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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Medford News: 1898

Medford-related news items from 1898. Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.



Clothing Cleaned.
    The Medford Steam Laundry is doing better work than ever before, and only asks a fair trial. In addition to the usual work executed, it will clean and press clothing of all kinds. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1898, page 3


    Geo. Kurtz and E. Merz, of the Medford cigar factory and brewery respectively, spent several hours in Jacksonville Monday.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1898, page 3


    Fred Luy, Jr. will return to Tacoma, Wash. in a few days, to settle his business affairs. He will soon afterward engage in business at Medford with Ralph Bunch, the tonsorial artist.
    Judge Crowell returned from Salem on Saturday, where he represented Jackson County before the state board of equalization. He presented facts and figures in such a convincing manner that no change was made in the assessment of the county. The Salem Journal quotes the Judge's remarks in extenso, and reviews them in a very complimentary manner.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Elva Galloway spent the holidays with her parents at Central Point.
    Mrs. Crystal is visiting her daughter, Mrs. C. F. Lewis, at Yreka, Calif.
    Rev. A. S. Foster has tendered his resignation as pastor of our Presbyterian Church.
    Geo. Coulter has succeeded R. P. Little as the tamale man at Theiss' popular resort.
    Miss Bessie Hammond, who is attending the U. of O. at Eugene, spent the holidays in Medford.
    The Lutheran Church is about completed, and the congregation will be able to occupy it in a short time. It is a neat and comfortable edifice.
    Mrs. Fannie Birdsey of Gold Hill spent several days in Medford last week, at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Compson.
    Rufus Edwards, who was seriously hurt in a sawmill in Grant County a short time since, arrived in Medford last week, accompanied by his sister, Mrs. Minot Austin. He has not yet fully recovered.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1898, page 3


JUDGE CROWELL'S ADDRESS.
    The Salem Journal, speaking of Hon. W. S. Crowell's address before the state board of equalization, says:
    Judge Crowell of Jackson County appeared before the board by appointment and made a very pleasant address. Judge Crowell is a large man in every respect, prepossessing in appearance, dignified and an effective talker. After extending thanks to the board for the courtesies of a hearing, he answered some questions of members. He explained a shortage of 1,200 acres appearing on the roll this year. He said there was quite a difference this year from last year on account of the different interpretations placed by different assessors upon the terms "tillable" and "non-tillable" land, the previous assessor taking the position that all land cleared of timber and chaparral so that it might be cultivated and cropped should be classed as "tillable," while the present assessor and the county judge do not so hold.
    Judge Crowell explained the assessment of railroad bed, which is valued in that county at $10,000 a mile, and told that the Southern Pacific Company had held up Jackson County by injunction from collecting its $19,000 of taxes, and that the county had paid $4000 of that amount to the state. He thought the assessment of railroad property in the county was only fair and just, and all he wanted was to be let alone. He exhibited a map of Jackson County showing the land owned by the railroad company therein, covering an area of half a million acres, or some 62,000 acres more than the whole amount of land owned by the total population of the county, placed at 15,000 people. He also defended the assessment of these lands, saying they were on an average valued lower than similar lands owned by residents.
    Judge Crowell was bitter toward the railroad company. He exhibited the various petitions of the company for reduction of assessment, showing such a variation of values in their own minds that, as the Judge quoted:
"They wriggled in and wriggled out,
  Leaving the people still in doubt,
  Whether the snake that made the track,
  Was coming forth or going back."
    "It was the same old S.P. railroad company," said the Judge, "with that archangel of hell, Collis P. Huntington, at its head."
    Judge Crowell showed that according to statistics cost of building all the railroads in Oregon was $90,000,000, while the assessed valuation of said railroad last year was only $5,673,135, or a little over 6 percent of their cost, while the farmers and business men of the state are paying taxes upon a valuation of 60 to 75 percent of the full cost or value of their property, and he claimed that this was "an unanswerable, stinging wrong to the people of this state," and that it ought not to be borne any longer. He compared the mode of assessing railroads in California with that of Oregon, showing that our sister state on the south knows far better how to make railroads pay their just share of taxation than we do and that we should derive a good lesson therefrom.
    Judge Crowell said a great many things to open the eyes of the state board, and displayed a profound knowledge of the subject in hand, as well as an earnest desire to see justice done.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dan Engelman, late of Big Butte, has become a resident of this city.
    Our municipal election takes place next Tuesday. It promises to be quite interesting.
    The opera house was in use for eight consecutive nights during the holidays. The festivities were conducted under the auspices of different societies of our town.
    The board of school directors has arranged for a loan of $19,000 for three years, at seven percent interest, from R. H. Whitehead. This is practically an extension of the notes already held by Mr. W., but at a lower rate of interest.
    The following is a list of the officers of the Medford lodge of Masons installed on St. John's Day by D. T. Sears: J. E. Enyart, W.M.; J. A. Whitman, S.W.; A. S. Hammond, J.W.; Z. Maxcy, Treas.; W. V. Lippincott, Sec.; Eli Fisher, chaplain; H. U. Lumsden, S.D.; C. W. Wolters, J.D.; Wm. Slinger, S.S.; Garl T. Jones, J.S.; J. K. Darnell, T.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1898, page 3


    J. C. Pendleton informs us that Bybee Bros. drove about 150 head of fat hogs to the Medford market from Table Rock precinct on Tuesday.
    The Rogue River Choral Union has accepted the invitation of the people of Medford to hold their annual convention at that town during the holiday season of 1898-9.
    H. C. Mackey, the Medford photographer, one day last week had a new $45 overcoat stolen from the office of the Ashland House. Al. Helms, one of the lessees of the house, lost a similar garment a few days since in the same way.
    Wm. Eaton and Bob Beaver are wanted by the Medford authorities for disturbing a meeting of the Salvation Army. S. Goodman, J. Wigle and J. H. Prall were arrested for resisting an officer at the same time.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1898, page 3


    Fred Luy, Jr. left for Tacoma, Wash. on Tuesday. As soon as he can close his business there he will locate at Medford.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Ray Everett, who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. N. Butler, of Medford, returned home to Grants Pass a few days since.
    J. H. Miller, the boot and shoe dealer, left last week for the gold fields of the Klondike. He was joined at Roseburg by his daughter, Miss Lou, who will accompany him.
    J. W. Wiley shipped a carload of hogs to Portland one day last week. The supply of marketable porkers is about exhausted, and few further shipments will be made this season.
    The football game between the Ashland lightweights and the Medford team was played on the grounds south of the depot instead of at the fair grounds and resulted in a victory for the boys from the granite city by a score of 8 to 0.
    The following officers were installed by the K. of P. last week: A. C. Hubbard, C.C.: J. H. Butler, V.C.; F. Wilson, P.; W. W. Woods, M. of W.; J. F. Wait, K. of R. and S.; J. E. Enyart, M. of E.; J. Bates, M. at A.; Eugene Orr, I.G.; H. C. Mackey, O.G. The installing officer was H. U. Lumsden, D.D.G.C.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1898, page 3


    A party of eight linemen of the Postal Telegraph Co. have been engaged in stringing a wire from Ashland to Redding, Calif. lately, and when that is completed will run one from Ashland to Roseburg. This will give the postal three wires from San Francisco to Portland.
    The mail from Ager to Klamath Falls is now carried on a buckboard on account of the sticky mud on the route. The writer has had personal experience with that same mud and is of the opinion that a flying machine is the only vehicle which can safely navigate the stretch of country from Ager to the Klamath River in the winter time.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Etta King left a few days since for Ashland to take a position in one of the hotels there.
    Jonas Justus returned a few days since from San Francisco and will take his departure for the Klondike in a short time.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
G. L. Schermerhorn to E. G. Bradbury; tract in Medford . . . 2000.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1898, page 3


    Henry Klippel of Medford intends going to the Klondike in the spring.
    Miss Minnie Coleman of Medford and Attorney W. H. Parker of that city visited relatives in Grants Pass during the holidays.
    Parties in Medford are reported having disturbed Salvation Army meetings. Arrests have been made and the disturbers will be made to pay the penalty, provided all of them can be found.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, January 13, 1898, page 1


    H. C. Nute, of Medford, Oregon, is in Toledo. Mr. Nute is administrator of the Rich estate and is here to sell off the property in this county and close the matter up. He will be here for several days.

"Local Notes," Lincoln County Leader, Toledo, Oregon, January 14, 1898, page 6


    At the city election Tuesday in Medford, a total of 312 votes was cast. This is considered a very light vote in Medford, the following officers elected: Mayor H. L. Gilkey; councilmen, F. Hubbard, Garl T. Jones, R. H. Whitehead, and A. M. Woodford; recorder, J. W. Lawton; treasurer, Charles Strang; marshal, M. R. Hart.

Daily Capital Journal, Salem, January 14, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    H. L. Shideler of Watsonville, Calif. is visiting in Medford.
    Ted Howard, late of Butte Creek, has purchased the tamale business of Geo. Coulter.
    Mrs. Bert. Childers, who has been a resident of Watkins district for some time, returned to Medford Saturday.
    The S.P. Co. has made some needed improvements around the depot, filling in the crossings with stone and gravel.
    F. M. Mingus has returned from Washington, where he has been running a threshing machine for several months.
    M. Purdin has been granted a patent on his paper toothpicks. The invention promises to cut quite a figure, as it is a valuable one.
    N. B. Bradbury has purchased from G. L. Schermerhorn the planing mill property on North D Street, and with R. W. Gray will operate it.
    Mrs. C. E. Wolcott returned a few days since from San Francisco. Her husband has gone to Denver, Col. and will canvass the middle states for a publishing house.
    W. P. Dodge and F. A. Bliss are boring a well for the Medford distillery. They have already reached a depth of 200 feet, and will probably go 100 feet deeper.
    S. A. D. Higgins has disposed of his interest in the confectionery business of Parker & Higgins to I. A. Mounce. It is said that "the Duke" contemplates going into business at Gold Hill.
    Miss Edith White, daughter of G. W. White, who is a teacher in the Jefferson, O.T. public schools, was married on Dec. 30th to Prof. Delzel, principal of the same school. The many friends of the young lady in southern Oregon tender congratulations and best wishes.
    The city election passed off quietly, 327 ballots having been cast. The following were the successful candidates: Mayor, H. L. Gilkey; councilmen, F. Hubbard, Garl T. Jones, A. M. Woodford, R. H. Whitehead; recorder, J. W. Lawton, treasurer, Chas. Strang; marshal, M. R. Hart.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1898, page 3


    H. B. Reed, formerly engaged in the fence business in southern Oregon, but now located at McMinnville, passed through the valley a few days since, en route home from a trip to the East.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1898, page 3


Probate Court.
    The petition of C. K. Brandenburg, as administrator of the estate of W. W. Brooks, deceased, for an order authorizing him to sell some real property of the estate, came up for hearing before probate court this morning. Clara Drisko, of Medford, one of the heirs, through her attorneys, D'Arcy & Richardson, objected to the sale of the property. Further hearing of the petition was continued until Jan. 27, at 2 p.m.
    Thos. Strang, administrator of the estate of Rosetta L. Strang, deceased, today petitioned probate court for an order authorizing him to accept a warranty deed to a store building and residence adjoining, located in Clackamas, in lieu of the payment of a note for $1,000 executed on June 29, 1893, by Wm. S. Runyon payable to the deceased. A mortgage to the above-mentioned premises was given to insure the payment of the note, but Runyon finds it will be impossible to cancel the note and wishes to deed the property to the administrator without going through the formality and extra expense of foreclosure proceedings. The petition was granted.

Daily Capital Journal, Salem, January 17, 1898, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    R. H. Halley and A. D. Naylor will leave Medford for [the] Klondike in a few days.
    Ira A. Phelps, the expert printer, and his family left for San Francisco this week to locate. They carry with them the best wishes of many friends.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. P. H. Legate, W. F. Shawver and W. W. Cardwell, formerly of Medford, are stationed at Fort Wrangel, Alaska, en route to the Klondike.
    J. S. Howard, who has been inspecting government surveys in Arizona, returned home a few days since, accompanied by Mrs. H., who has been visiting relatives at Los Angeles.
    A minstrel company has been organized in Medford with the following members: H. A. Frenna, manager, W. H. Simmons, J. R. Hardin, Geo. Webber, A. J. Webber, Thos. Berry, Joe Frizell, Carl and Ray Crystal. They will make their initial bow to the public in a short time.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dan. Waldroop has a bad attack of the Klondicitis, and offers the Crater at a bargain.
    There will be a dancing party in the Medford opera house on Tuesday evening, under the auspices of the Sylbo club.
    Fred Luy, the clever tonsorial artist, who will soon engage in business with Ralph Bunch, is making arrangements to move to our city with his family.
    A special car, built and sent out by the Baptist Publication Society, has been in Medford for several days. It is in charge of Rev. Jacques and wife, who hold services therein.
    Mrs. Norton, one of the earliest pioneers of southern Oregon, died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Fred. Barneburg, last Saturday. She was nearly 90 years of age. A lady of many estimable qualities, her death is mourned by a large circle of friends.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1898, page 3


    Harvey Hall has jumped the Anaconda mine in Williams Creek district, owned by A. C. Tayler, A. A. Davis of Medford and others, because assessment work on it was not done in 1897. This is not right.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Chas. R. Ryder to E. F. Walker; lots 5 and 6, blk 40, Medford . . . 200.00
Edw. Wilkinson to E. F. Walker; lots 10 and 11, blk 4, lot 26, blk 3, Orchard Home Association . . . 300.00
Edw. Wilkinson to Prudence Walker; right of way through certain portions of Enoch Walker subdivision . . . 20.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Mamie Nicholson, one of our irresistible belles, spent Wednesday at the county seat.
    J. F. D. Wrinkle, who purchased the stock of Angle & Plymale, has shipped that remaining north.
    Mrs. M. Chapman of Williams returned home last week from a visit with her daughter, Mrs. Ed. Tryer.
    Miss Esther Silsby, the clever music teacher, has over twenty members in her vocal class, who are progressing nicely.
    Miss Pearl Hibbard, the popular stenographer, left last week for Seattle, where she will visit friends and perhaps locate. We wish her success.
    L. M. Lyon, the contractor, has exchanged his residence property in this city with M. F. Parker for 160 acres of land in Central Point precinct.
    The old board platform in front of the S.P. depot has been torn away, and the ground has been treated to a liberal coat of decomposed gravel. The pond of water under the building was a menace to the health of the community for some time.
    J. A. Whitman, one of the most popular young men in southern Oregon, surprised his many friends by taking unto himself a wife on Wednesday evening. Mrs. Whitman was Miss Mitchell, who came from Indiana several months ago and has been residing with Mrs. C. I. Hutchison. She is an accomplished and charming young lady, and highly respected by all who know her. The happy couple have gone east on a wedding tour. May their married life be a long, blissful and prosperous one.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1898, page 3


    Snowballing was liberally indulged in this week, an amusement not often afforded in this section.
    The hills are frequented by the younger residents of town, who find much amusement in coasting.
    J. H. and C. E. Stewart each shipped a carload of dried fruit to New York from Eden precinct last week.
    The Star minstrel troupe, composed of 15 of Medford's most talented artists, will appear at the U.S. Hall in Jacksonville on Feb. 4th. The programme is a varied and excellent one, and will no doubt give entire satisfaction. Don't fail to patronize the boys.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    R. P. Little and E. W. Carder started last week for the Klondike.
    J. A. Whitman has shipped 20 carloads of fruit, principally apples, to eastern markets.
    Miss Estella Spangler left last week for Terre Haute, Ind., where she will make her home with a sister of her deceased mother.
    F. K. Deuel has sold his interest in the firm of Deuel & Stevens to W. B. Stevens, and will seek a location in southern California.
    I. A. Webb left last week for Los Angeles, Calif., on a visit to his brother and to try a change of climate for the benefit of his health
    H. D. Sears of Oakland, Calif., son of D. T. Sears of Medford, passed through the valley last week, accompanied by his wife. They will locate at Tacoma.
    The Medford McKinley Club last week elected the following delegates to the state league of Republican clubs, which meets at Portland on February 1st: Geo. F. Merriman, G. L. Davis, Dr. J. M. Keene, W. I. Vawter, C. W. Wolters, W. T. York, J. H. Norris, D. T. Lawton, H. G. Nicholson, F. M. Stewart and C. J. Howard.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1898, page 3


    Sheriff Frazier of Multnomah County bought a carload of fine horses and mules at Medford last Friday. They were nearly equally divided, horses predominating.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1898, page 3


Whitman-Mitchell.
    Miss Nellie Mitchell, formerly of this city, and Mr. Bert Whitman were married in Medford, Oregon, January 26th.
Logansport Reporter, Indiana, January 31, 1898, page 8


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
H. U. Lumsden to M. B. Clark; w ½ of lots 2 and 3, blk 1, Barr's add to Medford . . . 1100.00
M. B. Clark to H. U. Lumsden, w ½ of lot 1, blk 2, Barr's add to Medford . . . 1100.00
Carrie L. Johnson to G. W. Isaacs, Sr.; lot in Medford . . . 2.00
Carrie L. Johnson to G. W. Isaacs, Sr.; adm'r deed to same property . . . 768.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    C. M. Phillips of this precinct has moved to Elmira, Wash.
    Mrs. H. C. Turpin spent several days in Medford last week, with her daughter, Mrs. Chas. Milligan, who has been quite ill.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. Luy, Jr., late of Tacoma, have become residents of our town. Fred. has formed a partnership with Ralph Bunch, the popular barber. Both are first-class tonsorial artists.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Nannie Woolf to F. L. Howey; lot 1, blk 22, Medford . . . 2000.00
Perry Ellis to Bertha S. Barnum; lot 14, blk 22, Medford . . . 150.00
J. F. Kelly to same; lots 14, 15 and 16, blk 23, Medford . . . 225.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Mamie Nicholson holds a position at W. B. Stevens' mercantile establishment.
    Dr. E. P. Geary returned a few days since from a trip to California in search of a location. He found nothing to suit him, and will locate at Portland.
    Medford school district has levied a tax of ten mills for the ensuing year, the same as last year, which raised about $1200 more than necessary for meeting expenses. The surplus was used to pay outstanding warrants.
    The city council has awarded the contract for operating the water works and also lighting the streets with electricity to R. A. Proudfoot. Part of the members are opposed to the scheme. This proceeding has caused considerable comment, and there is talk of applying to the circuit court for an injunction to restrain its consummation.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1898, page 3


    The branch of the Salvation Army which is operating at Medford will hold a meeting at the town hall in Jacksonville during this week.
    J. D. Heard of Medford, the clever operator in mines, returned last week from Yreka, Calif., where he closed a deal whereby the blue gravel mines near that city become the property of the Colorado Development Co. of Denver. The consideration is reported to be $12,000.
    The Medford minstrels gave an interesting performance at the U.S. Hall last Friday evening, to a fair-sized audience. The attendance would have been much better had the troupe indulged in thorough advertising. We hope to see them with us soon again.
    The annual meeting of the Medford fair association will be held on February 12th. There is considerable stock in the corporation which has not been called for, and it will be necessary for stockholders to procure it in order to be qualified to vote at any meeting.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1898, page 3


    Uncle Nate Stevens is selling off his household goods at this place, and will go to Medford, where he will make his home with his son. Uncle Nate will be missed from this locality.
"Local Notes," Lincoln County Leader, Toledo, Oregon, February 8, 1898, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    G. W. Eaton, late of Flounce Rock precinct, has become a resident of Medford.
    Will. Pickens has returned from Elliott Creek, where he has been employed in the Boggs mine for the past few months.
    Our minstrels gave one of their clever performances at Eagle Point on Wednesday night. They were favored with a large audience.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 10, 1898, page 2


    J. W. Wiley of Medford shipped two carloads of hogs north from Ashland this week.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 10, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
W. E. Nicholson to Martha L. Tice; lots 9 and 10, blk 2, Medford . . . 175.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Geo. N. Spurr of Cottage Grove has commenced the erection of a bowling alley next door to the "Crater."
    S. A. D. Higgins, Eugene Amann, D. W. Hazel and son, Alex. Galloway and Taylor Payne left Sunday evening for Alaska.
    The Salvation Army has received a new drum and is preparing for a general assault along the whole line in a short time.
    Miss Maysie Foster has been chosen to fill the vacancy in the public schools of Grants Pass caused by the resignation of Miss Mary McCarthy.
    Mrs. Fred. Barneburg and her daughter, Miss Mollie, left last week for Los Angeles, Calif., to remain some time for the benefit of the latter's health.
    Drs. Pickel and Wait last week removed an enlarged tubercular gland from the neck of Miss Millie Tryer. The operation was entirely successful, and the young lady is recovering.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1898, page 3


    C. B. Rostel is making preparations to open a barber shop and variety store in his brick building in Medford.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Janet Garrick to Wesley Dial; lots 5 and 6, blk 75, Medford . . . 600.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1898, page 2


    It is reported that W. J. King, formerly of Medford, who went to Alaska last year with Jos. Ritter, was drowned while trying to cross the Yukon on the ice.
    H. M. Crowell of this precinct has received returns from a carload of apples shipped to New Orleans. He netted 76 cents per box, but the fruit was unusually fine.
    The personal property belonging to the estate of M. A. Williams will be disposed of at public and private sale at the residence of the deceased, a few miles southeast of Medford, on Saturday, March 5th. There are quite a number of useful articles among the assortment.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The firm of Williams & Cox, which has been conducting the brick livery stable, has been dissolved, I. F. Williams retiring.
    Geo. Kurtz, the clever cigar manufacturer, is building up an excellent trade in different parts of the valley. He makes a number of popular brands which sell readily.
    Capt. Nash is contemplating the erection of a brick building adjoining his hotel. The lower story will be modeled into a store room, while the upper will be divided into rooms and used in connection with the hotel.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
R. D. Foster to Adelia N. Foster; lots 5 and 6, blk 39, Medford . . . 1.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    R. H. Halley and Perry Stewart have returned from Alaska, better pleased with this section than ever.
    J. D. Heard, the mining expert, has gone to Yreka, Calif. to look after the recent purchase made by the company he represents.
    L. B. Warner, who is handling mining stock at Stockton, Calif., spent several days with his family last week. He is doing a big business.
    The well at the brewery is now down 302 feet, in a slate formation all the way. Mr. Merz has gone to Portland to consult Mr. Weinhard as to the advisability of proceeding further.
    Pith and Push is the name of a new venture in the monthly magazine field launched by Rev. E. E. Thompson, formerly of Medford, at Oakland, Calif. It is bright and interesting, and we wish it success.
    Robt. B. Reame won the prize for the best essay in the Medford public schools, and the effort will be entered in the contest for the reward offered for the three best compositions on revolutionary subjects by the order of the Sons of the Revolution.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1898, page 3



    The genus hobo is flitting northward in large bands, bound for Skagway or any other old place.
    The new wire recently strung between Portland and San Francisco by the Western Union Tel. Co. is being used.
    The Medford detachment of the Salvation Army held services at the town hall on Friday evening, and will appear here once a week hereafter. One convert was made, and more are said to be on the way.
    The supreme court has passed on the case of M. W. Wheeler, et al., vs. H. H. Taylor, et al., involving the title to a large body of land in Eden precinct. The decision of the lower court has been modified in one particular, and the appellants get judgment for costs in the upper court.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1898, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Geo. Coulter, the clever painter, was in Jacksonville one day this week, where he will paint a number of buggies.
    G. W. Eaton, lately of prospect, and a first-class cooper, has opened a shop in this city. He guarantees satisfaction.
    Rufus Edwards is at Cottage Grove on a visit to his brother-in-law, J. L. Downs, who is suffering from a stroke of paralysis.
    School Clerk Jones has completed the census of children of school age in this district, and finds 725 as against 765 last year.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1898, page 3


    Jesse J. W. Wilson of Medford has commenced a suit for divorce against his wife, Rosanna Wilson.
    Al. Young of Medford is acting as fireman of the R.R.V.R. until Pat Donegan, Jr. recovers from his serious illness.
    Geo. L. Davis of Medford has announced himself as a candidate for the Republican nomination for county clerk. We are at [a] loss to know what he wants with it--perhaps to hang it up as a memento. There is no probability of a nomination from that party in Jackson County blossoming into anything like an office this year.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ira Phelps, the well-known printer, is now employed in an Albany job printing establishment.
    Mrs. Carrie Johnson and children returned last week from Pacific Grove, Calif., where they have been spending the winter.
    G. W. White left a few days since for Sacramento and other California points, to look for a location for educating his children.
    Rev. J. F. Wallace, who is afflicted with asthma, has removed to Ashland for the benefit of his health. He will still remain in charge of our M.E. church.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 28, 1898, page 3


    Schuyler Hammond was arrested at Medford last week on information from Salem charging him with burglary committed near there some time ago. He had an examination before Justice Jones of Medford, who discharged him for want of evidence. Hammond immediately left and has not been apprehended, although officers are after him.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 28, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Eunice M. Lumsden to John A. Smith; lot 4, blk 23, Medford . . . 100.00
J. H. Stewart to A. J. Weeks, 54.04 acres in twp 38 s, r1w . . . 2161.60
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 3, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Oscar Williams has gone to Sacramento to engage in the barber business.
    E. D. Elwood arrived from Newberg, Yamhill County, last week, and will open a jewelry store in Medford.
    The annual school meeting for this district will be held next Monday, for the purpose of electing one director for one year, another for two years and a clerk.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 3, 1898, page 2


    Harry Campbell of Medford was sent to the county jail for 30 days by Justice Jones this week, for stealing $25 worth of wood from the S.O.P. Co. It is thought that he is crazy, and a complaint has been made charging him with insanity.
    Harry Campbell of Medford today had an examination in Judge Crowell's court and was adjudged insane by Dr. Pickel. He will be taken to Salem today by Sheriff Barnes and J. A. Wilson.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 3, 1898, page 3



     Mr. and Mrs. Bert Whitman came here to visit with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Enyart, of the Westside. Mrs. Whitman was formerly Miss Nellie Mitchell, of this city. They intended to remain some time, but a telegram announcing the serious illness of Mr. Whitman's father at Medford, Oregon, unexpectedly called them home.
"City News," Logansport Pharos, Indiana, March 3, 1898, page 8


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    F. E. Birge, the mining expert, has gone to Chicago on a business trip.
    W. V. Lippincott has returned from a visit to his son, who is attending Mt. Angel College.
    Col. Rouse, the mining expert, who has been ill for some time with Bright's disease, died at Prall's hotel on Sunday. He was about 60 years of age.
    The entertainment for the benefit of the public school library, which has already been postponed twice, will be given on March 12th, without fail. An excellent programme has been arranged.
    An Irishman went into a certain hotel in Medford for a "square meal." The waiter first brought him a bowl of soup, which Pat drank with a relish. She then brought in celery, which went the way of the soup. She then brought a fine lobster. Pat looked at the lobster for a minute and then replied, "Madam," said he, "Oi've drank your dishwater and ate your bouquet, but Oi'll be dom'd if Oi'll ate the big."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1898, page 3


    S. U. Mitchell of Medford, the well-known horseman and attorney, was with us one day last week.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Martha Hosler to Ida Schermerhorn; lots 1 and 2; blk 56, Medford . . . 630.00
Oliver Harbaugh to Thos. Riley; 160 acres in twp 36s, r1w . . . 1500.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Populists meet in county convention at the opera house on Saturday.
    The city is lit with electricity again, and it presents a much improved appearance at night.
    Rev. F. Sach, our German Lutheran preacher, has gone to Roseburg, where he expects to organize a church.
    T. W. Johnson has been appointed constable of this district, vice Isaac Woolf resigned. A good appointment.
    J. R. Wilson and N. B. Bradbury were elected officers of our school district on Monday and G. T. Jones clerk.
    Rev. Eli Fisher of our Christian Church has tendered his resignation as pastor, having accepted a call to a Salinas, Calif. church.
    The firm of Cranfill & Hutchison of Medford has been dissolved. The stock of goods will be divided and both gentlemen will engage in business on his own account, Mr. Cranfill occupying Angle & Plymale's brick.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 10, 1898, page 3


    There is considerable sickness at Ashland and Medford.
    J. T. Rodgers, B. R. Willits, Thad. Powell, A. R. Thompson, Sam Parker and Geo. Howard left Ashland last week for the Klondike; also Perry McGee of Medford.
    The Populists' county convention will meet at Medford next Saturday for the purpose of electing ten delegates to represent them in the state convention on the 23d.
    S. W. Speas of Medford has a method for capturing codling moth, which he claims has been a successful one. He hangs a small bottle filled with sweetened water on his fruit trees, which attracts the insects, and they are unable to get out when once in it. Last year he put out over 100 bottles, and they were nearly all filled with the pests.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 10, 1898, page 3


A GRAND AFFAIR.
    P. Redlinger, being desirous of leaving Jacksonville on account of his health, has determined to dispose of his property by a drawing that will take place at an early day. There will be 500 tickets, ranging from 5 cents to $5.00 in value. The following is a list of articles to be distributed among the participants, parceled as they will be awarded:
    1. House and lot, corner lot, known as Dr. Jackson's place; almost one and a quarter acres, with 82 fruit trees and 15 grape vines.
    2. Walnut parlor set, 6 pieces, upholstered.
    3. Black walnut bedstead, with spring mattress, bureau, washstand and two chairs.
    4. Oak parlor center table.
    5. Oak writing desk.
    6. Domestic sewing machine.
    7. Kitchen stove, No. 8.
    8. Oak extension stable.
    9. Sofa.
 10. Three straw chairs, color cherry.
 11. Table, color brown.
 12. Table with drawer.
 13. Bedstead with wire springs, washstand and chair.
 14. Bedstead with wire springs, washstand and chair.
 15. House clock.
 16. Sink and flour chest.
 17. Cupboard and table.
 18. Winchester rifle, .44 caliber.
 19. Shotgun, 12 gauge.
 20. 24 chickens and rooster.
 21. Three tiers of manzanita wood.
 22. Crosscut saw and bucksaw.
 23. Two washtubs, washboard and wringer.
 24. Three tiers of manzanita wood.
 25. 24 chickens and rooster.
 26. Two pitchforks, shovel, pick, hoe and rake.
 27. Grindstone and wheelbarrow.
 28. Three tiers of manzanita wood.
 29. Two 25-gallon barrels.
 30. Two 4-gallon earthen jars and churner.
 31. Six kitchen chairs.
 32. Three galvanized spittoons.
 33. Washstand.
 34. Two lamps and lantern.
 35. Two milk pails and wash boiler.
 36. Kraut knife.
 37. Fruit press.
 38. Parlor hanging lamp.
    It will be the grandest event of the kind which has taken place in Jacksonville during a long time, and there will be many chances to get valuable articles at a very small cost.
Democratic Times, 
Jacksonville,
March 10, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Alonzo Slover has gone to eastern Oregon to seek a location.
    The Democratic county convention will meet at the opera house on Saturday the 19th.
    Mrs. Ed. Tryer, who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. Chapman of Williams, has returned home.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Whitman, who have been spending their honeymoon in the East, returned to Medford last week.
    Jack Morris has disposed of his second-hand store to Jos. Shone and G. L. Schermerhorn, who will add a stock of furniture, hardware, etc.
    G. F. Gavitt, late foreman of the Mail, receiving news of the illness of his wife at Chehalis, Wash., left last week for that city. He will probably remain there.
    S. A. D. Higgins, who met with success while passing as the duke of Sleepy Hollow, but who sought to extend his dominions by taking in Alaska, has returned to Medford much disgusted with his last venture. He was welcomed home in a royal manner.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1898, page 3


    The Democratic primaries take place on Wednesday, the 16th. The delegates elected then will meet in Medford on Saturday for the purpose of choosing thirteen delegates who will represent Jackson County in the state convention that meets in Portland on the 23d.
    The Times is sorry to learn that financial difficulties have overtaken J. A. Whitman, one of Medford's most enterprising and popular business men. He has been operating in fruit extensively, and losses in this commodity have had much to do with his misfortunes. We hope that his embarrassment will be temporary.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. D. Heard, the mining operator, and his family left a few days since for California to remain some time.
    Dale Hazel, who started for [the] Klondike a short time ago, returned last Sunday. He went no further north than Portland, but visited Baker City before starting for home.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 17, 1898, page 2


    The Alaska Dog Co., composed of residents of Ashland, which shipped a carload of canines to Seattle a short time since, for disposal to Klondikers, is "busted." Last week over 40 dogs were turned loose on the streets of that city, there being no market for them. Many of those which were disposed of went for less than cost.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 17, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Atha H. Russell to Sidney E. Cole; E ½ lot 1, blk 2, Mingus subdivision, in twp 37s, r2w . . . 225.00
C. Mingus to D. T. Lawton; blk 3, Mingus subdivision . . . 550.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 17, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Rufus Cox and family of Central Point precinct have become residents of Medford.
    Mrs. C. E. Wolcott left last week for Denver, Col., where her husband is now located.
    J. U. Willeke came up from Leland last week with part of the cleanup of the Willeke, Whitehead & Co. mine, amounting to about $1500.
    E. A. Johnson has traded his fruit orchard near Medford to D. B. Russell of Drain for a mill site, machinery and town property owned by the latter at that place. Mr. J. will erect a still of forty barrels capacity on the site.
    A man, who says he was one of those that lost all he had in the wreck of the steamer Corona in Alaskan waters, fell in front of the brick livery stable on D Street one day last week from exhaustion and want of food. A sufficient sum was subscribed to enable him to reach his home at Los Angeles, Calif.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1898, page 3


    Ream R. Findley claims that he was pushed off a train going at full speed in Union County a short time since and considerably injured. He says that Jas. Coeti, who left Medford for Colorado, and with whom he was traveling, was guilty of the act. it was the greatest wonder that he was not killed. Findley also charges Coeti with rifling his valise, after having borrowed $20 from him.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
D. H. Van Antwerp to Addie Van Antwerp; lots 1 and 2, blk 5, Beatty's add. to Medford . . . 50.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 24, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. D. Heard and family have taken their residence at Pasadena, Calif.
    Rev. Sach, the German Lutheran minister, has returned from Roseburg, where he has completed arrangements for the erection of a church.
    Dr. B. F. Adkins, wife and daughter, and D. S. Youngs and wife, who have been spending the winter in southern California, returned home last week.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 24, 1898, page 3


    O. B. Allen, the well-known printer, has accepted the position of foreman of the Medford Mail.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 24, 1898, page 3


    Miss Myrtle Woodford of Medford is temporarily holding a case in the Times office.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 24, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss May Phipps is teaching a successful term of school in the Mound district.
    S. Childers, wife and children left last week for Chico, Calif. to seek a location.

    J. W. Curry has gone to Eugene in the interest of the Singer Sewing Machine Co.
    Bert Hooker and John Williams have gone to Yreka, Calif. to seek employment.
    J. H. Wrisley has removed with his family to the Olsen saw mill on Poorman's Creek.
    W. B. Grubb of Klamath Falls was in Medford last week and took out seven hacks for G. T. Baldwin of that place.
    The city council decided on the erection of a new city bastille at their meeting last week. Bids for the construction have been asked for.
    The men of the postal telegraph company put up several new poles in Medford last week and made some changes in the wires at the office.
    Dr. and Mrs. B. F. Adkins returned from southern California last week. Their daughter, Miss Ora, did not accompany them, but will come later on.
    M. S. Damon has been awarded the contract to carry the mail from Keno, Klamath County to Picard, Calif., making a round trip daily, except Sunday.
    I. A. Mounce has disposed of his interest in the temperance billiard hall to S. A. Owens, his partner, who in turn sold a half interest in the business to S. A. D. Higgins.
    A commercial club, the object of which is the encouragement of sugar beet culture, was organized here last week at the conclusion of Prof. Shaw's lecture. W. T. York was elected president and J. W. Lawton secretary.
    E. W. Carder of this place, who left for the Klondike in company with several others some time since, arrived at Lake Lindermann with 1000 pounds of provisions on March 6th. His party experienced some rough weather, but came through all right.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. D. Heard, the mining man, returned from Yreka a few days since.
    Rev. Fisher and family have gone to Salinas, Calif., where he has accepted a pastorate.
    W. E. Phipps was in Salem last week, taking the examination before the supreme court for admission to the bar.
    Mrs. J. S.  Young of Heppner, who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Hooker, of Medford, returned home a few days since.
    Mrs. W. W. Stanfield, accompanied by her daughter, Daisy, and Edith Duval, her granddaughter, left Medford on Sunday for her old home at Waverly, Kansas. They leave many friends in Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 31, 1898, page 3


    No. 4 of the National Tribune, a weekly reform journal with 100 editors representing all parties, has been received. E. B. Webster is the managing editor, 432 Washington Boulevard, Chicago. E. E. Phipps, Medford, is an associate editor for Oregon. There are to be editors in each state. Price $1.00 a year.

"Far Western Reflections,"
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, April 1, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    L. Shideler left last week for Knoxville, Tenn., to be gone some time.
    Fresh California vegetables and citrus fruits just received by Wendt & Puhl.
    Bids for the construction of the new city jail will be opened on Tuesday, April 5th.
    Hugh Elliott, the expert horseshoer and blacksmith, has removed to his new stand near the Bear Creek bridge.
    Wm. Sanor, one of the pioneers of southern Oregon, died at his residence in this city on Thursday. In early days he hauled freight from Crescent City to Jacksonville, and later from Roseburg. His wife is very ill and in destitute circumstances.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1898, page 3

Influenza January 24, 1901 San Francisco Call
January 24, 1901 San Francisco Call
    La grippe is rampant in southern Oregon. So is politics.
    It seems as if Gus. Newbury will receive the Republican nomination for county clerk, as he has been slated by the bosses. He is quite averse to letting go of the public teat.
    Medford's branch of the Salvation Army held a meeting at the town hall on Friday evening and were greeted by a big audience. They will be with us again on Wednesday night.
    A. S. Hammond of Medford is a prominent candidate for the Republican nomination for attorney general. He is one of the best lawyers in southern Oregon, and would fill that position well, if he gets a chance to.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. Fordyce of this precinct has purchased a new threshing outfit, with a capacity of 3000 bushels per day.
    C. M. Harvey of Talent has become interested with True Cox in the brick livery stable, which will be known as the New Nash.
    Perry McGee, who started for Alaska some time ago, has returned. He visited several points in Washington while gone, but went no farther.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 7, 1898, page 2


    The son of N. A. Jacobs, now residing at Los Angeles, Calif., fell from a porch not long since and had his left arm broken.
    The case instituted by the estate of K. Kubli against the Southern Oregon Pork Packing Co., involving the possession of a portion of the land formerly belonging to the Hanley estate, has been compromised. That appealed to the supreme court has also been dismissed.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 7, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Medford Brewing Co. last week shipped a six-horse load of its superior beer to J. H. Houston & Son of Klamath Falls.
    The grocery firm of Lumsden & Warner has been dissolved, Mr. L. retiring. H. G. Worman has purchased his interest in the business.
    Mrs. W. V. Lippincott has been visiting in the Willamette Valley. She spent Easter at Mt. Angel College, which her son Walter is attending.
    U. M. Damon, formerly of Medford, was married at Oroville, Calif. last week to Miss Pearl Leonard, one of the most popular young ladies of that city. We extend congratulations.
    Fred. Barneburg, who has been in southern California, accompanied by his wife and daughter, returned home a few days since. Miss Mollie's health is considerably improved, we are glad to learn.
    Weeks Bros. of Phoenix have purchased the building on the west side formerly occupied by Hugh Elliott, and will remodel it into a store room, where they will display a fine line of undertaking goods.
    B. F. Crouch was awarded the contract for building the city jail, his bid, $334.50, being the lowest. Other bidders were: Christian & Son, $419; Starr & Drisko, $380.56; G. H. Williams, $375; A. C. Nicholson, $370.
    Drs. Geary, Wait and Pickel last week performed an operation for appendicitis on Henry Helms of Talent. This is the sixth successful operation for that disease which has been performed by Dr. Geary, and speaks very nobly of his ability as a physician.
    The very important office of school superintendent was given to Medford by the Republican convention, notwithstanding the fact that it casts more votes than any other place in the county, excepting Ashland. Such generosity is overwhelming. Prof. Gregory will prove not a popular candidate, even in his own city.
    R. W. Sweet of San Francisco has been in Medford to interest our citizens in a cooperative creamery. The company he represents does not expect a payment until the creamery has been built, tested and accepted by a committee selected by the stockholders. Then one-half is to be paid in the stock and the balance in three months. Such an enterprise should prove remunerative.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1898, page 3


    J. S. Hagey's residence in East Medford, a fine, large structure, was burned to the ground Monday morning, at about two o'clock. Most of the contents were saved. The value of the property destroyed is placed at $2500. There was considerable insurance upon it.
"Two Residences Destroyed," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Arthur Wilson to Almira Wilson; tract in Galloway add. to Medford . . . 800.00
Conrad Mingus to John Weeks; lot 20, blk 54, Medford . . . 300.00
A. A. Batterson to A. S. Bliton; lot 17, Fairview add. to Medford . . . 1.00
A. S. Bliton to E. W. Starr; same property . . . 1.00
Rosanna Wilson to J. A. Carlisle; 54.25 acres in twp 38s, r2w; also lots 7 and 8, blk 36, Medford . . . 1000.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 14, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Nannie Matney, the expert dressmaker, has returned from a visit to Applegate.
    Miss Myrtle Woodford, who has been holding a case in the Times office at Jacksonville, has returned home.
    Rufus Cox is having a good-sized home constructed on his property on North C Street, which will soon be among the handsomest in our city.
    Gray & Bradbury have secured the large planer formerly operated in the J. P. Cotton sawmill near Talent, and are better prepared than ever to accommodate the wants of their numerous customers.
    Ed. Wilkinson, the popular butcher, has had a slaughterhouse built on the land he recently purchased of E. F. Walker. When finished it will be one of the most complete and convenient establishments of the kind in southern Oregon.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 14, 1898, page 3


    The wave of la grippe that undulated over southern Oregon seems to be abating.
    Miss Anna Jeffrey of Medford is teaching a successful term of school in Eagle Point district, with fifty-eight pupils enrolled.
    Jas. A. Wilson, who is the pioneer painter of southern Oregon, has been doing some good work on the Jacksonville Marble Works.
    Geo. R. Justus of Medford was in Jacksonville on Monday. He has since been the recipient of many congratulations, in which the Times joins.
    Thos. Farris, who has been spending the winter in Medford, left last week for his home at Palouse, Wash., by team, accompanied by Henry and Ben. Edwards.
    Tom Clemmens of Medford visited Jacksonville not long ago. He informs us that he will soon leave for eastern Oregon, to take a position in one of the placer mines of Eagle Creek district.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 14, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
Eda M. Morris to J. F. Wait; lot 9, blk 70, Medford . . . 50.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    F. M. Mingus returned to Washington last week, to resume threshing last year's crop.
    Wm. Churchman and family left last week for Squaw Valley, Cal., where they expect to locate.
    Dr. G. B. Cole, who joined the rush to Alaska in January, is now at Fort Wrangel. He intends to resume his practice here in a short time.
    S. A. Owens has sold his interest in the billiard parlors to Wm. Townsend, and the business will hereafter be conducted by Higgins & Townsend.
    While clipping one of his horse's legs last week Jos. Scott was struck in the mouth by the knee of the animal, and lost a couple of teeth, besides being severely cut on his lip.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1898, page 3


    The Mail has been asked to make a kick because that the fire bell cannot be heard as distinctly now as in days agone. The request is made, of course, in hopes that the city council will elevate it. Since the livery stable has been enlarged--extended past the bell tower--and other buildings have been built near by, the tower is so surrounded that the sound from the bell, when it is rung at the time of a fire, has trouble in reaching the ears of a slumbering people. Let us cite: When Mr. Hagey's house burned last Sunday night Horace Nicholson didn't know of it until the next morning. Never before in the history of this city, since Horace came within its limits, has there been a fire no larger than the burning of an ash barrel that he has not been in attendance, in full force and effect. There is something seriously wrong with that bell and it ought to be fixed.
    Work on the new city jail is progressing finely. Mr. Priddy has finished the brick work and contractor Crouch is now at work putting in the inside cribbing. The outer walls are of brick, roof of corrugated iron, and the floor of cement. It will be 14x22 feet in size and will have two apartments. The city has passed an ordinance compelling prisoners to work out fines on the streets when the payment of such fines are refused in money. The new jail will be a place to house prisoners in a more humane manner and working them on the street will be a means of paying for their board.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 22, 1898, page 7


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Medford band is making good progress under the leadership of Mr. Snow, a late arrival from St. Louis.
    The two-year-old child of Dack Foster was taken ill suddenly one day last week and died the next morning of spinal meningitis.
    The adjuster of the Royal Insurance Company was in Medford last week and settled with Mr. Hagey for the loss of his residence, paying the full amount of the policy, $2,000.
    The new city jail is progressing finely, and will be quite a comfortable structure of the kind. The city council has passed an ordinance requiring prisoners to work out fines on the streets in default of cash payments.
    Dr. Kirchgessner performed a successful operation in removing a large tumor from the neck of J. B. Rhinehart. The growth had been a great infliction [sic] and had been pronounced incurable by a number of physicians. The tumor is entirely gone, and was removed without the use of a knife.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1898, page 2


    The Democrats, Populists and Silver Republicans will hold their respective county conventions at Medford on Saturday. Much interest is being taken in the outcome.
    There will be a big crowd in Medford next Saturday, as the Democratic, Populist and Silver Republican conventions will meet that day and put forth a joint ticket.
    Miss Vowell's class in music at Gold Hill, assisted by Medford talent, gave an entertainment Tuesday night. It was well attended and is highly spoken of by those in attendance.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Three county conventions meet in our city on Saturday--Democratic, Populist and Silver Republican.
    The baseball game last Saturday, between Medford and Ashland nines, at this city, resulted in a victory for the granite city boys by a score of 30 to 15.
    E. W. Carver of Phoenix has purchased the wagon and bicycle business of J. A. Whitman. The latter will remain with the business for a time, and then enter the employ of the Earl Fruit Co.
    John Schneider has reopened the Red Front Saloon, and is selling the best of beer for 5 cents a glass. He will also furnish the best of sandwiches to order. Give him a call when you are hungry or thirsty, as he will treat you well.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 28, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Salstrom and daughter left a few days since for Portland.
    Mrs. Alta Weston (nee Brous) of Prairie City, Iowa, arrived in Medford last week, and will spend the summer here with relatives and friends.
    Moses Jackson, dead, has been granted an increase of pension from $30 to $72 per month, and the widow and minors of Moses Jackson have been granted $18 per month.
    The Medford volunteers held their first drill on Friday afternoon. The martial bearing of the company made a deep impression on the spectators, and indicated that the spirit of patriotism is yet strong.
    Last February Thos. Sims brought his aged mother to the residence of A. J. Fredenburg and engaged board for her. Since that time Sims has not made his appearance, and has evidently deserted his parent. The old lady is over 73 years of age and quite feeble. She has a daughter in California and a son in eastern Oregon, who have been communicated with.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1898, page 3


    Mrs. Thos. Beckett and children left Medford last week for Fort Wrangel, Alaska, to join Mr. B., and will remain there during the summer.
    D. Russell of Medford, who is an agent of the Oregon Fire Relief Association, has been in Jacksonville on business connected with that corporation.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our school directors have selected Prof. N. L. Narregan as principal for the ensuing year.
    Wendt & Puhl make a specialty of canned goods. They keep the best of every description.
    R. Derr and wife, late of Ashland, have become residents of Medford. Bob is Court Hall's chief mixologist now.
    J. North will furnish 40 cords of fir wood for the public schools, at $2.40 per cord, while I. Householder will supply the necessary oak wood at $3.45 per cord.
    A number of Medford people are becoming interested in the Fort Klamath section, among whom are W. H. Beidleman, Will. Nicholson, Mr. Scott, Dr. Kirchgessner, Chas. W. Palm and John Arnold. Most of them will engage in the stock business. H. L. Gilkey will open a store there in connection with Mr. Stevens.
    A number of business changes have taken place in Medford lately. S. A. Owings has sold his interest in the billiard hall to W. L. Townsend and purchased C. M. Harvey's share in the Nash livery stables; W. T. Kame, the shoe dealer, and J. Merley of the Fair have consolidated; H. L. Gilkey has sold out to his partner, Geo. L. Davis.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 5, 1898, page 3



    Geo. Mickey of Medford is traveling over the county with a stereopticon outfit and meeting with success.
    Grant Rawlings of Medford has been elected chairman of the middle-of-the-road Populist county committee, and has called a meeting of that body to be held at Medford on Saturday.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 5, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
C. D. Kellogg to D. T. Lawton; tract in Medford . . . 225.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1898, page 1


    Geo. Mickey of Medford and J. Williscroft of Eagle Point are giving combined stereopticon and phonograph entertainments in different parts of the county. They are meeting with considerable success.
    The Union campaign committee is composed of I. O. Miller, J. W. Jacobs and G. H. Haskins, Democrats, A. S. Barnes, G. R. Lindley and E. E. Phipps, Populists, Frank Galloway, Silver Republican. It met at Medford last Saturday and transacted considerable business, including the levy of an assessment on the candidates for campaign purposes.
    The Democratic county committee was organized at Medford last Saturday by the election of Fred J. Pape of Jacksonville as chairman and J. H. Beeman of Gold Hill as secretary. I. O. Miller of Ashland, G. H. Haskins of Medford and John W. Jacobs of Central Point were appointed as an executive committee, to act with like committees appointed by the Populists and Silver Republicans. An effective campaign will be inaugurated at once.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ralph Dean and Lee Jacobs, Union candidates for sheriff and treasurer, spent Saturday afternoon in our town. Both are popular, reliable and deserving young men, and will poll a big vote in Medford as well as elsewhere.
    The Medford Musical Association, composed of some fifty voices, will give an entertainment at the opera house on Tuesday evening. Solos and choruses of noted composers and instrumental selections by the best talent of the city will be on the programme. A grand musical treat is assured.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
W. I. Vawter to N. W. Powell; lot 18, blk 21, Medford . . . 1.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 12, 1898, page 1



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Joe Caskey, the scientific blacksmith, has gone to Ashland to take a position in Peil's shop.
    A street fakir has been annoying our citizens nightly with his loud voice and false promises.
    The wife of J. E. Fenton of Spokane, Wash., the attorney, who resided in Medford a number of years ago, died a few days since, from a paralytic stroke.
    Jas. Stewart, a rising young barrister, has been nominated for justice of the peace by the reform forces. T. W. Johnson is on the same ticket for constable.
    G. T. Hershberger is chief dispenser for the M. D. & R. Co.'s retail department since J. J. Brophy left for his homestead in Lost Creek precinct. He fills the place acceptably.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 12, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    F. K. Churchill of the Gold Hill News will be employed on the Medford Mail after election.
    John Compton and Delbert Terrill have dissolved partnership in the delivery business, the latter retiring.
    Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Galloway went to Portland last week to visit their sons, Robert and Alex., prior to the departure of the latter for San Francisco as members of Oregon's volunteers.
    H. L. Gilkey has sold his stock of goods at Fort Klamath and returns to Medford to take the position of cashier at the Jackson County Bank, vice J. E. Enyart. The latter has accepted a good situation at Chicago.
    The entertainment given by the pupils of the Medford public school at the opera house on Tuesday evening of last week was largely attended. The programme was quite an interesting one and satisfactorily rendered.
    Alex. Orme and J. M. Whipple, Republican candidates for sheriff and representative respectively, interviewed our citizens last week. They are good men and would make excellent officials, but are on the wrong side politically.
    Our town was last week infested by a loud-mouthed fakir, who nightly expatiated on his ability to make artists of everybody--old and young, the blind, deaf and dumb--for $1.50. If anybody developed enough talent through this fellow to paint a barn, much less a picture, we will take this all back.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1898, page 3


    The southbound overland now arrives at Medford ten minutes later than usual.
    D. T. Cox of Medford is shipping 30 carloads of hay to the drought-stricken regions of California, where it commands as high as $26 a ton. That article will be higher in the valley on account of these shipments.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The annual memorial services will be held at the opera house on Sunday, the 29th. Rev. E. Gittins officiating.
    Miss Rose Hockenyos returned to Jackson County from Portland this week, after an absence of about a year.
    John Schneider made his many friends at Jacksonville a visit one day this week. He is suffering with a severe attack of rheumatism.
    A handsome dancing party was given at the opera house on Wednesday night by the Sylbos, a society having for its membership a number of our most popular young ladies. It was the event of the season.
    J. E. Enyart, for several years past the cashier of the Jackson County Bank, leaves for Chicago on Friday evening to accept a lucrative position. He has made many friends here, all of whom wish him unlimited success in his new home.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 19, 1898, page 3


    Medford's branch of the Salvation Army was with us yesterday evening.
    The Medford and Ashland baseball nines will play the final game at Medford on Saturday to decide the championship. Each club has won a game, and good ball will probably be put up.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 19, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    We are glad to see that Tom Merriman is able to be out again. He has been quite ill.
    J. E. Enyart left for Chicago Friday accompanied by the best wishes of many friends.
    Jack Morris has gone to Ashland to add further laurels to his reputation as a dealer in second-hand goods.
    Wm. Hamlin, late of Josephine County, has purchased John Webber's interest in the Medford delivery business.
    L. F. Glasscock of Walla Walla, Wash. has been negotiating for the Medford laundry, but has not acquired it as yet.
    The Medford public schools close next Tuesday. Commencement exercises will be held on Wednesday at 8 o'clock p.m.
    A number of Medford volunteers under Capt. Hembree went to Central Point one evening last week and took on four recruits.
    Rev. O. J. Gist, who has accepted the pastorate of the Christian Church of this city, left a few days since for Willows, Calif. for his family.
    The Medford whist club has discontinued its meetings for the present. The last gathering was held at Woodmen hall a few evenings since, and was one of the most interesting of the season.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1898, page 3


    The return game of baseball between Medford and Ashland nines was played at the grounds of the former last Saturday. It proved an easy victory for the Medford ball tossers, who were assisted by two experts from Jacksonville. The score stood 30 to 8 in their favor.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Rev. E. Gittins will conduct the memorial services at the opera house on the 29th. The regular decoration exercises will be held on Monday, the 30th.
    The commencement exercises of the Medford public schools took place at the opera house on Wednesday night. The program proved a most excellent one and was faultlessly rendered. The following composed the graduating class: Mabel Beaver, Lillian Barr, Elsie Wiley, Louis Warner, Rosa Miller, Ralph Woodford, Geo. Faris, Pearl Webb, Robt. Reame, Kate Angle, Chas. Dunn, Lin Purdin, Jas. Grieve, Jos. Parker, Belle Sturgis, Jos. Slinger and Edna Wait. Much credit is given Prof. Gregory, the principal, for the progress the schools have made while he has been in charge of them. The pupils were indeed fortunate to have had the benefit of his services.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 26, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. H. C. Dollarhide (nee Shideler) of Dunsmuir, Calif. visited in Medford last week.
    News has been received of the death of Miss Florence Squires, formerly of Medford, at Hollenberg, Kansas.
    Ed. Worman left last week on an extended trip to Nebraska and Kansas, for the benefit of his health.
    Mrs. L. Shideler and daughters left last week for Los Angeles, Calif., where they will make their future home.
    The directors of the Medford public schools have elected the following teachers for the ensuing school year: Prof. N. L. Narregan, principal, salary $100 per month; Miss Pearl Hall, vice-principal, salary $45; primary teachers, Mrs. Mary Peters, $40; Miss Emma Reed, $35; intermediate grades, Misses Aileen Webber, Fannie Haskins, May Phipps, Maysie Fisher, Julia Fielder, Jessie Wait, at $28 per month each.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1898, page 2


    Forty-four veterans of the Indian, Mexican and civil wars lie buried in Jacksonville Cemetery, and thirteen found a resting place in the burying ground near Medford. Their graves were all handsomely bedecked with flowers and flags on Decoration Day.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
Emma W. Christian to Mabel W. Burns et al.; lots 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11, blk 23, Medford . . . 1.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1898, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The entertainment given for the benefit of the volunteers was well attended and gave general satisfaction. The programme was an excellent one.
    During the past week our town has been full of young men who hope to be able to give their services to the government in its war with Spain. There is no certainty that they will be mustered in, however.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1898, page 3


    L. W. Fancher, the popular teacher, is engaged in farming near Medford, but will reenter the schoolroom in the fall. His services are always in demand.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1898, page 3


    STANFIELD.--At Medford, Ore., Wesley W. Stanfield, aged 59. He was born in Ohio. He was married to Louisa C. Barnes at La Porte, Ind., in 1850. Nine children were born, four of whom survived their father. Since his death the oldest son has died. Capt. Stanfield enlisted in 1861 in Co. E, 14th Iowa, but afterward served in the 127th U.S.C.T. as Captain. He was in many important battles with his regiment, and served with distinction. After the war he practiced law in Union and Sac counties, Iowa, and in 1883 was mayor of Creston. He resigned to go west, taking with him his four younger children. He first went to California, thence by water to British Columbia, then to Washington Territory, but upon meeting with reverses journey south to Oregon, where he located in the little city of Medford. He had held a number of city offices, and at the time of his death was city recorder. Dr. Stanfield took a great interest in the C.C. and L.H.W., and was often a contributor of interesting articles.
"Mustered Out," The National Tribune, Washington, D.C., June 2, 1898, page 6


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Mary Sisemore of Sams Valley, who has been here some time for medical treatment, is much improved.
    Mrs. E. A. Johnson and daughters left last week for Drain, to join Mr. J., who is constructing a flour mill there.
    Mrs. J. H. Miller and daughter have gone to Tacoma, Wash. Mr. M. is seeking his fortune in the Alaska gold fields.
    Rev. O. J. Gist has returned from Willows, Calif. with his family, and will hold regular services hereafter at the Christian Church.
    Dr. Pickel, assisted by Drs. Wait of Medford and Hines of Jacksonville, last week successfully performed an operation for the relief of hernia on D. Rice, father of Mrs. D. T. Lawton.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1898, page 2


    Geo. Fiddler and family, lately of Applegate, have become residents of Medford.
    Frank Wilson, the Medford baker, while returning home from Jacksonville last Friday, had one of his legs broken. The thills of his wagon fell and the horse began kicking, striking Mr. W. on the limb, with the above result.
    There was a grand Union rally in Jacksonville on Saturday evening, which was the political event of the season. A free train ran between Medford and our town, and carried a large number of people. Excellent music was furnished by the Medford band, which is improving fast under the leadership of Prof. Snow. The meeting at the courthouse, which was presided over by Judge Neil, brought several hundred people together. B. F. Ramp of Albany, Judge Howell and Sheriff Barnes were the principal speakers.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1898, page 3


    S. S. Pentz of Medford, Ben Haymond of Rock Point and C. Bircher of Portland were made notaries today.

"State House News,"
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, June 9, 1898, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The next term of the Medford public schools will commence September 5th.
    Mrs. J. A. Whitman left a few days ago for Sacramento, Calif., to join her husband.
    The Medford band has been engaged to furnish music for Ashland's 4th of July celebration.

    Miss Mollie Ober, the photographer, has gone to San Francisco for treatment for her eyes.
    W. E.
McCauley has put in a hot tamale and lunch counter next door to the Medford cigar factory.
    S. U. Mitchell has resumed the practice of law. He has had considerable experience in his profession.
    J. C. Hall has had the Turf Exchange Saloon renovated in fine style, and it has no superior in southern Oregon.
    Joe Powell of Central Point, a popular young man, is now a salesman in W. H.  Stevens' extensive mercantile establishment.
     The young ladies of Medford raised twenty-three dollars by subscription for the purchase of a flag for the local company of volunteers.
    F. K. Churchill and family, lately of Gold Hill, have become residents of Medford. Mr. C., who is a good printer, is now foreman of the Mail.
    The following officers were recently installed by Medford lodge, I.O.O.F.; C. C. Taylor, N.G.; Frank Amann, V.G.; H. H. Harvey, R.S.: Z. Maxcy, F.S.; W. A. Jones, Treas.
    The Rebekah lodge has elected the following officers: Virgie Woodford, N.G.; Mrs. Georgia Nicholson, V.G.; Mamie Isaacs, R.S.; Z. Maxcy, F.S.; Mrs. Josie Simmons, Treas.
    Last week Jesse Wilson, Jr. and a son of M. Demmer, both about 11 years of age, become involved in a personal encounter, the former getting the worst of it. It is reported that, being furnished a pistol by his mother, Mrs. Rose Wilson, who with John Carlyle urged him to shoot his opponent, he shot at him twice. The man and woman were bound over by Justice Jones to appear before the grand jury with bonds fixed at $250 each.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1898, page 3


    Arthur Nicholson of Medford and Miss Georgia Spencer of Griffin Creek were united in marriage at the residence of the bride's parents on Sunday, June 5th, Rev. Edw. Gittins officiating. The wedding was a quiet one, only relatives and a few of the intimate friends of the contracting parties being in attendance. Mr. N. is one of the prominent contractors of southern Oregon, while his bride is the popular and accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Spencer. Both are well and favorably known in this section. The Times joins with their many friends in wishing them a long, prosperous and happy voyage on matrimonial seas.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1898, page 3


    T. M. Howard, Jonas Justus and G. W. Hamlin of Medford were arrested for killing a steer and appropriating the meat. The men were bound over to the grand jury in the sum of $200. They gave bail bond and were released.
"Oregon State News," Daily Capital Journal, Salem, June 13, 1898, page 2


    T. M. Howard, Jonas Justus and G. W. Hamlin were arrested last week, charged with having killed a steer belonging to Henry Myer, of Butte Creek, on May 28th. The trial came up Thursday and the accused were bound over to await the action of the grand jury.
    The flower gardens of Medford have been surpassingly beautiful until the severe hailstorm of last Friday, and even now they make an excellent showing. One of the prettiest gardens in the city is that of Mrs. Wm. Edwards, in North Medford, who alone has fifty different varieties of roses.
    Mrs. Mary Childers has leased the Commercial Hotel and taken possession. Mr. Prall, the former proprietor, expects to go onto the road in a short time to canvass for his new process of picture painting. The Monitor-Miner hopes Mrs. Childers will be successful in her hotel venture.
    Tuesday was the day set apart by the Odd Fellows as their decoration anniversary, and many of the local lodge and their friends gathered flowers galore and marched to the cemetery east of Medford, where fitting memories of the dead were observed and flowers were strewn in fraternal love upon the resting places of their dead.
Buffalo-Pitts Steam Traction Engine
    The Lewis brothers, of Eagle Point, have just received at this station a fine Buffalo-Pitts separator and straw stacker combined, together with a large traction engine which furnishes the power, and the boys propose to turn this machine to good use in the garnering of the bountiful harvest which seems certain to bless this valley this year.
    The heaviest and most destructive rain and hail storm seen for many years in this valley fell last Friday afternoon. Just how far the hail extended we have not learned, but many early gardens about Medford suffered severely, and the flowers were knocked silly. The storm was accompanied by heavy lightning and thunder, a bolt of which struck the residence of G. E. Allen on the east side, doing considerable damage. When the storm abated the whole valley was literally a sheet of water, and drifts of hailstones lay for some time in many places about Medford. However, the thorough drenching which the earth received will probably more than overcome the damage in the increased yield which will result from what remains.
Medford Monitor-Miner, June 16, 1898, page 3


    Jack Morris, the erstwhile Medford second-hand man, but now of Ashland, was in Medford last Friday.
    G. W. Williams and family left Tuesday morning for Burns, Harney County, where they expect to reside.
    Wm. M. Colvig, of Jacksonville, left last Wednesday for New York to attend the supreme lodge A.O.U.W. as a representative from Oregon.
    Prof. J. A. Harvey, of Gold Hill, left Sunday for Ukiah, California, where he has a position in the schools of that place. Prof. Harvey is an up-to-date teacher, and we congratulate the people who have secured his services.
    Miss Irene Chitwood, who formerly resided here with her brother, Charley Chitwood, has gone to Pasadena, Calif., on a visit to relatives, after having spent the last few months in Klamath Falls with relatives and friends.
"Personal,"
Medford Monitor-Miner, June 16, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
Liza Williams to F. J. Williams; lots 1 and 2, blk 70, Medford . . . 100.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1898, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    R. M. Nute, lately of Evans Creek, has become a resident of our town.
    W. H. P. Legate, who went north some time ago, returned to Medford from Alaska this week.
    H. G. Meyer of Lake Creek had T. M. Howard, Jonas Justus and G. W. Hamlin arrested last week, charging them with killing one of his steers and appropriating the meat. Justice Jones fixed their bonds, to appear before the grand jury, at $200 each, which were furnished.
    E. D. Elwood, an expert optician and jeweler, has become a fixture of Medford. He tests eyes free and adjusts glasses, so that there is no necessity of patronizing itinerants. Mr. E.'s stock of jewelry, watches and clocks is a superior one, with prices to beat everybody. Give him a call, for he will never fail to please.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1898, page 3


    J. A. Bradley, the wheelwright, who has been mining on Forest Creek, removed to Medford this week.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Russell Alford and sister, Mrs. L. F. Willits of Klamath County, visited relatives in Medford last week.
    Rev. A. S. Foster has accepted a call from Myrtle Point, Coos County, and left last week for that place.
    Al. Reynolds, the popular tailor, has gone to Marysville, Calif. to look after his business interests in that section.
    Prof. N. L. Narregan and his son Carl arrived by team from Santa Clara, Calif., last week. The balance of the family came by rail.
    Mrs. Mary Childers has leased the Commercial Hotel. Mr. Prall, the former proprietor, will canvasss for his new process of picture painting.
    Miss Pearl Hall has gone to San Francisco on a visit to her brother, Vint. Hall, who is attending the Cooper Medical College, and also to have her eyes treated.
    Marshal Hart and family left last week for Klamath and Lake counties, where the latter will spend the summer. J. H. Bellinger is looking after the peace of the town during Mr. Hart's absence.
    C. E. Townes, representing a telephone company which is connecting its lines from Los Angeles, Calif. with Spokane, Wash., was in Medford last week soliciting subscriptions for a local exchange. He secured quite a number.
    Mrs. Tice's residence was considerably damaged Sunday afternoon. The prompt arrival of the fire department alone prevented its total destruction. Some boys were shooting firecrackers in front of the building, and it is thought that they originated the flames. The loss was small.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1898, page 3



    W. E. Phipps of Medford has been admitted to the bar. Success to him.
    S. S. Pentz of Medford and Ben Haymond of Rock Point have been appointed notaries public.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1898, page 3


    Rev. A. S. Foster, pastor of the Medford Presbyterian Church, has accepted a call to Myrtle Point. The Medford church is clear of debt and has added 71 new members to the roll.

"Oregon State News,"
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, June 20, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Asa Fordyce of Medford precinct has received a new threshing outfit.
    S. U. Mitchell, an experienced attorney, has opened a law office in Medford.
    Mrs. E. Stewart has gone to Klamath County to spend the summer with her sons.
    The venerable mother of W. I. Vawter, who resides at Harrisburg, is paying her son a visit.
    Geo. Mickey, who has a first-class stereopticon, is doing good business with it in Siskiyou County, Calif.
    Mrs. R. G. Jeffrey has gone to Klamathon, Calif. to join her husband. Miss Anna Jeffrey accompanied her.
    Rev. Frank Van Dyke, who has been attending the Portland University, returned home a few days since. He expects to graduate next year.
    Bert. Redden has been commissioned an ensign of the U.S. Naval Reserve, and is drilling a battery at Astoria, awaiting orders for active service.
    Dr. J. M. Keene of this city has been appointed by Gov. Lord as a member of the state board of medical examiners. This is a compliment well deserved.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1898, page 3


To Wearers of Fine Shoes.
    A. C. Tayler of Medford, the foot fitter, has just received five lines of high- grade, up-to-date walking and dress shoes for girls, including the shell cordovan, Zulu calf and Curacao kid made by Stacy Adams Co., the famous shoemakers of Brockton, Mass. Call and see him.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1898, page 3


    Some horses are already quartered at the fairgrounds near Medford, in anticipation of a good racing programme at the fall meeting, and others are expected before long. F. M. Mosier of San Joaquin Valley, Calif. is now there, en route to Portland, with Lillian M., a pacer by Steinway, Lottery T. and Klamathon, trotters by Lottery Ticket, and Partisan, a fast runner.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
J. L. Wigle to P. B. O'Neil; lots 3 and 4, Short's add. to Medford . . . 700.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1898, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. E. Olson has added a new jig saw, for bracket and other ornamental work, to his planing mill.
    Mrs. Martha Cardwell is visiting with Mrs. C. H. Hoagland at the Bellinger residence in Medford.
    Miss Mollie Ober, who started for San Francisco to have her eyes treated, is recuperating at Ashland.
    Mrs. S. S. Pentz and Miss Sarah B. Collier, her sister, have gone to Castle Crags, Calif. to spend the summer.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. V. Lippincott accompanied by their daughter, Miss Maizie, attended the commencement exercises of Mt. Angel college.
    Dr. Pickel, assisted by Dr. Wait, performed a delicate surgical operation on Mrs. C. W. Hoagland of Klamath County last week. It was a successful one, and the patient is recovering.
    J. J. Brophy has removed to his homestead claim in Lost Creek precinct and W. I. Taggart has succeeded him as dispenser of liquid refreshments at the retail establishment of M. D. & R. Co.
    Walter V. Lippincott of Medford was a member of the class which graduated from Mt. Angel College last week. He delivered the valedictory, which the Oregonian said was "pregnant with thought, graceful in style and action and eloquent in expression." We predict for him a successful career.
    Mrs. Ella J. Rivers has received notice of the death of her son, Claud, aged 19 years, which is said to have occurred at Sutter Creek, Calif. several weeks ago. The circumstances are not yet obtainable, but one account states that the young man was sandbagged and robbed of $60, dying from the effects of the assault.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1898, page 3


    W. J. Compton, who has been a resident of Medford for some time past, has returned to his home near Brownsboro.
    Gus Newbury, who takes charge of the county clerk's office next week, will be assisted by Mrs. M. Peters and Miss Theresa Bryant.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    C. W. Palm, the well-known dealer in real estate, visited the county seat one day this week.
    J. A. Whiteside, formerly of Medford, is now foreman of a crew of carpenters employed on the San Joaquin Valley railroad and resides at Stockton, Calif.
    M. S. Damon left last week for Klamath County, accompanied by his family. He has the contract for carrying the mail from Keno to Picard, Calif., a distance of 15 miles.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 30, 1898, page 3


    Gus Newbury and family will occupy the residence now the home of County Clerk Jackson and family about July 15th. The latter will locate in Medford.
    The junior nines of the Jacksonville and Medford clubs played about the best game of the season at Harbaugh's grove on Sunday. It took ten innings to decide the game, which stood 11 to 10 in favor of the Medfordites.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 30, 1898, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ed. Worman returned from Kansas this week, accompanied by his wife.
    Dick Besse, who had one of his legs broken some time ago, is able to be about again.
    John Compton of the Union Livery Stable has had his carriages and hacks repainted in fine style by Geo. Coulter.

    The Medford Brewing Co. sent a four-horse load of superior beer to Klamath County this week, the second in a short time.
    The report that District Attorney Jeffrey would locate at Ashland after expiration of his term of office is without foundation. He will remain at Medford and practice his profession.
    Kit Bateman, who has been running a threshing machine in Washington until quite recently, came home last week. He will purchase another machine and return north to thresh the 1898 crop, which is even larger than that of last year.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 7, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Chas. W. Palm, the live real estate dealer, started for his old home in Ohio this week on a visit.
    Mrs. Arthur Weeks of Oakland, Calif. is paying a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Stewart.
    Medford's water system has been enlarged--by 600 feet of 6- inch pipe and 3000 feet of 4-inch pipe. This is a necessary improvement.
    Miss Allie Klippel left last week for Portland, being a delegate to the grand lodge of the Degree of Honor, A.O.U.W., from Medford lodge.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Shawver, who left this section some months ago for Fort Wrangel, Alaska, are at Seattle, Wash., where they will probably locate.
    Dr. J. W. Odgers, the well-known dentist, has returned from a successful professional visit to Siskiyou County, Calif. He was in Jacksonville one day last week.
    Mrs. John Hickler, whose husband is interested in the dredger being built near Tolo, was thrown from the buggy in which she was riding a few days ago. The team she was driving, formerly owned by Fred. Fredenburg of Central Point, became frightened by the whistle of the water works blowing and ran away. The lady sustained painful injuries, while the vehicle, a new one, was considerably damaged.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1898, page 3


    Mrs. E. M. Lumsden, of Medford, Oregon, is visiting Charles Enyart and family, of the North side. She will also visit several weeks at her former home in Peru before returning to the Pacific coast.
"Additional Local," Logansport Pharos, Indiana, July 11, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. R. Williamson has returned from the Siskiyous, where he has been mining.
    Mackey Bros. are now conducting Medford's photograph gallery and doing up-to-date work. They cannot be beaten anywhere in southern Oregon.
    Geo. V. Stickel, the well-known brick manufacturer and mason, was in Jacksonville not long since. He secured contracts to do work in his line there.
    Messrs. Mackey and Weston, the popular photographers, have returned from their trip to Lake and Klamath counties. They took many photographs and enjoyed themselves thoroughly while gone.
    Baker Wilson's wagon, which is always indulging in episodes, lots its front wheels one day this week, the horses running away with them after they had parted company with the wagon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 14, 1898, page 3


Still with Us.
    J. C. Stratford, the photographer, did not go to Ashland, as announced in the last issue of The Times. The people of Jacksonville and vicinity have such an appreciation of good photographs that he could not possibly get away on such short notice; so he has decided to stay with us until August 1st. Mr. S.'s superior in his line has never been in southern Oregon [sic].
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, July 14, 1898, page 3


    Wm. McKinney and family have removed to Medford precinct to engage in farming.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 14, 1898, page 3


    Geo. A. Jackson, ex-county clerk, and wife, also their son Will. and his family, have become residents of Medford. The Times regrets their departure and wishes them success in their new home, in which it is joined by their many friends.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 14, 1898, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Oscar Williams, the barber, has returned from California.
    It is announced that F.. K. Churchman will soon commence the publication of a Republican weekly at Medford.
    N. G. Bates has formed a partnership with John R. Hardin, the 16-to-1 barber. Both are excellent workmen.
    Miss Kate Van Dyke, who holds a position as stenographer in San Francisco, is paying her old home a visit.
    Frank Wait, of the Medford marble works, has new quarters on Seventh Street, and is turning out superior work.
    Dr. Arnold of Colorado is employed in Dr. Odgers' dental parlors. He comes well recommended. This is a strong combination.
    Dr. Keene left for Salem Saturday evening to attend a meeting of the state board of dental examiners, of which he is a member.
    J. E. Olson has purchased the large engine formerly used at Henry Klippel's sawmill in Galls Creek district, and will fit it up for use here. He is always making improvements.
    N. B. Bradbury had a narrow escape at the Olson planing mill one day last week. He was ripping lumber when one of the boards broke into pieces, striking him a severe blow on the chest. For a time his life was despaired of.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1898, page 3


    Mrs. Chas. Hoagland of Klamath County, who has been at Medford for surgical treatment, has improved so much as to be able to go to Gold Hill, where she will visit with her mother, Mrs. A. L. Harvey.
    The University of Oregon graduated last June the largest class in its history. The class numbered thirty. The fall term will begin September 19th. Students who have completed the tenth grade branches can enter the sub-freshman class. No examinations are required for graduates of accredited schools. Reasonable equivalents are accepted for most of the required entrance studies. Catalogues will be sent free to all applicants. Persons desiring information may address the president, Secretary J. J. Walton, or Max A. Plumb, all of Eugene, Oregon. The courses offered are those of a good university. There are departments of modern and ancient languages, physics, chemistry, biology, geology, English, elocution, advanced engineering, astronomy, logic, philosophy, psychology, mathematics, and physical education. Music and drawing are also taught. The tuition is free. All students pay an incidental fee of ten dollars yearly. Board, lodging, heat and light in the dormitory cost $2.50 per week.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Margaret I. Rhinehart to Emma F. Hall; lots 10 to 14, inclusive, blk 45, Medford . . . 20.60
Emma F. Hall to H. C. Knackstedt; same property . . . 10.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 21, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ralph Woodford is chief of baker Wilson's express line, and drives to Jacksonville every day but Sunday.
    H. C. Knackstedt, who has had much experience in this line, has taken charge of the Commercial Hotel, on the west side, and will thoroughly renovate the building.
    D. T. Sears of Medford was at the county seat Saturday. He fills the position of gauger and storekeeper so acceptably that the government retains his services indefinitely.
    Miss Bessie Wait, who has been attending school in New York, returned home last week, accompanied by her cousin, Chas. Mades of Indiana, who will spend several months in southern Oregon.
    District Attorney Watson was at Medford this week to attend the preliminary examination of M. Crystal, charged with breaking an irrigating ditch by Wm. Edwards. The defendant was discharged.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 21, 1898, page 3


    Mel. Crystal, who returned from San Francisco some time ago, has taken charge of his mother's garden near Medford. He is disposing of a large quantities of berries and vegetables of an excellent quality raised there.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 21, 1898, page 3



    The Commercial Hotel has changed hands again. This time a Mr. H. C. Knackstedt, of Callahan, Calif., is the new man at the helm. Last Friday the deal was completed, and Mr. K. is now the owner of the buildings, grounds and furniture. He is an old-time hotel man and promises that his house, when in running order, will be conducted in first-class shape and will be in every respect a hostelry for the very best of the traveling public. The house is closed for a couple of weeks, during which time the entire interior of the place will be rearranged and made more convenient and inviting. Mr. Knackstedt's family arrived Monday night, and they are all now at work making the improvements which have been mapped out. They are apparently very fine people and will undoubtedly do well in their chosen business.
    Joshua Patterson was unloading from the cars here Monday a new threshing outfit, consisting of a Buffalo-Pitts "Niagara" separator, with a 32x52-inch cylinder, and a sixteen-horsepower traction engine. The purchase was made through the agency of Hubbard Bros., of this city. Mr. Patterson has had a number of years experience with threshing machines in this valley and knows how to operate one to the satisfaction of himself and customers. He has about 5000 bushels of wheat to thresh for himself and expects to commence work at home this week.
    "Mr. Ira Phelps," says the Albany Democrat, "for several months foreman of the People's Press, in this city, has purchased the Scio Press and will take charge of it tomorrow, getting out the first issue next week. Mr. Phelps is an experienced newspaper man and is as well a first-class printer." Ira is one of the best printers that ever hammered type in the Mail office. He knew he was a good workman, but it didn't swell his head.
    The Medford brewery is doing an immense business these times. Since the warm weather came on the demand for both ice and beer has made it necessary to put on a night crew, and now the machinery in the building is kept running continually. Mr. Merz is a thorough hustler for business, and he is fast getting a sure foothold in Southern Oregon that will soon put entirely in the shade all possibility of any importation of the goods in which he deals.
    Ed. Wilkinson's family has been out on the farm, north of Medford, for four or five weeks and are getting on finely. As Mr. W. put it, they are doing so well that it keeps him busy in supplying them with edibles--so hearty are they. His son, Johnnie, has gained eleven pounds in flesh, and Mrs. W. is unusually healthy. They will remain on the farm until fall.
    The Grants Pass Mining Journal is authority for the statement: "It will take about twenty men some six or eight weeks on the Sterling mine to clean up, as there are three or four acres of bedrock to go over carefully besides the sluices, in order that all the gold may be secured."
    The following quoted lines are from the Junction City Times, and the party referred to is no less a personage than Mr. Spear, the telegraph operator, who was in Medford for so long a time and whom everybody knows as "Shake." "Will Spear has enlisted and sailed for Manila this week. He enlisted in the signal service department and will have charge of an instrument in the telegraph service."
"City Happenings,"
Medford Mail, July 22, 1898, page 3


To the Public.
    There are very few persons who know anything of the pleasures of being a public servant, especially in a small town, and a large majority care less. The position of a town councilman is a peculiar one in many respects. He is the target for general criticism and general abuse, and many petty annoyances and complaints come to him with which he has nothing to do and over which he has no control. Very few business men are willing to accept a position so full of empty honors and adverse criticisms unless he has the good of the town at heart and is willing to undergo some of these disagreeable things for the sake of improving the general condition of affairs, morally, financially and from a sanitary point of view.
    As a matter of course, someone must bear these burdens, and if the voters have been unfortunate in selecting those to act for them in the conducting of the town affairs they should be awake to their interests and make better selections in the future. In the interest of good government, we hold that every citizen should give those whom they elect their moral support, unless the measures promulgated are pernicious and out of harmony with the public weal.
    Among the duties of the town board of trustees, they have to provide for the prevention of fires, the introduction and spread of disease and to adopt such measures as will conduce to the security, peace, cleanliness, ornamentation and the general health of the community. And to attain this end they should have the hearty cooperation of every loyal citizen. Every person who bears the proud distinction of being an American citizen should have self-respect enough to do all in his power to further these objects in the town in which he lives. If all the people in our little town would vie with one another along these lines what a change in the general appearance and the habitableness of the place. When an improvement which is an acknowledged benefit is proposed by the trustees and costs but a nominal sum, what a pity that a penalty has to be tacked onto it before it can be enforced. Much of this neglect is the result of thoughtlessness. It is hoped that at no distant day we shall have better sanitary conditions here, but in the meantime, let us remember that old adage--"Cleanliness is next to godliness."
    The morals of a town depend not so much upon the laws of the place, as upon the standard morals among the people and their willingness to aid in enforcing legislation against vice in all forms. Strangers coming into a town and seeing the citizens alive to the welfare of the place and doing what they can to further its interests along all lines can be favorably impressed, and in no other way can the success of a place be assured.
    If by these few words I shall be able to stir up the minds of some of our citizens to a realization that they are a part of this community, and their acts, whether public or private, have their influence for the elevation or degrading of our conditions, I shall think my task done.
Very Respectfully,
        H. L. GILKEY, Mayor.
Medford Mail, July 22, 1898, page 3


    The Medford Mail has become a Republican newspaper, in order to forestall F. K. Churchill, who was about to start a journal at Medford to represent Mark Hanna & Co.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1898, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Alex Orme to Meda Howard; lot 7, blk 58, Medford . . . 250.00
Meda Howard to D. H. Miller; same property . . . 250.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1898, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Lin Purdin is with us again since the saw mill at Klamathon shut down.
    Mrs. Ed. Wilkinson and her sons have been spending the past several weeks on the farm north of town.
    W. S. Dunn is again at his post at the S.P. depot, after an absence of several weeks. We have missed thee, Willie.
    W. P. H. Legate has returned to Fort Wrangel, Alaska, where is is residing with his family and engaged in business.
    Al. Reynolds, the popular tailor, has returned from his trip to Marysville. He will soon become a resident of that city, we are sorry to learn.
    The Medford brewery and ice plant is kept running day and night in order to supply the demand for its products, which give entire satisfaction.
    Medford has a new tailor shop, conducted by one of the best workmen in the state. It is located next door to the M.D.&R. Co.'s retail department.
    Will. Spear, formerly telegraph operator at Medford, has enlisted in the signal corps of the U.S. army and sailed for Manila recently. He has separated from his wife.
    Dr. J. W. Odgers left last week for Klamathon and other Siskiyou County points, on a professional trip. Dr. Arnold will be in charge of his dental parlors during his absence.
    N. A. Jacobs has been detailed at Los Angeles, Calif., through the necessity of resetting the arm of his son which was broken some time ago. He will return before long, however, accompanied by his family.
    Billie Taylor, who formerly conducted a confectionery stand in Medford, and who is engaged in the same business at Eugene, fell from his bicycle one day last week and broke the cap of his right knee.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1898, page 3


    Cox & Dunn, the Medford hay dealers, are shipping considerable quantities of baled hay to San Francisco.
    Jas. Gaines, of Medford precinct, returned from a trip to Tennessee lately, much benefited in health.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
A. A. Davis, et al., to Big Bend Milling Co.; part of blk 21, Medford . . . 1.00
Same to same; lots 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 11, blk 13, Medford . . . 1.00
W. I. Vawter, et al., to same; lot 10, blk 13, Medford . . . 1.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 28, 1898, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. L. Barnum, a prominent citizen of Minnesota and a cousin of W. S. Barnum, is paying our town a visit.
    Kime Bros. of Griffin Creek district are doing a big business with their header and giving general satisfaction.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 28, 1898, page 3


From the Klondike.
    G. F. Wilson, a brother of Robt. Wilson of Griffin Creek, writes that he has arrived at Dawson City. The voyage, although not covering a long distance, is made quite hazardous by huge rocks and other obstructions in the streams. One rock which the craft that he was aboard passed over caused the destruction of a number of boats. Prices are "out of sight" at Dawson. Single meals cost $2.50 each, and the following are some of the prices quoted in the markets there: Bacon, 40 cents a pound; oranges, $6 a dozen; dried fruit 50 cents a pound; beefsteak $2 a pound; potatoes 75 cents a pound. Mr. Wilson says that the weather is warm, with daylight prevailing during the entire 24 hours. Dawson is a city of tents, has the appearance of a continual celebration. Mr. W. believes that 90 percent of the population will leave there in the fall, as there is much dissatisfaction.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, July 28, 1898, page 3


Fires in Jacksonville.
    Our town had two fire alarms on Tuesday the first occurring in the afternoon, at about 11:30 o'clock, when flames discovered in the roundhouse of the R.R.V.R.R. Co. The fire started in the wood in the tender of the engine, which had been cleaned out after the arrival of the 10 o'clock train. Some fire had evidently lingered in the fuel drawn from the locomotive and ignited the wood in the tender, communicated with the building. Prompt and efficient work on the part of the fire company prevented a conflagration. The damage resulting was merely nominal, a few rafters being charred and the paint on the engine scorched. The second alarm was sounded about 8:30 o'clock in the evening, and everybody turned out to fight the fire fiend. A big brush pile in the southern part of town, on land belonging to Chris. Ulrich, had been set afire, and there was no occasion for any excitement.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, July 28, 1898, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ed. Weston of Des Moines, Iowa, who was called to Medford several weeks since by the illness of his child, has returned home.
    The annual meeting of the alumni of the Medford high school was held at the residence of Prof. Narregan last week. Quite a number of the members were in attendance and spent several hours pleasantly.

    Misses Lillian Rhinehart and Mamie Knox left for Eugene Saturday and will be gone about a month. They went by wheel. Miss Nellie DePeatt is in charge of the Postal Telegraph office during the absence of the latter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Angle & Plymale to W. L. Smith, part of blk 1, Cottage add. to Medford . . . 150.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 4, 1898, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. G. B. Cole has returned from Alaska after an absence of six months. He will not return to that section.
    Miss Clara Skeel, who excels as a bicyclist as well as a stenographer, rode to Grants Pass on her wheel last Sunday. We are glad that she did not prolong her stay.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 4, 1898, page 2


    The worthy wife of Rev. J. A. Slover died at Visalia, Calif. last Saturday after a short illness. The remains were brought to Ashland and interred in the cemetery near that city. For several years Mr. and Mrs. Slover were residents of Jacksonville, where they conducted a hotel, afterward becoming citizens of Table Rock precinct. Mrs. S. was a truly good woman, and her friends were legion. Besides her venerable husband she leaves two sons (James and George), who reside at Grants Pass, and two daughters, Mrs. A. F. Eddy and Mrs. Fanny Ellis of Ashland.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 4, 1898, page 3


    Hugo Von Der Hellen, who had one of his legs mangled in a threshing machine Thursday, had his leg amputated yesterday. He died from the shock last evening.

"Oregon State News,"
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, August 6, 1898, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Jas. W. Simpson, who has been in Siskiyou County, Calif., for some time past, has returned to the valley.
    Robt. Galloway, who is now practicing law at Portland, is visiting his old haunts. We are always glad to see him.
    Mr. Norris, of the firm of Beek & Co., left for Indiana Friday evening, to pay his father, who is reported to be quite ill, a visit.
    Mrs. A. J. Weeks, daughter of Hon. and Mrs. J. H. Stewart, has returned to her home at Oakland, Calif., after a pleasant visit here.
    Geo. L. Webb and wife and Mrs. D. T. Sears left for New York the forepart of the week, to order goods and see the styles and sights.
    N. A. Jacobs and family, who have been in Los Angeles, Calif., for a number of months, returned Friday. Mrs. N.'s [sic] health is considerably improved.
    Paul Perrault, the leading tailor of southern Oregon, is building up a nice trade. He does first-class work and guarantees a perfect fit; notwithstanding his prices are quite reasonable.
    A mass meeting was held on the 4th to discuss the proposition of enlarging the water system. On account of the small amount of snow in the mountains last winter there is a scarcity of water for city and fire purposes. A commission was appointed to report on the proposition of building a reservoir on the bank of Bear Creek and a tunnel under the creek, to strike the under strata of water.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1898, page 3


    A party of young folks drove up from Medford Saturday evening in a header wagon and serenaded a number of the residents of Jacksonville. Their music was entrancing and was substantially appreciated. Come again.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. J. G. Van Dyke and her daughters, Misses Edith and Sadie, are at Colestin.
    J. E. Enyart has returned from Chicago, and may locate in southern Oregon.
    E. C. Stickel, the expert mason, is at Gray's mill on upper Rogue River, doing a lot of brick work.
    F. Hubbard is now a traveling salesman for the big firm of Baker & Hamilton of Sacramento, Calif.
    Mrs. J. H. Harris, who has been visiting her brother, E. D. Elwood, the popular jeweler, has gone to Montague Calif.
    Mrs. E. Wilkinson, who has been looking after the Walker ranch for several weeks past, is rusticating at Jacksonville with her sons.
    The warm weather does not affect the sale of Macaulay's celebrated hot tamales.
These are in demand at all times of the year, because they can't be beaten in any particular.
    Hugh Elliott was thrown from a sulky at the fair grounds one day last week, while driving a young horse. He was considerably bruised, receiving a gash in the head.
    Although Dr. Keene's reputation as a tooth carpenter is established, he has also gained laurels as a wheelwright. Such is the opinion of those who occupied the header wagon which broke down while en route from Jacksonville to Central Point last Saturday night.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 11, 1898, page 3


    The fourth quarterly conference of the M.E. Church, South, this district, was held at Medford last Saturday and Sunday. Rev. R. A. Reagan, presiding elder, was among those in attendance.
    Eight gallopers and an equal number of trotters and pacers are in training at the fair grounds near Medford, and more are expected in a short time. The fair promises to be much of a success.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Rev. Mr. Haberly, the new Presbyterian minister, has rented Mrs. Faris' residence. The latter has gone to reside with her father, Mr. Scott of Sams Valley.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
C. W. Palm, et al., to D. H. Whetstone, deed of correction to lot 7, blk 48, Medford . . . 1.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 18, 1898, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Laura Bradley of Eugene, who has been visiting relatives in Medford, returned home this week.
    Mrs. F. V. Medynski is being visited by her brother, who arrived from Eau Claire, Wis. last week. He was unfortunate enough to lose his sight some years ago.
    M. R. Hart, who has been acceptably filling the position of city marshal, resigned this week, and will open a racket store at Lakeview in a short time. Chas. Johnson has been appointed to fill the vacancy.
    There was a scrimmage last Tuesday, and the marshal brought the defendants before Recorder Lawton, who fined them. R. N. Warnock of Klamath County, one of them, has taken his case to the circuit court, and it will come up on a writ of review at the September term. There is a whole lot of fuss and little feathers in this matter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 18, 1898, page 3


    Fruit and melon thieves are becoming numerous, now that the moon does not look upon their depredations.
    Wm. Fidler, who has been at Medford for some time past, has returned to Applegate. He passed through town one day this week, accompanied by his daughter.
    R. T. King, one of the energetic farmers of Medford precinct, called on us a few days ago. He owns the Ritter place, which will produce a large crop of fine prunes.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 18, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Oliver Hansen to J. F. White; parts of lots 3 and 4, blk 8, Park add. to Medford . . . 200.00
A. L. Penwell to Ida I. Morey; part of lot 6, Galloway's add. to Medford . . . 260.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1898, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    G. H. Palethorpe, who has been in charge of the mechanical department of Wilson's bakery, will soon remove to Ashland to engage in business. He is one of the best bakers in southern Oregon.
    An attempt was made Sunday night to burn G. W. Isaacs' barn, turpentine having been poured over the premises. Parties returning from the camp meeting near Central Point extinguished the flames.
    Mrs. Chas. E. Wilkinson was at Jacksonville Saturday, to make arrangements for the education of her two daughters at St. Mary's Academy. In company with her husband she will soon leave for San Diego, Calif., and spend the winter there.
    It is rumored that J. S. Howard has sold his stock of goods to White & Jacobs, of Jacksonville. Your correspondent has not heard the report confirmed as yet, although stock is being taken and C. J. Howard, agent for Wells Fargo Co.'s express, has removed to C Street near the post office.
    Medford's business men have guaranteed the payment of the premiums and purses offered by S.O.S.B. of A., to the extent of $500, and the district fair will be held at the grounds near that city. Fifteen horses are now in training there, and inquiries for stable room are being made daily. As much more interest than usual is being taken in the fair, it will in all probability be a success.
    The Commercial Hotel caught fire from a flue Saturday morning and would have been totally destroyed but for the prompt action of the fire department, assisted by a number of our citizens. The proprietor, Mr. Knackstedt, saved nearly all of the contents of the building. The latter was badly damaged although the frame still stands. The loss is estimated at $1500, which is nearly covered by insurance. Most of the printing material in the Monitor-Miner office was removed to the street; but it proved an unnecessary proceeding.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    G. W. Priddy, who is doing the brickwork on the Loomis and Nininger buildings at Ashland, has got done with one of the structures. He is doing a first-class job.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 25, 1898, page 3


    The Commercial Hotel was burned to ashes Monday. The Monitor Miner newspaper office was badly wrecked while being removed from a building adjoining the hotel.

"Oregon State News,"
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, August 25, 1898, page 2


    San Francisco firms are buying Southern Oregon preserved fruit. They are contracting not only for this year's product, but for what was left over from last year. They are paying cash, because Oregon growers will now sell for cash only. One of the San Francisco buyers relates that he paid 37½ cents each for Oregon apples at Queenstown, Ireland last fall. The apples were shipped from Medford to Hamburg, Germany, and thence to Queenstown.

Lincoln County Leader, Toledo, Oregon, August 26, 1898, page 5



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Jeff. Heard, the popular operator in mines, and family are now residing at Alameda, Calif. Mr. H. may soon pay us a visit.
    J. E. Olson is making substantial improvements about his planing mill, among which is the erection of a 16x70-foot addition.
    Ed. Binns and family from Grants Pass have become residents of Medford. Mr. B. has entered the employ of the S.O.P.P. Co.
    Misses Grace Foster and Jessie Worman, who have been at Astoria, returned a few days ago. They were in attendance at the regatta.
    The Medford orchestra has been engaged to furnish the music for a social dance at Jacksonville on Thursday night. A good time is assured.
    Wm. Ulrich is back again from the coast, having secured over 400 head of cattle, which are now on the range in the Deer Creek section, Josephine County.
    J. A. Whitman and wife, who have been in California for several months past, returned to Medford last week. They may become permanent residents of this place again, so we are informed.
    Frank Wilson, the baker, has leased the building belonging to G. W. White on 7th Street, and now occupied by D. T. Pritchard, the jeweler, for a term of five years. Mr. W. will take charge Sept. 15th.
    A well 20 feet in diameter is being dug on a lot purchased by the city from W. S. Barnum on South A Street. The object is to secure all the water necessary for city purposes, and it is to be hoped that the required depth can be reached. Councilman Woodford is superintending the work.
    Our public schools will open next Monday, September 5, 1898, with the following corps of teachers; Miss C. Grace Foster, first primary; Miss Emma Reed, second primary; Miss May Phipps, second grade; Miss Aileen Webber, third grade; Miss Fannie R. Haskins, fourth grade; Miss Jess G. Wait, fifth grade; Miss Maysie M. Foster, sixth grade; Miss Julia C. Fielder, seventh grade; Miss Pearl Hall, the eighth and part of the ninth, and Latin; ninth and tenth by the principal, who will also teach German, bookkeeping and penmanship.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1898, page 2


    W. W. Skeel, employed in the box factory at Grants Pass, was joined by his family, who have been residents of Medford for a number of years, not long since. This will become their permanent home, and they bring with them the best wishes of many acquaintances.
"Josephine County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1898, page 2


    Frank Wilson, the popular baker of Medford, was in Jacksonville Wednesday, the first time for nearly three months, when he met with a runaway accident in which he had his leg broken. While not able as yet to get off and on his wagon without considerable difficulty, he has someone with him to assist in waiting on his customers about town. His friends were glad to see him.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 1, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford now has direct communication with many of the cities and towns of California by telephone, the Sunset line having been completed to this city from the south a few days ago.
    Ralph Woodford has charge of the main office of the Sunset Telephone Co. in Medford, which is located in Chas. Strang's drug store. Ralph will no doubt prove himself popular in his new position.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 1, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our public schools have resumed studies for the fall and winter term.
    Robt. Galloway returned to Portland last week, where he is practicing law.
    W. H. Parker returned from the north on Sunday. He has been at Yaquina Bay and Portland for several weeks.
    There are now more than 20 horses at the fair grounds--in training for the coming races--some of them being fast ones.
    Geo. L. Webb and wife, who have been in New York, buying goods, returned home during the past week.
    D. T. Pritchard, the pioneer jeweler, will remove his place of business into a portion of the room occupied by J. W. Lawton's harness store within a few days.
    On the 15th inst. the Rogue River Baptist Association will meet here, remaining in session over the Sunday following. Several prominent ministers and laymen will be in attendance.
    William Little, who has had a couple of colts at the fair grounds, has returned to Klamath County. One of the horses will compete in the Oakwood stake race at Bonanza on the 8th.
    Miss Lottie Knox of Lane County, who was in charge of the Postal Tel. Co.'s office here several years ago, died at her home a few days since. She was a worthy young lady and respected by all who knew her.
    At the last meeting of the directors of the First Southern Oregon District Agricultural Society the following officers for the coming fair were appointed: Superintendent of pavilion, W. H. Norcross, Central Point; ladies' superintendent, Mrs. Geo. M. Love, Jacksonville; chief marshal, W. K. Price, Tolo; assistant marshal, Dave Keenan, Grants Pass; entry clerks, Miss Frances L. Barnes, Gold Hill; Miss N. E. DePeatt, Ashland; stock entry clerk, H. W. Dox, Jacksonville; judges, John Harmon, Yreka; Joseph Dame, Ashland; pool clerks, Chas. Gillette, Ashland; J. M. John, Kerbyville; gatekeepers, J. H. Gay, Central Point; W. A. Carter, Gold Hill; campground gatekeeper, Frank Kasshafer, Medford; ticket seller, Horace Nicholson, Medford; assistant secretary, not yet appointed. Starters of trotting and running races and pool seller, not yet appointed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1898, page 2


A LETTER.
    Medford, Oregon, Aug. 29, 1898.           
    Again has the ever-revolving wheel of time whirled September into our midst, and by certain signs are we reminded that this is the month of our southern Oregon fair; and, too, do we realize that it rests with us, the people, to decide whether the institution will be a success and a benefit to our locality or a failure, and so worse than no attempt at all.
    Last year was the first time of holding the fair in Medford, and against heavy odds was the enterprise carried through. Not only had the track to be made, but buildings of all kinds, including the pavilion, built; and not until one week before the date for opening of the fair was the foundation for the latter laid.
    Naturally the effect of this late work was the feeling that there could be no fair, and as a result of this very general feeling but comparatively little preparation for exhibits of any kind was made. Notwithstanding all this, however, the display was, especially in the pavilion, a very creditable one, and a feeling of pride was noticeable in all visitors that southern Oregon could produce such fine specimens in all lines.
    If, therefore, amid all the hurry and bustle and disappointment of last year could grow up anything noteworthy, how much more should 1898 produce, with 1897 for an incentive, and a whole year in which to prepare for the exhibition.
    One exhibit particularly admired last year was the display of produce from Table Rock. No better advertisement of any kind could be found than selections from the best that can there be produced, and it seems to us that, with no entrance fee for such exhibit, each locality could get together specimens of its fruits, vegetables, grains, minerals, coals, etc., and with a tag attached to show the source make an extremely interesting exhibition, and at the same time show by comparison the parts of the district best adapted for certain products.
    We are looking for a larger display of livestock than last year, and as all stock must this year be registered before being entered for premiums it is hoped that all persons having anything fine in the stock line will see to it that it is registered before date for opening [the] fair. Up to October 1st the charge for registering is only $1.00, to be raised to double that amount next year; and as we are all interested in encouraging better breeding, the advantages of this requirement are plainly visible.
    We further wish to state that the catalogues have been largely revised; and while some premiums have been increased, a great many, especially in the fruit and fancy work departments, have been added.
    Friends, we want to make this fair a success, for it is clearly to the advantage of every person, whether farmer, business man or merely a resident of our counties, to make the best possible showing. Let us, one and all, do our part, gather up whatever is fine, either in livestock, farm produce or those fine domestic productions, and so, working as a unit, make of the entire thing a success to be proud of and to reflect credit on our district and ourselves.
    By order of the Board,
M. W. PENDLETON, Sec.               
Medford Mail, September 5, 1898, page 2


Proposals for Grand Stand Privileges.
    Proposals for grand-stand privilege of selling soft drinks, confectionery, cigars, etc. (privilege to be strictly protected), will be received until 12 o'clock noon of Saturday, September 17th, at Medford, Oregon, by secretary of First Southern Oregon District Agricultural Society, for fair to be held September 27th to October 1st exclusive. Certified check for $20 to accompany each bid, as a guarantee of good faith.
M. W. PENDLETON, Secretary.           
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1898, page 3


    The fair association has introduced a new feature for the last day of the district fair near Medford, awarding premiums as follows: G. L. Davis will give a prize of five dollars in groceries to the best-looking baby; Deuel & Sevens, $2.50 in goods to the same best-looking baby, A. C. Tayler, pair of fine shoes to the handsomest lady; D. H. Miller, one-half dozen tablespoons to the handsomest lady. Both the above are intended as first and second prizes. The association will also give a prize to the homeliest man.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Roberts & O'Neil to J. U. Willeke; part of blk 14 in town of Medford . . . 1600.00
G. W. Galloway to Elijah Denton; lot 1, blk 1, Short's add. to Medford . . . 244.00
Ella Medynski to Margaret Lynch; part Meeker's addition to Medford . . . 500.00
F. W. Hutchison to Mattie E. Rhodes; lot 9, blk 52, Medford . . . 320.00
T. G. Spangler to E. Denton; q c d to lot 2, blk 1, Short's add. to Medford . . . 600.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1898, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The public schools have been closed, pending the disappearance of diphtheria. This is a wise proceeding.
    Jas. S. Howard, inspector of government surveys, has been in Jacksonville and vicinity during the past week.
    Miss Warner was at Jacksonville Wednesday. She will soon resume her studies at the Pacific College in Forest Grove.
    There are some cases of diphtheria in the family of Chas. Strang, the druggist, and one of his twins is in a critical condition.
    C. B. Rostel has purchased the bar fixtures formerly used by S. P. Jones at Jacksonville, and will open a beer saloon in his building on Front Street.
    Dr. Warren Cameron of Uniontown visited in Medford this week. He will soon resume his studies at a medical college in Chicago. We wish him unlimited success.
    Frank Wilson, the popular baker, is steadily recovering from the injuries he sustained some time since, and made several trips to Jacksonville with his wagon during the past fortnight.
    Paul Perrault, a drunken tailor who has been infesting Medford for several months past, and who bilked everybody that he was able to, skipped for other scenes last week. His proper abode is the penitentiary.
    The recent cloudburst at Ashland and in this vicinity had a perceptible effect on Bear Creek, and water is again abundant in Medford, much to the satisfaction of our citizens, who have been greatly discommoded by the drought.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1898, page 3


    Medford has been quarantined, as there are some cases of diphtheria in the town.
    Quite a number of horses are in training at the fair grounds near Medford, and more will arrive in time to participate in the speed programme.
    I. W. Thomas has purchased 80 acres of the Bybee farm, lying near the Jacksonville-Medford road, paying Beekman & Reames $3200 therefor. It is first-class land and dirt cheap.
    The Times regrets to announce that White & Jacobs are removing their stock of goods to Medford. They have secured J. S. Howard's storeroom on Seventh Street, where they may be found in the future. The firm is one of the most popular and substantial in the county, and will doubtless meet with success in its new location.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1898, page 3


A Runaway.
    G. M. Love had a lively experience on the Jacksonville-Medford road today. He was driving a span of spirited colts, which crowded the wagon to which they were attached off the grade near the Bybee farm, and then gamboled over the boulders at a rapid rate, spilling the contents of the vehicle in every direction. The harness broke in different places and placed George at the mercy of the animals. They circled several times, finally running into P. N. Ficke's corral, where they came to a standstill. No serious results occurred, although Mr. Love was hit on the head and sustained painful injuries. The wagon was uninjured.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1898, page 3


    We received from our old friend Mr. H. C. Nute, of Medford, this week five boxes of luscious peaches grown on his peach farm. They were great, big nice yellow fellows. We don't know of what variety they were, but we do know that they went right to the spot, and it did not take us long to find out just what spot they were adapted to.

"Local Notes," Lincoln County Leader, Toledo, Oregon, September 9, 1898, page 8



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Carrie L. Johnson, administratrix, to A. V. Hurt; lot 5, blk 24, Medford . . . 325.00
Same to same; q c d to same property . . . 325.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1898, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    G. W. White, the attorney, expects to leave Medford at an early day.
    Medford is having more than its share of fires. The firebug seems to be in the land again.
    Sidney Cole has gone to San Francisco. It is reported that he is stagestruck and will enter some theater.
    Mrs. L. J. Sears, the expert milliner, who lately returned from a visit to River Falls, Wis., is displaying a fine line of all millinery.
    A. L. Penwell is paying his many friends in Medford a visit. He is engaged in mining in Reuben Creek district, Josephine County.
    The public schools resumed studies Monday, as Chas. Strang's family is convalescing and there seems to be no danger that the disease with which they are afflicted will become epidemic.
    Medford will present a busy scene this week, as the county Sunday school convention and the soldiers and sailors of southern Oregon will meet there. Each will present an interesting programme.
    Ex-Marshal Hart, in company with L. G. Beach, opened a racket store in Lakeview on the 1st inst. They are displaying a fine, large stock of goods already, which will be enlarged at once. Success to them.
    There is no foundation for the rumor that Judge Webster of Portland and A. S. Hammond will engage in the practice of law at Burns, Harney County. Mr. H. will remain a citizen of our town, we are glad to say.
    The residence of B. F. Crouch, located in Mingus' addition, was burned to the ground on Saturday, about noon. A portion of the contents was saved. Nobody was in the house at the time. The loss amounted to several hundred dollars, but there was little, if any, insurance.
    The barns of A. J. Stewart and Arthur Wilson, situated in the western part of town, were burned on Saturday, at about midnight. Each contained several tons of hay, Mr. W.'s also sheltering a buggy. The loss approximates $800, and there was no insurance.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1898, page 3


    Mrs. Julia Miles and Miss Wilson, lately of Medford, are conducting the Blue Front restaurant and bakery at Ashland.
    The veterans of the Civil War are holding their annual reunion at the fair grounds near Medford, which will end on Friday, Sept. 16th. An excellent programme has been prepared, that comprises addresses by prominent preachers, singing by Gore Bros.' quartet, campfires and other interest exercises. Mayor Gilkey of Medford made a clever address of welcome on Monday, which was nicely responded to by W. H. Caine, of Gold Hill, district commander.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1898, page 3


Fires at Medford.
    MEDFORD, Or., Sept. 12.--The fire of Sunday was followed by the burning of two barns about midnight last night in another part of the city. The barns were the property of Arthur Wilson and A. J. Stewart, standing on opposite sides of an alley. The fire was undoubtedly the work of incendiaries. There was no insurance on either. An extra force of night watchmen will be put on at once.
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, September 12, 1898, page 1


    The annual convention of Jackson County Sunday schools will be held in the Presbyterian Church, Medford, on Tuesday and Wednesday.
    The residence of B. F. Crouch, a contractor of this city, was totally destroyed by fire Saturday afternoon, only a few pieces of furniture and a small amount of bedding being saved. It was insured for $500, about half the value.
"Oregon State News,"
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, September 12, 1898, page 3


    Medford--The seventh annual reunion of the Southern Oregon Soldiers' and Sailors' Association began Monday and is being held at the Medford fair grounds. There are about 75 tents erected at the grounds, and a large attendance is expected. The address of welcome was delivered by the mayor, H. L. Gilkey, and the response was made by District Commander W. H. Cane.

Daily Capital Journal, Salem, September 14, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Capt. A. C. Smith left for Hawaii this week, and may locate at Honolulu with his son.
    The town is full of veterans of the Civil War and Sunday school folks, all of whom seem to be considerably interested.
    Frank Wilson, the genial baker, has fitted up the building formerly occupied by D. T. Pritchard in fine style, and is doing a lively business.
    Friday, Sept. 30th has been selected as "Medford Day," and our business men will close their places during the afternoon and attend the district fair.
    When the well, which is being dug by order of the city council just south of where W. S. Barnum's planing mill stood, is completed, it will be operated by the pumping plant formerly used by the Tolo Mining Co.
    C. W. Wolters has sold a half interest in his grocery business to H. H. Howard, who represented Chas. Hegele & Co. of Portland for a number of years. The firm is a strong one, and will doubtless do a big business.
    Chas. Riley, a thrifty stockman of Malheur County, who resided in southern Oregon many years ago, arrived in Medford a short time since, accompanied by his son. They drove in a band of 20 head of good horses, which are for sale.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 15, 1898, page 3


    The annual session of Southern Oregon's Baptist Association is being held at Medford. More interest than usual is being taken in it.
    Jackson County's Sunday school convention, which was held at Medford this week, proved a success. The attendance was large and the exercises interesting.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 15, 1898, page 3


    Medford--the eighth annual Sunday school convention is in session here. There are 38 Sunday schools represented, with a total membership of 1,304 scholars.

"Oregon State News,"
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, September 16, 1898, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
W. A. Rummel to F. W. Hutchison; lots 5 and 12; blk 1, Lumsden's add. to Medford . . . 300.00
G. W. Hamlin to Lucy Hamlin; e½ of sw¼, nw¼ of se¼, sec 31, tp 38s, r1w; also lts 12 and 13, in blk 20, Medford . . . 500.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1898, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Grace Odgers is attending the Pacific University at Forest Grove.
    Ira Phipps has gone to Chicago, to attend a prominent dental college.
    G. W. Galloway has gone to Portland, and will spend the winter at the metropolis.
    Mrs. A. R. Phipps was at the county seat Friday. She is efficiently managing the large estate of her late husband.
    Messrs. Beidleman and Nicholson have purchased Geo. Shepherd's farm on Wood River, Klamath County, paying $2000 therefor.
    Mr. Magers, who has spent a lifetime in photography, and is an expert, is employed at Mackey's gallery, where the best work is done.
    The city council has at last responded to the importance of the situation, and offers a reward of $500 for the arrest and conviction of the party who has been engaged in wholesale arson.
    The firebug, who is thought to be a female, on Friday night set fire to a small barn belonging to J. F. Wait, in the western portion of town, which contained a few tons of hay. It was a total loss.
    Ed. Pottenger, who is in charge of the S.O.P.P. Co.'s butcher shop, was in Jacksonville several times during the week. He was attending circuit court much of the time, however.
    The annual harvest festival of the Salvation Army is now progressing. The public is invited to donate any article they wish to as a thank offering to the Almighty, all of which is displayed at the barracks. On the 20th inst. there will be a sale of everything, and the proceeds will be devoted toward sustaining the army's homes for the fallen and needy and the general social work engaged in by its members.
    The firebug is still at work, having attempted the destruction of John Curry's residence on Sunday night, at about half-past nine o'clock. The fire was set on the back porch, which had been saturated with coal oil. It was fortunately discovered before having made much headway by parties returning from church, and extinguished before the fire department arrived. Mr. Curry and his family are at Grants Pass, which fact was probably known to the scoundrel.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1898, page 3



    Justin Wigle, the genial representative of the Medford Steam Laundry, is making regular trips to Jacksonville again.

    The sportsmen of Medford met yesterday afternoon and formed an organization having for its object the protection of the fish in Rogue River, for the enforcement of the game laws and for the punishment of the violators of the same. One-half the amount of fines collected are paid the informants which will be used toward defraying the expenses of the prosecution. Other parts of southern Oregon will be invited to membership in the club.

    Jesse Wilson, Jr., of Medford, an incorrigible youth about ten years old, was convicted in the circuit court Saturday on an indictment charging him with an assault with a dangerous weapon upon another small boy. The verdict was unexpected, as his mother was acquitted by a jury of the same charge. After the verdict was announced mother and son set up a lamentable wail. Mrs. Wilson's eldest daughter attempted to sympathize with her brother, and was struck in the face by her mother.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
T. J. Hamlin to Geo. W. Hamlin; ½ interest in lots 12 and 13, blk 20, Medford . . . 1300.00
T. F. Gooch to Jane Hibbard; part of blk 8 in Park add to Medford . . . 775.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 22, 1898, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Palm, who have been visiting in Ohio, returned home Sunday.
    Dale Hazel left for Davenport, Wash. last week, where he has secured permanent employment.
    A. C. Nicholson of Medford, the scientific carpenter, is putting a new floor in the R.R.V.R. Co.'s passenger coach.
    Alva Danielson, son of Dr. Danielson, who has been visiting his old home, returned Sunday to Oakland, Calif., where he is located.
    Medford's company of volunteers, which has disbanded, presented their flag to Chester A. Arthur Post, G.A.R., and their drum to the public school.
    E. W. Tryer has resigned his position with the S.O.P.P. Co., and is succeeded by Geo. H. Binns, lately of Grants Pass. He will have charge of M. Chapman's farm on Williams Creek, Josephine County, next year.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 22, 1898, page 2


    The S.P. Co. has made a rate of $11.00 for the round trip from Medford to the state fair at Salem, from September 19th to 29th inclusive, tickets good until October 3d.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 22, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
A. V. Hurt to F. M. Stewart; lot 5, blk 24, Medford . . . 400.00
T. E. Pottenger to Eugene Childers; lot 10, blk 33, Medford . . . 1.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1898, page 1


    John Schneider of Medford, proprietor of the Red Front, has commenced an action in the circuit [court] against Thos. Collins of Klamath County for damages, alleging that he libeled him.
    The R.R.V.R. Co. will run a train daily, at one o'clock, for the accommodation of those who wish to attend the district fair. Those who buy tickets of admission at the depot will be granted half fare.
    "A Summer's Fancy," a clever comedy, will be presented at Medford Thursday evening and at Jacksonville Saturday evening. The cast comprises some of the best talent in southern Oregon. The performances will doubtless be well patronized, as they are certain to give satisfaction.
    Anson L. Penwell of Medford has commenced suit for a divorce against Lillie J. Penwell. White & Jeffrey are his attorneys. Anna Belle Hamilton of Ashland wants to be divorced from Alex Hamilton, and is represented in court by E. D. Briggs.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford hasn't had a fire for a whole week.
    Dr. J. M. Keene, the senatorial Warwick, left for Salem Friday evening, to help start the legislature.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1898, page 3

 
PLACER GOLD EXCITEMENT.

Fabulously Rich Discoveries Reported in Northern California.
    Medford, Ore., Sept. 26.--The greatest mining excitement ever known in northern California has been caused by a rich strike claimed to have been made in the Siskiyou Mountains, one mile from the Jackson County line, in northern California, on what is known as Sterling Butte. William Angle and Jordan Brown are the alleged discoverers. They came to Medford last night, claiming to have 50 pounds of gold dust. They say they have been prospecting for about six weeks and struck the pay dirt about two weeks ago. They have taken out about 60 pounds of gold and are very enthusiastic as to future developments.
    The mine is said to be 7,200 feet above sea level. The altitude will make it impossible to work more than a few weeks longer this winter but it is likely that hundreds of people will be in the vicinity within the next few weeks.
The Salt Lake Herald, Utah, September 27, 1898, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. A. Owen of Central Point is at the Turf Exchange during fair week.
    C. H. Paine, the clever leader of the orchestra, is acting as deputy marshal and giving general satisfaction.
    Medford's book store has changed hands, being conducted by Carl Narregan and Jas. Stewart, who will improve it in every way.
    W. E. Macauley was in Jacksonville one day last week. His brother, who has been paying him a visit, has returned to Fredrick, Kansas.
    Mr. Bodge, a first-class tailor, who recently arrived from Ohio, has located in Medford. He may be found in the building formerly occupied by A. Reinhold.
    Miss Carrie George of Cottage Grove, an expert manipulator of electricity, is in charge of the Postal Telegraph office in our city, having succeeded Miss Mamie Knox.
    Mrs. M. E. Rigby, wife of the well-known teacher of penmanship, etc., who was formerly stationed in Medford, has been visiting in Jackson and Josephine counties. She left for her home at Brigham, Utah, Monday. Mr. R. is in poor health.
    "A Summer's Fancy" will be presented at the opera house this Thursday evening, by Medford and Jacksonville local talent under the direction of the talented young actor, Percy H. Levin. A large audience will no doubt be in attendance. This splendid comedy will be presented at Jacksonville tomorrow (Friday) evening.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 29, 1898, page 3


"A Summer's Fancy."
    The bright, sparkling comedy in four acts, entitled "A Summer's Fancy," will be presented at the U.S. [Hotel] hall tomorrow (Friday) evening, by Jacksonville and Medford local talent, directed by the talented young actor, Percy H. Levin. The following is the cast of characters: Jack Henderson, Percy H. Levin; Harry Woodthorpe, Carl Narregan; Jethro Baxter, Henry Pape; Philander Poots, James Stewart; James Henderson, Lin Purdin; Wally Henderson and Jake Baxter, Ralph Woodford; Emma Watson, Miss Mamie Nicholson; Edith Henderson, Miss Bessie Nickell; Mercy Baxter, Miss Genevieve Reames. None should fail to witness the performance of this splendid comedy. Get your seats at once, now on sale at Max Muller & Co.'s. General admission, 25 cents; reserved seats, 35 cents; children under 12 years of age, 15 cents.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 29, 1898, page 3



    The road between Jacksonville and Medford is full of holes, which should be filled before winter arrives.
    Wheat has returned to the 50-cent mark, and the belief is general that it will go higher soon.
    C. L. Elwood of Medford, the scientific optician and jeweler, has a new advertisement in today's Times. He has built up a good business, as he keeps a full assortment of first-class goods and does the best work.
    Oregon and San Francisco were connected by telephone last Friday, and the event was celebrated by the Sunset Co., which allowed its patrons here to converse free of charge with people at the other end of the line.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 29, 1898, page 3


    Frank W. Smith, of Hornbrook, Calif., visited his mother, Mrs. A. S. Jacobs, of Central Point, this week. He was accompanied by his two sons.
    Mr. and Mrs. O. Gilbert arrived in this city Monday from Crescent City, Calif., to make Medford their future home. They will occupy the Walter Anderson residence, on South C Street, until they can build on their lots in East Medford. Such good people are always a welcome acquisition to our fast-increasing population.
    Mrs. A. S. Bliton and daughters, Loraine and Mildred, left Sunday evening for a few weeks' visit with home folks at Wheatland, North Dakota. Mrs. B. has been ill with rheumatism for several weeks, and the change of climate is made in hopes of improving her health. Her mother will return to Medford with her and spend the winter here.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, September 30, 1898, page 6


    One day last week Marshal Johnson filed a complaint against John Schneider, the vendor of wet groceries, in Recorder Lawton's court on a charge of selling liquor to minors. The hearing of the case was postponed until Monday of the week, but before the trial of the case came on, the marshal withdrew the complaint on account of the town ordinance being defective. The case will probably come up in Justice Stewart's court.
    Work on the town well has been suspended for a few days. Operations cannot proceed satisfactorily until the steam pumping outfit has been adjusted, the small hand pump proving inadequate to the demands. As soon as the new order of things is inaugurated the work will be pushed to completion as rapidly as possible.
    Attorney S. S. Pentz contemplates leaving Medford in the near future, to seek a more desirable climate for Mrs. Pentz, whose health has been quite poorly for some time. The new location will probably be somewhere in California.
    Merchant J. F. White's little daughter has been very seriously ill at their home in Jacksonville this week with something like tonsillitis. County Treasurer Lee Jacobs is doing duty at White & Jacobs' this week on account of Mr. White being detained at home.
    J. R. Wilson, the expert hackman, had a bad attack of rheumatism last week in his strong right arm which necessitated him in taking a few days off. After proper medical treatment J. R. is now at his old place and expects to be himself again.
    Merchant J. F. White is erecting himself a residence in southwest Medford near G. C. Noble's residence on lots that he owned for some time.
    Johnny Stewart has quit the brewery and has taken a position with Boyden & Nicholson.
    Ira Dunlap swings the sledge in Wilson & Hunsaker's blacksmith shop.
    D. W. Andrus has leased the Gale lime kiln and quarry on Kanes Creek, and in company with Oscar Carpenter commenced work last Tuesday in getting out rock and putting up a kiln. They expect to have a kiln of lime ready to open the latter part of next week. The lime from that quarry is always all right, and these gentlemen understand how to handle it.
    E. G. Hurt left yesterday morning for Pomona, Calif., in response to a telegram that his little son was dangerously ill with diphtheria.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 30, 1898, page 7



    Miss Myrtle Woodford of Medford, who has been employed in the Times office for several weeks past, left for Portland this morning on the excursion train. She expects to remain indefinitely, and will be the guest of relatives at the metropolis. Her many friends all wish her well.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1898, page 2


They Did Well.
    The performance of the splendid comedy entitled "A Summer's Fancy," at the U.S. Hall on Friday evening, under the direction of Percy H. Levin, was a success and gave general satisfaction. The cast, which was composed of Mr. Levin and Jacksonville and Medford talent, more than met the expectations of the audience, which was a good-sized one, and its appreciation of the theatrical genius displayed was shown by frequent applause. The music furnished by the Medford band added much to the entertainment. The rendition of the play at Medford on Thursday night was equally as well received.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1898, page 3


    Apple buyers are now in the valley and paying 40 cents and upwards per box for a choice article.
    Several of the young people of Grants Pass, who came to attend the fair near Medford, visited in Jacksonville more or less of their time.
    The English and German Expert Specialists of San Francisco will be at Medford next Monday. They are building up a big practice in Oregon.
    Since the improvement in the price of wheat a large number of sales have been made. Most of the cereal has changed hands at 50 cents a bushel, which is very low.
    Jacksonville was well represented almost every day at the fair near Medford last week, notwithstanding that the weather was not as pleasant as it might have been.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1898, page 3


The District Fair.
    Rain and uncomfortable weather was the order last week, which had a depressing effect on the fair given under the auspices of the 1st S.O.S.B. of A. The attendance would otherwise have been much larger and the exhibits more numerous. The speed contests were participated in solely by horses belonging to the district, and proved interesting and perfectly square. Although there were not so many articles in the pavilion as usual, they were exceptionally excellent. Not a great deal of fine stock was exhibited, but what there was would have taken premiums anywhere in Oregon. The board of directors did everything possible to ensure success, and are entitled to much credit. Unfortunately they could not control the elements.
Democratic Times, 
Jacksonville,
October 3, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. L. Wigle, who has been in the laundry business for some time, left for the Willamette Valley last week, accompanied by his son and daughter.
    Eugene Guard, Oct. 4: Dr. Robt. F. Burnett, lately of Astoria, is in the city visiting his mother and sisters. He is on his way to Medford, where he will associate himself with Dr. J. M. Keene for the practice of his profession.
    Frank Morey, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Morey, died at Butte, Mont. a few days since, of typhoid fever. The remains will be buried in Medford one day this week, under the auspices of the K. of P.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 6, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
E. E. Phipps to G. F. Schmidtlein; blk 4, Fair view add. to Medford . . . 200.00
Mrs. D. G. Ross to Anna Oiler; lot 7, blk 3, Lumsden's add. to Medford . . . 200.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 6, 1898, page 3



    Mrs. Elmira Cochran of Medford has sold her farm on Butte Creek to O. Harbaugh for $2500.
    The threshing machine of Patterson & Chute of Talent precinct threshed over 80,000 bushels of wheat this season, it is said. Several others also did very well.
    It is estimated that over 500,000 bushels of grain was threshed in Jackson County this season. If a good price was realized therefor everybody would be happy.
    "A Summer's Fancy," which was performed at Jacksonville and Medford last week, will be played at Yreka, Calif. by P. H. Levin and local talent next Wednesday.
    Nearly 300 residents of Jackson and Josephine counties were aboard the special train that left Ashland for Portland Monday. Medford furnished about 40, Ashland 50, Grants Pass 40, Jacksonville and vicinity 15, and the balance got on at different railroad stations. This will take a large sum of money out of circulation in southern Oregon.
"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 6, 1898, page 3


"A Summer's Fancy."
    This play, as advertised, came off at the Medford opera house last Thursday evening, and was witnessed by a large and appreciative audience.
    The acting of the principals, Percy H. Levin and Miss Genevieve Reames, cannot be praised too highly, and the support they received throughout the entire cast cannot be said to be lacking.
    Percy Levin, who took the part of Jack Henderson, is an actor such as does not visit Medford every day, and Miss Genevieve Reames, a Jacksonville lady, is a coming actress if she will follow the stage. Henry Pape, as Farmer Baxter, was good, as Henry's droll ways are exactly adapted to the part assigned him, making him a farmer at all times during the play. Lin Purdin, the elder Henderson, Jack's father, was good, considering the fact that this was Lin's first appearance before an audience. Prof. Philander Potts, in the person of Jas. Stewart, was a character well impersonated, and Ralph Woodford, who took the part of Wallie Henderson, Jack's brother, portrayed the same excellency, although this was his first appearance on the stage. Emma Watson, of uncertain age, giddy and girlish, was well delineated by Miss Mamie Nicholson, while the she-will-and-she-won't Edith Henderson representation was well carried through by Miss Bessie Nickell. The part of lover, who was devoted to one particular star, was well rendered by Carl Narregan, who is a rising young actor.
    The play was for the benefit of the Medford band, which furnished excellent music during the evening. Quite a neat little sum was realized, and we trust that the band will not let "A Summer's Fancy" be the last entertainment they will put on at the opera house during the coming winter.
Medford Mail, October 7, 1898, page 2


    Fred Barneburg was at Ashland last Friday on business connected with the new brick he and Robt. Tayler are building in that city to rent.
    Dr. Robt. F. Burnett, of Astoria, arrived in Medford Wednesday morning and expects to drop anchor right here. He has associated himself in the dental business with Dr. J. M. Keene, of this city.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 7, 1898, page 6


    A testimonial concert and ball will be given at the opera house by the Medford band, on Friday evening of next week, October 16th. For several months Prof. W. A. Snow has very ably instructed the band boys, and the young men have embraced this opportunity to repay him in part for his efforts on their behalf. Tickets for the concert will cost but twenty-five cents and for the ball only seventy-five cents. Music for the dance will be furnished by the full band. Everybody is invited--in fact you are urged to be there and express your appreciation of meritorious services rendered your town boys.
    White & Jacobs are erecting a corrugated iron warehouse in the rear of their store on Seventh Street. The structure will be 25x30. Herbert Crouch and J. A. Bradley are doing the work.
    The county bridge over Bear River at the foot of Seventh Street is being repaired by having some of the old and broken boards in the floor replaced with new ones.
    J. A. Whitman is building a new fruit warehouse next to the railroad on F Street--Grants Pass Courier.
   
Wolters & Howard have put in a line of novelty chinaware, which they are advertising this week. On each piece of this new ware is burned a picture of either Table Rock, the Medford public school building or a part of Main Street, Medford. The ware is Wheelock china and was made in Austria especially for Wolters & Howard. A person looking for souvenirs for themselves or friends can find the needed article here. A list of the articles is printed in their advertisement--on this page.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, October 7, 1898, page 7



    Hon. J. J. Howser of Meadows precinct was in Jacksonville Saturday. He has purchased some valuable property from the Spencer Childers estate, and is here on business connected therewith.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Frances Kessler, who formerly resided in Medford, and later in Grants Pass, will be married in San Francisco this week.
    The remains of Frank Morey, who died at Butte, Mont., last week, were interred in our cemetery on Sunday. The funeral was largely attended.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1898, page 3


SUICIDE OF TWO LOVERS.
Man Shoots Himself and Woman Dies by the Rope.
    MEDFORD, Or., Oct. 10.--Mrs. Docia Worlow, daughter of Mrs. M. E. Worlow, residing about fifteen miles from here, committed suicide yesterday by hanging. The young lady was engaged to be married on October 20 to James Wyland, whose suicide by shooting was reported about two weeks ago. It is now known that both agreed to end their lives and that they had an engagement to meet for that purpose on the evening on which Wyland killed himself, he having told her he would bring a bottle of laudanum. Both deaths are enshrouded in mystery.
    The suicides were of respectable and well-to-do families.

The San Francisco Call, October 11, 1898, page 4


    Marshal Johnson deserves a chromo. If the city council don't put it up, The Monitor-Miner will. Several improvements are observable in the morals of Medford, not the least of which is the cessation of the loudmouthed swearing of certain of the hoodlum element--boys and men. It has formerly been a matter of general occurrence to hear a lot of the boys engaged in playing ball or some other sport shoot off their "bazoos" with obscenity or profanity until decent people would want to either stop their ears or walk away. Business men of the town have been heard to rip out oaths and obscenity on the street that would have put them into the "cooler" of a decent town--that is, if a decent town has such a thing. Marshal Johnson has given the men of the baser sort to understand that loudmouthed profanity must be stopped, and it is to be hoped that he will carry it out to the letter of the law. There are still other improvements that might be made in the morals of the town without interfering with anybody's rights. Let the good work go on.
Medford Monitor-Miner, October 13, 1898, page 2



    Hot baths at Hotel Nash barber shop.
    As we go to press we learn that M. Bellinger got both arms broke in a runaway this afternoon. No particulars.
    Hugh Elliott, the horseshoer, is the man who can fix your horse's feet just right. His work stands the test and is all right.
    Mrs. Geo. P. Lindley was the recipient this week of a handsome check for $1000, being the balance in settlement of her father's estate.
    Warner & Wortman have a new delivery wagon of their own--the completest thing of the kind in town. They will now deliver your groceries on time sharp.
    A gasoline grasshopper is the latest tri-wheeled machine that runs on rails. Mr. Running, assistant engineer for the lines of the S.P. company in Oregon, together with roadmaster Galvin, were in Medford Tuesday riding one. Mr. Running said he had made 40 miles an hour with it.
    The county court at its recent session appealed the railroad tax case to the supreme court for final adjudication. The court, sitting as an equalization board, refused to reduce the wild and tillable lands and personal property of the large number of taxpayers who were before them by petition, also refusing to give the Southern Pacific Company the reductions asked by its officials.
    All that was mortal of Frank E. Morey, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Morey, of this city, arrived here last Saturday, having been shipped from Butte, Montana, where died Sunday, October 2nd, of typhoid pneumonia, aged 26 years, 9 months and 14 days. The funeral occurred Sunday afternoon from the Christian Church, under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias, of which he was a member. Mr. and Mrs. Morey have the sympathy of a large circle of friends.
    Last Friday a bargain was closed between Hon. J. J. Howser, of the Meadows, and Mrs. Mary M. Childers, of Medford, by which the latter becomes possessed of the 160-acre homestead recently advertised for sale in this paper, and the former gets in return a fine piece of residential property just east of Bear Creek, in Medford. Mr. Howser will move his family to Medford, while Mrs. Childers will occupy the homestead property in the Meadows. She secured the place for her son, Spencer Childers, who wishes to go on the farm for a time.
    F. L. Cranfill is advertising his large and complete stock of goods in this issue. Messner & Eachus, of Central Point, are telling of their superior facilities for smithing and wagon work, and of their veterinary skill. White & Jacobs have a large and attractive ad of a large and attractive stock of merchandise. Hubbard Brothers will have a new ad next week of their large stock of plows. Warner & Wortman are advertising the best grocery store in Medford. We again impress upon our readers the importance of doing business with the houses that advertise in this paper. They are absolutely the best and safest businessmen of Medford, and instead of handling fire- and water-damaged goods, shelf-worn samples, etc., at job lot prices, they buy honest goods at the very best of honest bargains, and sell them accordingly.

Medford Monitor-Miner, October 13, 1898, page 3


    E. W. Carder returned yesterday morning from Dawson City, where he has been for several months.
    Geo. Feldmeyer, of the firm of J. A. Flowers & Co., hop growers of Applegate, was in Medford Tuesday. He reports their hop crop a good one and in prime condition.
    Thomas Patterson and wife, of Klamath County, were visiting Mrs. Patterson's father, Wm. Abbott, and family, of Talent, last week, and while in the valley purchased their winter's supplies of Medford merchants.
"Personal,"
Medford Monitor-Miner, October 13, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Mary M. Childers to J. J. Howser; q c d to land in Medford precinct . . . 10.00
Mary M. Childers, administratrix, to J. J. Howser; same property . . . 650.00
Oliver Hansen to Orson Gilbert; property in Galloway's add to Medford . . . 400.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 13, 1898, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Sidney Cole, the actor, has returned from San Francisco.
    E. W. Carder has returned from Alaska, with a much bigger stock of experience than gold.
    Miss Katie Parker of Gold Hill and Mrs. R. A. Carter of Talent, her sister, have been visiting in Medford.
    J. G. Taylor, who keeps the biggest stock of harness, saddles, etc., in southern Oregon, is enjoying a fine trade. He keeps the best and sells at reasonable prices.
    Prof. W. A. Snow, the efficient leader of the Medford band, will be tendered a testimonial benefit and ball on Friday evening, Oct. 14th. His pupils have made great progress, and are now able to play many difficult and choice numbers in a clever manner. Everybody should attend.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 13, 1898, page 2


    The Earl Fruit Co., through their agent, J. A. Whitman, have purchased a large quantity of apples in Jackson and Josephine counties. They are paying 50 cents a box for a choice article, f.o.b.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 13, 1898, page 3


Real Estate Transfers.
Mrs. D. G. Ross to Anna Oiler, lot 7, blk 3, Lumsden's addition to Medford . . . 200
E. E. Phipps to G. F. Schmidtlin, blk 4, Fairview addition to Medford . . . 200
Medford Mail, October 14, 1898, page 4



    Mrs. S. A. Owings and children left Wednesday morning for Newton, Iowa, where they will visit relatives during the winter.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 14, 1898, page 6



    Will Jackson, Orin and Scott Davis and Willie Bates returned early this week from a deer hunting expedition up Rogue River, and as a result of their chase fourteen deer were slain. Upon returning to Medford seven or eight of the deer carcasses were strung on a large pole, the pack horses were packed, the dogs, guns and all camp paraphernalia, including Willie Bates' pretty smiles, and the other three hunters were gotten together in a vacant lot on South C Street, and a picture was made of them.
    D. T. Cox has purchased his partner's interest in the New Nash Livery Stable, and hereafter will conduct the business single-handed. S. A. Owings, the ex-partner, has not determined as yet what business he will engage in.
    E. W. Carder, he who left for Alaska several months ago, returned to Medford Wednesday of this week. He has had a pretty tough time in that northern country, having been sick with scurvy, and has experienced all kinds of hardships. At one time there came reports that chances were that he would never be able to reach home again, but he partially recovered and made good his escape from the perils and hardships of the country that promises so much to so many and keeps good the promise to so few--but that he is with his friends again is so much a satisfaction that he will hardly be allowed to try the land of ice again, even should he want to. A boiled-down history of that country from him will appear in these columns next week.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, October 14, 1898, page 7



    Dr. J. M. Keene, of Medford, having returned from a visit to the Willamette Valley, will be pleased to meet all those in need of first-class dental work. Dr. Robert Burnett has entered into partnership with Dr. Keene, and are prepared to do the best of work at reasonable prices, guaranteeing satisfaction.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. J. M. Keene, who has been at Salem for several weeks past, making [sic] a U.S. senator, has returned.
    Your correspondent is informed that Medford will have another bank soon. J. E. Enyart is organizing it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1898, page 3


    Hon. J. J. Howser, he who has just moved to East Medford from Sams Valley, is not quite sure of his footing when he starts over town for his mail on a dark night. He is not in the least afraid of the dark, but there is that big Bear Creek bridge to cross over, and there are a whole lot of things to stumble against. To illume the east end of the bridge he is now negotiating with Mr. Proudfoot to have an electric light put in--at his personal and individual expense. When the light is there he sort o' figures that East Side people will be so delighted with the improvement that they will chip in and make good to him a part of the expense--and it would seem but natural that they would do so.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, November 11, 1898, page 7


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
Lucy Williams to Conrad Mingus; property in Short's addition to Medford . . . 280.00
W. D. Beidleman to Geo. P. Lindley; part of N. B. Evans' dlc in Medford precinct . . . 125.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 20, 1898, page 3



    A large quantity of apples is being hauled from Applegate to Medford. Most of them were sold at 50 cents a box.
    Ed Wells of Medford, an excellent butcher, has purchased the Gold Hill meat market of J. W. Marksbury, and will conduct it in the most approved style.
    Mel. Crystal of Medford, who has been furnishing this market with superior vegetables during the past season, has our thanks for a fine casaba.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 20, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    White & Jacobs have built a big warehouse in the rear of their store and filled it with goods.
    John F. White, the merchant, is building a neat residence, and will soon be joined by his family.
    W. I. Vawter and wife have returned from their eastern trip. They were gone nearly six weeks and visited many states.
    Frank Wait recently shipped to Glendale, for Mrs. N. R. Elliff, a handsome piece of work in marble. The monument represents a broken tree and is cleverly engraved, making it one of the finest ever put up in southern Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1898, page 2


    Henry Orth is now employed at Wilkinson's meat market in Medford, succeeding Ed. Wells, who has gone into business at Gold Hill.
    Mr. Sims lately from the East, is at the Medford fair grounds, breaking horses to ride under saddle. He can teach them twenty different gaits.
    The law firm of Hammond & Vawter, doing business in Medford, has been dissolved. Each of the gentlemen has opened an office in that town.
    The dancing party given at Orth's hall Friday night passed off nicely, the attendance being large. The music furnished by the Medford orchestra gave general satisfaction.
    D. B. Reame, the sewing machine repairer of Medford, was in town Saturday. He has had 26 years' experience and has no equal in his line in southern Oregon, being strictly honest in his work. Those who need his services will discover that he gives entire satisfaction.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
G. P. Lindley to J. U. Willeke and wife; property in Medford precinct . . . $  1.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 27, 1898, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Red Front Saloon, two doors west of Hotel Nash, will soon be reopened.
    Work is still progressing on the big well that the city is building to give the town a better supply of water during the summer time.
    Messrs. Perry & Foster, lately of Linn County, has purchased True Cox & Co.'s interest in the Nash Livery Stables. They will spare no pains to please the public.
    John Schneider, who has been conducting the Red Front for some time past, has removed to Sisson, Calif., where he will again engage in the saloon business.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 27, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Red Front Saloon will be reopened shortly by W. F. Taggart, the expert mixologist. He will soon make it a popular resort.
    Extensive improvements are being made to the Hotel Nash. The inside of the second story will be remodeled and the whole building thoroughly renovated.
    Frank Shideler, who is a graduate of the California Pharmaceutical College, has taken a position in Haskins' drug store. He arrived from Los Angeles, Calif., where his parents reside, last week.
    We are glad to learn that J. A. Whitman is again a resident of Medford, having purchased the business formerly conducted by him of E. W. Carder. He is one of southern Oregon's most enterprising citizens.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart has purchased the brick building occupied by Ferguson, the grocer, on 7th Street, as also the vacant lot adjoining. He will have constructed, for the use of the proposed banking institution, a handsome edifice, as also another story above it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1898, page 3



    Jas. Murray, the artist, is at Medford, embellishing the interior of Hotel Nash.
    A large quantity of choice apples, from the orchards of Messrs. Buckley, Bostwick, Hamilton and others, has been hauled to Medford lately. They were purchased by J. A. Whitman.
"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1898, page 3


    L. B. Warner of Medford is delivering a large assortment of fruit trees, shrubbery, etc., bought by residents of different parts of the county.
"Klamath County News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 3, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Geo. N. Spurr, who has been at Cottage Grove for several months, has returned and reopened his bowling alley.
    H. H. Howard, who purchased a half interest in Wolters' grocery store, has become a resident of Medford. His wife arrived with him.
    W. J. Mahoney of Oakland, Or. is W. V. Lippincott's assistant at the S.P. depot. He is clever and efficient, and will give general satisfaction.
    The residence that is being built in the western part of Medford for John F. White, our popular merchant, is nearing completion. It will be a neat and convenient one.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 3, 1898, page 3



    Hon J. H. Stewart will gather enough apples from his extensive orchards in Eden precinct to make 25 carloads; and Weeks & Orr will have about 12 carloads for shipment. They represent a considerable sum of money.
    A part of the staff of the English and German Expert Specialists and Dr. Meyers & Co. of San Francisco will be at Hotel Nash in Medford Wednesday, Nov. 9th, on their regular monthly visit. These successful doctors are becoming more popular every year, cure catarrh in all its forms, consumption in the first and second stages, all female complaints, diseases and weaknesses of men, deformities and chronic diseases generally. Consultation and advice free.
    John F. White, having resigned his position as a member of the board of trustees of Jacksonville, Geo. N. Lewis was chosen to fill the vacancy. Emil Britt was elected to succeed him as president of the board. Mr. White made an attentive and efficient official, and the people are loath to dispense with his services.
    Hon. John A. Jeffrey has opened a law office at Salem, in connection with that conducted by White & Jeffrey at Medford. Mr. White will attend to the business at this end of the line. Mr. Jeffrey is a promising young lawyer, having no superior in southern Oregon as an orator. His many friends wish him success.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 3, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Jas. Murray, the painter and paperhanger, who has been beautifying Mrs. H. M. Crowell's residence in this city, returned to Jacksonville Saturday.
    Fifteen window panes were broken out of the Catholic Church here a few nights ago, probably by hoodlums. The scoundrels will be severely dealt with if detected, as they ought to be.
    Kelly Bros., who have located a good quartz claim on Forest Creek, were at the scene of their discovery on Monday, accompanied by Court Hall.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1898


    Mackey, the Medford photographer, has leased the gallery at Gold Hill, and will take charge Nov. 10th, to remain 15 days.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
Andrew Griffin to J. H. Stewart; lots 17 and 18, blk 13, Medford . . . 2200.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1898, page 3


    J. A. Jeffrey, the talented young lawyer and orator from Medford who has located at Salem, has not yet secured an office. It seems desirable law offices are scarce. The firm will be Jeffrey and Bonham.

"Personal and Local,"
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, November 7, 1898, page 4


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Clara Macauley to F. W. Hutchison; 1.34 acres in Mingus subdivision adjoining Medford . . . 150.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 10, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. P. Johnston and family, formerly of Oak Bar, Calif., have become residents of Medford.
    John Schneider and family have become residents of Sisson, Calif. They carry the best wishes of numerous friends with them.
    Mr. King, the mining expert, who formerly was located in Medford with his brother and Jeff. Heard, has left this life of single blessedness. He was married in San Francisco recently to Miss Mary Bantz, a popular school teacher. Mr. King is now superintendent of the Blue Gravel Mine near Yreka, Calif. In unison with many friends we extend congratulations and hope that their life will be happy and prosperous.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 10, 1898, page 3


    F. E. Wanless and J. Eads were in town the forepart of the week. They are employed in the drifting diggings of R. A. Cook of Sterlingville.
    The town of Lakeview has decided to experiment for artesian water, something which has generally been unsuccessful in Oregon. A. P. Creed, formerly of Medford, has the contract to sink the well.
    Geo. W. Hamlin, who was indicted by the grand jury for the larceny of a steer belonging to Meyer & Sons of Lake Creek, was arrested by Sheriff Orme at his residence in Medford yesterday. He will be released on bonds today. Hamlin says he has never been out of the county since he was wanted by the authorities.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 10, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Rev. J. S. McCain and wife have become residents of Medford.
    The material for the new bank building is being put on the ground. Hon. J. H. Stewart is superintending operations.
    Mrs. J. F. Gregory and family of Central Point have removed to Medford and will be joined by Mr. G. in the near future.
    The firm of Wilson & Hunsaker, blacksmiths, has been dissolved. Mr. W. will continue the business, while Mr. H. will remove to Eugene with his family.
    G. W. White has returned from a trip to eastern Oregon and northern California. Although his family are at Portland, he has not definitely decided on leaving Medford.
    Frank Wait of the Medford Marble Works has removed his headquarters to the old photograph gallery on B Street, not far from his former location. He is enjoying a big trade this fall.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1898, page 2


    Geo. Porter of Medford has become chief clerk in J. W. Robinson's mercantile establishment at Wimer.
    J. W. Wiley of Medford, who ships a large number of stock out of the valley every year, a short time since sent a carload each of hogs and sheep to San Francisco. He finds that they are becoming scarcer every year.
    Chas. H. Pierce of San Francisco has been spending some time in the valley, looking after the interests of his uncle, congressman Hopkins of Pennsylvania, who has large timber interests in this and Klamath counties.
    Choice apples are selling for fancy figures, there being a big shortage throughout the country. J. H. Stewart, Weeks & Orr and others are getting $1.25 a box for Newtown pippins and other favorite varieties f.o.b. the railroad.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1898, page 3


    The following story, undoubtedly true (?), comes from a Medford correspondent: "Seven years ago a farmer living west of the city hung his vest on a fence in the barn yard, and as a result of it a wonderful story is told. A calf chewed up a pocket in the garment in which was a standard gold watch. Last week the animal, a staid old milk cow, was butchered for beef and the timepiece was found in such a position between the lungs of the cow that the process of respiration, the closing in and filling of the lungs, kept the stemwinder wound up and the watch has lost but four minutes in the last seven years."--Ashland Town Talk.

"Journal 'X-Rays',"
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, November 14, 1898, page 2


    Hon. John A. Jeffrey has opened a law office at Salem, in connection with that conducted by White & Jeffrey at Medford. Mr. White will attend to the business at this end of the line. Mr. Jeffrey is a promising young lawyer, having no superior in southern Oregon as an orator. His many friends wish him success.--Jacksonville Times. Mr. Jeffrey will be associated here with one of the oldest and one of the newest of Oregon's lawyers, Judge B. F. Bonham and Carey F. Martin. Their office will be over the new telephone office in the Wm. England block.

"Salem People and Other People"
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, November 14, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    John F. White's residence has been completed and is being occupied by himself and family. It is one of the neatest in town.
    Rev. J. S. McCain, while cutting wood in the hills near town, crushed one his limbs in a painful though not serious manner.
    F. M. Plymale, one of our most prominent citizens, is quite ill at his residence. His brother, W. J. Plymale of Jacksonville, is attending him.
    Arthur Weeks of Oakland, Calif., an excellent architect, is in Medford, crafting plans for the fine brick building Hon. J. H. Stewart, his father-in-law, proposes erecting soon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 17, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Bertha S. Barnum to Jas. R. Armpriest; lot 14, blk 22, Medford . . . 100.00
F. W. Hutchison to Wm. and Mary Vowels; lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 3, Park add. to Medford . . . 145.76
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 17, 1898, page 3


    John F. White and family are permanent residents of Medford, having removed their household goods from Jacksonville this week. We are sorry to lose them.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 17, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Willie Dunn, the genial telegrapher, is a resident of Salem again.
    Ralph Bunch, who has been employed at Simpson's shaving parlors at Ashland, has returned home.
    Chas. J. Howard, our popular express agent, will soon remove to Josephine County, having purchased the Briggs farm near Kerbyville.
    E. F. Walker, while waiting for the northbound train at Ashland one day last week, had his pockets picked of $3.50 in money, a knife and some keys.
    The English and German expert [medical] specialists of San Francisco will be at Medford again on Tuesday, the 29th. They do more business every time they come.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1898, page 2


    John W. Jacobs, who is clerking in White & Jacobs' store at Medford, spent last week with his family. Mother and son are doing well.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1898, page 2


    The Rogue River Valley Choral Union, which is composed of leading vocalists of southern Oregon, is making great preparations for its annual concerts, which will take place at Medford during the holiday season, commencing Dec. 26th and ending Dec. 31st. Prof. Boyer of Portland and Mrs. Geo Brooks of Eugene, who enjoy a state reputation, will assist. It will doubtless be an interesting event.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Mabel Bruns to W. B. Stevens; lots 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, blk 23, Medford . . . 800.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 24, 1898, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mel. Crystal has gone to Lakeview, and will probably locate in California again.
    Medford will furnish a large number of participants in the Thanksgiving ball at Jacksonville.
    The Wizard Oil Co., with little Jerry Sullivan as one of its star performers, will open a week's engagement at the opera house on the 28th.
    The Red Front has been thoroughly renovated and fitted up with handsome bar fixtures, etc. W. F. Taggart, a popular mixologist, is in charge and building up a good business.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 24, 1898, page 3


    Wm. Ruddick has removed to Medford and holds a responsible position at the water works there.
    Gray & Proudfoot have shut down their sawmill in Prospect district, after cutting a large quantity of superior lumber.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 24, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Capt. A. C. Smith has returned from his trip to Hawaii. He is not so enthusiastic over that country as he was before his departure.
    Mrs. L. M. Wood, who recently arrived from Weaverville, Calif., has purchased the Crater from Waldroop & Karnes and took possession last week.
    A. J. Weeks of Oakland, Calif., who has been here on business connected with Hon. J. H. Stewart's proposed brick edifice, has returned home. He will prepare plans and specifications therefor at once.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1898, page 3



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Mabel Bruns to W. B. Stevens; lots 8, 9, 10, 11, blk 23, Medford . . . 200.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1898, page 2


    W. R. Jones of Medford precinct and his son Wilbur, two of the best farmers in the valley, are in charge of the Bybee farm near Jacksonville. They have already put a large portion of it in grain.
    The shooting tournament at Jacksonville on Thanksgiving developed a large amount of poor shooting and cruel sport. Live pigeons were used, but they did not work as well as expected. J. E. Enyart of Medford won first honors, killing fifteen birds straight.
    S. Rosenthal of Medford, the prince of clothiers, has leased Gold Hill's new brick store, and will stock it with one of the largest and best stocks of general merchandise ever brought to the valley. There is no doubt of his success, for he always treats his customers royally. I. M. Muller and Oris Crawford will assist him in his new enterprise.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Will. Phipps, who has been in Washington for several years past, returned last week.
    Shorty Hamilton is considerably swelled up because a bouncing boy has taken up residence with him.
    Go to Elwood for holiday goods. He keeps a large and handsome line of jewelry, watches, silverware, etc., and his prices are just right.
    Chas. Wilkinson and wife left this week for San Diego, Calif., and will be gone for several months. The former's health is not the best, and the trip is made for the benefit of it.
    Mrs. J. C. Dickey of Lewiston, Calif., a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Tryer, has returned home from a visit in Medford. Miss Millie Tryer, her sister, accompanied her as far as Ashland.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 1, 1898, page 2


    The R.R.V. Choral Union, which will hold its annual meeting at Medford during the holidays, will be assisted by Prof. Boyer of Portland as leader, D. Zan of Portland as baritone and Mrs. R. C. Brooks of Eugene as soprano. It will be the greatest musical event that ever occurred in southern Oregon.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 1, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Willie Dunn is now in the railroad office at Roseburg.
    Childers Bros., three in number, who have been making brick for the Agnews (Calif.) insane asylum, returned last week.
    Mrs. Mattie Carrick, well known in hotel circles here, was lately married in Reno, Nev., to O. F. Woods of Colusa County, Calif.
    G. W. Snyder and Miss Cora Jones left for Siskiyou County, Calif. one day last week. There seems to be something on the tapis.
    Wm. Courtney, who has been sick for a number of years, died on the 1st. He leaves a wife and several children in destitute circumstances.
    R. N. Warnock has purchased J. R. Williamson's restaurant on Front Street. There is a report afloat that he will also engage in the saloon business.   
    J. C. Hall has sold his saloon business to W. T. Nelson, who arrived from Klamath County a short time since. Court has not yet decided what he will engage in.
    We expected to chronicle and interesting event in Medford pugilism, but one of the parties who had signed flunked at the last moment, shooting his pistol as he sped across Bear Creek bridge. This deviation from the original programme had an exhilarating effect on the would-be spectators of the mill, as they fled in every direction, not being particular as to the manner of their going either. At last accounts the pugilist who remained was still in his shirtsleeves, awaiting the return of his friend.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1898, page 3



    Dr. J. M. Keene of Medford is in town. He is here to make arrangements for the opening of a branch dental office.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Fred. Rice of Roseburg is in town, in the employ of the Wiley B. Allen Co.
    I. Woolf has traded his property in town for F. L. Howey's farm near Eagle Point.
    Jas. Murray of Jacksonville, the artistic painter and paper hanger, is embellishing the inside of Hotel Nash.
    Wiley B. Allen's sample rooms are being visited by many every day. Mr. Allen spares no pains to please all who call, and is doing a good business.
    Geo. Kurtz, our enterprising cigar manufacturer, has renovated his place of business and embellished it with a handsome counter made of glass and lit by electricity. He makes first-class cigars and enjoys a good trade.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 8, 1898, page 3



    White & Jacobs have a new advertisement in today's Times. They have the largest and best stock of goods in Medford, and sell at prices that defy competition.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 8, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Chas. J. Merrill has had his pension increased to $10 a month.
    Supt. Gregory was in Jacksonville last week on business connected with the R.R.V. Choral Union.
    Mrs. C. B. Rostel was among those who received a valuable present at one of the recent entertainments of the Wizard Oil Co.--a gold watch worth a neat sum.
    There was a fire alarm Friday, but it proved unnecessary. R. A. Proudfoot's residence at one time seemed in danger, but the fire was extinguished without difficulty.
    Dan. Waldroop is paying Yreka, Calif. a visit. He will engage in business with his former partner, Mr. Karnes, as soon as a suitable location can be found.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. Vint. Hall of Lakeview is paying his brother, Court Hall, a visit.
    Wm. Ulrich, manager of the S.O. Pork Packing Co., was at Gold Hill last week.
    S. Rosenthal, the genial clothier, has been at Gold Hill on business in connection with his new store there.
    R. N. Warnock, who purchased the building formerly used as a restaurant by J. R. Williamson, will have it renovated immediately. He will have the neatest restaurant in town when he commences business.
    The alleged Quaker combination has folded their tents and silently stolen away, carrying with them a snug sum of money. They are humbugs of the first magnitude, which those who have been silly enough to place faith in them will soon find out, if they have not already done so.
    The Portland Telegram of the 12th says: George S. Parker, late of eastern Washington, a son of attorney Parker of Medford, is at the Esmond. He has the reputation of being a racy writer and all-round newspaper man. He was formerly engaged on the Medford Mail, and later with a Sandon, B.C., mining journal. He is perfecting arrangements to start a local paper in eastern Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 15, 1898, page 1


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Bertha S. Barnum to R. N. Warnock; lot 9, blk 20, Medford . . . 900.00
C. D. Kellogg to Amanda A. Kellogg, lot 10, 11 and 12, blk 12, Medford . . . 1.00
Ulrich & Slinger to Mary C. Foster; lot 12, blk 39, Medford . . . 1.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 15, 1898, page 1


A Sad Accident.
    J. C. Hall of Medford, while hunting on last Tuesday in company with J. E. Enyart, met with an accident that may result in the loss of an eye. The latter fired at some birds, but one of the shot, after glancing off the limb of a tree, struck Court in the eye. The many friends of the unfortunate man hope that the wound is not as serious as it is supposed to be.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 15, 1898, page 3


    Doctors Keene and Burnett of Medford expect to open dental parlors in Jacksonville next week.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 15, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Prof. Paine, who has been acting as special policeman, resigned last week.
    C. Coleman will leave for San Francisco this week, to spend the holidays with his family.
    Geo. W. Eaton, the expert cooper, who has been at Yreka, Calif. for some time past, has opened a shop in Medford. He is worthy of a liberal patronage.
    Dr. W. S. Jones and L. Wiggin, the scientific veterinarian, were at the county seat Saturday. So were Justice Stewart and Ralph Woodford.
    The slander suit instituted against Thos. Collins by John Schneider was dismissed upon motion of the plaintiff's attorney. There was nothing to it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1898, page 2


    The 40-cent round-trip rate on the R.R.V.R. has been discontinued, and 25 cents will be charged each way after Dec. 31st.
    Nearly every farmer is at work, and a large area is being plowed and sown in wheat. The weather is especially favorable for farming.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ink tablets, from 4 cents to 50 cents each; also a large assortment of elegant papeteries for the holiday trade, at Puhl's.
    R. N. Warnock has fitted up his building on Front Street in fine style and will soon open a saloon there, which will be stocked with the best in the market.
    S. S. Pentz, the attorney, who has been a resident of our town for many years, will leave for San Francisco next week, to engage in the practice of the law. His numerous friends wish him success.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 22, 1898, page 2


    Quite a number of couples from Jacksonville will attend the dancing party at Medford on Thursday evening. We are pleased to see this evidence of sociability between the two towns.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 22, 1898, page 3


A Holiday Event.
    There will be a musical festival at Medford during the holidays, with grand concerts on the nights of Dec. 29th and 30th. It will be the largest assemblage of singers ever known in southern Oregon, and there will be 100 voices in the chorus. A big orchestra, under the leadership of Dr. F. W. Van Dyke of Grants Pass, will furnish the instrumental music. There will be vocal and instrumental solos, duets, etc., in addition to which the great cantata "Fair Ellen" will be rendered. Prof. Boyer of Portland, the noted leader, will direct the whole, Mrs. R. C. Brooks of Eugene being the leading soprano soloist, Miss Belle Robinson of Grant Pass pianist and Miss Maysie Foster of Medford organist. Tickets can be obtained at Cronemiller & Love's store.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 22, 1898, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. Pickel, assisted by Dr. Hargrove, on Tuesday performed a delicate operation on Cleve., the fourteen-year-old son of J. W. Manning of Klamath Falls. Several bones were removed from the lad's arm, which had been affected by rheumatism. The operation was entirely successful.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 29, 1898, page 1


    An S.P. freight train, bound north, broke in two between Medford and Phoenix one day last week, and the accident was not discovered until the front section stopped at the switch at the latter place, when the rear end crashed into it, wrecking three car and delaying traffic for several hours.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 29, 1898, page 3





Last revised February 11, 2015
For more complete names of persons identified by initials, see the Index.