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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Medford News: 1899

Medford-related news items from 1899. Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    F. R. Sims, the horse trainer, has purchased the celebrated pacing stallion, Tokio, 2:31, from Joe Hill for $700, and will train him to trot.
    John Compton has disposed of his interest in the Union Livery Stables to Emil DeRoboam of Jacksonville and Ned Orser, and has returned to his farm at Lake Creek.
    J. C. Pendleton, in behalf of the stallion Tintorette, Wm. Clark for Tybalt and Joe Hill for Tokio, have deposited a forfeit of $25 each, for a yearling colt race, the colts to be sired by the stallions above named.
    Mrs. Jos. Crain and daughter, Mrs. J. W. Cox, returned last week from a visit to relatives in Indiana. Two nephews, Frank and John Graham of Covington, Ind., accompanied her, and will examine this section with a view to locating.
    The contract for furnishing the water pipe to lead from the new town well to the pumping plant was awarded to Arthur & Co. of Portland for $2,055.75 for 1925 feet. The only other bid was that of Boyden & Nicholson of Medford, for $2,185.50.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 5, 1899, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
J. E. Enyart to Nancy M. Daw; lot 10, blk 9, Park's add. to Medford . . . 150.00
J. F. White to Hattie White; lots 3 and 4, blk 8, Park's add. to Medford . . . 200.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 5, 1899, page 2



    Chas. F. Lewis, the well-known engineer, who presided at the throttle on the R.R.V.R. for some time, and has been for the past two years engineer on the Yreka Railway, died at his home in Yreka, Calif. on January 1st, and was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Medford on Tuesday. Mr. L. was a man of many excellent parts, and leaves a wide circle of friends, who mourn his untimely death. He is survived by a wife and six children.
    The convention of the Rogue River Choral Union, held at Medford last week, was one of the most successful musical gatherings held in southern Oregon. Some of the best singers of the state, besides our local warblers, were present, and the result was a high-class musical entertainment, such as is very seldom heard outside the large cities. The grand concerts on Thursday and Friday evenings were attended by large audiences, and the affair was successful financially as well as musically.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 5, 1899, page 3


Comes Well Recommended.
    W. B. Stevens, of the firm of Deuel & Stevens, has decided to leave Medford and locate in Albany, this state, where he has rented suitable buildings and will open a general merchandise store. The firm will remain the same as of old in Medford and will be under the sole management of the senior member of the firm, F. K. Deuel. These gentlemen have made a wondrous success in their business in Medford, but both being ambitious to be prepared for that rainy day which comes to us all, they are now just naturally branching out. Mr. Stevens has been a very honest, upright citizen of our city, and many will regret his departure, and this same regret is felt also for his family, which is a most exemplary one--and the entire household have friends innumerable in this city. Mr. Stevens will leave for the East in January, where he will purchase goods for the new Albany store, and will return in time to open business about the first of March.--Medford Mail.
Lincoln County Leader,
Toledo, Oregon, January 6, 1899, page 4



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    F. E. Birge, the mining man, has returned from a trip to the East.
    Dan. Waldroop has gone to Etna, Calif. to open a confectionery and temperance drink establishment.
    Geo. Faucett has been appointed Wells-Fargo agent at this place, vice C. J. Howard, who has gone to farming near Kerbyville.
    G. N. Spurr, who has been conducting a bowling alley in Medford for some time past, will remove with his family shortly to Ironwood, Mich., where he has a good position awaiting him.
    Wolters & Howard's delivery team ran away one day last week, colliding with Dr. Wait's team and starting it. Ed. Miller, the driver of the delivery wagon, was thrown out and seriously bruised.
    Messrs. F. K. Deuel and W. B. Stevens have opened a branch store at Albany under the firm name of W. B. Stevens & Co. The business at this place will be operated under the name of F. K. Deuel & Co.
    John H. Klippel of Portland, who is still connected with the U.S. customs house, is paying his parents a visit. He has just returned from Trinity County, Calif., where he has been looking after placer mines for parties living at the metropolis.
    The "liquid baking powder" fiends caught a few of the residents of Medford with their scheme a short time since. The stuff was sold for $1 per bottle, and every purchaser got a chance for the grand capital prize being offered by the company, and incidentally each one drew a prize worth from $20 to $40, which were to be delivered in time for Christmas presents. Of course, the prizes failed to materialize, and the baking powder wouldn't raise a disturbance at an Irish fair.
    There are two full tickets in the field for Tuesday's city election, and the contest promises to be a lively one. The following are the names: Citizens' [party]--For mayor, Dr. E. B. Pickel; councilmen, N. B. Bradbury, D. Brooks, Garl T. Jones, G. C. Noble; Recorder, J. W. Lawton; treasurer, Chas. Strang; marshal, T. W. Johnson. People's--For mayor, H. L. Gilkey; councilmen, N. B. Bradbury, Garl T. Jones, R. H. Whitehead, A. M. Woodford; recorder and treasurer, same as citizens' ticket; marshal, Chas. Johnson. Geo. Mickey is an independent candidate for marshal.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    I. E. Hitch and his newly married wife arrived from Siskiyou County, Calif. a short time since, and may locate.
    Fred. Johnston, formerly of Oak Bar, Calif., has become a resident of our town, as also have several of his relatives.
    Caldwell, who was in the employ of Ed. Wilkinson several years ago, is an assistant in one of the dance halls of San Francisco.
    G. R. Justus, who is logging for Proudfoot & Gray, in the upper Rogue River section, has built a mile of skid road, which is enabling him to put a large number of logs at the mill. George is a rustler.
    It seems difficult to ascertain what was the real issue in the late city election. Some think that one ticket was in favor of building a sewer to Bear Creek, while the other was against that proposition. The former was successful.
    The contest over the municipal offices, on the 10th, was an interesting one, and resulted in the success of the People's ticket, to wit: Mayor, H. L. Gilkey; council, G. T. Jones, A. M. Woodford, N. B. Bradbury, R. H. Whitehead; recorder, J. W. Lawton; treasurer, Chas. Strang; marshal, Chas. Johnson. Lawton and Strang were elected without opposition.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 12, 1899, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. C. Hall, who was accidentally shot by J. E. Enyart several weeks ago, is able to be about. The sight of the injured eye has been lost, but there is every probability that the ball will retain its wonted size, while the other eye is not affected as yet.
    Mrs. Oliver Williams (nee Stormer) one day last week telegraphed from Ashland to Marshal Johnson to detain her husband, but that official did not have authority to do so, as no charge was preferred. She followed her recreant spouse to this city, but found he had skipped to Central Point, where she subsequently captured him. The affair caused a small ripple of excitement.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1899, page 2


    It is reported that J. W. Prall of Medford has bought J. B. Wrisley's farm near Central Point. Consideration $8000.
    E. E. Phipps has sold his stock in the Monitor-Miner to Rev. J. S. McCain and A. H. Chessmore, who have already taken charge of that journal.
    In the House this week, Representative Stewart introduced a bill to require the display of the United States flag on all public schools during school hours.
    Weeks & Orr, of Eden precinct, are planting 34 acres in apples and pears, and will then have over 200 acres in orchard. They sold a large quantity of fine fruit at big prices last season.
    Chas. H. Pierce, who is now engaged in the warehouse and transfer business at San Francisco, expects to return to the valley during 1899 and engage in the lumber business on upper Rogue River on a large scale.
    R. E. Cantrall of Applegate lately sold 60 head of fine beeves, some of which brought $45 apiece, to McDermott, a California buyer; also 10 head to J. W. Wiley of Medford. They were driven through town yesterday.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 19, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
John Morris to W. A. Patrick; lot 11, blk 70, Medford . . . 125.00
C. K. Fronk to E. D. Elwood; property in Medford . . . 1.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 19, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Geo. S. Howard is holding a case in the Times office at Jacksonville.
    Mrs. M. Jeffrey of Medford, mother of the Hon. J. A. Jeffrey, is reported to be very sick.
    John Dick, Jr., the telegraph operator, is at Albany, in the employ of the S.P. Co.
    Miss Laura Burnett, the clever milliner who has been assisting Mrs. Sears for several months past, returned to Eugene last week.
    The Ione (eastern Oregon) Post has made its appearance. It is published and edited by Geo. S. Parker, formerly of Medford, and is neat and spicy.
    C. I. Hutchison left for Pasadena, Calif. a few days since, to visit his wife, who for several months past has been attending her sister, Mrs. Schafer, who is ailing with consumption.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 19, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Schermerhorn & Shone will open a second-hand store at Gold Hill in the near future.
    A ten-mill tax, the same as last year, has been levied for the support of our public schools.
    Miss Clara Skeel is again a clerk of a committee of the state senate, in which capacity she gave entire satisfaction before.
    Mrs. Chas. Wilkinson has returned from southern California. Her husband will remain a while longer for the benefit of his health.
    Ole Oviatt and Chub Hamlin, two of our bad boys, were last week fined $5 and costs each by Recorder Lawton, for disorderly conduct. The former was the aggressor, and was stabbed in the arm and shoulder by the other. The wounds are not dangerous, although an artery was cut.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1899, page 3


DELINQUENT TAX SALES.
    The following is a list of the sales made for delinquent taxes by the sheriff on Dec. 24, 1898:
Jennie Anderson's 4 lots in Medford in block 52, to G. Naylor, $16.58
R. C. Alexander's lots in block 3 Orchard Home Association, to G. Naylor, $2.73
A. A. Allen's lots in same tract as above, to G. Naylor, $6.39
Fannie J. Baker's lots in Beatty's addition to Medford to G. Naylor, 2.75
J. E. Donnelly's lot 3 blk 40 Medford, to G. Naylor, 2.25
A. A. Davis' interest in Medford water ditch, to Jackson County, 45.25
Frank E. Howe's lot 7 blk 7 Orchard Home tract, to G. Naylor, 1.42
Will Jackson's lot 40 blk 70 Medford, to G. Naylor, 1.83
E. Monkhouse's lot 4 blk 75 Medford, to G. Naylor, 4.29
E. Medynski's interest in Meeker's add. to Medford, G. Naylor, 11.65
John Morris' lot 12 blk 70 Medford to same, 2.25
G. W. Mason's lot 12 blk 7 Orchard Home, to same 1.42
Orchard Home Association's lots in blk 3 tp 37 2 w, to G. Naylor, 11.36
Jos. Randles' lots 2, 3 and 4 blk 9 Medford, to W. I. Vawter, 9.42
Mrs. M. J. Smith's lot 5 blk 49 Medford, G. Naylor, 1.84
Tilson Smith's lot 1 and 2 blk 30 Medford, G. Naylor, 8.40
Kate Stiner and W. H. Norman's lot 3 blk 18 Medford, G. Naylor, 2.25
C. C. Thurston's lots 12 and 13 blk 4 Orchard Home, G. Naylor, 2.73
Unknown, lot 12 blk 10 Medford, to G. Naylor, 6.34
Chas. E. Werst's lots 19 and 22 blk 3 Orchard Home, G. Naylor, 6.39
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 26, 1899, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Joe Parker officiates as salesman in Rosenthal's clothing emporium, and fills the position creditably.
    Miss Mamie Isaacs was awarded the prize for being the best dancer at the fireman's ball at Gold Hill. A deserved compliment.
    Noah Smith, late of Oakland, Or., has been in our town lately, looking for a location. He has had much experience as a salesman.
    Ralph Bunch did not return with the excursionists, having secured a good position in a barber shop in San Francisco, on Mason Street.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 26, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our town has another tailor shop, Fred Slagle having opened one recently.
    Mrs. Anna Jeffrey and Mrs. R. G. Jeffrey have intentions of opening a racket store in Yreka, Calif.
    A ball will be given at the opera house on Feb. 13th, to provide a fund for the purchase of Chinese pheasants with which to stock the valley.
    Representative Stewart has introduced a bill for the incorporation and extension of the corporate limits of Medford. The people are not unanimous in its support by any means.
    J. F. White has purchased the bowling alley of G. N. Spurr (who recently went to Michigan) and utilized the alleys for sidewalks at his residence. The building has been converted into a shooting gallery.
    The 1925 feet of cast-iron pipe, eight inches in diameter, which will connect the well recently dug and the water works, has been distributed along the line. R. A. Proudfoot has the contract for laying the pipe.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
A. A. Davis to Effie M. Halley, lots 7 and 8, blk 76, Medford . . . 1.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Representative Stewart has introduced a bill to amend the charter of Medford.
    Jeffrey & Co., which is composed of former residents of Medford, have opened a racket store in Yreka. A. N. Cox is manager.
    Geo. Kurtz, the popular proprietor of the Medford cigar factory, and his family visited N. A. Jacobs and wife one day this week.
    It is reported that Geo. Webb of the Racket Store will dispose of his property here and leave for Los Angeles, Calif. in the near future.
    Some of our wise ones seem to think that our charter should be amended, and an effort is on foot to have several changes made by the legislature. One of them is to include east Medford in the corporation.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 2, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
R. H. Halley to Addie Halley; part of lots 17, 18, 19, 20, Medford . . . 2.00
A. A. Davis to Angelina Davis; lots 9 and 12, blk 76, Medford . . . 1.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 2, 1899, page 3\



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A ball will be given in the opera house on the 10th for the purpose of raising money with which to start a fund for the purchase of Chinese pheasants to stock the valley with.
    Representative Stewart's bill to amend the charter of Medford has passed the house and will become a law. There is great opposition to it among the residents of the east side, who object to being embraced in the corporation.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
W. S. Barnum to Town of Medford; lot 1, Barnum's add. to Medford . . . 130.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 9, 1899, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Capt. Nash will enlarge his hotel in a short time, so as to cover the lot adjoining on the south.
    G. W. Galloway and family leave for Portland this week. We are sorry to lose them from our midst.
    E. E. Phipps, late of the Monitor-Miner, has sold his residence to Mrs. E. Cochran. He will leave for California soon, to seek a location.
    C. E. Smith, late clerk at Hotel Nash, Bert. Brandenburg and Mr. Jackson have gone to Williams Creek, Josephine County, to engage in mining.
    Willie Warner, son of L. B. Warner, a lad of about 15 years, was thrown from his pony on Tuesday morning, striking his head and receiving injuries which may prove fatal. He was unconscious for about 16 hours.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 9, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Rev. J. Merley has retired to his farm near Medford, having sold his mercantile interests to his partner, W. T. Kame.
    Medford has a huge indebtedness, which will in all probability be increased soon. It amounts to nearly $43,000 now, half of which is bonded at 7 percent.
    E. E. Phipps, lately of the Monitor-Miner, having sold his property in Medford, has gone to California to seek a location, accompanied by his family. We wish him success.
    The three amendments to the charter of Medford have gone through the house and will probably pass the senate. There is more or less opposition to all of them, but the bosses care little for that.
    The ball given at the opera house on Friday night was much of a success, 150 tickets being sold. The music furnished by Prof. Paine's orchestra was up to its usual standard and gave general satisfaction. The proceeds will go toward stocking the valley with Chinese pheasants.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
G. H. Andrews et ux. to Geo. R. Justus; lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 53, Medford . . . 250.00
G. R. Justus to H. Vogeli; lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, blk 53, Medford . . . 1400.00
E. E. Phipps to Elmira Cochran; land adjoining Medford . . . 450.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 16, 1899, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Al. Crystal has returned to Medford. He recently came into possession of an estate, and is thinking of engaging in business either here or at Dunsmuir, Sisson Mirror.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 16, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Childers Bros. have commenced the construction of a kiln of 300,000 brick, which will be used to finish the J. O. Johnson building.
    Roy Richardson, son of J. W. Richardson, is one of the crew of the Oregon, now on her way to Manila. He was with the ship on the first journey around "the horn" and participated in the battle of Santiago.
    A car loaded with bananas, which was attached to the northbound passenger train, came into Medford one evening last week with its top burning. A few buckets of water stopped the flames, however.
    At the meeting of the city council last week a right of way for a sewer was purchased through the land of W. T. Nelson, for $250. The route of the sewer will be from the school house down 7th Street to the alley back of Hotel Nash, thence to A Street and down that street to the Nelson place, where the dumping grounds will be made.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
W. A. Patrick et ux. to Wm. Terrill; 30 acres in sec. 8, twp 39 s, r 1 3; also lot 11, blk 70, Medford . . . 800.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Frank Mingus and family will soon become residents of Ashland.
    W. I. Vawter has been elected city attorney, under the provisions of the new charter, by the municipal council.
    Work has been commenced on the new bank building. The brickwork is being done by Geo. Priddy, an expert workman.
    Our town will have a sewer in the near future; in fact, arrangements have already been made for its construction. It will dump on land along Bear Creek, purchased of W. T. Nelson.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 23, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Fred Luy's barber shop has been renovated throughout and is now one of the neatest in southern Oregon. He has fitted up his bathrooms with porcelain tubs, which are a decided improvement on those in use in the interior.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1899, page 3


    The Times is informed that the track built on the Fordyce place near Medford by the Southern Oregon Fair Association is being plowed up. Where the next district fair will be held is a matter of conjecture.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
C. Mingus to Callie Palm; lots 17 and 18, blk 44, Medford . . . 600.00
E. F. Walker to Callie Palm; lots 3, 4, 5 and 6, blk 30, Medford . . . 700.00
Herbert Crouch to W. L. Halley; lot 30, Fairview add., Medford . . . 100.00
Eda M. Morris to Grace Hosler; lots 7 and 8, blk 70, Medford . . . 275.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Callie Palm to Edw. and Daisy Bodge; lot 18, blk 44, Medford . . . 300.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 2, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    F. P. Smith, the grocer, will soon move to Ashland to engage in business there.
    J. E. Bodge, merchant tailor, gives good value and fashionable fits. Don't fail to give him a call.
    Olson's planing mill at Medford is being put into the best shape for the coming season's work.
    Dr. B. F. Adkins is being visited by his nephew, Guy Adkins, a prominent merchant of Crawfordsville, Inc.
    D. T. Sears is able to resume his position as store-keeper and gauger at the distillery, after a severe illness.
    Frank Wait is ornamenting the Adkins building on 7th Street with a fine stone curb. He never fails to please.
    Orser & DeRoboam keep one of the finest livery stables in the state, and are doing a good business. They spare no pains to please and never fail to give satisfaction.
    R. N. Warnock, having sold his saloon to Al. Helms, will soon leave for Idaho. he has secured the agency of Dr. Phelps' hair restorative, which is causing such a fine crop of hair to sprout on Geo. Coulter's bald head.
    W. T. Nelson was arrested Wednesday on a charge of shooting at R. N. Warnock and held to answer to the next grand jury. It seems to be a case of mistaken identity. Nelson had notified Gabe Plymale to keep out of his saloon, under the penalty of being harmed, and he mistook Warnock for that individual.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 3, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Carrie L. Johnson to Guy A. Childers; qcd to lots 2 and 3, blk 2, Medford . . . 2.00
Carrie L. Johnson, administratrix' deed to lots 2 and 3, blk 2, Medford, to same party as above . . . 1100.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1899, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. S Rosenbaum, the S.P. Co.'s clever agent at Gold Hill, and Miss Alice Matthews visited their many friends in Medford Friday.
    A carload of tramps was unloaded in Medford one day last week. They had taken charge of one of the empty cars of a northbound freight train and got this far without being discovered.
    Mr. Shearer, the drayman, lost a team of fine, large horses Thursday afternoon while attempting to cross Bear Creek near the bridge. Although the stream was not deep, the current was quite strong and quicksand unusually abundant. In trying to get out the horses broke the tongue of the wagon and got themselves tangled in the harness. Mr. Shearer had a narrow escape from drowning, saving himself by catching some willows.
Democratic Times, March 6, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
F. P. Fehely to Mrs. A. M. Lewis; 2 acres adjoining Medford . . . 730.00
Conrad Mingus to Wallace Woods; lots 15,1 6, 17 and 18, blk 54, Medford . . . 700.00
J. Richardson to W. F. Williamson; 397½ acres in Medford precinct . . . 2900.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 9, 1899, page 1



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. T. Nelson of the Turf Exchange spent an afternoon this week in Jacksonville.
    Mrs. E. S. Adams of Grants Pass is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hamlin of this city.
    Miss Annie Gilbert, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. Gilbert, has returned to Crescent City, Calif. to teach school. He is an excellent teacher.
    Mrs. J. Barneburg and Mrs. J. E. Bodge, two of our cleverest riders, rode to Jacksonville Sunday. Their horsemanship is up to date.
    The name of the Monitor-Miner has been changed to the Southern Oregon Eye, and it is being steadily improved. The proprietors have our best wishes.
    Miss Lena Carter, who has been connected with Hotel Nash for some time, is stopping with her parents, who reside on Williams Creek, Josephine County.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 9, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Carrie L. Johnson, administratrix, to Eliza J. Wrisley; lots 11 and 12, blk 53, Medford . . . 600.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1899, page 1



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Lake France, formerly of Medford, who now manages one of the biggest flour mills in eastern Oregon at Athena, Umatilla County, has been visiting in Portland.
    John Peterson, who fell from the scaffolding of the second story of Stewart's block, while wheeling mortar and brick, is about again. Fortunately no bones were broken.
    D. Montague has returned from the railroad hospital at Sacramento, Calif., where he has been having his foot, that was hurt by a freight train several months ago, treated.
    Chas. G. Johnson, who has acceptably filled the position of city marshal, has tendered his resignation. The salary paid is entirely too low, which is his principal reason for resigning.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1899, page 2


    The 23 Chinese pheasants received by the Medford Rod and Gun Club last week have been turned loose on the Plymire farm, a few miles east of Medford. The twenty-six which have been in charge of E. D. Elwood and others were liberated on the Cora Taylor place in Eden precinct. Those which have been kept at Geo. E. Neuber's residence during the winter will be given their liberty this week, the Bybee and Armstrong farms having been selected as their rendezvous. As these birds are protected absolutely by law, anybody killing them will be prosecuted.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1899, page 3


    Chessmore & McCain have exchanged the Medford Monitor-Miner to The Southern Oregon Eye. These gentlemen seem to have the true American conception of an independent newspaper.

"Journal 'X-Rays'," Daily Capital Journal, Salem, March 14, 1899, page 3



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
I. J. Phipps to trustees M.E. Church of Medford; property adjoining Medford . . . 15.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 16, 1899, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Sam Murray has been appointed city marshal, vice Chas. Johnson resigned. He will doubtless make an efficient officer.
    R. N. Warnock has gone to Idaho to remain. As he will not be here when circuit court meets, the case against W. T. Nelson will amount to nothing.
    J. C. Hall and Wm. Isaacs have purchased Mrs. L. J. Sears' building on Seventh Street, now occupied by Mounce & Karnes, and will fit it up in fine style for a cigar store.
    Geo. C. Stanley has severed his connection with the Eye, after a very short stay in Medford, and is succeeded by Bruce Allen, whose interest in the Town Talk he has acquired.
    J. E. Enyart, one of our prominent business men, left for Albany Tuesday. He will not return alone, as he was married yesterday to Miss Cannon, an accomplished and popular young lady who resided in Medford a few years ago. They have been kept busy receiving the congratulations and best wishes of their many friends.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 16, 1899, page 3


    The Jacksonville Marble Works last week furnished a handsome monument for the grave of Mrs. Jane Fisk, whose remains lie in the Medford cemetery.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 16, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Alex Orme to John F. White; tax deed to property in Central Point and Medford . . . 151.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1899, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. G. B Cole, who went to Riddle lately to locate, is meeting with considerable success.
    It is said that the hotel on the west side of the S.P. track will be rebuilt as soon as the title is perfected.
    Mrs. Dr. Wiggin gives notice that anyone selling or giving intoxicating liquors to her husband will be prosecuted.
    J. H. Miller and F. P. Smith, former residents of this city, will engage in the mercantile business at Ashland in a short time.
    R. G. Jeffrey and family and Miss Anna Jeffrey are now residents of Yreka, Calif., where they are conducting a racket store.
    T. H. Gilson of Sterlingville, one of the pioneers of Jackson County, has purchased D. S. Youngs' residence and will soon take possession. The consideration was $650.
    Articles incorporating the First German Evangelical Lutheran Zion Congregational Church of Medford have been filed with the secretary of state by the trustees, Paul Daemmer, Jacob Schaefer and J. L. Daemmer.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1899, page 3


    E. E. Phipps, formerly editor of the Monitor-Miner, is now at Stockton, Calif., where he has opened a racket store.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1899, page 3


    Al Helms has recently purchased the Mint saloon at Medford.
"Oregon News Notes," Daily Capital Journal, Salem, March 20, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Sidney Cole to R. F. Anderson; E½ of lot 1, blk 2, Mingus' add. to Medford . . . 225.00
I. J. Phipps to G. E. Fox; property in Medford . . . 150.00
Frank Wilson to Ray Toft; lots 1, 2, 3, 4, blk 39, Medford . . . 300.00
I. J. Phipps to R. H. Toft; property in Medford . . . 100.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 23, 1899, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Stella Byrne of Watkins is learning the art of dressmaker from Mrs. M. F. Parker.
    A. E. Heller will go to Corvallis this week, to train the well-known trotter Woodman.
    The firm of York & Wortman is handling much real estate. The demand is steadily improving.
    Rufus Cox and his son John have been in Klamath County, looking after their interests. Jos. Scott accompanied them.
    Sousa, the celebrated composer and bandmaster, and his company passed through the valley Sunday, en route to Portland to play an engagement.
    H. B. Reed of McMinnville, the fence manufacturer, passed through Medford Sunday, accompanied by his son. He has been making an extensive trip in the eastern states.
    Orchardists, call on Chris. Ulrich and get a circular explaining the use and virtues of a carbolic compound that has been used effectively for five years for scale and moth. It will pay to investigate it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 23, 1899, page 3

Fred Waschau patent
MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Geo. A. Jackson and his son Willie, who have been visiting in Jackson Creek district, near Jacksonville, returned Saturday.
    Fred. Waschau has been granted a patent on his repeating watch, which promises to be one of the wonders of the age. He has received a liberal offer for his invention.
    Mr. Mahoney, the popular assistant of W. V. Lippincott, left for Oakland, Or. Friday evening, ostensibly to visit his parents. There is a suspicion that he will not return alone, however. His place at the depot is being filled by C. O. Pearson.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
J. L. and Justin Wigle to L. A. Danforth; property in Medford; also 36 adjoining said town . . . 100.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Myrtle Woodford, who has been at Portland for the past several months, has a position in a millinery store. Having excellent taste, she is becoming proficient in the art.
    The Jessie Shirley Co., one of the best that has ever toured the coast, is playing to large audiences at the opera house. Dramas of established reputation are being put on the board, and everybody who attends speaks in terms of the highest praise of the performances. The season will close Saturday night.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1899, page 3


Choice Plants at Reasonable Rates.
    The wave of political prosperity which started in the East a year ago has finally reached Oregon, and is bound to come to the garden spot of the state if we, the citizens of Jackson County, show our faith by our work, by beautifying our homes. This can be cheaply done by buying home-raised plants, which can be had at the Medford Greenhouse at the following low prices: 6 ageratum plants, 25¢; 6 alyssum plants, 25¢; 5 salvia plants, 25¢; 12 gladiola bulbs, 25¢; 10 two-year-old roses, $1; and all other plants in proportion.
FRANK SUTTER,
        Medford, Ore.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1899, page 3 et seq.


    Henry Pohlman, the scientific horticulturist, will act as foreman for the tract of fruit land until lately owned by the Orchard Home Association, but which now belongs to the Portland Trust Co. He has acceptably filled that position for some time.
    G. Elksnat, the well-known surveyor, accompanied by his wife, left Monday evening for Waldport, Lincoln County, where they will permanently locate. They have been residents of Jacksonville for a number of years, and made many friends, who wish them success in their new home.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    For cameras, Kodaks, etc., as also supplies, go to Elwood, the jeweler and optician.
    Milton Harlan, late of The Dalles Chronicle and formerly of Medford, has been appointed assistant editor and business manager of the Vancouver Register.
    Fred Miller has been promoted to the position of Col. Hamilton's first lieutenant and is looking after the interests of the patrons of Hotel Nash in the most scientific manner.
    The Jessie Shirley Co. last week played the most successful engagement ever known in Medford. The audiences were large, increasing each night. There was an entire change of programme nightly, which enabled the troupe to display its versatility and excellence to good advantage.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
I. J. Phipps to C. C. Pletcher; lots 10 and 11, blk 10, Medford . . . 300.00
Hamilton & Palm to First German Evangelical Lutheran Church; tract in Medford . . . 40.00
R. N. Warnock to A. M. Helms; lot 9, blk 20, Medford . . . 500.00
John G. Gore to Edw. E. Gore; part of blk 19, Medford . . . 650.00

Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
John F. White to J. F. Wait; lot 7, blk 2, Nickell's add. to Medford . . . 100.00
L. C. Redden to S. S. Strayer; property in western part of Medford . . . 250.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 6, 1899, page 1



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    R. N. Warnock has returned and is attending circuit court as a witness in the Nelson case.
    Miss Lena Carter, formerly of Hotel Nash, now has a position in Sisson's leading hotel.
    Thos. H. Gilson and wife, late of Sterlingville, and pioneer residents of southern Oregon, have become residents of our town. We welcome their arrival in our midst.
    Mrs. Mary Allen, wife of J. O. Allen and mother of O. B. Allen, foreman of the Eye, died at New Pine Creek, Lake County, March 25th. She was 73 years old, and formerly resided in Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 6, 1899, page 2


Schedule Changed.
    The R.R.V.R.R. will on Monday, the 10th, change its running time, leaving Jacksonville for Medford at 9:30 a.m. and 3:10 p.m.; returning at 11:25 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. A rearrangement of the Southern Pacific Co.'s schedule is the reason of this. On and after the 9th train No. 5 (formerly 15) leaves San Francisco at 7 instead of 8 p.m., reaching Medford at 4:08 p.m. and Portland the following morning at 8 a.m. instead of at 9:30. Train No. 6 (formerly 16) leaves Portland at 7 p.m.m instead of 6 p.m., reaching Medford at 10:50 a.m. and San Francisco the following morning at 7:45 a.m. instead of 8:15 a.m. Dining cars will be run between Redding and Glendale, which will shorten the stops made at Ashland and Sisson.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 6, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Eunice Lumsden to Louise Muller; lots 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11, blk 1, Lumsden's add. to Medford . . . 300.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1899, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. P. Johnston and family, who have been living in Medford for several months, this week moved to Forest Creek, to engage in mining.
    W. H. Hembree, N. Bates and E. Hutchinson have returned from Klamath County. They brought in the trotting stallion purchased by the first-named person.
    Miss Bessie Hammond, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Hammond, who is attending the U. of O., is paying her home a short visit. She will soon graduate from that institution.
    The Southern Oregon Presbytery will meet at Medford on the 11th inst. and remain in session several days. Ministers from Jackson, Douglas, Coos, Klamath and other counties will be in attendance.
    Medford's water system will be extended across Bear Creek, to supply those who were embraced in the corporation by act of the last legislature. Bids for 2270 feet of 4-inch pipe have been called for.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1899, page 2


    The railroads are running on the new schedules. The Jacksonville train now leaves for Medford at 9:30 a.m. and 3:10 p.m.
    Potatoes and beans are very scarce in the valley. A carload of the latter was recently received at Medford, but tubers cannot be obtained anywhere.
    Jas. Carr of Medford precinct, one of the staunchest friends of The Times, was in Jacksonville Monday, accompanied by Mrs. R. Chavner, his sister-in-law.
    Dr. H. P. Hargrave, the popular physician, and Miss Maud Weeks, the amiable and accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Weeks of Phoenix, will be united in matrimony on the 29th. The Times extends congratulations and best wishes in advance.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford again has a branch of the Salvation Army, under the charge of the Ashland officers.
    Last Saturday five or six girl babies were born in Medford. Can any town of our size beat this record?
    Geo. L. Colby of Florida, the noted inspirational speaker and life reader, who has been in the valley for the past two weeks, will lecture at the opera house in Medford on Sunday evening next on any subject, to be selected by the audience. The lecture will be free. He will probably also deliver one or two addresses in Jacksonville.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1899, page 3


    At the Presbyterian Church last Sunday the pulpit was filled by Rev. Dr. Haberly of Medford. This church is always pleased to listen to him, as he is a fluent and eloquent speaker. In the evening he preached from the text, "Forever, O Lord, Thy word is settled in Heaven." The music was an attractive feature of the services.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1899, page 3



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Emma Sampson to D. T. Lawton; lots 8 and 9, blk 3, Medford . . . 300.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1899, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    S. J. Lashier of Newberg, Or. has taken the position of foreman of the Mail.
   
J. W. Dunn of Yreka, Calif. has purchased the Medford Bottling Works of Mounce & Karnes, and will conduct the business hereafter.
    H. G. Nicholson, I. A. Webb and C. C. Taylor have been chosen as representatives of Medford I.O.O.F. lodge at the meeting of the grand lodge at Salem next month.
    The city council at its meeting last week let the contract for furnishing 2270 feet of four-inch pipe for East Medford to J. M. Arthur & Co. of Portland for $1074. Only one other bid, that of John Norris for $1965, was offered.
    The team of Mr. Swinning of this precinct were frightened one day last week by a boy on a bicycle, and overturned the cart to which they where attached, throwing Mr. S. under the wheels and bruising him quite severely. The cart was wrecked, but no further damage done.
    While engaged in a friendly wrestling match with Robt Bybee one evening last week W. E. Weaver had the misfortune to break a bone in one of his ankles. He had walked around several hours before the extent of the injury was known, when he was taken home and the fracture reduced.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1899, page 3



    The engagement of Miss Irma Wangerin, of this city, to Clifton Taylor, of Medford, Oregon, has been announced.
"Personal and Social," Oakland Tribune, April 18, 1899, page 5


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    For cameras, kodaks, etc., as also supplies, go to Elwood, the jeweler and optician.
    F. G. Pittard, a blacksmith from Stockton, Calif., has located in Medford and is employed in G. F. Merriman's shop.
    Mrs. Jane Dyer of Grants Pass visited her daughters, Mesdames A. M. Woodford and N. E. Wood, in Medford last week.
    D. S. Hockett and family of Kalama, Wash., who have been residents of Medford for the past few months, returned home last week. They came for the benefit of Mr. Hockett's health which, we are sorry to say, has not improved.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1899, page 3


    J. S. Howard, the well-known surveyor, is engaged in preparing for the survey of the big ditch to be brought out of Rogue River, for the purpose of irrigating a greater portion of the valley.
    A fine assortment of cameras, kodaks, etc., of the most popular brands, as also supplies for the same, can be found at the jewelry store of Elwood, the Medford jeweler and optician. Satisfaction guaranteed.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1899, page 3



Presbyterian Church entertainment ad, April 21, 1899 Medford Mail    The work on the Stewart block is progressing rapidly. The tower is being erected and the building is nearing enclosure. That it is a great addition to Medford as a beautiful piece of architecture is putting it very mildly.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 21, 1899, page 7


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Work on the Stewart block is progressing rapidly.
    J. J. Brophy has removed his family to his ranch near Leeds.
    S. S. Pentz, formerly of this city, is practicing law at Stockton, Calif.
    J. B. Grossman, who has been very ill for some time past, is in a critical condition.
    The ladies of the M.E. Church are making elaborate preparations for the celebration of "Dewey Day," May 1st.
    F. O. Hurd has returned from a three-weeks stay in Josephine County, where he has been looking after some mines.
    People in Medford have been finding loaded sticks in their wood piles lately, and several minor explosions have occurred.
    The eight-inch water pipe is being removed from the city park and will be used for gutters under the street crossings.
    Garl T. Jones returned from the Siskiyous a few days since, where he had been engaged in running the lines of the old Cole ranch.
    The well being sunk at the Medford brewery has reached a depth of 350 feet, and some hopes are entertained of striking artesian water.
    J. B. Rhinehart has returned from Oakland, Calif., and is now in Josephine County, inspecting mines in company with Mr. Kimball of that city.
    Ernest Langley has secured the contract for putting in the pipe and arranging the water system for J. H. Stewart's new brick block. He is a competent workman, and will give satisfaction.
    D. T. Lawton has purchased a couple of lots on the corner of B and Sixth streets, for a consideration of $300, and will erect a brick building thereon, to be used by Mitchell, Lewis, Staver & Co., as a retail farm implement and carriage establishment.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1899, page 3


    Mrs. E. J. Kubli has disposed of a lot of farming implements to Hubbard Bros. of Medford.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Daniel Youngs et ux. to T. H. Gilson; lot 6, blk 3, Cottage add. to Medford . . . 650.00
Alex Orme to T. E. Pottenger; tax deed to lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 46, Medford . . . 21.00
Milton Harlan to Daniel S. Youngs; lot 6, blk 3, Cottage add. to Medford . . . 1.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1899, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. F. Luy of Jacksonville visited her son Tuesday. She was accompanied by her daughter, Mrs. H. Tuttle of California.
    Justice Stewart's court and a jury are occupied with a case in which a man and wife are concerned. The latter had the former arrested for assault and battery.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1899, page 2


    Prof. Gregory, who has been teaching a singing school in Jacksonville, closed his labors last night.
    Geo. E. Neuber and T. J. Kenney have purchased of Chas. F. Wall of Honolulu the property in Medford on the corner of Seventh and Front streets, occupied by Nelson's saloon, Macaulay's tamale stand and Butler's watchmaker's shop. The consideration was $4200. A handsome brick building will be built on it in the course of time.
    The 
deed transferring Hon. J. H. Stewart's fruit farm in Eden precinct to Gordon Voorhies of Portland had been placed on record. This is the finest property of the kind in southern Oregon, and the sum paid ($20,000) is very low. Mr. S. found his avocation of horticulturist becoming onerous in his declining years, hence he concluded to make this sacrifice.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1899, page 3


    R. L. Wade, the new implement dealer, has leased the Woolf building and is adding thereto a store room 45x24 feet, the same to be covered with corrugated iron. Mr. Wade will handle nothing but implements this summer but says he will put in a stock of hardware this fall. This business will be one of several branch stores throughout the state, having their headquarters at Salem, instead of Portland, as stated last week. Mr. Wade has been in all the towns of any importance in Southern Oregon and he pronounces Medford the most promising one among them from a business point of view. L. E. Hoover will be general assistant and all-round hustler for the firm.
    The entertainment given by the gentlemen of the Presbyterian Church last Friday evening was quite well attended, considering the number of entertainments that had been presented previous to their date. Special features of the entertainment were a violin duet by Misses Hammond and Annes and two vocal selections by the Gore brothers' quartette. A nice luncheon of sandwiches, candy and nuts was served at the close of the program.
    For a long time--ever since Medford shed her baby dresses--the frame building standing on the corner of Seventh and D streets, and known as the Turf Exchange Saloon, has, because of its prominent position in the town been a structure which no citizen has pointed to with any very great degree of pride--but things are not now what they were and if we guess aright it will not be many months ere a two-story brick building, of modern architecture, will loom up from that corner. Mr. T. J. Kenney, of Jacksonville, this week purchased the property from C. F. Wall, paying therefor $4250. The purchase embraces a piece of land 50x100 feet in size, and the buildings thereon. That Mr. Kenney made this purchase with the intent of leaving it as it now is, is not probable. While it is not general street gossip yet it is whispered around that Geo. E. Neuber, of Jacksonville, is mixed up in the deal and that he will build a two-story brick building on the lot and will occupy the same with the "finest saloon south of Portland." However, we feel safe in predicting that the old buildings will be removed and a new one take their place. This deal was made through the York & Wortman real estate agency.
     C. L. Best, of the Best Manufacturing Company, of San Leandro, Calif., arrived in Medford Monday and on Tuesday, in company with R. A. Proudfoot, started out over the road between here and the Gray-Proudfoot saw mill on Rogue River. The object of Mr. Best's visit is to gain information as to the feasibility of putting a traction engine on the road from the mill with which to haul lumber to the railroad. If the roads will warrant a fifty-horsepower engine will be purchased and put to work on the run. An engine of this size is capable of hauling forty tons weight. The gentlemen have not yet returned from their investigating trip.
    W. S. Barnum is building a good-sized addition to his brick building on South A Street. It is being erected in order to give room for a new cider mill which Mr. Barnum will put in shortly, and which will turn out ten or fifteen barrels of cider a day. it will also be used for storing purposes. The dimensions of the addition are 20x30 feet.
    Someone had the audacity to "swipe" George Faucett's wheel while he was at choir practice last Thursday evening, and nothing was seen of it until the following morning when it was found at the Hotel Nash considerably scratched and showing hard usage.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 28, 1899, page 7


As You Like It--Hot or Cold Shoes.
    Geo. F. Merriman will shoe your horses with any kind of shoes you want--handmade or factory, any weight or pattern. Will not put a warm shoe to your horse's foot if you object to it, and if you are not satisfied with the shoeing it will not cost you one cent. I have had twenty-seven years of experience shoeing horses and can shoe your horses just as scientifically as anyone in Southern Oregon or anywhere else. Work of all kinds in the blacksmith line done in a first-class manner. All work warranted and prices just as cheap as any first-class mechanic--and this is no "horse talk," either.
Medford Mail,
April 28, 1899, page 7


Bargains in Plants.
    This notice will appear but once. It is therefore important that the ladies take advantage while the bargains last.
    Twenty-five cents will buy any five of the following named plants, pots included: Chrysanthemums, ageratums, alyssums, anemones, fuchsias, geraniums, weeping lantanas, salvias. At the Medford Greenhouse.
Medford Mail,
April 28, 1899, page 7


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Hugh Elliott, the expert blacksmith, doing business at the west end of the Bear Creek bridge, is kept busy. He is being assisted by Joe Caskey, who has no superior in southern Oregon.
    A party of Medford Odd Fellows went to Gold Hill one night last week, to assist in the dedication of the Odd Fellows' hall. W. I. Vawter, D.D.
G.M., acted as master of ceremonies.
   
S. S. Cooper went to Applegate Sunday, returning with the body of his old friend Nathan Kendall, a miner, who died there that day. The remains were interred in our cemetery Monday.
    The S.P. Co. is about to transfer Willie Mahoney to Hornbrook, Calif. His many friends demur emphatically to such a proposition, and a petition for his retention at this point, numerously signed, has been forwarded to headquarters.
    Dan. Waldroop, who is engaged in business at Etna, Calif., and is doing well, made his many friends in Medford a visit last week. He did not return to Siskiyou County alone, having joined fortunes with Mrs. Fannie
Brous while here. The couple have the congratulations and best wishes of all.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1899, page 3


    Clarissa Garrison of Medford has commenced a suit for divorce against R. H. Garrison.
    Joe Frizell of Medford was in Jacksonville Saturday, repairing our local telephone line.
    J. S. Howard and his party have commenced the survey of the ditch with which Ward & Pearce expect to cover the mining districts of Sardine, Sams, Galls, Foots and Kanes creeks.
    Gov. Geer has appointed Dr. Everett Mingus, a son of C. Mingus of Ashland, and a prominent young physician, as health officer for Coos Bay, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Dr. J. T. McCornack. The latter resigned because of the ruling of Attorney General Blackburn that he could not hold two offices, he already being assistant surgeon in the marine hospital service.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1899, page 3


    Gordon Voorhies, who purchased J. H. Stewart's fine, large orchard in Eden precinct, has been spending a few days in Jacksonville. The Times is pleased to learn that he will become a resident of our valley.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
W. S. Conklin et ux. to Emma C. Hall 5, 6, 9, 10, 11 and 12, blk 6, Medford . . . 1.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 4, 1899, page 2



First Class Blacksmithing.
    Hugh Elliott, whose shop is located near the west end of the Bear Creek bridge in Medford, is better prepared than ever to do all kinds of work in his line, especially horse shoeing. He is a first-class blacksmith himself, and is assisted by one of the best mechanics in southern Oregon. His prices are right, and he spares no pains to give satisfaction.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 4, 1899, page 3 et seq.


To Bicyclists.
    Sheriff Orme has the tags required, and requests those owners of bicycles who have not paid the tax provided by law to settle the same on or before the 20th of May. All who fail to pay by that time will be delinquent and be liable to a penalty of $1 each.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, May 4, 1899, page 3


    A son of E. Hammond of Evans Creek died at Medford a few days ago of consumption.
    John Buckley of Applegate this week bought a thoroughbred Durham bull of Thos. McAndrew of Medford precinct. It is a fine animal.
    Mrs. E. J. Kubli has sold her stock of hardware, etc. to her sons, who will remove it to Gold Hill and open a store. The consideration was $500.
    The directors of the First Southern Oregon Fair Association will assemble at Medford next Monday, when it will probably be decided where its next meeting will be held.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 4, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Maggie Brandenburg left one day this week for Scio, Linn County, to visit her sister, Mrs. Ira Phelps.
    G. W. Isaacs of Medford was in Jacksonville Thursday, paying his old friend and partner, Judge Day, a visit.
    Will Mahoney, who has been transferred to Hornbrook, Calif., is succeeded at the S.P. depot by Mr. Pearson, a likely young man.
    B. S. Webb and family, who have been at Los Angeles for some time past, returned a few days ago. Ben has made no definite plans for the future.
    J. W. Dunn, formerly of Yreka, Calif., is the new proprietor of the Medford Bottling Works. He has thoroughly renovated the property and is making the best of carbonated drinks, which command a ready sale.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 4, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Alex
Orme, sheriff, to W. W. Woods and A. C. Hubbard; tax deed to lot 10, blk 71, Medford . . . 7.00
Same to W. W. Woods; tax deed to lots 4, 5 and 6, blk 46, Medford . . . 20.50
F. K. Deuel to S. J. Day et al., trustees; lots 7 and 8, blk 4, Park addition to Medford . . . 500.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1899, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. John Power of San Francisco is paying her cousin, Mrs. G. S. Howard, a visit.
   
E. J. Calley of San Francisco, one of the most popular and successful commercial tourists on the road, spent Saturday in Medford. While here he sold a large and handsome soda fountain to Hall & Isaacs, who are fitting up an elegant store on 7th Street.
   
Thos. Collins has succeeded W. T. Nelson in the proprietorship of the Turf Exchange, and has inaugurated a number of improvements. He keeps some of the best liquors and will take pains to please his customers. Give Tom a call when you are in Medford.
    The following is a list of those who have been employed by the board of
directors to teach in our public school: Prof. Narregan, Misses Emma Reed, Maysie Foster, Julia Fielder, Grace Foster, Jessie Wait, May Phipps. Misses Hall and Webber did not apply for reappointment, but who will succeed them is not yet known.
    Joe Frizell beat Paul Demmer so
severely last Saturday night that he is still confined to his room. He also struck John Bohl on the left arm with an iron instrument and broke one of the bones of that limb. A warrant was issued for Frizell's arrest, and he was brought before Justice Stewart, who held him to answer at the next term of circuit court, placing bonds at $500.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1899, page 3


    Mary Nelson has commended a suit for divorce against W. T. Nelson. Both parties live in Medford. Chas. Prim and W. S. Crowell are her attorneys.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1899, page 3



    Capt. G. Voorhies, a gentleman recently from Portland, has bought 160 acres of J. H. Stewart's fine fruit farm, located 3½ miles south of Medford, consideration $20,000. The latter will engage in the banking business in this city.
"Characteristic Items from Far-Away Oregon," Freeborn County Standard, Albert Lea, Minnesota, May 10, 1899, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. I. M. Muller of Gold Hill visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Parker, Medford last week.
   
L. G. Porter, who has been looking after his interests at Leland, Josephine County, has returned to Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Orvin Davis, who have 
been residents of San Diego, Calif., for some time past, returned to Medford last week to remain.
   
J. B. McGee, the mining man, has gone to Phoebe, Nevada, to open up some silver mines, brought forward by the opening of a railroad extension from Salt Lake.
   
L. C. Burt and L. P. Philips of Philadelphia, Pa., have purchased the Bradbury planing mill in this city, and are fitting it up for the purpose of manufacturing furniture.
   
Judge Day of Jacksonville was in Medford last week, and while here, in company with the other trustees of the M.E. Church, South, completed the purchase of the Gibbs property in West Medford for a parsonage for that denomination.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 11, 1899, page 3


Levanted.
    Jos. Frizell, who was bound over by Justice Stewart of Medford in $500 bonds, on Sunday, for assaulting Paul Daemmer and John Bohl, took French leave and hasn't been seen since. He had already secured two sureties on his bond and was ostensibly waiting for a third. While waiting he excused himself for a few minutes and stepped out. A horse was in readiness, and he made his escape before the officers discovered that he had gone.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 11, 1899, page 3


    All bar-rooms located at S.P. stations on the property of the company have been ordered closed on June 1st.
    J. S. Howard is engaged in making a survey for the high-line water ditch on the north side of Rogue River. The survey commences at a point 200 feet above the level of the water at Gold Hill, and will be continued easterly until it taps Rogue River, which, it is estimated, it will do about the foot of what is known as the big grade on the Fort Klamath road.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 11, 1899, page 3


    Messrs. Mounce & Karnes moved into their new store last week, and have things arranged in apple pie order therein. The rooms are papered in lovely tints and present a very charming interior. These gentlemen have one of the best-equipped confectionery stores in Southern Oregon, and carry everything that is fresh and delicious in that line. The whole interior of the establishment operated by these gentlemen has been made over into rooms especially suited to their business. The entire front is constructed in such manner as to enable them to open the whole store onto the street, the large windows sliding upwards. At the rear of the salesroom is their ice cream parlor, which is also newly papered and painted. At the back of this are rooms occupied by the Medford Soda Works, where the proprietor, J. W. Dunn, is busily engaged day and night in preparing soft drinks for his many patrons in all parts of Southern Oregon. As a whole this building is very properly occupied with a fine stock of goods and there seems nothing in the way of their doing a good business. In the remodeling of the building the handiwork of carpenter Nicholson, painter Ling and paperhanger Butler are noticeable.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 12, 1899, page 7



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Roberts have left for Tacoma, Wash., to make their future home.
   
Prof. Goble steps higher than anybody because a bouncing boy has taken up a residence at his house.
   
C. W. Palm has received a new two-seated carriage, fitted with pneumatic tires, which is a model of comfort and durability.
   
Miss Iva Purdin, who has been attending the Ashland normal school, returned home last week, suffering from an attack of mumps.
   
Dr. Bohannon, the cancer expert, has returned to Stockton, Calif., after successfully treating Mrs. J. Tungate and Mr. Kincaid of this place.
    The tenth anniversary of the
foundation of the Epworth League was appropriately celebrated at the M.E. Church in this city on Sunday.
    The ditch for the water pipes in
East Medford is completed and the pipe is on the ground, ready for laying. Contractor Lyons expects to have it in position this week.
    The Ashland Mandolin and Guitar
Club gave a pleasant entertainment Saturday evening. The attendance was good, and everyone was well pleased with the programme.
    In reporting the teachers elected in
the Medford schools last week the name of Miss Fannie Haskins was inadvertently omitted. She will retain the position she so ably filled last year.
    Mesdames
W. W. Woods and A. Hubbard had a runaway accident last week on the road between this place and Jacksonville. Fortunately the ladies escaped with a few bruises, but the carriage was badly demoralized.
    A. C. Tayler, the well-known boot and shoe dealer, was married on May
3d at Oakland, Calif., to Miss Irena Wangerin of that city. The many friends of Mr. T. in this section are extending congratulations and best wishes, in which The Times heartily joins.
    The
Nicholson residence in the northern part of town had a narrow escape from destruction by fire one night last week. The flames are supposed to have started from a match which was thrown away after having been used to light a lamp, and were fortunately discovered before gaining much headway.
    The regular annual meeting of the Jackson County auxiliary of the
American Bible Society was held in Medford last week. Rev. O. J. Gist, vice-president, called the meeting to order in the absence of S. S. Pentz, president. The reports of officers and the minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved. The following officers were elected: President, Rev. J. S. McCain; vice-presidents, resident pastors; secretary, J. R. Erford; treasurer and depositary, G. H. Haskins; executive committee, A. Haberly, O. J. Gist, E. F. Wilson, J. S. McCain, J. R. Erford. Rev. P. C. Hetzler, general agent of the society, delivered an interesting address.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1899, page 3


    A Medford blood became too boisterous on Friday evening, and was locked up by Marshal Murray until he cooled off. He was released the next morning on promise of future good behavior.
    The daughter of John F. White of Medford fell under the wheel of a buggy Sunday in such a manner that the little finger of her right hand was crushed off. The attending physician is of the opinion that most of the injured digit can be saved.
    The First Southern Oregon Board of Agriculture met at Medford last week and adjourned for one week in order to give the citizens of Central Point time in which to submit a proposition for holding the next fair of the association at that place.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1899, page 3


    S. J. Lashier, of the Medford Mail, returned to his home at Newberg this morning, where he was called by the death of his father.

"Personal and Local'," Daily Capital Journal, Salem, May 17, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    H. C. Tanner and F. Salkald of California are getting up a minstrel performance, which will be given under the auspices of our lodge of Ladies of Woodcraft. The participants will all be ladies of Medford.
    Fred. Patterson of Roseburg, the well-known contractor (who enlarged Hotel Nash), has gone to Drain to begin work on a brick building for W. A. Perkins, and will probably put up one for Judge Lyons also.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1899, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Carrie and M. S. Damon to Loren L. Damon; lot 10, blk 16, Medford . . . Love and affection
Lucy A. Clark to Carrie E. Damon; lot 10, blk 16, Medford . . . 75.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1899, page 3


    Frank Sutter has sold his fine home and greenhouse in North Medford to a Mr. Riggs, who formerly resided near Phoenix and who owns a fine farm in that vicinity. This piece of property is a gem, and Mr. Sutter sold it at a figure much below what it cost him. We have not yet received information as to the exact amount of money for which he sold the place.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 19, 1899, page 7



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Edward D. Boyd to C. N. Elmore; lots 16, 17 and 18, blk 47, Medford . . . 350.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1899, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Fricke Bros. of Portland have been awarded the contract to build the sewer to Bear creek. Their bid was $2095.
    A quarterly meeting of the M.E. Church, South, was held in this city Saturday and Sunday. Presiding Elder Shangle was in attendance.
    The third game of baseball, played here a few days ago, between Ashland and Medford teams, resulted in a victory for the visitors by a score of 16 to
6. The Ashland boys have won two of the three games played.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1899, page 3


    Medford's lady minstrels will appear at the U.S. Hall Saturday evening, their former date conflicting with that of the Jacksonville public school's commencement. A very clever performance is promised.
    The management of the Medford Eye has changed, Rev. J. S. McCain retiring. That newspaper will probably be conducted in the future by A. H. Chessmore and O. B. Allen. We wish the new firm unlimited success.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1899, page 3


Memorial Exercises.
    Chester A. Arthur Post, G.A.R., will observe Decoration Day at Medford, and an excellent programme has been arranged for the occasion. The members will assemble at their hall on Sunday, May 28th, at 10:30 a.m. and march to the opera house, where union services will be held by Rev. Mr. Gist and other ministers. On the 30th the usual memorial exercises will be held. The Post, W.R.C. and Sons of Veterans will assemble at their hall at 9:30 o'clock a.m. A parade will form on the corner of C and Seventh streets, at 10 o'clock, as follows: Band members of G.A.R. and all other soldiers and sailors of either army, ladies of W.R.C., Sons of Veterans, girls representing states. Any of the fraternal orders will be assigned places in the parade. After a short march the procession will go to the opera house, where the following programme will be observed: Music by the choir, led by Prof. Gregory; address of welcome, post commander; services, post officers; singing, choir; oration, Rev. Mr. Adkins; reading of order, Adjutant Damon; singing, choir; benediction, Rev. Mr. Rounds; adjournment for dinner. At 2 o'clock p.m. there will be a reassembling at the door of the opera house and a procession to the Odd Fellows cemetery, where the regular exercises will be carried out according to the ritual. All are invited to join in these ceremonies.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, May 25, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
C. Mingus to Callie Palm; lot 9, blk 44, Medford . . . 250.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 25, 1899, page 2


    The Times is sorry to announce that Medford's lady minstrels will not appear in Jacksonville. They would have received a hearty welcome here.
    Messrs. Tanner and Salkeld, who managed the minstrel performance given by ladies of Medford, called on The Times yesterday. They may give a similar entertainment here, if they can enlist local talent.
    Joe Frizell, who beat Paul Daemmer and broke John Bohl's arm in an altercation at Medford not long since, but who made his escape while his bonds were being prepared, was arrested by the sheriff of Tehama County, Calif. this week and is now in jail at Red Bluff. Requisition papers will probably be issued and Frizell brought back to Jackson County.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 25, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Geo. L. Parker, eldest son of W. H. Parker, who is publishing a newspaper at Ione, arrived in Medford this week for a short visit.
    The opera house was well filled on Tuesday evening, to witness the minstrel performance given by about thirty ladies of Medford. Everybody was surprised at the excellence of the entertainment, as it was the second of the kind ever attempted in southern Oregon, and few were aware that we had so many burnt cork artists among us. The jokes were new and amusing, the singing and dancing clever, while the rendition of the balance of the programme would do credit to performers of much more experience. The cake walk, which proved the most interesting part of the performance, was participated in by a number of couples. The contest was so close that it was difficult to make a decision. The first prize went to E. D. Elwood and Miss Mamie Nicholson, the second to Wm. Mahoney and Miss Hibbard, and the third to Sidney Cole and Miss Lillian Rhinehart. A repetition of the performance would have packed the hall
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 25, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
John A. Morey to Martha A. Hazel; lots 3 and 4, Morey's add. to Medford . . . 75.00
Catherine Noland to C. F. Wall; lot 16, blk 21, Medford . . . 500.00
Mary S. Nelson to Town of Medford; right of way through certain property in Medford . . . 250.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1899, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    'Squire Stewart is recovering from a severe attack of the mumps.
    Calvin Welch, lately of North Yamhill, has opened a stock of goods in one of the buildings on the west side of the railroad track.
    Geo. Kenney, engineer at the brewery, had the middle finger of his right hand so badly mangled by the machinery that it was found necessary to amputate it.
    W. S. Conklin, who was a resident of Medford for years, is located at Denver, Idaho. His many friends hope to see him return at an early date.
    Requisition papers have been applied for, and as soon as they are received Sheriff Orme or one of his deputies will go to Red Bluff, Calif. for Joe Frizell.
    Articles incorporating the Jackson County Canal, Water and Power Co. have been filed with the secretary of state. The incorporators are A. S. Hammond, F. E. Birge, H. L. Gilkey; principal place of business, Medford; capital, $100,000.
    Medford's proposed sewer will run from the public school building, through Seventh Street, thence down A Street to Bear Creek, where it will dump on the ground purchased of W. T. Nelson. The property owners along its route will pay the cost thereof. Citizens living in other parts of our city will petition for the construction of another sewer.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1899, page 2


    The schools of Medford, Jacksonville and Ashland closed last week.
    There were no graduates from Medford this year, but the school gave a closing entertainment which was attended by all who could get in the house. The many beautiful drills, marches and songs were interspersed with recitations and other features which made the evening one of great delight. An admission was charged, the proceeds to go to the library fund.
G. A. Gregory, "County School Notes," 
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1899, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Thos. H. Short, the expert blacksmith, is employed at Merriman's shop. He has no superior in southern Oregon.
    Little Zela White, who had one of her fingers badly injured not long ago, is recovering. The greater portion of the digit will be saved.
    W. F. Taggart, who managed a branch of the M.D.&R. Co.'s business for some time, has removed to Eden precinct, where he is engaged in farming.
    Decoration Day was very well observed in Medford. Most of our business houses were appropriately decorated and closed part of the time. The exercises, under the auspices of Chester A. Arthur Post, G.A.R., participated in by a large number of veterans, their wives and children, were impressive and interesting.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1899, page 2


    F. Sutter, of Medford, the well-known florist, is in town. He has not sold his conservatory, as reported.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
J. A. Morey to R. H. and Addie Halley; part lot 20, blk 20, Medford . . . 3000.00
Addie and R. H. Halley to J. A. Morey; same property . . . 3000.00
Abigail Turner to E. F. Walker; lot 7, blk 71, Medford . . . 200.00
John Morris to J. W. Jory; lots 11 and 12, blk 69, Medford . . . 175.00
Alex Orme to Portland Trust Co.; 214 acres in Orchard Home Association tract, except certain lots and blocks heretofore sold . . . 5500.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1899, page 1


    J. W. Dunn, proprietor of the Medford Bottling Works, has thoroughly overhauled and greatly improved them. He is now furnishing the trade with the choicest soft drinks. Buy of him and keep your money at home.
    Joe Frizell, who was held to answer for assaulting John Bohl with an iron instrument used in climbing telephone poles and skipped while his bonds were being prepared, was brought back Monday evening by Deputy Sheriff Deneff from Red Bluff, Calif., where he had been arrested by the sheriff of Tehama County. He is now confined in the county jail, but expects to be bailed out.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Henry Ireland, who has been in eastern Oregon, shearing sheep, has returned. He reports that the weather was unfavorable for his business nearly the whole time he was gone, to say nothing of the competition put up by several crews of Spaniards from California.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Frank Wait of the Medford Marble Works took several orders at Grants Pass last week.
    D. S. Youngs and wife started this week for Yaquina Bay, where they will spend the summer.
    Capt. A. M. Smith, formerly in business at Medford, is operating in the mines of Josephine County.
    Miss Clara Skeel, who has been attending to the business in J. H. Whitman's office for the past several weeks, returned to Grants Pass this week.
    J. H. Whitman, the well-known abstracter who has been lying dangerously ill at his residence in this city for a short time, died Wednesday night. He will be buried tomorrow, probably under the auspices of the southern Oregon bar.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Mary E. Davis to J. H. Thorndike; lots 3 and 4, blk 7, Park add. to Medford . . . 400.00
E. F. Walker to G. Naylor; lots 10 and 11, blk 4, lot 26, blk 3, Orchard Home Association tract . . . 110.00
A. S. Barnes to E. Wilkinson; sheriff's deed to lots 10 and 11, blk 4, and lot 26, blk 3, Orchard Home Ass'n. tract . . . 271.41
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1899, page 2


    Medford and Eagle Point ball tossers will try conclusions at the latter place tomorrow afternoon. The contest is expected to be an interesting one. In the evening there will be an entertainment and ball under the auspices of the Eagle Point Literary Society.
    An accident occurred at Medford on Thursday afternoon which might have resulted seriously, but which fortunately resulted in the participants escaping with a few bruises and a severe shaking up. Misses Laura and Lucina Reames, Helen Colvig and Marie Nickell of Jacksonville had driven to Medford and in turning around in front of the Hotel Nash, the horse became frightened and upset the carriage, throwing the girls out on their heads. Lucinda Reames was rendered unconscious but soon recovered. Marie Nickell did not show much evidence of being hurt until nearly home, when she fainted from the effects of the shock. Both girls are recovering nicely and no danger is apprehended.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Mary E. Davis to J. H. Thorndike; lots 3 and 4, blk 7, Park add. to Medford . . . 400.00
E. F. Walker to Granville Naylor; lots 10 and 11, blk 4, lot 26, blk 3, Orchard Home . . . 110.00
A. S. Barnes to E. Wilkinson; sheriff's deed to same property . . . 271.41
Edna and John Morris to A. T. Beidler; lot 10, blk 70, Medford . . . 400.00
A. T. Beidler to A. J. Moffitt; same property . . . 150.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1899, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Uncle Jimmy Stewart, a Civil War veteran, died suddenly one day last week. He was in one of the chairs at Hardin & Bates' barber shop at the time, and death came so peacefully that even Mr. Hardin, who was attending him, was not aware of it.
    Medford's new bank was organized last Saturday, with a capital of $50,000. The officers are: President, J. H. Stewart of Medford; vice-president H. E. Ankeny of Sterlingville; cashier, J. E. Enyart of Medford; directors, W. B. Roberts, R. H. Whitehead, J. H. Stewart, H. E. Ankeny, J. E. Enyart. A number of the prominent citizens of the county have taken stock.
    F. W. Jennings, a prominent business man of Portland, and Miss Mollie Reames, the handsome and accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Reames of Klamath Falls, were married at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. John F. White Saturday. They left for their future home at the metropolis the same evening, accompanied by the congratulations and best wishes of many friends, in which The Times joins.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1899, page 2


    The large concourse which paid their last respects to the late John H. Whitman of Medford last Friday gave evidence of the high esteem which he was held in by the community in which
he had lived. The funeral was carried out under the auspices of the bar association of southern Oregon, of which he was an honored member. Mr. Whitman came from Iowa a number of years ago, and was a resident of Jacksonville for some time after his arrival. Conscientious and capable, reliable in everything, he had the confidence of all. A wife and four children survive him, who have our sympathy.
"Gone to Their Rest," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Trustees of M.E. Church, South, to Martha Murray; lot 12, blk 10, Medford . . . 150.00
G. W. White to Big Bend Milling Co.; lot 12, blk 13, Medford . . . 2000.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 22, 1899, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Rufus Cox returned a few days ago from Klamath County, where he has been looking after his stock interests.
    Dr. J. M. Keene of Medford has been chosen as Oregon's delegate to the National Association of Dental Examiners, which will be in session at Niagara Falls, N.Y., July 23-31, where the question of uniform state legislation as to dentistry and uniform examinations of the candidates in every state of the Union will be discussed. Dr. T. L. Nicklin will serve as alternate.
    Our new banking institution opened for business on the morning of the 20th. It is called the Bank of Medford, and occupies handsome quarters on the corner of Seventh and B streets. The officers are: President, J. H. Stewart; vice president, H. E. Ankeny; cashier, J. E. Enyart; directors, H. E. Ankeny, J. H. Stewart, W. B. Roberts, W. F. Towne, R. H. Whitehead, Horace Pelton and W. S. Crowell.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 22, 1899, page 2



    A very sudden and unexpected death occurred in Medford Saturday morning. Mr. James D. Stewart was in the Hardin & Bates barber shop and the barber had just finished shaving him, when before leaving the chair he suddenly fainted. He was quickly taken out of the chair and placed on the floor in such a way that the air could best reach him. Dr. Pickel was quickly summoned but life was extinct by the time he reached the unfortunate man. Mr. Stewart was the father of Perry Stewart of this city, and was aged seventy-four years and four months. Deceased was born in Manchester, New York, and was a veteran of both the Mexican and Civil wars, having served three years in the Civil War. Deceased had been a resident of this city for about three years. Funeral services were held in the Woodmen Hall Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock and interment was made in the Odd Fellows cemetery. Perry Stewart and family wish us to extend their heartfelt gratitude to those people who were so kind and helpful to them in their sad hour of affliction. Especially do they feel grateful to those who furnished such an abundance of flowers and to the members of the G.A.R. post who conducted the funeral.
    J. G. Grossman has so far recovered from his serious illness as to be able to walk downtown Wednesday. The effort was a great one, and his friends are hoping that he will regain his former strength.
    W. T. York closed a real estate deal this week which is of no little importance to our town, the same being that of selling to the Big Bend Milling Company a business property, situated on Seventh Street, adjoining the Lindley brick, and now occupied by F. M. Wilson, the baker. The purchase was made from attorney G. W. White and the price paid was $2000. The members of the above named company are W. I. Vawter and A. A. Davis, of Medford, and G. W. Howard of Oakland, Calif. These gentlemen now own a frontage of land on Seventh Street of seventy-five feet and on C Street of 140 feet. Upon all this property are now small buildings, but the Mail learns that soon a large brick building will be constructed thereon, covering all of the land. Should this be true a great improvement in the appearance of the town shall have been made. The building may not go up this season, but it is a certainty for next year. A conclusion naturally arrived at is that the principal part of the first floor will be for banking purposes--and its occupants the Jackson County Bank.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, June 23, 1899, page 7



    Mrs. J. D. Wangerin has returned from a visit to her daughter, Mrs. A. C. Tayler, in Medford, Or.
"Personal and Social," Oakland Tribune, June 26, 1899, page 5


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    I. L. Hamilton will retire from the management of Hotel Nash, which he has graced so long, and will be succeeded by S. R. Reeves, who has had considerable experience as a landlord. Shorty will continue to conduct the saloon annex, however.
    A very enjoyable At Home was given Wednesday, June 21st, by Mrs. I. A. Webb and her daughter, Miss Pearl, at their handsome residence in Medford, which was artistically decorated for the occasion. The drawing rooms were tastefully arranged with white lilies, while the dining room, where the guests were served with delicious refreshments, was resplendent with La France roses. About 75 invited guests from Medford, Ashland and Jacksonville called between the hours of four and seven. The ladies who assisted in receiving and entertaining were Mesdames Foster, Haskins, Bliton and Narregan, Misses Maysie and Grace Foster, Frances Haskins, Laurie Burnett and Jessie Worman. Those from Jacksonville were Mesdames W. M. Colvig, DeBar, A. E. Reames, T. Cameron, Love, Chas. Hines, Robinson and Miss Allie Hanley.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 29, 1899, page 2


Bank Incorporated.
    The Medford Bank has filed articles of incorporation, at Medford, Jackson County. The capital stock is fixed at $50,000. The incorporators are R. H. Whitehead, J. E. Enyart, J. Stewart, W. B. Roberts and H. E. Ankeny. The company will conduct a bank.
Lincoln County Leader,
Toledo, Oregon, July 7, 1899, page 3



    The Misses Florence and Grace Weeks are the guests of their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Weeks of Medford, Oregon. Their parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Weeks, are also in Oregon.
"Personal," Oakland Tribune, July 12, 1899, page 3


Editors at Medford.
    A copy of the Medford, Oregon Mail contains a column article regarding the extensive arrangements made to entertain the editorial excursion party last Friday. Dinner for five hundred was prepared, followed by a drive about the beautiful valley in which Medford is situated. Everybody in that vicinity owning any kind of vehicle was called upon to assist in conveying the party on the drive. There are a number of Logansporters residing in Medford, among whom is J. E. Enyart, who was on the reception committee.
Logansport Reporter, Indiana, July 12, 1899, page 8


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Frank Sutter to Michael Riggs, property in Medford . . . 1800.00
W. S. Barnum to H. L. Stickel, lot 9, Childers' eastern add. to Medford . . . 80.00
E. C. Stickel to H. L. Stickel, lot 16, Childers' add. to Medford . . . 25.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1899, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Jeff D. Heard and family, who have been residing at Alameda, Calif. for some time past, have returned to Medford.
    Ralph Bunch, the barber, who went to San Francisco last December on the Woodmen's excursion, is conducting a shop in the bay city.
    Mrs. H. Elliott had a lower limb badly broken at the knee while returning from Jacksonville Sunday evening with her husband. The accident was caused by the horse Mr. E. was driving becoming frightened and running away.
    Wm. Wulf, a prominent business man of Crescent City, Calif., and Miss Anna Gilbert, a popular young school teacher, were married at the Presbyterian parsonage by Rev. A. Haberly last Sunday. They have already gone to their future home. Numerous friends offer their congratulations and best wishes.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1899, page 2


    Joe Frizell of Medford was married to Miss Belle Mills of Eden precinct at Yreka, Calif. on the 11th.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The first watermelons have made their appearance.
    Wm. Davidson, who has been recuperating at his home in Medford, returned this week to Sterlingville, where he is in the employ of Ray Cooke.
    J. C. Hall and Wm. Isaacs opened their handsome variety store and ice cream saloon a few days ago, and are enjoying a big business already. They have fitted up their building in an elaborate manner.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
J. U. Willeke to Jas. Taylor; property in Medford precinct . . . 350.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1899, page 2


    The hegira to the mountains and summer resorts has commenced, and the towns are becoming depopulated.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
J. W. Ward to T. F. Gooch; w ½ of lot 1, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford . . . 5.00
T. F. Gooch to Elizabeth A. Ward, same property . . . 5.00
J. W. Robinson to Max Muller; same property . . . 5.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 20, 1899, page 2


    The R.R.V.R. Co. is having its coach handsomely painted. Geo. Coulter of Medford, the well-known artist, is doing the work.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 20, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Woodford's feed store caught fire Wednesday, but the blaze was extinguished before any damage resulted.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 20, 1899, page 3



    MEDFORD, ORE.--James Stewart has bought out the interest of his partner, L. C. Narregan, in the book business, and is now sole proprietor.
"Bibliographic Notes," The Publishers' Weekly, July 22, 1899, page 159


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Jos. Scott, Miss Nicholson and Dr. Pletcher and family left last week for the Fort Klamath section, on an outing.
    Dr. J. M. Keene left for Saratoga, N.Y., Friday evening, to attend the National Dental Congress. He will be gone a few weeks.
    C. M. Anderson, the printer and band leader, who is employed in the Eye office, has removed his family from Ashland to Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1899, page 3


    J. M. Keene, of Medford, formerly a Salem rounder, passed through Salem on his way to Niagara Falls, to attend the National Dental Association.

"Personal and Local," The Daily Journal, Salem, July 24, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Heavy shipments of peaches and other early fruit are now being made to northern markets.
    Mrs. H. Elliott, who had one of her lower limbs badly broken a few weeks ago, is improving slowly.
    A big camping party left Medford during the past week, which will be gone some time. It is composed of E. D. Elwood, J. E. Bodge, J. D. Heard, G. L. Schermerhorn, Frank Wilson, Dr. Jones, John Butler, Fred Deuel, C. W. Palm, Dr. Arnold, all of whom are accompanied by their wives and families, each having a wagon and team and camping equipage. Their itinerary includes among other points of interest Pelican Bay, Crater Lake and Jenny Creek.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 27, 1899, page 2


    Attention is called to the professional card of Dr. I. E. Mushett, who has located at Medford for the practice of her profession. The lady is a regular graduate, and has had a long and successful experience.
    J. J. Brophy and Joe Phipps of Lost Creek precinct were at the county seat Monday. The former informs us that Proudfoot & Co. are building a good road into that section, to enable them to get out the large quantity of sugar pine lumber they are manufacturing.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 27, 1899, page 3


    F. H. Rice of Medford, operator in mines, has been here several times lately. He is negotiating the sale of some mines in this vicinity.
    True Cox and others are building a large, first-class warehouse at Medford, in which farmers can store their wheat at a reasonable figure and not be at the mercy of any combination.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The northbound train will arrive in Medford at 5:33 p.m. on and after Aug. 2d.
    Dr. J. E. Shearer, who has been living in Missouri during the past five years, returned last week.
    Van Exxe, the clever photographer, has returned from the Josephine County caves. He brought home a number of fine views of them.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Cochran is paying Jacksonville a visit, being the guest of her daughter, Mrs. Chas. Carney.
    The little daughter of C. Reed died one day this week. She was afflicted with typhoid fever.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Jackson's child, which has been quite ill, is improving, we are pleased to announce.
    There are several cases of typhoid fever in Medford and vicinity at present, a few of which are dangerous.
    Fred Luy, our popular barber, is happier than ever. For further particulars see the item under the head of "born."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 3, 1899, page 3


    H. H. Wolters, formerly of Jacksonville and Medford, is said to be in the employ of the Southern Pacific Company at San Francisco and doing well.
    William Frazier, of Portland, will be at Medford, May 17th, for the purpose of buying 100 cavalry horses. They must be five to seven years old, solid colors, gentle and broken to saddle, 14½ to 15½ hands high and weigh from 900 to 1,000 pounds.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. T. Nelson has sold his farm in Klamath County to Wm. Davis for $1200.
    Van Exxe and Geo. Mackey, the well-known artists, have formed a partnership.
    Prof. W. A. Snow, the well-known musician, is with us again, after an absence of several months in southern California. He was in Jacksonville one day last week.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1899, page 3



HOTEL GOSSIP.

    "Oregon has got her second growth," said Dr. J. M. Keene of Medford yesterday. Dr. Keene, who is a member of the Oregon state board of dental examiners, is just returning from Niagara Falls, where he has been as a delegate to the National Association of Dental Examiners, which held its session there. "Times were never better in our state, and Medford is growing at a rapid rate. Our mines in southern Oregon have proven first-class and while we are not booming we are going ahead at a rapid rate. The Rogue River section never had the promise of a better crop than is likely this year, and we are in the very best shape. As for politics, I am not much of a politician, but we are all expansionists out there, and believe in holding on to all we acquired in the [Spanish-American] war."
The Salt Lake Herald, Utah, August 8, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. J. Compton's thresher is in this vicinity and doing fine work.
    A. T. Searle was this week licensed by the supreme court to practice in the courts of the state.
    Joseph Ritter, who was a resident of the valley until a year or two ago, returned one evening this week.
    J. W. Dunn has sold the Medford soda works to Walter Crowell of Grants Pass. We are glad to learn that he will remain among us.
    The special trains carrying the returning Oregon volunteers [returning from the Philippines] stopped a few minutes at the depot and were enthusiastically received.
    W. B. Roberts and wife returned from St. Helena, Calif. Friday, whither they had been called by the illness of the latter's father. The old gentleman died soon after their arrival at his bedside.
    Alex. Galloway and Robert Dow, who were among the brave soldiers mustered out at San Francisco, have returned to Medford. The latter will leave at once for Portland, where his parents now reside.
    Dr. J. B. Wait had a narrow escape Tuesday evening, while returning from Jacksonville. He was driving his rig over one of the R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s crossings in town, just in front of the train, when the tender struck his buggy and demolished it. Neither the doctor nor his horses were injured. The railroad company's employees cannot be blamed for the accident, as they did all that was possible to prevent it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 10, 1899, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Robert E. L. Beaver to Francis Beaver, 11.56 acres in Medford precinct . . . 1.00

Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1899, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. J. L. Downs of Forest Grove is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Edwards.
    Mrs. Marion Tryer is visiting her brother, John Clemmens of Butte Creek Valley, Calif.
    Miss Mamie Nicholson, Deuel & Stevens' clever saleslady, has returned from a visit in Klamath County.
    Mr. Tryer, father of F. M. and Marion Tryer, is reported to be in a critical condition. He is about 80 years of age.
    Orra Angle, who was formerly in business here, is located at Ashland for the present. He is assisting Lou. Bender in conducting his restaurant and bakery.
    Chas. H. Pierce arrived from San Francisco Friday. He comes to look after his interests on upper Rogue River, being interested with R. A. Proudfoot in the manufacture of lumber.
    J. B. Riddle of Douglas County, formerly landlord of our big hotel, and his wife tarried awhile in Medford last week. They were on their way to Ashland to meet their son Edwin, who was one of Oregon's soldiers.
    The citizens of Medford gave an enthusiastic reception at the opera house Friday evening to Alex. Galloway, Olney Hopwood, Robt. Dow and Jas. Grieve, who did good work against the enemy in the Philippines. The programme, which consisted of addresses, vocal and instrumental music, etc., was impromptu, but nevertheless well rendered and interesting.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1899, page 2


    Wm. Frazier will be at Medford on the 17th for the purpose of buying 100 head of cavalry horses. He will be at Grants Pass on the 16th.
    Grain is turning out well in most parts of the valley, and some extraordinarily large yields have been reported. About 15 acres of the Plymire farm in Medford precinct yielded over 800 bushels of wheat.
    A big traction engine, weighing 17 tons, has been received by the Sugar Pine Lumber Co., which is operating on a large scale in the timber on upper Rogue River. It will be used in hauling lumber to the valley.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
O. Harbaugh to W. M. Howard; 8 acres in Medford precinct . . . 1.00

Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 17, 1899, page 1


Volunteers' Reception at Medford.
    MEDFORD, Aug. 12.--The young women of Medford planned a movement which resulted in an enthusiastic reception to four of the soldiers who returned from the Philippines. Robert Dow, of Medford, Jas. Grieve and Olney Hopwood, of Central Point, and Alex. Galloway, formerly of Medford, now of Portland, were the recipients of kindly greetings of the citizens at the opera house. A well-arranged programme was presented by the leading people of the city. An interesting feature was the music of the band. Robert Dow took part with an immense double bass horn, which he captured from the Spaniards at Manila. A Spanish flag, captured by the same soldier at the fall of Manila, was displayed by Mayor Gilkey. At the close of the reception a banquet was served at Hotel Nash. Toasts on patriotism and kindred subjects were responded to by W. I. Vawter, Lieut. Amos Fries, of the U.S.A., and others.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 17, 1899, page 3


Property Burned.
    The large barn belonging to A. J. Hamlin, of Eden precinct, which contained six horses and a colt, about 30 tons of hay, a large quantity of harness, several farming implements, vehicles, etc., was burned by incendiaries on the night of August 14th, at about 11 o'clock. A stack of unthreshed wheat was set afire by the same parties and destroyed, but the attempt to burn another stack failed. The total loss is considerably over $1,000. Mr. Hamlin was at home at the time, asleep. When he was awakened by his wife, the barn was already a mass of flames and could not be reached on account of the heat. In the distance he could see human beings running away from the grain stack, and he shot his gun at them, without effect, however. His sister, Mrs. Rose Carlisle, of Medford, with whom he has been having financial difficulties, and her husband were immediately suspected of the crime, and their arrest followed. They had an examination in Justice Stewart's court at Medford, and were held to answer at the September term of court. Their bonds were fixed at $1,000 each, in default of which they were sent to the county jail. It is claimed that their horse and buggy were tracked to their residence from the scene of the fire, the horse being identified by a peculiarly shaped shoe he wore.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 17, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    H. C. Barker arrived here from Fort Klamath a few days ago. We are glad to learn that there is a probability of his becoming a resident of our town.
    R. R. Dunn, of San Francisco, who was manager of Staver & Walker's business in Medford a number of years ago, made our town a visit one day this week.
    Dr. J. M. Keene, who went to New York to attend the National Dental Association's meeting, returned Saturday morning. He had a pleasant and profitable trip.
    H. C. Mackey of Medford, the popular photographer, and Miss M. L. Walker, a handsome and worthy young lady, have been granted license to marry. They have the congratulations and best wishes of a wide circle of friends.
    The Presbyterian Church was handsomely decorated on the evening of the sixteenth, in honor of a very happy event, when Lieut. Amos A. Fries of the U.S.A. and Miss Bess Wait, the popular and accomplished daughter of Dr. J. B. Wait, were united in marriage. The contracting parties have been residents of Jackson County for a number of years, and enjoy the highest esteem of all who know them. The ceremony was performed in an impressive manner by Rev. A. Haberly. May the matrimonial journey of this young couple, so auspiciously begun, be fraught with prosperity and bliss.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 17, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Rev. G. N. Annes, our popular Baptist minister, has resigned his pulpit here, to accept that vacated at Napa, Calif. by Rev. A. M. Russell, who is now located at Ashland.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1899, page 3


    All kinds of sick shoes and boots doctored by Tayler, the Footfitter, Medford.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1899, page 3


    John Carlyle of Medford is on trial at Medford for burning a barn.
"Oregon Newslets," The Daily Journal, Salem, August 22, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Z. Maxcy, bookkeeper and accountant at the Jackson County Bank, left last week for Oakland, Calif., where he will visit relatives for a couple of weeks.
    Rev. Annes, pastor of the Baptist Church at Medford, has resigned and will leave in a few days for Napa, Calif., where he has accepted a call. He will preach his farewell sermon at Medford on Sunday next.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 24, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Nancy Allen of Kentland, Ind. arrived in Medford last Wednesday morning for a visit with her sister, Mrs. R. A. Finney.
    A. H. King, a brother of the assistant station agent at Medford, was here over Sunday. He was en route from Cottage Grove to Illinois, where he will attend school.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Fitzgerald have removed from Medford to Gold Hill. Mr. Fitzgerald owns the Gold Hill hotel property, on which he intends to make some improvements.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fitzgerald, who have been living here for the past three months, left last Tuesday for Gold Hill to take charge of the Union Hotel, of which Mr. F. is proprietor.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1899, page 2


    C. A. Beaver, living between this place and Medford, is building a new fruit dryer and warehouse. It will have a capacity of 3,000 pounds in 24 hours. Mr. Beaver has about 30 acres of young fruit trees which will yield this season about one ton to the acre of very choice prunes.
    All weak places in your system effectually closed against disease by DeWitt's Little Early Risers. They cleanse the bowels, promptly cure chronic constipation, regulate the liver and fill you with new life and vigor. Small, pleasant, sure; never gripe. City Drug Store.
    Captain Hugh Thomason and his company of Rough Riders, which are the sensation of the day, who fought under three flags will appear at every performance on the Hippodrome track with the Walter L. Main shows at Medford, Saturday, September 9th, and give the most novel and exciting exhibition that has ever been given to the public. They will be dressed as they were in Cuba, where they took part in the battles of San Juan Hill, Daiquiri, Sibony and El Caney.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1899, page 3


The First of the Season.
    W. A. Snow, the popular band director, has reorganized the Medford band, which is furnishing better music than ever. It is their purpose to give a series of soirees during the fall and winter, the first of which will take place at the opera house in Medford on Thursday night, Sept. 7th. A few selections will be given on the street during the evening, commencing at 7:30 o'clock, including the latest oddity, Ragtime Melody, Shuffling Rufus, Valse di Concert, Moonlight on the Hudson, Schumann's Traumerei. Tickets for the party have been priced at 75 cents. A good time is assured.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, August 31, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. S. Fitzgerald and family have removed to Gold Hill.
    A. S. Hammond, the attorney, has returned from a professional trip to Lake and Klamath counties.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 31, 1899, page 3


    C. A. Beaver, living between Jacksonville and Medford, is building a new fruit drier and warehouse. It will have a capacity of 3000 pounds in 24 hours. Mr. Beaver has about 30 acres of young fruit trees which will yield this season about one ton to the acre of very choice prunes.

"Personal and Local," The Daily Journal, Salem, September 1, 1899, page 3



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
E. Davis to E. C. Boeck; property in Medford . . . 422.50
Elizabeth Cummons to O. E. Gorsline; lot 15 in blk 47, lot 2 in blk 33, Medford . . . 95.00
C. J. Howard to T. H. Moore; e ½ of lot 1, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford . . . 950.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1899, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. J. Heeley of Jacksonville visited her daughter, Mrs. L. Lytle, last week.
    Rev. G. N. Annes and family have gone to Napa, Calif., their future home.
    Cox's warehouse is doing a big business. The highest cash price is being paid for grain there.
    Mrs. Root, who received a stroke of paralysis recently, is improving, although she is 90 years old.
    The Medford orchestra's soiree on Thursday evening will be one of the pleasantest events of the season.
    Mrs. M. W. Skeel and family are again residents of Medford, having returned from Grants Pass a few days ago.
    Geo. Mackey is sole proprietor of the Medford photograph gallery, situated opposite the post office, and is doing lots of good work.
    Miss Laura Burnett, the clever milliner, has purchased Mrs. Kinney's store at Independence, Polk County. Her many friends here wish her unlimited success.
    Thos. Johnson of Jacksonville has been placed in charge of White & Jacobs' store, pending the litigation instituted against the firm by San Francisco creditors.
    Frank Wait of the Medford Marble Works last week put up a handsome piece of marble in the Jacksonville Cemetery, to mark the grave of the late John O'Brien.
    Van Exxe, the alleged photographer, who has been in business here during the past several months, has levanted, leaving a number of creditors to regret the confidence they placed in the fellow. The public should look out for him.
    As Hugh Elliott and his son Ernest were on their way to Jacksonville one night last week their horse took fright and turned short, upsetting the buggy and throwing them to the ground. They escaped without serious injury, however.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1899, page 2


    Alvin Cardwell of San Francisco, well known to old residents of Jacksonville, passed through the valley Friday evening, en route to Crescent City, Calif., on business connected with some mines in Del Norte County. He reports that Francis Fitch, the attorney, is seriously ill with Bright's disease at the bay city, and not likely to survive long.
    The Times is sorry to learn that the well-known firm of White & Jacobs, doing business at Medford, is in financial difficulties. Their store was closed Friday evening by Sheriff Orme under an attachment issued at the instance of Lippman Sachs, representing San Francisco creditors whose claims aggregate $3,600. We hope that their embarrassment is only temporary.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1899, page 3


First-Class Blacksmithing.
    Hugh Elliott, whose shop is located near the west end of the Bear Creek bridge in Medford, is better prepared than ever to do all kinds of work in his line, especially horseshoeing. He is a first-class blacksmith himself, and is assisted by one of the best mechanics in southern Oregon. His prices are right, and he spares no pains to give satisfaction.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 7, 1899, page 1


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
T. F. Gooch to F. E. Payne, property in Medford precinct . . . $1500.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 7, 1899, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Rev. D. T. Fero of Seattle, the Seventh Day Adventist evangelist, held services at the Baptist Church in Medford Sunday and baptized seven converts.
    John F. Tryer, father of Tryer Bros., a highly respected old gentleman, died on the 2d inst., after a lingering illness. He was buried Monday under the auspices of Medford lodge of Odd Fellows.
    Wm. Clark, the well-known horseman, has returned from Roseburg, where he attended the district fair. He says that the officers of the 2d S.O.S.B. of A. are entitled to much credit for the event. Everything passed off smoothly and all who attended were well satisfied.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 7, 1899, page 3



Medford Mail, September 8, 1899

    The parade this season with the Walter L. Main Shows which exhibits at Medford, Saturday, September 9th, is especially noteworthy in that it contains more novelties than ever before, notably the Zouave Drum Crops, a troop of performing elephants, and an ancient historical Quebec Calash properly costumed. The parade is said to be of unusual length and brilliancy, and worth going miles to witness. The parade will leave show grounds at 10 o'clock a.m. A free exhibition will be given at the show grounds after the return of the parade. In order to give all a chance to see the grand exhibition of the "Congress of Nations" in the menagerie tent the doors will be open at 4 and 7 o'clock p.m.
    The Rialto is daily gaining more popularity, and in consequence its patronage is increasing. It is without a peer in all Oregon for neatness, while the summer drinks and confections are excellent in quality.
    The Western Clay Company, of Portland, has taken the contract for putting in the Medford sewer. The contract they have is the one forfeited by Frick Bros., and the city council has decided to allow them to fill the same as mapped out and for the same price as that given to Frick Bros. R. E. Smith, representing the Portland company, has been in Medford this week arranging all details necessary to starting the work, and just as soon as men can be secured to dig the sewer they will be put to work. It is given out that sixty men are wanted. The city council has appointed Garl T. Jones as superintendent of the work for this town.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 8, 1899, page 7


    THE THIRD TRIP.--The Sugar Pine Lumber Company made its third trip with its big traction engine and train of wagons last week. It started Thursday noon and returned Saturday evening with 18,000 feet of lumber and two cords of wood, having made the trip to the Olsen mills, a distance of 60 miles in two and a half days. Had they not been detained by an accident they would have made the trip in two days. The company is well pleased with the results.--Eye.

Gold Hill News,
September 9, 1899, page 1



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder this week:
E. Davis to E. C. Boeck; property in Medford . . . 422.50
Elizabeth Cummons to O. E. Goraline; lot 15 in blk 47; lot 2 in blk 33, Medford . . . 95.00
C. J. Howard to T. H. Moore, e ½ of lot 1, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford . . . 950.00
Excerpt, Gold Hill News, September 9, 1899, page 4


    The Medford band will give one of its popular dancing parties at Jacksonville in the near future.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The first of the Medford band's soirees, held at the opera house Thursday evening, was a success. The music was superb, and all in attendance enjoyed themselves thoroughly.
    R. P. Little, Medford's original tamale manufacturer, who has been in the Alaska mines during the past two years, got back one day last week. He had an attack of the scurvy, from which he is just recovering. Mr. L. is interested in several good claims, and will return to work on them.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1899, page 3




    Prof. A. Day Parker, formerly vice principal of the Ashland schools, has been elected principal of the public school of Paisley, Lake County, which opens in November.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 11, 1899, page 3


The Medford Arson Case.
    The grand jury brought in a true bill against J. Carlile and wife, held for arson in the setting fire to a barn and other property belonging to Mrs. Carlile's brother, Bud Hamlin, near Medford, a few weeks ago, and the former was arraigned before Judge Hanna yesterday morning.
Ashland Tidings, September 14, 1899, page 3


    The contract for building the school house in district No. 23, Talent, was let on Saturday to Roberts & Orr, of Medford. The contract price is $1400.
    John Beeson of Talent has been employed as fireman on the new road engine engaged in hauling lumber to the valley for the Rogue River Sugar Pine Company.
    The cannon, which does the honors at every important civil and military meeting held here, was this week shipped to Grants Pass, where it will be used at the reunion next week.
    Mrs. Sarah V. Heard, widow of the late Elijah Heard and mother of J. D. Heard of Medford, died at Etna last Saturday morning. She was a pioneer settler of Siskiyou County and highly esteemed for her exemplary qualities.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 14, 1899, page 3


Sam Is Somewhat Riled.
    In the last issue of the Eye there appeared an item so very misleading and so basely untrue that I feel called upon to reply to it, not because that I in any way think it has been widely circulated but because that a few of my friends have asked me to do so even though they know but few have seen it.
    The writer of the article, or rather the item, in question, even though he be from the wilds of some California timbered seaport town, and untaught in the characteristics of an even moderately equipped gentleman, should have first accorded me the justice due by inquiring into the matter before swishing his mop over the rag he calls a newspaper. It is really to be regretted that there are alleged item writers so low in base matter and so void of mental faculty as to permit them with their scurrilous insults to make even attempts at injury of our townspeople.
    But to the matter which brought forth this bit of eloquence (?) from my friend, the Eye:--On Monday of last week two carloads of mules were brought to town by the Beall brothers, and as the animals were untamed and might possibly do someone injury unless caution was observed, I was asked to keep the small boys out of their way as best I could until they were in the stock pens and then to keep the boys off of the stock yard fences. This I did, and so thoroughly did I do it that I went without my dinner in the prosecution of my duty. About half past five I went home for my combination meal of dinner and supper. At that time everything was quiet on the streets and Mr. Parker had not, to my knowledge, purchased the animal which occasioned the disturbance. Upon my return, an hour later, I found Mr. Parker endeavoring to break the horse and to drive on the streets. I at once went to him and told him to get the animal off the street or that I would be compelled to arrest him. He said he did not know he was violating a city ordinance and that if he was he would of course get out of the way, and he started toward home, but of course had to finish his way through Main Street to get out of town. He went out of town with all haste possible, and that was the last seen of him.
    If the duties of a marshal are such we will not permit him to eat at least two meals a day, then there should be two men employed, but there were no grounds for the scurrilous attack upon me, and I will leave the matter to the people to say whether or not I did my duty.
                Yours Respectfully,
                                S. H. MURRAY.
Medford Mail, September 15, 1899, page 3


    Wolters & Howard are doing a good business at fruit shipping these times. They are daily sending to Portland markets from 1000 to 1500 boxes of peaches. Heretofore there has not been a very swift market in peaches, they not being a fruit that would stand shipment to other than local markets, and the demand has not been brisk because of the usual good crop in the Willamette Valley, but this year there are no peaches in that country and the always reliable Rogue River Valley is called upon to supply the demand. It is to be hoped, however, that the demand for peaches this year will not get our orchardists excited on the peach question to an extent that will put them to planting large orchards. Pears, apples and prunes are the staple fruits of this valley, and to these our orchardists should hang fast to if they expect good returns every year.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 15, 1899, page 7



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Hanna J. Gilbert to Geo. E. Weber; property in Medford . . . 262.75
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 15, 1899, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our band will enliven the district fair with their superior music on Thursday.
    Ed. Pottenger leaves for Stockton, Calif. this week. It is whispered that he will not return alone. Shake.
    J. Keets is conducting a feed stable at the old Childers stand, in the eastern portion of town, and building up a good business.
    L. L. Reynolds, who recently arrived in this county, has located in Big Butte precinct, near Derby. He was in Medford Saturday.
    Ed. Tryer of Williams Creek, the granger, is officiating at the block in the S.O.P.P. Co.'s shop, and manipulates the knife and cleaver as smoothly as of yore.
    Mrs. Sarah V. Heard, one of the pioneers of northern California and a woman of many estimable qualities, died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. A. H. Bar of Etna, Siskiyou County, on the 10th, aged 64 years. She was the mother of J. D. Heard of Medford, who attended the funeral.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 15, 1899, page 1


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder this week:
Hanna S. Gilbert to Geo. E. Webber; property in Medford . . . 262.75
Excerpt, Gold Hill News, September 16, 1899, page 1


    ANOTHER RICH STRIKE.--Word was received here Saturday from W. Angle, who is now working his mine at Mt. Sterling, south of the Ashland Butte, that he had just made a third and richer strike than any preceding at that place. It will be remembered that about a year ago he took out about $5,000 at one time. This year several weeks ago he made another rich find near the surface and took to his home in Medford three quart jars full of gold dust. He reports now a third pocket, surpassing in richness any of the previous finds. M. L. Alford, of this city, is camping near him.--Ashland Tidings.
Gold Hill News,
September 16, 1899, page 1



Sentenced to Nine Years.
    A sudden and unexpected finale--at least to the public--in the Medford arson case took place in the circuit court Saturday evening. While District Attorney C. B. Watson was in Ashland Saturday afternoon he received a telephone message to come to Jacksonville at once. On his arrival there he was notified that Mrs. Rosanna Carlile, who had been indicted on the charge of setting fire to the barn of her brother, A. J. Hamlin, last July, was ready to plead guilty to the charge. Court was convened and Mrs. Carlile entered a plea of guilty, and waived time for passing of sentence, whereupon his honor Judge Hanna decreed that she be committed to the state penitentiary for a period of nine years.
    Investigation of the case showed the district attorney that the evidence was not conclusive against the guilty woman's husband, John A. Carlile, and that in fact he had tried to dissuade his spouse from entering upon the crime, but was overruled by her. In view of these facts Mr. Watson made a motion that the charge of arson be dismissed against Carlile, which was done by the court.
    It will be remembered that A. J. Hamlin, living near Medford, lost his barn and some grain stacks one night in July by an incendiary fire. Buggy tracks in the soft soil led from and to the Carlile home, and the husband and wife were arrested immediately. Mrs. Carlile is a sister of Hamlin, and there had been an estrangement between them on account of some family property, the sister believing that she had been wronged by her brother in the distribution. This impression so worked on her mind that in a fit of desperation and revenge she fired Hamlin's barn.
Ashland Tidings, September 18, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Robt. Dow visited his best girl in Jacksonville one evening this week.
    Hon. M. Stewart of Talent, who was a prominent educator before he came to Oregon, is in Medford, attending the teachers' institute.
    Wm. H. Morgan of Etna, Calif., ex-sheriff of Siskiyou County, is visiting Medford, the guest of his daughter, Mrs. H. Knackstedt.
    The warehouse built by Cox & Co. is proving a great boon to the people of the valley. Nearly 100,000 bushels of wheat are already stored there.
    The Medford Book Store, which is conducted by Jas. A. Stewart, our popular justice of the peace, has been stocked with the latest and best in stationery of all kinds, stylish papeteries, writing materials, etc., in addition to the usual standard supplies. Mr. S. spares no pains to please, and succeeds admirably.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 21, 1899, page 1


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
J. U. Willeke to W. B. Roberts, property in Medford . . . 1.00
J. G. Grossman to J. W. Miller, lots 11 and 12, in block 66, Medford . . . 700.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 21, 1899, page 2


    E. E. Lyons, who has been a resident of Medford for some time, returned to Jacksonville this week, and will assume the position of roadmaster of the R.R.V. Ry.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 21, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
C. Mingus to J. E. and Daisy Bodge; lots 3, 4, 5 and 6, blk 69, Medford . . . 230.00
Margaret Lynch to F. W. Hutchison; lots in Meeker's add. to Medford . . . 100.00
Harriet Stanley McKee to F. K. Deuel; property in Medford . . . 100.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1899, page 2


    Mrs. Sarah A. Root, one of the earliest pioneers of southern Oregon, died at Medford on the 16th. She leaves one son, Edwin.
    J. N. Beek of Medford was in Jacksonville while on his way to the Carberry fork of Applegate, in which he is interested with parties living in Vancouver, Wash. There is a prospect of a sale on the property.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Medford band will give a concert at the opera house on Thursday evening, Sept. 28th. Misses Grace Foster and Mabel Jones, who clever artists, will assist Prof. Snow, who enjoys an enviable reputation as a cornetist.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1899, page 3


Professional.
    Thursday, Friday and Saturday of this week Dr. Lowe, the optician, will be at the Hotel Nash in Medford. Lack of time will prevent him from visiting Jacksonville at these dates, much to his regret.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, September 25, 1899, page 3


    Medford is to be blessed with an academy costing $5,000.
    The Conrad Mingus fruit ranch, in Jackson County, has been sold to a man from Missouri for $12,000.
"State News," The Daily Journal, Salem, September 25, 1899, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. B. Rhinehart has been visiting his old home at Eugene.
    J. A. Whitman was at Grants Pass this week, looking after fruit for shipment.
    Frank Van Dyke has gone to Madison, N.J., to enter the Drew Theological Seminary.
    Ralph Woodford, who has been in the hop fields of Josephine County, is visiting in Grants Pass at present.
    Rev. Blair, the presbyterial and Sunday school missionary for southern Oregon, preached at the Presbyterian Church Sunday.
    Medford has a prospect of securing an academy, if $7,000 in the way of gifts and the purchase of scholarships can be raised. A committee is now at work on the proposition.
    Miss Gracie Odgers, one of the most talented of our local musicians, has gone to Cottage Grove to finish her course in the university there. Her studies will embrace a special course in instrumental and vocal music.
    Miss Milspaugh, a representative of the Baptist Women's Home Missionary Society, spent last Sunday in Medford and preached at the Baptist Church in the morning and evening, holding services devoted to the young people's work in the afternoon.
    W. J. King, a former resident of Medford, who has been in the Klondike during the past two years, is among us again. He located several claims on Dominion Creek, which were confiscated by corrupt Canadian officials. Mr. K. will return to the frozen north in the spring.
    At Medford one evening last week State Senator B. F. Mulkey of Polk County delivered a very able and interesting address on the subject of "The Critical Period of Our Country," in which he recited much history of the early struggles of the United States at the time and previous to the adoption of the Constitution of the United States. This, he pointed out in a clear, logical manner, was the critical period of this country.
    The Medford schools opened Monday with the following corps of teachers: North primary, C. Grace Foster; south primary, Emma Reed; second grade, May Phipps; third grade, Jessie G. Wait; fourth grade, Fannie Haskins; fifth grade, Grace Amann; sixth grade, Julia Fielder; eighth and high school, Miss Gertrude Sutton, Latin and mathematics; N. L. Narregan, German, English literature, history, civil government, penmanship and drawing.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 28, 1899, page 2


    The northern markets have been well supplied with southern Oregon watermelons this season, the quality being unusually good. Twenty-five carloads have been shipped from Grants Pass up to date.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 28, 1899, page 3


    Thos. J. Kenney is building a handsome residence on the corner of 4th and B streets. A. C. Nicholson of Medford, the expert builder, has the contract.
    W. H. Stewart of the Earl Fruit Co. last week finished shipping 15 carloads of Bartlett pears from the orchards where they [were] purchased, near Medford and Phoenix. The fruit netted the growers $1 per box.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 2, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    It is stated that about 200,000 bushels of wheat are stored in the warehouses at Medford, which is about equally divided between the two.
    At a meeting of citizens held last week it was decided to take steps toward raising a fund of $5000 to secure the establishment there of an academy under Presbyterian direction.
    Medford's new sewer system was built by the Western Clay Company of Portland. The work was begun a short time ago, and the trenches completed last week. While the system is not extensive, it will relieve the most thickly settled portions of the city, and is so arranged that it will form the main line for future additions.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 2, 1899, page 3


    There is an examination today before the Supreme Court of candidates for admission to the bar from one o'clock to five. Following persons appeared to be admitted to practice in the courts of Oregon: Lynden C. Narregan, Medford. . . .

"Before the Court," The Daily Journal, Salem, October 3, 1899, page 4



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Rev. W. B. Moore, who was formerly stationed at Jacksonville, will be in charge of the M.E. Church in Medford during the coming year.
    Rev. J. L. Jones, lately of Dallas, who was in charge of the M.E. Church, South, here for a few years, has been paying Medford a short visit. He has been transferred to Los Angeles, Calif., and is on his way to that city.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 5, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    C. C. Coleman left for San Francisco this week, but will return soon. He is shipping hogs as well as wheat.
    S. Danielswicz, deputy supreme councilor of the Order of Pendo, this week organized a council here, with a fair-sized membership.
    W. K. Davis, who has secured employment in a sawmill at Crescent City, Calif., has been joined by his family.
    Ed. Pottenger, who has been spending several weeks in San Francisco and Stockton, Calif., returned Monday evening, well pleased with his trip.
    We are sorry to learn that Willie Dunn, for a number of years in the employ of the S.P. Co. as telegrapher and station agent, is lying dangerously ill with consumption at the residence of Mrs. Whiteside.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 12, 1899, page 2


    John Cox has traded his farm near Medford to his father, Rufus Cox, for the latter's interest in a big stock ranch in Klamath County.
    R. T. Blackwood, the efficient road supervisor of Medford, has sixteen teams and quite a force of men engaged in graveling the roads between Phoenix and Medford.
    The Times is glad to announce that the firm of White & Jacobs, doing business at Medford, has effected a settlement with its creditors and will resume business at an early day.

    W. F. Wilkinson of Big Butte spent yesterday in Jacksonville, trading with our merchants. He reports that there is a great deal of travel on the Rogue River road this year--much more than ever before, to say nothing of the business that is made by the big steam lumber outfit Proudfoot, Pierce & Co. are operating between Skookum Prairie and Medford.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 12, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
J. H. Wilson to W. B. Roberts, 139.17 acres southwest of Medford . . . 4500.00
W. B. Roberts to J. H. Wilson, property in Medford . . . 2500.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 12, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    E. A. Carter of Ashland, the well-known schemer, was with us Friday.
    F. M. Stewart is again local reporter for the Mail, vice Earl Van Antwerp. He is the right man in the right place.
    Another switch is being put in by the S.P. Co. to meet the increased business at this point. A new railroad depot will be built in the near future.
    A. C. Nicholson, the expert contractor and builder, spends considerable of his time at Jacksonville, having the contract to build a fine residence for T. J. Kenney.
    W. S. Conklin and wife, who went to Idaho a few months ago, have returned to permanently locate. The former's health has been quite poorly since he left our town.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1899, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
Mattie E. Rhoads to Jabez Rhoads, lot 9, blk 52, Medford . . . 500.00
Sarah A. White to R. H. Halley, property in Medford . . . 500.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1899, page 2


    The firm of White & Jacobs has been dissolved, L. L. Jacobs retiring. Mr. W. has not definitely decided what his plans for the future will be.
    Latest styles, best goods and reasonable prices always found at J. E. Bodge's tailoring establishment in Medford. You can't overlook him if you wish stylish, serviceable clothing.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ernest Langley will soon commence laying the pipes for the Gold Hill water works.
    Miss Gertrude Sutton, of our public schools, spent last Sunday with her parents in Ashland.
    F. V. Medynski, who has been absent about two years in Alaska, is expected to arrive home soon.
    Joe Shone has gone to Yreka, where he will open a furniture store. His family is still here, but will leave soon.
    Miss Mollie Ober, who formerly resided in Medford, now has a position with the Sunset Telephone Co. at Sacramento, Cal.
    The fourth crop of alfalfa is being cut on the farm of I. W. Thomas near Medford. Although this is rather unusual, the yield of the last crop is heavy.
    Mrs. M. A. Williams has sold her interest in the old J. G. Van Dyke homestead to Samuel Van Dyke, who is now in complete possession of the property.
    Three trail wagons loaded with 21,000 feet of lumber were brought to Medford from the Proudfoot sawmill near Prospect a few days ago. They were hauled by the traction engine, which had not the least difficulty in pulling the wagons with their heavy loads.
    J. H. Wilson and W. H. Roberts have exchanged properties, the former trading his ranch near Medford for the building and lot of Mr. Roberts opposite the post office, and also a cash consideration. It is understood that Mr. Wilson will personally conduct the farm which he thus secured.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 19, 1899, page 2


    Dr. E. Kirchgessner is erecting a fine residence on the property he recently purchased.

"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 19, 1899, page 2


    An event in the social life of Jacksonville which has not been heretofore mentioned in The Times--its overlooking being wholly accidental, however--occurred on Sunday, the 8th inst., at the residence of Chas. Carney, when his daughter, Miss Anna, was united in marriage to E. A. Hicks of Medford, Rev. J. S. McCain performing the ceremony. A limited number of friends were present to witness the wedding and extend their sincere congratulations to the happy couple. After the wedding dinner Mr. and Mrs. Hicks went immediately to Medford, their future home, where the groom is one of the most prosperous and promising young business men of the community. The bride has for some years been numbered among Jacksonville's most popular and accomplished young ladies, and with her husband will be welcomed to any community. The Times joins with the host of friends in extending congratulations and best wishes.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 19, 1899, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. H. Chessmore of the Eye, who has been visiting in Kansas, returned last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Webb, the widely known and popular singing evangelists of the Christian Church, visited with Rev. and Mrs. O. J. Gist in Medford last week.
    Chas. Silvers and family have arrived from Klamath County and will make Medford their future home, in order to allow the children to avail themselves of school advantages.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1899, page 2


    Miss Gertie Sutton, the popular Medford school teacher, spent Sunday in Ashland, visiting her parents.
    Hon. H. K. Hanna performed the ceremony which united in marriage Moses Glidden, a prominent citizen of Siskiyou County, Calif., and Miss Elizabeth B. Powers, formerly a resident of Medford.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
Chas. Winters to Anna Jeffrey, lots 7 and 8, blk 22, Medford . . . 1.00
Amanda A. Kellogg to J. S. Howard, property in Medford . . . 180.00

Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1899, page 3


    If anyone should imagine that Medford is doing no business these days, the hallucination should be expelled by the appearance around the depot these days. Tuesday, 37 loaded cars stood on the track with goods, lumber, wood, etc. for disbursement. Four carloads of hogs and eight carloads of cattle are now waiting cars for shipping, and our draymen are as busy as bees.
    The firm of Wolters & Howard, the grocerymen, is being dissolved, and an invoice of the goods taken this week Mr. Wolters has sold his interest in the business to Mrs. Fellows, mother of Mrs. H. H. Howard, who will be associated with Mr. Howard in the business. The store will be conducted hereafter under the name of H. H. Howard & Co. Mr. Wolters has not as yet disclosed his intentions for the future, but it is presumed that he will again enter business here.
"Personal and Social," Southern Oregon Eye, Medford, October 26, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
J. F. Tryer to E. W. Tryer, lot 12, blk 40, Medford . . . 50.00
Portland Trust Co. to H. Pohlman, lt 5 and w ½ blk 6, Orchard Home . . . 700.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 26, 1899, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    F. V. Medynski, who has been in Alaska for some time past, returned to home last week. He expects to go back to the frozen north.
    A report that there is a case of smallpox in Medford has been circulated in other towns. There is absolutely no foundation to it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 26, 1899, page 3



    GROSSMAN.--At Soldiers' Home, Santa Monica, Cal., Comrade J. G. Grossman, Co. F, 134th Pa., and Co. I, 78th Pa. He was a member of Chester A. Arthur Post 47, Department of Oregon, Medford, Ore.
"Mustered Out," The National Tribune, Washington, D.C., October 26, 1899, page 5


    Hon. J. A. Jeffrey has retired from the Salem law firm of Bonham, Jeffrey & Martin.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
J. F. Tryer to Harriet B. Tryer, lot 11, block 40, Medford . . . 150.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1899, page 3


    Miss Pearl Webb left today for her home in Medford, Oregon. Miss Webb has been a guest of L. H. Webb and family and Mr. and Mrs. Camburn I. Webb for the past three months and has won many friends during her visit here.
"University Place," Des Moines Daily News, Iowa, October 31, 1899, page 2



REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
Jas. Carr to Mary E. Roberts, 5 acres in Medford precinct . . . 500.00
Walter Anderson to Annie M. Arnold, lot 5 and 6, block 18, Medford . . . 450.00
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 2, 1899, page 2


    G. C. Culy, Joe Russell and others on Tuesday drove 180 head of fine cattle, purchased of the first-named gentleman, through town. They were delivered to J. C. Mitchell, the California buyer, at Medford.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 2, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ralph Woodford is officiating as night clerk at Hotel Nash and filling the bill acceptably.
    Mrs. E. Cochran and her granddaughter, Mrs. Anna Carney Hicks, spent Friday in Jacksonville.
    Our town has been full of Indians during the past week, who have been buying a large quantity of supplies.
    Miss Myrtle Woodford, who has been a resident of Portland during the past year, returned home last Saturday.
    Mrs. Arthur Nicholson is visiting at Jacksonville, where her husband is building a handsome residence for T. J. Kenney.
    J. H. Ray and family, lately of Oakland, Or., have become residents of Medford. Simon Caro and family are occupying their residence in Oakland.
    There is every probability that we will have a fine, new railroad depot in the near future. The S.P. Co.'s superintendent of depot construction was in Medford lately, looking over the ground.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 2, 1899, page 3


    John Bohl has taken charge of the Jesse Wilson farm, situated about a mile southwest of Medford, which he has bonded from W. B. Roberts for a large sum.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Ora Adkins has gone to southern California to spend the winter for the benefit of her health.
    W. L. Edmonson and wife of Big Butte were in Medford Friday. They have disposed of their land in that section.
    Rev. A. S. Foster, the Presbyterian minister, who is now stationed at Myrtle Point, Coos County, is paying his family a visit.
    C. E. Smith, formerly clerk at Hotel Nash, is holding a like position at Hotel Layton in Grants Pass. He will doubtless give satisfaction, as he understands the business thoroughly.
    Frank Van Dyke and Robt. Faucett, formerly of Medford, have become ministers of the gospel. Both have started for India, to serve as missionaries, the former for Singapore and the latter for Lucknow.
    The introduction of the sewer system in Medford has been so successful that there is already a demand for an extension. In accordance with a petition by property owners, the council ordered a sewer constructed from D Street to the main on A Street, and the contract has been awarded to C. W. Huggins of Portland. A 10-inch pipe will be laid at an expense of 80 cents per foot. With this addition the main part of the business portion of the city is well provided with sewerage.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1899, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
Emma F. Hall to G. W. Isaacs, lot 47, blk 21, Medford
Carrie Orton to Sherman Orton, lots 6, 7 and 8, blk 1, Park add. to Medford

M. F. and Louisa R. Parker, to Sarah Richards, property in Mingus' subdivision, adjoining Medford

R. H. Toft to J. F. L. Chandler, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, blk 39, Medford

Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 9, 1899, page 2


    With the removal of the depot from the center of Seventh Street comes the news of the possible and very probable erection of at least three or four brick blocks on West Seventh Street. Merchant D. H. Miller owns a couple of lots on the northeast corner of the block in which is situated the Presbyterian Church, and upon these it is reported he will build a two-story brick block. The corner lots opposite him, in the block east, are owned by I. W. Thomas, and the same rumor says he, too, will build a brick block. T. H. Moore, who owns the [Clarendon] hotel corner, intends building, as was stated last week. On the opposite side of the street Dr. G. B. Cole owns a lot, and he is getting into a notion of building, as is also tailor J. E. Bodge, who owns a lot on that side of the street. Understand, The Mail is not giving this item out as positively an assured fact, but that all these buildings are contemplated was told us this week.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, November 10, 1899   Miller, Cole and Bodge did not build. Moore would not build for another six years, Thomas for another eight.


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    We are glad to learn that B. S. Baker has become a resident of Medford.
    Geo. W. Priddy, the expert brickmason, has been doing considerable work in his line at the county seat.
    Robt. B. Reame and Ross Sutton spent several days in Jacksonville and on Applegate during the week, advertising the business of H. C. Mackey, southern Oregon's popular photographer.
    W. F. Williamson, the attorney and school teacher, who traded his land near Medford for property in Clinton, Mo., and a farm near that city, will leave this week for his new home. His many friends wish him success wherever he may go.
    "Renus" Hamilton and Robt. Wilcox were arrested last Tuesday, charged with robbing a one-legged man named Phipps, in the rear of a saloon, of about $50 early that morning. It seems that all the parties were more or less intoxicated. The accused men claim that they took the money for safekeeping, and tendered it to Phipps before the examination took place. Justice Stewart thought otherwise however, and held them to answer to the next grand jury. They furnished the required bonds.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 16, 1899, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Tom Merriman, the clever young blacksmith, was at the county seat one night last week on peculiarly interesting business.
    Frank Hull is employed at the Medford photograph gallery and making excellent headway. He will become one of the principal artists someday.
    There was an alarm of fire Sunday evening, caused by the antics of a gasoline lamp in the Turf Exchange Saloon. The fire department responded promptly, but its services were not required as the lamp was carried into the street and all danger averted.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 20, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Four carloads of hogs were shipped from here to 'Frisco recently by L. C. Coleman.
    Brace Skeel has gone to Salem to accept a position with the electric light company there.
    F. J. Wait, who recently went to Astoria to reside, was in Medford for a few days last week.
    Frank Zell went to Leland this week, where he will engage in mining during the present season.
    Prof. W. A. Snow, the director of our band, has gone to San Francisco, where he has secured a good position.
    Chas. W. Wolters is acting as salesman at the mercantile establishment of White, Harbaugh & Co., a position he is well qualified to fill.
    A. F. Nelson, one of the leading mining men of Josephine County, spent Monday in Medford. Some are beginning to wonder what his visits mean.
    Frank Wait has returned from east of the mountains, where he delivered a large quantity of handsome marble work his agent took orders for some time ago.
    The concert given by our band last Thursday evening was a successful one in every way. The boys showed a great deal of improvement, and rendered several difficult selections quite acceptably.
    H. B. Myer has purchased the building occupied as a restaurant by Sid Cole, and will fit up part of it for a jewelry store. W. H. McGowan, who has a crockery store on the west side of town, will occupy the balance.
    Mrs. Gregory, wife of our school superintendent, who has been visiting at her old home in Nebraska for eight months past, returned last week accompanied by her father, S. R. Foss, who will remain here until spring.
    Prof. Paine's orchestra, which is one of the best in southern Oregon, is prepared to furnish music of the latest and finest quality. It is practicing regularly, preparatory to filling a number of engagements during the holidays.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 23, 1899, page 2


    Rev. J. S. McCain of Medford has published a book entitled "Manual of Christian Brotherhood" as an aid to his intention to bring into effect an organization embracing all churches in one general society. Rev. McCain is quite enthusiastic over this work and will soon be in the field organizing the societies.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 23, 1899, page 3



    G. F. Palm left Wednesday night for Medford, Oregon, for an extended visit with his brother.
"People We Know," Coshocton Age, Ohio, November 24, 1899, page 8


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Thos. Collins of the Turf Exchange and Mr. Silvers spent Saturday in Jacksonville.
    Wm. Simpson of Montague, Calif., a former resident of Medford, is paying our town a visit.
    Wm. Ennis has returned from Happy Camp, Calif., after an absence of several years. He has sold his saloon there, and is looking for a location.
    Sherman Orton has resigned his position as cook at Hotel Nash, and will leave for Salt Lake City before long. He spent several days at Grants Pass last week.
    F. M. Poe, a respected citizen of our town and a veteran of the Civil War, was found dead in his bed one day last week. He had been afflicted with heart disease for some time.
    J. D. Whitman of Medford, who has made several experiments in the hope of discovering a method by which Klamath County fish can be preserved for marketing, has sent 25 barrels to Lost River, and next spring will try again. He now proposes to skin the fish, remove the bones and salt the meat. We hope that he will meet with success, as quite an industry can be established in that event.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 27, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    D. H. Barneburg and wife will spend Thanksgiving Day with the latter's parents, who reside in Jacksonville.
    Mrs. Hattie Stevens is filling the position as chief cook at the Old Channel mine in Josephine County.
    Frank Zell, the miner, who has resided in Medford for some time, left for Leland last week. He has since gone to Prineville, Crook County.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 27, 1899, page 3


    A party of Medford men passed through Ashland yesterday morning on the way to locate timber land claims. The men's destination was a point near the Topsy grade, in ranges 7 and 8, south of Keno and west of Snow, just inside the Lakeview land district. Following named were members of the party: T. J. Beckett, Doc. Cole, A. D. Naylor, A. T. Drisko, Harry Stewart, D. R. Andrus, Wm. Forsyth, G. Shell, A. M. Woodford, N. G. Bates, C. O. Ramsey S. R. Reeves and ---- Orser.
Ashland Daily Tidings,
November 27, 1899


    Jas. E. Hamilton, of Brooks, left today for Medford, to visit his sister, Miss Blanche Hamilton, who is quite ill.

"Personal Movements," The Daily Journal, Salem, November 28, 1899, page 4



    Dr. G. W. Stephenson, of Lakeview, Ore., has moved to Medford, Oregon.
"Personal," Medical Sentinel, December 1899, page 570


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. H. Chessmore has purchased the interest of his pardner, O. B. Allen, in the S. O. Eye.
    The many friends of F. M. Plymale will regret to learn that he is still in very poor health.
    Attorney J. R. Cunnyngham, who formerly lived here, now of Portland, arrived Wednesday evening for a two-weeks' visit with friends.
    White & Harbaugh are meeting with success in handling the celebrated White sewing machines and recently received a large consignment.
    Schermerhorn, the second-goods dealer at Medford, claims the record for stove-selling for the present season, having disposed of a very large number.
    Last week a party composed of S. R. Reeves, Dr. Cole, T. J. Beckett, Dolph Naylor, Perry Stewart, A. T. Drisko, G. L. Schermerhorn, D. R. Andrus, Wm. Forsyth, A. M. Woodford, Grant Shell, Nate Bates, C. O. Ramsey and Ned Orser started to Klamath County to locate timber claims in ranges 7 and 8.
    Attorney W. H. Parker, who is preparing an index to the Oregon statutes, will soon have the work completed and ready to be placed on the market. It is regarded by those who have examined it as a work of great merit. The present index is so imperfect and badly managed that it has always been a source of perplexity and annoyance even to lawyers.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 4, 1899, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Mail and Semi-Weekly Times have changed foremen, Mr. Hill going to Jacksonville and Mr. Roach coming to Medford.
    Wm. Ennis left for Grants Pass Saturday, accompanied by his wife. He will be employed at the Brewery Saloon in that city.
    W. H. Parker has been at Portland on business connected with the work he is about to issue. and which is gaining much favor with the legal profession.
    One of the largest and finest lines of articles suitable for Christmas presents ever brought to southern Oregon is being displayed at Elwood's.
    Wm. Merriman, who got his start in Medford, and who has been in charge of the S.P. railroad station at Junction City for some time, was recently promoted, and is now located at McMinnville.
    Miss Iva Purdin writes that she arrived safely at Kemmer, Wyo., and will at once take charge of a school in that district. We expect her to steadily increase the success which has already attended her as an educator.
    O. B. Allen, late of the Eye, has purchased the plant of the defunct Ashland Advertiser, and will at once commence the publication of a weekly newspaper. He has the best wishes of a large circle of friends.
    The old Clarenden Hotel property, on the west side of the track, was sold by the sheriff at Jacksonville Saturday, under foreclosure of the mortgage on it. It was bid in for Frank H. Ray of New York at $665. It is said that an interesting legal controversy over the property is likely to arise.
    The many friends of W. S. Dunn (formerly telegrapher and assistant agent at the railroad depot in Medford) will be pained to hear of his death, which occurred at the residence of his mother in Salem last Saturday. He fell a victim to that greatest enemy of mankind, consumption. Will. was a bright, promising young man, endowed with sterling qualities and highly esteemed by all who knew him. He leaves a widow (nee Miss Annie Helms of Jacksonville) and other relatives to mourn his untimely death. The funeral took place Monday at Salem under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias, of which order he was a member.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 11, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The largest and best selection of toys and notions ever brought to Medford at the new store of G. A. Gurnea.
    Some miscreant on Tuesday night pelted the rear of the overland train with rocks and broke some of the windows of the sleeping cars, besides doing other damage. It is believed that he is the same party who bombarded a freight train in the same manner.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 14, 1899, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    There was a game of football at Medford Tuesday, between the local and Eagle Point teams, which proved quite interesting. Our boys won easily.
    H. Tilson Smith, a veteran of the Civil War, who has been suffering with epilepsy for many years, died at his residence in this city last Friday. He had just finished eating dinner when he was attacked with his malady, and died soon afterward.
    The following number of carloads of freight have been shipped from this point in the past year, and 100 to 200 are still in reserve: Grain, 103; four, 25; millstuff, 14; livestock, 50; hay, 20; fruit, 91; ice, 13; general merchandise, including lime, brick, lumber, etc., 88, making 404 in all.
    Mr. Smith, the clever representative of the Western Clay Co., which has been constructing our sewer system, left for his home in Portland Tuesday to spend the holidays. He will go to Grants Pass about the first of the year, to supply that city with sewerage, which will occupy his attention for at least two months. Mr. Smith is a pleasant gentleman and made many friends while here.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 21, 1899, page 3


    The trustees of the Medford Presbyterian Church have purchased a parsonage at a cost of $1500.

The Daily Journal, Salem, December 22, 1899, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Anna Carney Hicks, who has been visiting with her parents, who reside near Jacksonville, has returned home much improved in health.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 28, 1899, page 1




Last revised May 28, 2014
For more complete names of persons identified by initials, see the Index.