completing final negotiations. They have agreed to accept our bonds, but, as they cannot use town warrants to advantage, a number of the public-spirited citizens of this place have agreed to give their notes, to the amount of $6500, in lieu thereof, payable when the railroad is completed, and take the scrip themselves. The same may be said of Medford, where a similar state of affairs exists. At this writing there seems to be no doubt but what the two towns will be lighted with electricity and joined by rail inside of four months. This is a consummation devoutly to be wished. There is no calculating the benefit that will accrue therefrom. Great credit is due to all of whose who have so nobly assisted in bringing this result about, and we feel certain that they will be amply repaid in the future.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1889, page 3


    Hurrah for the beautiful rain!
    Goldsmith at Medford wants your wool.
    Goldsmith at Medford pays the highest cash price for produce.
    Jacksonville's citizens, like Ed, have at last "got there with both feet."
    Ten thousand pounds of dried apples and peaches wanted at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    Several Chinese skilled in packing fruit have arrived from California and are at work in the different orchards.
    A new era is dawning for Jacksonville. Electric lights and a railroad will bring many other things that will add to our prosperity and progress.
    With a railroad running through it, with its streets lighted by electricity and the foothills teeming with orchards and vineyards, what is to prevent Jacksonville from booming again?
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Mattie Brown of Elkton, Oregon, is attending school at Medford.
    B. W. Powell has returned from his eastern trip and gone to Puget Sound.
    Ira A. Phelps, the printer, has removed to Albany, where he will follow his calling.
    Arthur Langell of Klamath County last week visited his little daughter at Medford.
    The wife of Henry Hollingsworth of Medford arrived from Omaha one day this week.
    Mrs. Emma Amy and her mother of Colorado arrived last week for a visit at Judge Walton's.
    Henderson, the barber, last week removed to Woodville, after selling out his business here to Mr. Peters.
    The News has changed from a semi-weekly to a weekly newspaper and will appear in an enlarged form at once.
    Much of the material is on hand and work under way for the construction of the tanks of the new water works.
    Recorder Sears is making an assessment of the town, and the council proposes levying a five-mill tax at once.
    Milton and Newell Harlan are now the proprietors of the Mail, Thos. Harlan having retired from the management.
    A butcher shop, run by A. S. Johnson, will hereafter be operated in the building occupied by the Medford shaving parlors.
    Jacob Wrisley and Geo. Justus have formed a partnership and are conducting a first-class livery and feed stable at Dr. Lewis' old stand.
    Orra E. Angle, son of 'Squire Angle, this week opens up a stock of gents' furnishing goods in the building lately vacated by J. Goldsmith.
    Mrs. L. J. Sears and Miss Jennie Wilcox have dissolved partnership, the latter retiring from the firm. Mrs. Sears will continue the business of dressmaking.
    Mrs. D. H. Miller and her brother, Chas. Brous, were summoned to Iowa last week, to the bedside of their mother, who is very ill. They departed on the southbound train Wednesday morning.
    S. Rosenthal has returned from his trip to San Francisco and reports having had a fine time. He was unable to find his old haunts, so much had the city changed, but he was not long in making himself at home again.
    J. S. Howard has secured the post office. His principal competitor for the post office was a general favorite in this place, and would not resort to Howard's tactics, even to secure so desirable a position. Howard ascribes his success to the fact that he "entertained" our congressman, while custom forbade his competitor being equally hospitable.
    The commission of J. S. Howard and postmaster of Medford arrived last week, and he will take charge of the office about Nov. 1st. Mr. H.'s appointment is satisfactory to most of the Republicans of the county, though there is more or less dissatisfaction here. He has appointed G. A. Webb assistant, and has forwarded the required bond for $6000 to the department at Washington.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1889, page 3


    Messrs. Converse and Kirkwood, who represent the company who propose building the electric railroad between Jacksonville and Medford, are in town for the purpose of concluding arrangements looking to the inauguration of that enterprise.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1889, page 3



    G. W. Bashford, who purchased the Shideler farm in this precinct recently, is building a handsome residence.
    The Gilroy planing mill at Ashland has been sold to H. C. Dollarhide of Siskiyou and L. L. Angle of Medford, they paying 50 cents on every dollar of the unpreferred indebtedness of the concern.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
MURRAY-WILSON--At the residence of the officiating minister, in Medford precinct, September 30th, 1889; by Rev. C. Hoxie, Wm. Murray and Miss Addie Wilson.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1889, page 3


    It is a very poor town in Oregon now that is not platting its several additions. This, together with the fact that a need of houses is reported from every town and city of the state, is an indication of growth and development unknown before in our history.
"All Sorts," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1889, page 4


    The veteran Republican, J. S. Howard, has been reappointed postmaster at Medford, to succeed D. H. Miller, whose four years' term has expired. Mr. Howard was appointed postmaster of Medford in 1884, and was removed in 1885 by Cleveland, the civil service reformer, for partisan reasons. Mr. Howard was a prominent Republican when the party hadn't much consideration shown it in Jackson County.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 11, 1889, page 3


Medford Items.
    J. Goldsmith, our popular grocer, now occupies the large store building in the Childers block.
    P. Henderson has sold his barber shop to Mr. Peters. He will leave in a few days for Tacoma, W.T.
    A large gents' furnishing store will open in a few days in the building vacated by J. Goldsmith.
    C. W. Skeel has the contract for building a fine school house at Gold Hill and sent a corps of competent carpenters down on Sunday to do the work.
    B. S. Webb and W. Ridenour returned from San Francisco Sunday evening. They purchased the engine and pump for the water works, and the work will begin in a few days.
    Miss Norah Plymale secured the first and second premium in landscape painting, and first on crayon work, at the fair last week.
    The brick work on Adkins & Webb's building is progressing rapidly and will soon be completed.

Ashland Tidings, October 4, 1889, page 3


Staver & Walker Catalog, Portland, OregonMEDFORD SQUIBS.
    E. G. Hurt is engaged in prospecting in Josephine County.
    A. S. Johnson has sold his butchering business in Medford to Hanley & Wilkinson.
    John Bellinger has become a resident of this place. He is selling a large amount of baled hay.
    It is said that the planing mills at Central Point will be removed to this place if any inducements are given by our citizens.
    Mable Stanley's burlesque company performed here last Tuesday evening. It is simply a leg show, but seemed to please the large audience in attendance.
    Mrs. Beek, an elderly lady, died here this week and was buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery the following day. She was highly respected by all who knew her.
    Staver & Walker have rented the ground floor of Angle & Plymale's large new brick building and will stock it with an immense assortment of agricultural implements, vehicles, etc., making this their headquarters for southern Oregon.
    Our citizens did noble work when they subscribed the $7500 subsidy asked of them by the electric light company. This railroad will be of great benefit to our town, virtually making it the center of the valley as far as business is concerned.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1889, page 3


The Railroad a Certainty.
    Our citizens having raised the $12,000 required of them and those of Medford the remaining $7500, there is no doubt but what a railroad operated by electricity will be running between the two places inside of six months. Electric lights will be burning in both towns before that time. The organization which has taken the contract to construct the road will be known as the Jackson County Electric Light and Power Co., and must agree, in addition to furnishing and conducting a complete electric light outfit, to build and equip a railroad between Jacksonville and Medford, the said road to be of three-foot gauge, with steel rails not less than 24 pounds in weight, and to furnish the same with what is known as an electric motor, first-class passenger coaches and freight cars having sufficient transporting capacity, all to be finished and in running order next May. The generating machinery and plant will be located in Jacksonville, and the whole must be operated successfully and continuously for a period of five years. If the said company should, in that time, fail to operate said road and works for twenty successive days, they forfeit their right thereto. In all probability these articles of agreement will be ratified by the corporation, when work will be commenced in a very short time. Bids for furnishing the necessary poles have already been submitted.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1889, page 3


What the Railroad Will Bring.
    Two of the best dwelling houses in Jacksonville have lately been sold to newcomers, and several minor transactions in real estate hereabouts are reported. While this place may never become a very prominent business point, it is certain to lead as a town of residences, for nowhere can be found a more healthful and agreeable location. It is also more than probable that on each side of the proposed electric railroad will be built, a few acres apart, a continuous row of neat dwelling houses, which will be surrounded by productive orchards, vineyards and gardens. What a handsome picture--and how different from the one at this time--will be presented here in a few years! It will be almost like a dream, but nevertheless it will be realized sooner or later.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1889, page 3


    Goldsmith at Medford wants your wool.
    The Jacksonville-Medford electric railroad is an assured fact.
    Goldsmith of Medford pays the highest cash prices for produce.
    Timothy, alfalfa and all kinds of grass seed at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    Ten thousand pounds of dried apples and peaches wanted at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    More people are coming to the valley from east of the mountains for supplies than ever came during one season.
    Good winter apples are in demand, and the competition of buyers from abroad has raised the price from forty to seventy cents a bushel.
    Our vineyardists are shipping hundreds of boxes of choice table grapes to northern markets, where they find ready sale at good prices.
    None who had fruit to sell "got left" this year, even if it was the driest on record. Therefore, plant your land with choice fruit trees, grape vines and berry bushes.
    Already there is a big difference in Jacksonville. Real estate is changing hands, improvements are going on and a feeling of confidence pervades the whole community.
    The fact becomes more apparent each day that this is preeminently a fruit country, and our people should lose no time in transforming their land into orchards, vineyards and berry patches.
    John Tice of Medford was found lying near the railroad track, a short distance from Grants Pass, one day this week, in a paralyzed condition. He had lain there three days before being discovered. Mr. T. now lies in a critical condition at home.
    The fact that there is so much vacant land of a choice quality about Jacksonville is enough to insure a large population which will make this a good-sized, prosperous one, now that new life is being imparted into the community. Those holding much of this idle land will cut it into tracts to suit purchasers and sell them at reasonable rates.
    It will not be long--now that a railroad is assured us--before the country surrounding Jacksonville will be teeming with orchards, vineyards and gardens. This land has no superior anywhere, and there is enough of it vacant to support hundreds of families. The only wonder is that it has lain dormant so long.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1889, page 3


    Mrs. J. W. Weatherford of Puget Sound, sister of Dr. Robinson, has been paying Jacksonville a visit.
    Cyrus Kinman has gone to Washington for his family, and all will become permanent residents of Jacksonville.
    Edward E. Gore of Medford was appointed to a vacant scholarship in the University of Oregon by the commissioners last week.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1889, page 3


Keystone Corn Planter, 1883 Keystone Catalog
Auction Sale.
    The undersigned will sell at public sale at the old Tice farm near Medford on Saturday, Oct. 26, 1889, commencing at 10 o'clock A.M., the following described property: Several head of work horses, milch cows and hogs, steel beam plows, harrows, mowing machine and other farming implements; two wagons, ten sets of harness, one top buggy and harness, one Keystone corn planter, household furniture, and other articles too numerous to mention; also one fine young Durham bull. Terms--All sums under $10 cash in hand; on larger sums nine months' time without interest, note to be well secured. A fine lunch will be spread, which all are invited to partake of free of charge.
O. HARBAUGH.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1889, page 3


Life's Ending.
    Mrs. John Beek, of Medford, died last Tuesday evening, after a long illness. Mr. and Mrs. Beek came out to this valley from Portland some two years ago, and lived in Ashland about a year before going to Medford. At the request of Mr. Beek, Mrs. J. H. Russell, Mrs. M. L. Gillette and Mrs. M. H. Drake went down from Ashland to visit the lady in her last hours. On Sunday evening they were with her, and she rallied from a stupor and recognized them all and appeared much improved when they left on Monday morning.
Ashland Tidings, October 18, 1889, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The motor line will make Medford fairly boom.
    The condition of John Tice is critical and the worst is feared.
    W. M. Turner has sold his blacksmith shop to Mr. Evans.
    T. A. Harris and Ed. Worman attended the opening of the new hotel at Riddle.
    F. M. Mingus is having a neat residence built here and will take possession before long.
    Miss E. Galloway is teaching school at Cottage Grove, Lane County, with much success.
    Mrs. Corry, lately of Idaho Territory, is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Judge Walton.
    W. L. Webster is expected to arrive from Linkville in a few days and will spend the winter here.
    G. R. Follett, of the firm of Follett & Fowler, is ill at San Francisco, we are sorry to learn.
    Miss Elma Young is visiting friends at Riddle, having recovered from her recent spell of sickness.
    Mr. and Mrs. Dougherty of Illinois, the parents of Mrs. W. H. Barr, have been paying Medford a visit.
    A. S. Johnson and family, who were residents of our town when it first started, have gone to Wisconsin.
    Jesse Richardson had purchased property in town and will become one of our residents, we are glad to hear.
    The mother of Mrs. D. H. Miller and Chas. Brous, whose serious illness called them back to Iowa, is recovering.
    A handsome girl arrived at the Hamilton household a few days since, and "Shorty" seemingly has grown a foot in consequence.
    The raffle for the benefit of the Catholic Church here will take place Saturday, without fail. A fine horse will be the prize drawn for.
    Since the motor line became a fixed fact another building boomlet has struck our town. Quite a number of residences are going up in different directions.
    Wrisley & Co. report the following sales: Eighteen acres off Judge Walker's place to Dr. Geary; five acres by A. McKechnie to D. H. Miller; eighteen acres by A. McKechnie to Wm. Huff.
    Judge Tolman of Ashland has sold a yearling Holstein bull to S. L. Bennett of this precinct for $100. The animal was "Sconchin," to whom one of the premiums was awarded at the recent district fair.
    Mr. Dunn, who will be the manager of Staver & Walker's business at this place, arrived from Portland this week, to take charge thereof. The stock of implements, etc., at Central Point is now being moved here.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1889, page 2


Our Railroad.
    It seems that the electric railroad between this place and Medford will be built by Seattle capitalists, as the following dispatch from that place, under date of Oct. 19th, would indicate: W. H. Llewellyn, J. F. Eshelman, W. W. Kirkwood, F. B. Converse, C. J. Eddy and R. R. Spencer have incorporated themselves into a company designated as the Jackson County Electric Railway, Light & Power Company, and filed articles in the auditor's office at Seattle on the 19th inst. The capital stock is $50,000, divided into 500 shares of $100 each. The object of the company is to build and operate street railways from and between Medford and Jacksonville, Jackson County, Oregon, and to operate the same by such motive power as may be deemed best, and produce and sell electricity, etc. The company has engaged the services of R. A. Habersham, a first-class civil engineer, who arrived from Portland yesterday, and is making arrangements for the preliminary work. There is no doubt but what a full-fledged railroad will soon be running between the county seat and Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1889, page 3


Sudden Death.
    Last Tuesday evening Clarence M. Hoover, formerly of Medford, residing upon his mother's farm near Camas Valley, retired in his usual good health after partaking of a heavy supper. Some time in the night his mother heard a groaning in his room and calling to him received no response. She immediately went to this room and found him dying, and in a few minutes he breathed his last. The cause is only conjectural. Next week we shall learn something more definite. It is truly a sad and sorrowful occurrence. From the family record we learn that he was born Feb. 4th, 1866; and consequently was 25 years, 8 months and 11 days old at the time of his death.--[Roseburg Plaindealer, Oct. 18th.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1889, page 3


    Fresh cranberries at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    Ten thousand pounds of dried apple and peaches wanted at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    Some of the company which will build our railroad are expected to arrive this week.
    Thousands of fruit trees will be planted in this section during the present month. If the market for fruit is not supplied in a few years it will not be the fault of the fruit growers of Southern Oregon.
    Wagonloads of apples are still being hauled through town, en route to Medford, from which point they will be shipped both north and south. They will be sent on the electric railroad next season.
    Jas. A. Cardwell yesterday sold 500 boxes of apples to a buyer from Montana, and has a few hundred boxes more for sale. His orchard is only about two acres in extent, but it nets him several hundred dollars each year. It is very patent that nothing pays those owning land better than fruit-raising.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1889, page 3


    Henry Pape, Jr., editor and publisher of the Benton Leader, arrived on the belated train last Sunday morning. He started for Corvallis the same day, accompanied by his bride.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
PAPE-SHIPLEY--In Medford precinct, at the residence of the officiating minister, October 20th, 1889, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Henry Pape, Jr., and Miss Maggie Shipley.
DODSON-SIMPSON--In Medford, Oct. 15, 1889, by Rev. F. B. Ticknor, Alex. D. Dodson and Miss Narcissa D. Simpson.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1889, page 3


Medford Items.
    Born--On Oct. 18th, to Mr. and Mrs. "Shorty" Hamilton, a daughter.
    Wm. Fehely, of Waldo, is visiting his uncle, Wm. Angle, this week.
    The motor line is now a settled fact, and the work will begin before very long.
    The plastering is being put on the lower story of the new opera house, which is to be occupied by Staver & Walker.
    Oakes Comedy Sketch Club and Swiss Bell Ringers, Howard's Hall, Thursday evening. Do not fail to attend.
    Staver & Walker have moved their stock of goods from Central Point this week to this place. They will open their large house here about Nov. 1st.
    Orra Angle has placed a jar of beans in his store window, and the person guessing nearest the number of beans it contains will receive $10 in cash on Christmas.
    C. W. Coker left Thursday morning for California, where he will spend this winter in hopes of benefiting his health. He will return about the 1st of May.
    Rev. W. B. Adkins, who has been visiting his uncle, Dr. B. F. Adkins, of this place, will leave the coming week for his home in Ft. Wayne, Ind. He has made many friends here who are sorry to see him leave.

Ashland Tidings, October 25, 1889, page 2


The Jacksonville Railroad.
    An engineer to begin the surveys for the railroad from Medford to Jacksonville was expected to arrive from the north yesterday morning. All the requirements with regard to the bonus have been met by both towns, it is said, and actual construction work will be commenced soon. The Times says "there is no doubt that a railroad operated by electricity will be running between the two places inside of six months. Electric lights will be burning in both towns before that time. The organization which has taken the contract to construct the road will be known as the Jackson County Electric Light and Power Co., and must agree, in addition to furnishing the conducting a complete electric light outfit, to build and equip a railroad between Jacksonville and Medford, the said road to be of three-foot gauge, with steel rails not less than 24 pounds in weight, and to furnish the same with what is known as an electric motor, first-class passenger coaches and freight cars having sufficient transporting capacity, all to be finished and in running order next May. The generating machinery and plant will be located in Jacksonville, and the whole must be operated successfully and continuously for a period of five years. If the said company should, in that time, fail to operate said road and works for twenty successive days, they forfeit their right thereto. In all probability these articles of agreement will be ratified by the corporation, when work will be commenced in a very short time. Bids for furnishing the necessary poles have already been submitted."
    The bonus of $7500 on the part of Medford is secured by the individual notes of seventy-eight citizens of the town, the notes being payable at the bank when the road is completed not to be later than May 1, 1890. The citizens are to be reimbursed by the town scrip, it is understood.
    The Sunday Oregonian had the following Seattle dispatch concerning the matter:
    Seattle, Wn., Oct. 19.--W. H. Llewellyn, J. F. Eshelman, W. W. Kirkwood, B. Converse, C. J. Eddy and R. R. Spencer have incorporated themselves into a company designated as the Jackson County Electric Railway, Light and Power Company, and filed articles in the auditor's office today. The capital stock is $50,000, divided into 500 shares of $100 each. The object of the company is to build and operate street railways from and between Medford and Jacksonville, Jackson County, Oregon, and to operate the same by such motive power as may be deemed best, and produce and sell electricity, etc.
Ashland Tidings, October 25, 1889, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    An infant child of Mr. Dietz died a few days since.
    Chas. Meeker, who is now selling real estate at Astoria, was here last week.
    Robert Hazel and family are at present in southern California, where they will remain some time.
    James A. Johnson and wife of Council Grove, Kansas, are among the latest accessions to Medford's population.
    E. W. Dusenberry of Lake County, Illinois has purchased property near Medford and will make this place his future home.
    A. J. Merritt has moved to Medford from further down the valley and may inaugurate the business of manufacturing pressed brick here.
    A number of citizens of Medford attended the the grand ball and supper given at the new hotel at Riddle on Thursday evening of last week.
    Dr. Geary and W. I. Vawter last week purchased from Judge Walker a forty-acre tract of land lying on the Jacksonville and Medford road.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman has placed upon the market the canned product of his young peach orchard, in neat packages, handsomely labeled.
    The town council has authorized the drawing of warrants to the amount of $7500 to those citizens who subscribed to the railroad subsidy.
    Elder W. C. Ward of East Portland will relieve Elder Isaac Morrison of his charge at this place on the latter's departure for California in a few days.
    A large lamp in J. Goldsmith's store fell to the floor a few evenings since and made things lively for a while. Fortunately no considerable injury resulted.
    Geo. J. Wrisley has rented the Lewis barn and is conducting a first-class livery stable. His prices are reasonable and he guarantees satisfaction.
    M. Dougherty and wife of Illinois, who had been visiting their daughter, Mrs. W. H. Barr of Medford, for some time, left on the southbound train on their return trip on Wednesday of last week.
    Those in need of a nice pair of pants or an elegant suit of clothes should not forget that A. Garrick, our merchant tailor, can furnish them in short order. His prices are reasonable, and as he never fails to give satisfaction, there is no necessity of sending away from home for fashionable clothing.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1889, page 2


H. E. Baker to G. H. Baker, one-half interest in lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, block
7, and lot 4, block 6, Beatty's add. to Medford; $300.
E. M. Furman to W. W. Kimball & Co., lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, block 4, Cottage add. to Medford; $1.
John Brinegar to J. W. Mattox, lot
9, block 9, Park add. to Medford; $100.
Nannie Barr to Mary J. and A. G. Johnston, lot 1, block 4, Barr's add. to Medford; $500.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1889, page 2


The Presbyterian College.
    At the last meeting of the Southern Oregon Presbytery held in Roseburg, it was decided to take into consideration the building of a college at some point in Southern Oregon, within the bounds of this presbytery. A committee now has the matter in charge, and it is thought that the plan will be certainly carried out. The choice of location will be between Roseburg, Grants Pass, Medford and Jacksonville, all of which places are anxious to have it. It will take something substantial to secure it for any place. We sincerely hope that Medford may be the successful contestant, for it will add greatly to the attractions of the town; but the plum will not drop into her mouth without effort on her part. It has been suggested, and it is a good idea, that Jacksonville and Medford should combine forces and secure its location midway between the places, on the line of the motor road. Here suitable grounds could be procured, and the road would furnish easy access to either town. It would be difficult to find a better location for a college in any country.--[Medford Review.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1889, page 3


Our Railroad.
    R. A. Habersham of Portland, representing the syndicate which has the building of the proposed Jacksonville-Medford railroad in contemplation, made a preliminary survey last Saturday, and left for home the next evening. A meeting of the incorporators of the company was held yesterday, but we have not learned what the result thereof was. It is believed that Mr. H.'s report will be favorable and that the construction of the line will begin soon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1889, page 3


    Timothy, alfalfa and all kinds of grass seed at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    Gaylord Bell arrived from Grants Pass this week, and will prospect his quartz mine on Jackson Creek.
    Water in all the wells, streams, etc., is rising, and the scarcity of the aqueous fluid, which prevailed for a while, is now at an end.
    The drawing for the benefit of the Catholic Church at Medford took place at the U.S. Hotel last Saturday. John Schumpf was the lucky man and walked off with the horse, which is a fine one.
    It seems as if one "Dr." Willis E. Everett, who not so long since victimized the Golden Spike Mining Co. at Wagner Creek so scandalously, is still at his old tricks. The Sunday Welcome says that Dr. King , of Jacksonville, Florida, lately became so interested in the Alaskan collection of Everett, of Tacoma, that he purchased it entire for $3000. King paid very dearly for the stuff this so-called geologist palmed off as coming from Alaska.
    In the death of John R. Tice, at his family residence in Medford last Friday, the county loses one of its oldest pioneers. Coming to the valley while yet it was a wilderness, he made his home here, raised a large family and died universally respected. Until a few years ago he lived upon his donation claim about four miles from Jacksonville, but has recently made his home at Medford. The remains were brought to Jacksonville for interment in our beautiful cemetery, on Saturday afternoon, the burial services being conducted by Rev. E. McLean. A large concourse paid their last respects to the deceased.
    Last week Col. Jacob Johnson of Medford piloted eight lone, lorn female and three masculine attaches up into the timber belt at the head of Rogue River in quest of timber locations. The ladies averred that they were all widows and old maids and had not exhausted their right to buy 160 acres on Uncle Sam's timber reserve. Some eligible male ranchers along the road were following up the wagons at last accounts, with the avowed intention of inducing a portion of the female contingent to forfeit their privilege to buy on this side of the line.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1889, page 3


    Mrs. Jas. Guerin and children will visit George Brown and wife of Eagle Point, Mrs. G.'s parents, during the next few months.
    R. A. Habersham, the well-known civil engineer of Portland, was in the valley last week on business connected with the Jacksonville-Medford railroad.
    R. M. Shely, an excellent mechanic, who has been in Portland for some time past, returned a few days ago and is employed in the Jacksonville marble works.
    Mr. Eshelman, a prominent business man of Seattle, Wash., who will be largely interested in the Jacksonville-Medford motor line, spent a few days in this section last week. He is highly pleased with the valley, and speaks favorably of our new railroad enterprise.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1889, page 3


DIED.
TICE--At the family residence in Medford, October 25, 1889, of paralysis, John R. Tice, a native of Indiana and a pioneer of southern Oregon; aged 57 years and 2 months.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1889, page 3

Medford Items.
    Mrs. I. A. Webb is expected home next Saturday from her visit to her parents in Indiana.
    The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Deets died Friday night.
    A. D. Dodson has bought the News and will take charge of the office next week. We wish him success.
    W. H. H. Grant, the leading insurance man of Portland, has been sojourning in town this week.
    F. M. Mingus has charge of Mitchell, Lewis & Co.'s machinery here and is doing a good business.
    There has been rain enough during the week to enable the farmers to begin plowing.
    John R. Tice died at the family residence in Medford last Thursday night, aged about 65 years. He was well and favorably known all over the valley, and many friends will regret to hear of his death.
    Staver & Walker now have the largest stock of agricultural implements in Southern Oregon. Farmers needing anything in their line will do well to give them a call at their new building in the Opera Block.
    R. H. Halley has the contract for roofing the new building of Webb & Adkins, which is to be with tin. He will have it completed in a few days.
    Messrs. Wood and Whiteside began work on the water tank this week. The pipe line has not yet arrived, but everything is in readiness for going on with the work as soon as it arrives.
    Monday evening one of the large lamps in Goldsmith's store fell to the floor and caught fire, and for awhile it looked as if the store was sure to be destroyed, but by prompt action on the part of several men who happened to be nearby it was extinguished. The loss was about $100. It was a very narrow escape.

Ashland Tidings, November 1, 1889, page 2


The Remorseless Reaper, Death.
    John Tice, of Medford precinct, one of the pioneer residents of the valley, died at his home on Thursday last, from the effects of paralysis. About two weeks before his death Mr. Tice, while visiting at Grants Pass, started from that town to walk along the railroad track two miles to the home of Ole Severson, an old friend whom he intended to visit. When in the large field of J. P. Tuffs, about half a mile from the depot, he was suddenly paralyzed in one side, and taking a few steps from the track he lay down, unable to assist himself or call for help, from Saturday about 11 o'clock until Tuesday about 10 o'clock, when a passerby found him nearly exhausted from his three days' exposure without food or water, and hastened into town to send assistance. The unfortunate man was immediately taken into town and well cared for, and afterwards removed to his home at Medford. He continued to sink, however, and on Friday breathed his last. The funeral was on Sunday and was largely attended. Mr. Tice, Andy Davison and Jos. Crane were pioneer settlers and farmers in the central and richest spot of Bear Creek Valley. They were partners in business, and their wives were sisters. Mr. Tice is the second of the trio to fall before the grim reaper. Mr. Davison died several years ago.
Ashland Tidings, November 1, 1889, page 2


R. C. Ford to P. H. Oviatt, lots 1 and 2, block
64, Medford; $500.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1889, page 2


Well Done.
    A piece of work has been going on during the past week that is the source of much gratification to all who expect to do much teaming over the Medford and Jacksonville road during the coming winter. We refer to the fine roadbed being constructed by supervisor O. Harbaugh in the Tice lane where heretofore the road has been a terror to all passers during the winter season. Mr. Harbaugh never does anything by halves, and he prepared the ground for a well-drained roadbed by first building up with pine and fir tree-tops and straw, afterwards filling in with gravel. The public was astonished to find how rapidly a good road could be constructed over a bad route by this method, by one who understood what he was doing. The supervisor has almost completed the section through the Tice lane during the past week, and when the rest of the road is put in equally good condition, this famous loblolly in the winter season will rank among our best county roads.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1889, page 3

Sugar Pine Door and Lumber Company box factory, Merlin

    M. Armstrong and family have removed to Medford.
    Owing to the burning of the Grants Pass Sugar Pine Door and Lumber Company's factory there has been considerable difficulty among fruit packers in securing boxes.
    See the new advertisement of Orra E. Angle, one of Medford's liveliest and most progressive merchants, who is pursuing the right course to achieve success in the merchandising business by the liberal use of printer's ink.
    Fred O'Bryant of Medford again appears before the public in our columns this week. Persons desiring to have work done in his line, or to purchase fine jewelry or holiday goods, cannot do better than to give him their patronage.
    Legate, Hurn & Co. of Klamath County have arrived at Medford with their well-boring machinery and will attempt to find artesian water. It is hoped that they will succeed, for there is no calculating the benefit that will accrue therefrom.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1889, page 3


    C. Sly has returned from the east of the mountains and located at Medford.
    John H. Redfield has returned from Linkville and will probably engage in blacksmithing at Medford.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. S. Howard took charge of the Medford post office last Thursday.
    Geo. Isaacs last week bought three lots in Medford of the railroad company.
    M. E. Beatty of Portland has been appointed a notary public by Gov. Pennoyer.
    W. B. Adkins and wife returned to Indiana last week, and will probably remain there.
    C. W. Skeel has taken the contract to build a new house for W. I. Vawter on the west side.
    The custom of building bonfires at the depot whenever notables pass through on the overland train is growing in favor.
    Peter Henderson returned from Washington last Thursday, better satisfied than ever with Medford and Jackson County.
    The Medford detectives who followed up the supposed Gibbs last week, in the hope of obtaining the reward offered for his capture, were obliged to abandon the chase after following their man almost to the summit of the Cascades, owing to their horses having given out.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
KNIGHT-PURDIN--At the Presbyterian Church in Medford, November 2, 1889, by Rev. E. McLean, Stephen E. Knight, of Siskiyou County, Cal., and Miss Bertha L. Purdin of Medford.
GEORGE-CLARK--At the residence of Mr. Dodson in Medford precinct, November 5, 1889, by Rev. G. G. Thomas, Frank George and Miss Ollie Clark.
BORN.
SAMUEL--In North America, November 2, 1889, to Uncle Samuel and the Goddess of Liberty, twins, both girls: christened North and South Dakota. Old Boreas stood sponsor, Madame Aqua Pura has been employed as wet nurse, the G.O.L. having affairs of state to attend to.
DIED.
ELDER--At Medford, November 1st, 1889, of consumption, L. U. Elder, aged 17 years and 8 months.
    Deceased was a bright and promising boy of 17 years when he was stricken with consumption, and his home is now desolated for the third time in as many years by the fell destroyer, a fond mother and a loving sister having gone before. A large number of sympathizing friends accompanied the thrice-bereft father in charge of the remains to the family lot in the beautiful Jacksonville Cemetery, where they will rest until the great family reunion on resurrection morn. Rev. McLean conducted the beautiful and impressive burial service at the grave, at noon on Saturday, and preached a touching sermon on the occasion.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1889, page 3


-- NEW FURNISHING STORE. --
---- IN ----
MEDFORD, OREGON.
-----------------
I wish to inform the people of Southern Oregon
that I have opened a
COMPLETE STOCK
---- OF ----
Gent's Furnishing Goods,
In the building formerly occupied by J. Goldsmith,
Medford, consisting of
Men's Fine Shirts, Underwear, Hats, Caps, Gloves,
SUSPENDERS, NECKWEAR, ETC.
ALL THE LATEST STYLES in COLLARS and TIES.
Bushby's Double-Welted, Hand-Sewed Gloves; for both
Ladies and Gents,       Every Pair Guaranteed.
----------------
I buy for cash, thereby insuring my patrons of
THE LOWEST PRICES.
Call and see me. I guarantee satisfaction.
ORRA E. ANGLE,   Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1889 et seq., page 3



Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1889 et seq., page 3


Medford Items.
    Mrs. Fawcett, sister of Mr. I. A. Webb, arrived from Nebraska last Sunday, just two days ahead of Mrs. I. A. Webb, who had been visiting in that state, and expected to return with Mrs. Fawcett. Mr. Webb met his wife and little folks at Hornbrook Tuesday.
    The Medford post office was moved into its new quarters, J. S. Howard's store, the other day, and the retiring P.M. has put up at the old office the sign "Closed four years for repairs," following the example of his predecessor and successor, Mr. Howard.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peter Henderson have returned from their bridal trip northward, and Mr. H. has again opened a barber shop in Medford. Mr. Henderson and Miss Ida Wilcox were married at the home of the bride's parents on Evans Creek, about two weeks ago.
    I. A. Webb expects to move into his new store in about two weeks.
Ashland Tidings, November 8, 1889, page 2



    A. A. Davis of Medford this week advertises for sale his fine Poland China pigs, which he imported from Minnesota last fall. They are first-class stock.
    Ward Douglas "caned an editor" at Pendleton one day last week, the editor having been voted the handsomest man in the community. The Lord pity the balance of the Pendletonians.
    The county commissioners wisely appropriated the sum of $500 to assist in the good work of improving the county road between Jacksonville and Medford. This improvement was badly needed.
    Attention is called to the business advertisement of Hammon Bros.' nursery at Medford. Parties contemplating planting fruit trees this season should interview these gentlemen, who have a first-class lot of stock on hand for sale at reasonable prices.
    Our young friend Frank Fehely was joined in matrimony to Miss Fannie Crystal at Medford on Wednesday of last week, and the happy couple departed shortly afterwards for Crescent City, Call., their future home, attended by the best wishes of all who know them.
   No definite news has been received of the motor line railroad this week, although last reports were favorable. There can be little doubt that work will begin on the road in a short time. The Seattle stockholders are intending to hold a meeting this week to determine upon future action.
    Quite a Jackson County colony has located at Athena, Umatilla County. Besides attorneys DePeatt and Crawford, John H. Bentley, formerly of Medford, is running a bank, livery stable and hotel, and Dave Crosby is running a hotel, says E. F. Kaiser, who recently returned from a run through the northern country.
    The Presbytery of Southern Oregon announced a series of missionary conventions during the week, beginning at Ashland on Tuesday, yesterday at Medford and today at Grants Pass. The conventions are called for 9:30 o'clock each morning. The morning session is devoted to prayer and conference, the afternoon to woman's work and the evening to popular addresses.
    The advertisement of Staver & Walker, which appears this week, again calls attention to the immense business which the enterprising firm is building up in this locality. Vim and enterprise and business ideas about the use of printer's ink have put this firm in the van among the most successful on the coast, and it is very evident that they do not intend to let their reputation decline.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1889, page 3


    A. D. Dodson, editor of the Medford Mail, made us a pleasant visit yesterday.
    A. Z. Sears and family, after an extended residence here, have removed to Medford, where Mrs. S.'s relatives reside.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. J. Minnick is visiting her old home in Omaha, Neb.
    Sneak thieves seem plentiful in this place, as a number of thefts are reported.
    Miss Bertha Knight last week departed for Sisson, to remain an indefinite period.
    Geo. Howard is assistant postmaster at Medford, and fills the position acceptably.
    The Oregon Baptist convention for 1899 will be held at Medford on the fourth Sunday in next October.
    It will not be long until the Medford water works will be in operation, the tanks being about completed.
    J. G. and G. B. Montague left Medford for Glendale last week to fill a railroad contract for wood and ties.
    A. Goldsmith of Eugene was in Medford during the week, visiting his son, Julius Goldsmith of this place.
    Jas. A. Stewart has returned from Klamath County and will spend the winter at the home farm in this precinct.
    B. L. Redden, who has been engaged in the cowboy business in southeastern Oregon for two seasons, has returned to Medford.
    W. L. Webster is now in town and will remain with his family during the winter. All will take up their residence in Klamath County next season.
    Webb Bros. of Medford are enjoying the society of their sister, Mrs. Fawcett of Nebraska, who arrived last week to spend the winter in the valley.
    A sneak thief entered the residence of A. D. Dodson of this place a few evenings since and rifled his clothing, which was afterward found in the yard. The rascal secured about $10.
    The Times last week erred in stating that Horn, Legate & Mickelson of Klamath County had arrived with their well-boring machinery. They will arrive soon, however, when a bold attempt will be made to discover artesian water.
    News was received in Medford last Tuesday of the death that day in San Francisco of S. R. Follett, senior member of the firm of Follett & Fowler. Some weeks ago Mr. Follett and a daughter, who had been visiting him for some time, left Medford for their old home in New York. When in San Francisco, Mr. Follett was taken sick, and after lingering until Tuesday afternoon, breathed his last. Deceased was one of our sterling business men, and came to Medford some years ago in the hope of benefiting his health, leaving his family in the East for the time being, until he could establish a home for them. His death is generally regretted.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1889, page 3


MARRIED.
FEHELY-CRYSTAL--At the house of the officiating minister in Medford, November 6, 1889, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Frank Fehely and Miss Fannie Crystal.
EWEN-BETTS--At the house of the officiating minister in Medford, November 13, 1889, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Dudley T. Ewen and Miss Christina Betts, both of Butte Creek.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1889, page 3


STAVER and WALKER
BRANCH HOUSE,
MEDFORD,  -  -  -  OREGON
HANDLE A FULL LINE OF
    Engines, Boilers and Shingle Mills.

    Flouring, Mining and Brick Making Machinery.

    Belting, Oils and Mill Supplies.
The Celebrated J. I. Case, Wood and Steel Beam, Side and Center Draft Plows, Harrows, Cultivators, Seeders, Drills and Agricultural Implements of all kinds. Also Freight and Farm Wagons, Buggies, Carriages, and Vehicles of all descriptions.
Catalogues and Descriptive Circulars Mailed Free on Application.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1889 et seq., page 3


To the Farmers and Business Men
of Southern Oregon:
    GENTLEMEN:--Appreciating the fact that by opening a Branch House in the southern part of the state, we could fill the wants of our numerous customers more readily, with greater convenience to them, and a considerable saving in the way of freighting, etc., we finally decided to locate at Medford.
    We aim to carry all kinds of Implements used on the farm, and all kinds of Machinery and Mill Supplies, and shall be pleased to have, not only our old friends and customers, but the public generally, call upon us at our new store.
Very Respectfully,
Staver & Walker,
MEDFORD, OREGON

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1889 et seq., page 3


Medford Items.
   F. W. France has been appointed agent for the Woodburn nurseries, and is selling a large amount of fruit trees to farmers.
    A. Goldsmith, of Eugene, who has been visiting his son at this place for a week past, left for home on Sunday evening's train.
    Mrs. C. W. Wolters is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alford, of Talent.
    Miss May Howard gave one of her entertainments last Wednesday. It did not give good satisfaction.
    The Medford Mail has moved in the [Hamlin] block, in the hall formerly occupied by the Odd Fellows, where they will have much more room.
    Some conscienceless individual entered the sleeping apartments of the editor of the Weekly News Tuesday night and removed his pants from a chair near the bed and, taking them a convenient distance from the house, proceeded to rifle the pockets of a few stray dollars. "Dock" says times are pretty hard when anyone robs an editor.
    O. N. Fowler received a telegram Wednesday morning, informing him of the death of S. R. Follett, in San Francisco. By his death the community loses one of its best citizens, one who was always ready to join in anything for the best interests of his town. Although he has been here but about two years, he has made many friends throughout the valley, all of whom will regret hearing of his death.
Ashland Tidings, November 15, 1889, page 3


    T. R. North, Esq., received by Tuesday's mail a case of peaches addressed to "Baby North." They were from Hon Jno. D. Whitman, of Medford, Oregon, and are of his own production.
"County Exchanges," The Perry (Iowa) Chief, November 15, 1889, page 1


Not Dead, But Sleeping.
    The motor-line railroad project has apparently suffered a relapse, as it is rumored on good authority that the parties who contemplated building the road have concluded not to do so, without assigning any valid reason for so acting. Propositions have been submitted by our citizens to other capitalists with presumably more brains nd reliability, and, in the event of their failure to act, a local company will be organized to proceed with the immediate construction of the line. Jacksonville doesn't propose to beg anybody to accept of her bounty, and is abundantly able to put through the road and secure all-rail communication with the world by her own efforts, if necessary.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1889, page 3


    Goldsmith, wholesale and retail grocer, Medford, Oregon.
    An immense line of hanging lamps at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    If you want groceries, call on or address Goldsmith, Medford, for prices before buying.
    Alfalfa, timothy, clover and all kinds of grass and garden seeds at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    Pot-hunters along Bear Creek are causing some complaint among farmers in that vicinity. Carelessness in handling firearms frequently causes loss and injury to stock.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1889, page 3


    F. B. Converse of Portland, who originated the electric railroad scheme, is among us again.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Interest in real estate is reviving. Our town is bound to go ahead.
    A. Merriman has bought the blacksmith shop formerly owned by John Evans.
    W. F. Kennedy of Medford lost a white-eyed pup while in Grants Pass last week.
    E. S. Johnson is at present in Sams Valley, engineering for Griffis & Walker's sawmill.
    A. S. Johnson has returned to Medford from Wisconsin, whither he went about a month ago.
    A social party will be held at Medford hall tomorrow (Friday) evening by Robinson & Turpin.
    Frank Mingus has bought out the interest of T. A. Harris in their partnership business in Medford.
    Mr. Fanning this week resumes control of the Clarenden Hotel, and R. Westlake returns to California.
    Mr. and Mrs. Embler of Tacoma arrived in Medford last week. The latter is a daughter of Spencer Childers.
    H. W. Bloom of San Francisco, accompanied by his wife, was in Medford looking after property interests last week.
    The Plymale & Angle handsome brick block is almost completed. The opera house will be initiated with a grand ball soon.
    J. Fischer, the painter, last week furnished our enterprising dentist, Dr. Demorest, with a neat, new sign, very tastily executed.
    Fred O'Bryant, the popular jeweler, is displaying some very nice goods for the holidays. If you need anything in his line, take a peep into his store.
    The place to get the nicest and most fashionable gents' furnishing goods is at Orra E. Angle's. Don't fail to give him a call, for his prices are quite reasonable.
    Medford has organized a club of the Union or Amalgamated party, and will entertain the state canvasser, Prof. M. V. Rork, in a short time on the occasion of his expected visit through southern Oregon.
    Dr. Geary on Tuesday of last week preformed a successful operation for cataract on the eyes of Isaac Simpkins of Woodville. Two years he operated on one eye, enabling him to see, and how he has the use of the other one. This is the fifth case of cataract the doctor has had in this valley, says the News.
    The following ministers were in attendance at the Presbyterian missionary convention held at Medford on Wednesday of last week: Revs. E. McLean and M. A. Williams of Medford; F. G. Strange of Ashland; Robert Ennis of Jacksonville and Robert McLean of Grants Pass. Much interest was taken in the work of the convention.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1889, page 3


G. W. Howard to Wm. Clark, lot
16, blk 40, Medford; $70.
O.&T. Co. to S. R. Follett et al., lot 4, blk 70, Medford; $40.
Same to C. W. Palm, lots 8 and 9, blk 45, Medford; $
160.
G. H. and Julia Baker to W. C. Noon & Co., undivided one-half of lots in blks 18, 19, 20, 21, 1, 2, 3 and 9, Beatty add. to Medford; $840.
Iradell J. Phipps to Jane E. Morgan, lots 3, 4, 5 and 6, block
30, Medford; $100.
O.&T. Co. to Davis & France, lots 17 and 18, block
19, Medford; $170.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1889, page 3


Medford Items.
   S. Cooper returned from an extended visit to Kansas last Tuesday.
    Born in Medford, Nov. 19, to Mr. and Mrs. A. Garrick, a daughter.
    J. N. Fanning has again taken charge of the Clarenden Hotel, the late proprietor, Mr. Westlake, having returned with his family to Chico, Cal.
    Mrs. Geo. Anderson is very low with typhoid fever, and at times her life has been despaired of, but at last report she was improving. Dr. Pryce is in attendance.

Ashland Tidings, November 22, 1889, page 2


    Patronize home concerns, and when you want young fruit trees call on Hammon Bros., of the Medford nursery. Read their new announcement in advertising columns.
    N. A. High and Irving Brown, who came in from Klamath County some time ago, have bought the Crystal blacksmith shop in Medford, and will carry on the blacksmithing business there.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 22, 1889, page 3


    M. H. J. O'Neil, of the prosperous agricultural firm of Roberts & O'Neil, Medford, went down to Napa, Cala., last Saturday, for a fortnight's visit with old friends. He lived in Napa Valley some twelve years, and left there just about twelve years ago.
    Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Hill, of New York City, who had been at Medford for two weeks, left for the East last Saturday. Mr. Hill is a member of the New York Lumber Exchange, and has been looking up timber business in the upper Rogue River section.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, November 22, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. N. Fanning is again in charge of the Clarenden Hotel.
    Mrs. Geo. Anderson has been very ill for some time with typhoid fever.
    D. T. Lawton of this place has been appointed a notary public by Gov. Pennoyer.
    Rev. R. C. Oglesby will hold services here on Sunday morning, at the usual hour.
    P. B. O'Neil, of Roberts & O'Neil, is visiting friends in his former home at Napa Valley, California, where he will remain some weeks.
    N. A. High and Ervine Brown, of Klamath County, who recently bought out the Crystal blacksmith shop at this place, are enterprising and industrious, and will no doubt build up a good business.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1889, page 2


Now Is the Time to Act.
    The prosperity of a town is not graded by the wealth of its inhabitants, but by the uniformity with which they pull together when any important undertaking is to be accomplished. A man with a thousand dollars at his command and a love for his town in his heart can do more for the building up and improving of it than the millionaire who locks up his capital and snaps his finger at home progress. Jacksonville's citizens now have the opportunity to show whether they have enough enterprise and patriotism to ensure rail connection with the O.&C.R.R., and not allow their property, trade and town to go slowly but surely down the road to perdition.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1889, page 3


    Residents of Yreka report great benefit from their tap-line railroad, and express a determination to extend the line to Scott Valley in a short time.
    Attention is called to the advertisement of Hammon Bros., who are conducting a large nursery in Medford precinct, east of Bear Creek. They have a very full assortment of choice fruit trees of every description, and those needing anything in their line will do well to give them a call.
    F. B. Converse of Portland, who worked up the motor-line railway scheme, was in the valley last week, and was pained and surprised to learn that the Seattle company which had become interested in the construction of the road had backed out of the enterprise, which he considers will be remunerative and feasible. He has hopes of organizing a company at Portland which will carry the matter through to completion at an early day, and is now engaged in the work.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1889, page 3


    Jas. A. Johnson of Medford, lately of Kansas, called yesterday. He is well pleased with our county.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1889, page 3


    The Jacksonville-Medford motor scheme is one of the bursted bubbles.
Oregonian, Portland, November 28, 1889, page 4


    Mrs. W. H. Barr, of Medford, who has been selling hay over the Siskiyous, was at Hornbrook and Klamath City last Friday, looking after the business.
    Mr. Barney O'Neil, of Medford, returned home last Friday from Napa Valley, Cala., and reported a great spell of "webfoot" weather down in that part of California--some of the vineyards being under three feet of water as he saw them. The development of Napa Valley has been wonderful since he left it twelve years ago, through the fruit and wine industry--and Mr. O'Neil thinks Rogue River Valley just as good for both.

"Personal," Ashland Tidings, November 29, 1889, page 3


Seed! Seed! Seed!
    Choice seed wheat, oats and barley for sale at Medford Farmers' Warehouse. Also rolled barley and mill feed. Baled hay in carload lots of less. Apply to:
H. E. BAKER,
Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1889 et seq., page 1


    Thos. McAndrews, Jr., of Medford, is going to Portland soon to attend college during the winter months.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1889, page 3


    D. J. Lumsden of Medford was at the county seat yesterday, accompanied by his daughter, Mrs. O'Bryant.
    Miss Ray Young of Medford visited Jacksonville during the week, and in company with Miss Emma Lee called on the Times.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. H. Turner has gone to Granberry, Texas.
    Mrs. S. J. Sulder has returned to Philadelphia, Pa.
    Mrs. Lyons entertained her sister, Miss Jennie Donohue, last week.
    Theodore Cooper has returned from Kansas much improved in health.
    For the finest gents' goods go to Orra Angle. He never fails to please.
    Mrs. Geo. Anderson was convalescent at last accounts, we are glad to learn.
    J. W. Short and Frank Tryer have been mining at Gold Hill during the week.
    Wolff & Armstrong will have their skating rink in operation at Medford this week.
    Newell Harlan is spending the holidays at his old home in Harlan County, Nebraska.
    J. R. Wilson and family of Glendale are in comfortable quarters in Medford and will spend the winter here.
    Medford schools now have enrolled 238 pupils, who are making fine progress under a most efficient corps of teachers.
    The neat brick dwelling which A. Childers, Sr., is building on his ranch east of town is rapidly assuming proportions.
    Davis & France shipped a carload of their superior flour to Eugene last week. Their manufacture finds favor everywhere.
    Fred. Ginger is now one of the compositors in the Mail office. The paper was rather "spicy" last week in consequence.
    Barney O'Neil returned from his California trip a few days since. He says that he never saw it rain so hard as it did while he was there.
    Miss Louise Follett was in Medford several days last week on business connected with her father's estate. She left some days since for the East.
    E. C. Clutter of Forest Grove will next week open out in business in the photograph gallery lately occupied by Mrs. Morris, having leased the same from that lady.
    Mrs. Samuel Potter of Eagle Point has been in Medford undergoing treatment at the hands of Dr. Pryce during the past week. She has been in poor health for a long time.
    A shipment of 300 Thanksgiving turkeys was made from Medford to San Francisco last week by J. Goldsmith, the enterprising groceryman. The quality of national fowls produced in the Rogue River Valley is unsurpassed.
    A niece of General Andrew Jackson visited in Medford one day last week. Her name is Mrs. Davidson, and one can easily trace the family resemblance to the portrait of "Old Hickory." The lady was on her way to Salem to look after an estate belonging to some minor heirs, children of a deceased relative.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1889, page 3


To Hog Raisers.
    I wish to say to the farmers of Jackson County that I imported several head of full-blood Poland-China hogs from Minnesota last year, and now offer them for sale. They are fine, and received first premium at last September's fair held in this county. Will be sold at reasonable rates. Can be seen by calling on A. A. Davis at the Medford Roller Mills, Jackson County, Oregon. Also have some oak lumber and some wagon tongues for sale.
A. A. DAVIS.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1889 et seq., page 3


    Medford public school has 238 pupils enrolled.
    Mr. J. N. Fanning, owner of the Clarendon Hotel at Medford, has completely renovated the house since resuming possession about two weeks ago and is prepared to entertain guests in better style than ever before. The Clarendon is a fine building, recently constructed and newly furnished--has comfortable lodging rooms neatly and handsomely furnished, and the table fare is first class under the present management. The Clarendon is immediately west of the Medford depot.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 6, 1889, page 3


A DYED-IN-THE-WOOL CRIMINAL.
Frank Wade Must Wait Four Years Before His Next Theft.
    J. G. Birdseye, of Jacksonville, sheriff of Jackson County, arrived in the city yesterday evening, after having left an inveterate horse thief at the penitentiary at Salem.
    The prisoner, Frank Wade, well illustrates the incorrigible character of criminals in their career, and justifies in great measure the conviction of the officers of the law that these people never reform. They are no sooner out of prison walls than they are at their old tricks again.
    "Last spring," explained Mr. Birdseye, "Wade began stealing horses in our country, and after two or three operations was arrested. After he was confined he was examined for insanity, and got off on that dodge, being committed to the asylum. He lost very little time here in filing his way out, and on his way from Salem to Jefferson stole a horse, got caught, and was sent back to the asylum. The latter part of the summer he was discharged as cured and came back to Jackson County. As soon as opportunity offered he forged an order for money, which he got cashed, stole a horse and skipped.
    "Well, he took this horse and crossed over the mountains by way of Klamath and Lake counties, going through the snow, without an overcoat or blanket, over the mountains into California. Upon the conclusion of this exploit he tumbled into the hands of Deputy Sheriff Walker, of Klamath County, near Alturas. Then Sheriff Childers turned him over to me at Medford. His indictment soon followed. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced by Judge Webster to four years for the forgery, and the indictment for the theft of the horse still stands against him. He confessed interesting portions of his career to me on the way down."
    Sheriff Birdseye returns home today after the convention.
Oregonian, Portland, December 10, 1889, page 7


Blaze at Medford.
    Last Saturday evening, at 10:30 o'clock, Medford received her first baptism by fire, the harness and shoe shop of W. G. Cooper, with most of its contents, the harness shop of W. P. Wood and the agricultural machinery warehouse of F. Hubbard, furnishing the fuel for the flames. The fire originated in the rear of W. G. Cooper's building, and was beyond control when first discovered by night watchman Sears, very little of any value being saved from the building. The citizens worked nobly to prevent the spread of the flames, but owing to having no facilities for fighting fire, could not save the adjoining structures, the agricultural implement warehouse, and the frame building occupied by Mr. Wood. From both of the latter, however, most of the stock was saved, Mr. Hubbard losing more or less machinery. When the fire reached the brick walls of I. A. Webb's new building, which stood next to the street, it was easily checked and controlled. E. Worman's stable, on the opposite side of the fire, was saved, with extreme difficulty. Had it burned a large portion of the town would have been endangered. The building occupied by Mr. Wood belonged to Dr. Adkins; amount of insurance not ascertained. Hubbard's policy of $500 had expired a few days before the fire. The loss of implements falls principally on the manufacturers, we learn. Mr. Cooper carried a policy of $2000 on his building and contents, in the Farmers' and Merchants' Insurance Company of Albany. Our Medford neighbors should lose no time in providing the town with a well-equipped fire company.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1889, page 2


O.&T. Co. to Geo. W. Isaacs, lots
8 and 9, block 78, Medford; $10.
O.&T. Co. to A. H. Simpson, lots 9 and 10, block
39, Medford; $60.
Lucy A. Clark to
Precilla Brown, lot 11, block 16, Medford; $10.
D. L. Cox to Geo. W. Howard, lot 1, block 6, and lots
3 and 4, block 5, Beatty's add. to Medford; $900.
W. H. Barr to William Slinger, undivided one-fifth of lots 5 and 6, block 19, Medford; $
100.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1889, page 2


    Roads are quite muddy.
    Barley is quoted at 40 cents a bushel at the Medford warehouse.
    Thousands of fruit trees are now being delivered in Jackson County.
    Geo. J. Wrisley, of the Medford stables, was in town yesterday. He is doing a good business.
    Trains from the south have been quite irregular during the past week, the late rains having caused the streams to overflow their banks and wash away more or less of the railroad track.
    Among the many attorneys who have been admitted to practice lately none are making more progress than W. H. Parker. His address to the jury in the Roten case this week was an excellent effort and is highly complimented by all who heard it. Many were visibly affected by his remarks in behalf of the defendant.
    Several parties are now considering the project of joining Jacksonville with the main line of the railroad, and the prospects are favorable that the enterprise will be fully consummated in less than six months. Local capital will no doubt be employed if those now having the matter in view fail to do anything.
    A gentleman of this place who was somewhat interested in the fate of Dr. C. Lempert, whose mysterious disappearance some two years ago was a nine-days wonder, recently sent a detailed description of the man to Baker City, where Prof. Kugler of Portland reported him to be, and the answer came back from reputable parties that the man is undoubtedly there, practicing under the name of Dr. Kohler. His ways are certainly past finding out, for he did not have much occasion to leave Jacksonville.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1889, page 3


    Thos. B. Merry, well known in Southern Oregon, who is interested in several electric-road schemes, is paying this section a visit for the purpose of finding out what can be done toward joining Jacksonville with the main line of the S.P.R.R.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Holiday goods in reckless profusion at the 5 and 10 Cent Store.
    Great bargains in many lines at the 5 and 10 Cent Store, Medford.
    A. S. Johnson opened out in the butchering business here last week.
    Ladies will find a fine, large stock of millinery at the 5 and 10 Cent Store.
    Miss Elva Galloway is teaching school at Gold Hill and meeting with success.
    Heaps of new goods, just from the East, at the 5 and 10 Cent Store, Medford.
    A large quantity of seasonable goods has just been received at the 50 and 10 Cent Store.
    E. P. Hammond is completing a neat residence in the northern portion of town.
    The Medford opera house will be opened by a grand ball, which takes place on Christmas Eve.
    No trouble to show goods at the 5 and 10 Cent Store. Goods were never sold so cheaply as they are there.
    The Ashland planing mill will furnish a portion of the fittings for Angle & Plymale's brick block at this place.
    Mrs. W. R. Callahan has been entertaining her sister, Mrs. Harvey Rancies of Nebraska, during the week.
    Mrs. George Yaudes has returned from Sterlingville and occupies her nice residence property in this place.
    Mr. Guthrie, who has been engaged for some time on J. K. Green's house at Eagle Point, has returned to Medford.
    The Medford Gun Club will have a grand shooting tournament on Christmas Day, which will no doubt be interesting.
    Don't fail to call and see the large, handsome display of goods especially designed for the holidays at the 5 and 10 Cent Store.
    Allen J. Milton and family of Marshfield arrived in Medford last week with the intention of making this valley their home.
    The reputed niece of General Jackson, Mrs. Col. Davidson, departed for Salem last Thursday, after a week's sojourn at Medford.
    Engel Bros.' stock will be sold out at private sale at Medford, Mr. Lehners having supplied the demand at Phoenix for the present.
    A. Z. Sears was last week appointed night watchman by the town council, vice Noble, removed. Mr. Sears will make an efficient officer.
    Mrs. Potter has returned to Eagle Point after three weeks' sojourn in Medford, undergoing treatment at the hands of one of our local physicians.
    Klippel & Fitch have removed their quarters to the building opposite the Grand Central Hotel, formerly occupied by P. Henderson, the barber, on 7th Street.
    The board of trade met last Monday night and made arrangements for the proper distribution of the circulars and pamphlets recently printed for the town.
    The Medford Gun Club wants permission to shoot within the city limits. Don't allow them to do so, for our lives are already in too much danger from their guns.
    The ladies of the Christian Church, the "Earnest Workers," are preparing for a festival and fair at Howard's hall on the 19th inst. Everyone should attend and aid in a good cause.
    Miss Ollie Freeland of Albany has been in Medford during the week, undergoing medical treatment at the hands of Dr. Pryce. Her residence while here has been at Frank Galloway's.
    Medford post of the G.A.R. will give a "bean supper" this (Thursday) evening, at the brick building belonging to Comrade Grossman on Seventh Street. Of course, it will be an enjoyable affair.
    A school exhibition is announced for December 20th, to be given at Howard's hall. Object, to procure a suitable library case for the school. A fine time is anticipated, as the best musical talent in town will assist.
    C. H. Wallace, the contractor, last week returned to Medford, after completing a fine two-story brick at Junction City, in the Willamette Valley. Mr. W. built the first brick edifices in Eugene, Cottage Grove, Creswell and Junction.
    A member of the Medford Gun Club inadvertently and without malice prepense shot one of Geo. Merriman's geese one day last week, while hunting in the fog, but "ponied" up his six bits for the critter and carried home the game in triumph.
    A gentleman walking up the railroad track discovered an obstruction on the roadway, in the form of a fence rail so laid across as to almost surely derail a luckless train encountering it. Tramps doubtless placed it there with malicious intent.
    The late blaze shows how badly Medford needs protection from fire. Had Jacksonville's fire engine been at hand, most of the property destroyed would have been saved. Work on our waterworks should be pushed forward with all speed, for they are badly needed.
    The fair held by the ladies' aid society of the M.E. Church at Medford on last Tuesday evening was much of a success, and a most enjoyable time was had. In spite of the inclement weather the attendance was fair, and quite a neat sum was realized, to be applied towards furnishing the new church of that denomination.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1889, page 3


BORN.
CALLAHAN--At Medford, November 28, 1889, to Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Callahan, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1889, page 3


Fire at Medford.
    Medford had a small loss by fire last Sunday night. The two harness shops and Hubbard's machinery warehouse on [the] south side of the main business street were burned, together with a considerable part of the contents of the buildings. Losses are reported as follows: W. G. Cooper, $2500; F. Hubbard, $600; B. F. Adkins, $100. The buildings were of wood. It took hard work to save the livery stable property adjacent.
Ashland Tidings, December 13, 1889, page 2


    Medford comes to the front with a gun club and proposes to shoot any other club in this part of the state that will come to Medford on Christmas Day. To arms! Ashland Rod and Gun Club.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 13, 1889, page 3


Our Railroad.
    Thos. B. Merry was here last week, looking up electric-light and railway probabilities in behalf of one of the largest manufacturing companies in America. His idea is to get water power on Rogue River at a point nearest this city, and light Medford, Jacksonville and perhaps Central Point with it, in addition to operating a line of electric railway. Of course, Frank B. Converse's franchise has to run till the 23d of January, and till that time has expired, our people cannot entertain Mr. Merry's proposition. He is favorably known here, however, and in the event of a lapse in Mr. Converse's franchise our people would be as ready and willing to aid him as they were to help Converse and his associates. Mr. Merry thinks that $20,000 is an ample bonus to guarantee any company against loss for the first two years, and that he can make such a showing of it at the east as to be able to secure sufficient capital in cities where interest on money never exceeds 5 percent, as to enable him to get all the stock taken by the 1st day of March next.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1889, page 3


Railroad Talk.
    The project of connecting Jacksonville with the main track of the S.P.R.R. by rail is attracting much attention in different portions of the coast, and several parties are figuring on the cost of building the line, in order to see whether they can entertain the proposition of the citizens of this place and Medford, which offers a bonus of $20,000 to anyone who will build and operate a good railroad between the two places. T. R. North, a prominent citizen of Adel, Iowa, who resided in Jacksonville a short time in 1888, also thinks that he can organize a company to take hold of the scheme. It is likely that someone will push this enterprise to a successful termination during the coming six months. Our citizens will come to the rescue, if they do not.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1889, page 3


A New Fruit.
    We learn from E. W. Hammon, the Medford nurseryman, that M. J. Wessels, the general agent for the Idaho pear, is making his nursery headquarters for a few days and taking orders. Each tree has the seal or trademark of the Idaho Pear Co., proving that they are the genuine stock. We advise those having orchards to give this renowned pear a trial, as it is strongly recommended by leading orchardists.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1889, page 3


    Plenty of mud everywhere.
    There has been very little cold weather so far. Southern Oregon against the world for climate.
    Skating rink hall has been shut down indefinitely, Wolff & Armstrong having gone to Medford, where they open business in the opera house as soon as the building is ready.
    A few days ago we were presented with a beautiful pamphlet from the Idaho Pear Co., of Lewiston, I.T., with a handsome illustration of their celebrated pear, whose virtues are extolled by the most noted pomologists and horticulturists throughout the United States.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Teacher's institute here next week.
    Don't fail to try your luck at Jake Wolff's cane rack.
    E. Cutter & Co. open their new art gallery this week.
    O'Bryant, the jeweler, "takes the cake," and no mistake.
    The Mail is getting ready to issue a holiday edition next week.
    W. L. Webster is employed at the Times office in Jacksonville for the present.
    Trains passing from the south carried considerable snow for several days last week.
    "Shorty" Hamilton returned on Wednesday of last week from a run through northern Oregon.
    Don't fail to see those handsome things on display in Orra Angle's show window. He always leads.
    It is rumored that a change will take place in the management of the Grand Central Hotel here soon.
    "Ain't it grand!" is the exclamation of all who see O'Bryant's assortment of watches, jewelry, etc.
    S. L. Bennett, the milkman, continues to make his regular rounds and furnishes an excellent article of milk.
    If you want a genuine article in the jewelry line O'Bryant can furnish it as cheaply as any other dealer south of Portland.
    There will be a large assemblage of school teachers here next Thursday, the institute commencing on the day after Christmas.
    The new street lamps at Adkins & Webb's corner and in front of the express office aid materially in lighting the town these dark nights.
    Fred. O'Bryant has the nicest stock of jewelry, watches, etc., in the county. If you want something real nice in his line, call on him.
    Gents will find something really handsome in their line at Orra Angel's. He has a fine, complete stock of goods and sells quite reasonably.
    It is predicted that brick buildings will replace the wooden structures in the burnt district next spring, which will make our town more solid than ever.
    It is rumored that the State Insurance Co. intends to contest its liability to pay the policy it wrote on W. G. Cooper's property that was destroyed recently by fire.
    Don't forget the fact that C. C. Smith (1888) has many nice things for the holidays. He has a complete and first-class stock of goods and never fails to please.
    Three years ago Dr. Adkins bought his house, which was burned, and lot on which it stood for $400. He was offered $600 for the naked lot last week, which he refused.
    Jake Wolff has rented a building in this place and is furnishing much fun for the boys with his cane rack. He has a nice stock of holiday goods, which he gives away as prizes every evening.
    The municipal election is drawing near. It is not probable that a political ticket will be made. Mayor Purdin and the present council have done so well that it is likely they will all be handsomely reelected, with perhaps one or two exceptions.
    The ladies of the M.E. Church met with splendid success at the fair held at Howard's hall last week, realizing the sum of $54 from their enterprise. Everybody enjoyed the treat, and there is a very general desire for the ladies to repeat the entertainment at an early day.
    W. G. Cooper last week made application to the town council for leave to erect a temporary wooden building on the site of his burned business house, until such time as he can build a brick structure. Mr. Cooper is a live, energetic citizen, who cannot be kept down by adversity.
    The people of Medford and vicinity, who want to see and select from the largest and finest stock of holiday goods ever brought to southern Oregon, should call at the S.F. Variety Store in Jacksonville and feast their eyes on the elegant articles displayed there. No trouble to show goods.
    The following programme has been arranged by the Medford Gun Club for their shooting on Christmas Day: No. 1--Miss-and-out purse; No. 2--Turkey shoot, three birds; No. 3--Six-birds purse; No. 4--Three birds, turkey shoot; No. 5--Ten-birds purse; No. 6--Three birds, turkey shoot; No. 7--Three-singles and two-pair purse; No. 8--Three birds, turkey shoot; No. 9--Ten-singles purse. There will also be rifle shooting for a beef, which promises to be most interesting.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1889, page 3


The Wheeler and Wilson, No. 9,
Takes the lead, although other companies advertise receiving gold medals. At the Paris fair, 1889, the No. 9 received the first and grand prizes, over all. Machine sold on easy payments. All makes repaired and work warranted. Machines to rent. Office at J. B. Sollner's tailor shop, Jacksonville; Palace Hotel, Grants Pass; D. A. Huling's hardware store, Medford.
H. A. RAYMOND,
General Dealer for Southern Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1889 et seq., page 3


Medford's Water Bonds.
[Medford Mail, Dec. 12.]
    The city council held a meeting Monday evening, which was adjourned to Wednesday evening, to consider a proposition for the purpose of the water works bonds. They have been offered nearly the par value of the bonds, but some difference concerning the rate of interest to be paid has kept the matter from being consummated.
    The council has now made the party another offer, which will probably be accepted, whereby the bonds are to bring the face value and run at 8 percent. At the next meeting the bonds will probably be negotiated.
Ashland Tidings, December 20, 1889, page 3


    It is reported that if the offered bonus of $20,000 for a railroad from Jacksonville to Medford shall not be taken by the 28th of this month by the company who asked for it, another party is ready to take up the enterprise at once if the bonus be still offered.
    The Medford papers tell the following story, this wording being clipped from the News: T. P-------, who lately arrived here from Wisconsin, went across Bear Creek hunting geese. He found a nice bunch and opened fire upon them, killing one. The geese stood fire without flying, whereupon he "took a tumble to himself" and called on the owner and made a deposit of six bits and returned to the city with his goose. This is all right, as Tom is one of the boys and we won't give him away.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 20, 1889, page 3


S. H. Hull to W. I. Vawter, lots 7, 8 and 9, blk 66, Medford; $250.
G. W. Howard to G. S. Youngs, lot 7, blk
71, Medford; $80.
I. J. Phipps to Emma E. Justus, lots
3 and 4 and north half of lot 2, blk 9, Medford; $500.
S. R. Follett to Louisa F. Follett, town lots and property in Medford; $1.
Jane Beck to John Beck, quitclaim to lot
2, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford; $1.
H. E. Baker to Wm. Slinger, lots 5 and 6, blk
19, Medford; $120.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1889, page 2


$500,000, to loan, $500,000.
    By J. H. Whitman of Medford, on improved farm security in Jackson County, at the best rates of any loan agency in the county.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1889, page 3


    Several of our young people attended the holiday parties at Ashland, Medford and Central Point.
    Baled hay is selling at $15 a ton in Medford, and the prospects for a still further advance are good.
    The teachers' institute is in session at Medford, and is proving a highly interesting affair. The attendance is good.
    Fred. Barneburg, of Eden precinct, raises some of the finest and largest cattle in Oregon. He recently sold a steer that weighed 1,808 pounds, and a two-year-old that tipped the beam at 1,378 pounds.
    The Ashland post office goes to A. P. Hammond, under the Harrisonian administration, as it went under the old regime. The Medford post office, it will be remembered, returned into the hands of the former incumbent. There will be a show for the younger generation of aspirants for federal officials in the Republican ranks in this county when all the older fellows are dead and buried.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1889, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Do not forget the teacher's institute which convenes at Medford today.
    Wm. Oliver and family, formerly of this place, now reside in Washington.
    A. G. Johnston, the well-known real estate agent, will remove to Eagle Point, we learn.
    Vernon Phillips, formerly of Medford, is now conducting the Pilot, of Winlock, Washington.
    The gun club have been having daily practice during the week, and are able to show some excellent scores.
    T. N. Berlin, of Minneapolis, was the guest of his sister, Mrs. H. U. Lumsden, during the past week.
    T. R. North, father of Mrs. J. H. Whitman of Medford, is expected to arrive from Adel, Iowa, in a short time.
    B. N. Bunch and family of Brownston, Minn., arrived in Medford last Thursday, after a ten days' trip on the cars.
    J. F. Wisner, a teacher from the north, was in Medford several days last week, looking for a place to ply the birch.
    John S. Miller, Thos. Morine and G. C. Noble announce themselves as candidates for marshal at the ensuing city election.
    W. P. Wood has opened the stock of saddles, harness, etc., that he saved from the late fire in Powell's building on 7th Street.
    A little barefooted boy was observed on our streets last week, and was promptly supplied with comfortable shoes by kindhearted citizens.
    It is rumored that the Medford Mail will soon change its name to the Retractor. Its editor does the crawfishing act very gracefully.
    An excellent entertainment was provided by the public schools of Medford last Friday evening, which was attended by most of our citizens.
    A big crowd attended the shooting match at this place on Christmas Day and much interest was manifested. Some good shooting was done.
    Our old friend, B. W. Powell, has returned to Medford after quite an absence, and will remain permanently. His daughter preceded him here several months.
    The gross value of Medford's assessable property for the year, according to the city recorder's books, is $217,995; exemptions and indebtedness $88,414; taxable property, $129,581.
    The party at the new opera house was a well-attended and enjoyable event. The music was furnished by John Bellinger and John Howell, Jr., and the supper spread at the Grand Central Hotel was excellent and well spoken of by all in attendance.
    Emil Blossfield of Eugene City had Jake Wolff arrested for the larceny of a watch, but it proved a case of mere spitework, and was promptly dismissed by Justice Angle after he had heard the testimony. Not a particle of evidence was adduced to criminate Mr. Wolff in any manner.
    A tall man from Butte Creek wearing a white hat was interviewed by one of our rustling scribes a few days since, and the newspaperman's inquisitiveness concerning a little matter of current news was not exactly relished by the interviewed. After furnishing the scribe with more information than he had dared to hope for, the tall man with charming naivete said, "Haven't you a very smart wife, Mr. H." "Why yes," began the scribe, getting ready to sing the praises of his spouse. "I thought you must have," quoth the tall man, "for I don't see how else a man of your mental calibre could make out to halfway run a newspaper." And nothing was heard in response but the tapping of a woodpecker on the schoolhouse door.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1889, page 3


Last revised December 12, 2014
For more complete names of persons identified by initials, see the Index.