HOME


The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Paving Medford Streets

There's always something else that has to be done first. Refer also to the page on Medford Streets.

MEDFORD PREPARING TO PAVE
Southern Pacific Agrees to Assist City in Enterprise.
    MEDFORD, Or., Dec. 12.--(Special.)--At a special meeting, held this afternoon, the City Council ordered cast iron pipe for the distributing laterals of the water system, the pipe to be laid at once to enable the work of paving of Seventh Street, Medford's main thoroughfare, to begin at an early date. The Southern Pacific Company at the same meeting agreed to pave the entire distance of its holdings at a cost of $15,000. The City Recorder has made a call for sale of bonds on January 10, to the amount of $25,000.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 13, 1907, page 5


Have To Move Poles.
    The city engineer is after the telephone and electric companies with his "big stick," and as a consequence the companies will commence within a very short time to remove all of their poles in Seventh Street and other unimproved streets so that they will not stand in the gutter and obstruct the flow of storm water. The poles are to be reset inside of the curbing. At present the poles are in the gutter, and aside from the fact that they do not add anything to the beauty of the street, they are the cause of obstruction of the gutters, which is a serious matter after a heavy rain storm. At present a glance up or down Seventh Street shows the poles in a very irregular line. When they are placed inside of the curbing and in a straight line they will look some better at any rate. The reason that the engineer took up the matter is that Seventh Street is soon to be paved, and the poles must be out of the way prior to that work. The companies have both signified their intention to move the poles as soon as they can do so.
Medford Mail, April 24, 1908, page 1


ROAD NEARING COMPLETION
    It will not be a great while until the city will be in a position to place crushed rock from their quarry on the other side of Jacksonville upon the streets of Medford. The grading of the spur line from the terminus of the Rogue Rive Railroad Company's tracks has been almost completed, and all that remains to be done is the ordering of the materials for the track. President Barnum of the road will leave some time during the present week for Portland, where he will purchase the rails and other material.
    About ten days ago the city engineer left for Jacksonville to survey the route for the spur, and the work has been rushed since so that the grade and embankment is nearly completed. A large force of men have been doing the grading, and the watchword was "rush."
    S. Sandry is to have charge of the quarry for the city, and he will begin the work of opening the quarry within a short time. There is considerable development work to be done before the proper quality of rock is available. The development work will be finished, however, by the time the track is laid and the cars obtained for the hauling of the rock.
    It is probable that the first crushed rock brought to Medford will be used on Seventh Street prior to making that street ready for pavement.
Medford Mail, March 22, 1908, page 1

Warren Construction Company
A Warren Construction Co. pavement medallion, circa 1915, on display
at the National Museum of American History, Washington, D.C.

Street Work Begun.
(From Thursday's Daily)
    Today a start will be made towards the improving of Seventh Street, when the Medford Cement Company will put on a force of men to put in the cement curbing on the street. The Medford Cement Company is to handle all of the cement work, a contract having been let to them by the Warren Construction Company, which holds the contract for the paving of Seventh Street.
    There is probably no public improvement contemplated by this city which is of greater interest to the citizens of Medford than this one. For many months has the paving of the street been discussed. Each successive step from the day the matter was first agitated has been closely watched. During the spring there was nothing more discussed than the paving of Seventh Street. Therefore the news that the work is actually to start will prove a source of much gratification to many.
    Yesterday the work of laying the steel on the spur line from Jacksonville to the city's quarry was begun. It is thought that the work will be completed within four days, as all of the timber is laid, and all that remains to be done is the spiking of the rails and the ballasting of the roadbed. It is from this quarry that the crushed rock for the work on Seventh Street is to be obtained.
    The city engineer is at the present time having the two rock crushers of the city overhauled. These will be installed as soon as possible, and then the rock will be available.
    Within a few months the main streets of this city will be covered with a bitulithic pavement, and it is well.
Medford Mail, July 10, 1908, page 5


CITY ENGINEER BUSY.
    All street work and other city improvements are being pushed along as fast as it is possible to do so. Engineer Osgood is as busy as a whole covey of bird dogs. He is in about 17 different places at one time, setting grade stakes and establishing grades.
    The Jacobsen-Bade Company is at work on the sewer in district six.
    The Seventh Street curbing is about completed, and this little job itself keeps Mr. Osgood busy dodging epithets not altogether complimentary, which are hurled at him by those property owners whose sidewalks do not conform to curb levels.
    Then there are the crushed rock bunkers to be built. These the Southern Pacific officials, when here a few days ago, gave permission to have built between the Medford-Jacksonville railroad track and the Iowa Lumber & Box Company's retail sheds, near Sixth Street. These bunkers will be put in at a height sufficient to permit a carload of rock to be pushed up and dumped into them, and also permit the rock to again be dumped into wagons to be hauled to the to-be-paved streets. Now, don't laugh or crack any jokes right here, because Mr. Osgood has said that this incline will be of sufficient length to permit the Medford-Jacksonville short line engine to push a car up it without taking a run and a jump.
    Mr. Chitman, who is the cement street man here, has said that within fifteen days from the time the paving work proper is started it will be completed. Pedestrians and horses traveling Seventh Street have all gotten pretty well in the habit of jumping chasms, and a little further inconvenience will not be noticeable.
Medford Mail, August 14, 1908, page 1    The bunkers may not have been built near the Iowa Box Co., due to objections over having the crushers' steam engines so close to the lumber piles.


    The putting in of the curbing for the Seventh Street paving is nearly all in, and many of the sidewalks have been extended to their full width of 14 feet.
    The paving of this street is expected to start in about 10 days. In this work several colored men will be employed, and the reason for this is that the material used must be applied while hot, and the colored man is the lad upon whom this intense heat has but little effect.
"Improvements Are Many," Medford Mail, August 14, 1908, page 4


MR. HAFER OBJECTS.
    We all have our troubles--and then some of us have more troubles--but it is up to the Medford councilmen to have the most troubles. This body of men haven't gotten "squared away" on city water matters yet; as a matter of fact, they are not fairly started, but here comes another brew of trouble. However, there is some little satisfaction in variety--and the councilmen have all kinds.
    Yesterday morning engineer Osgood brought a gang of city workmen over from the quarries at Jacksonville and was making ready to put them to work erecting the rock bins in which it was intended to dump the crushed rock when biff! went something, and there wasn't a thing doing.
    The bins were to have been put in on the Southern Pacific right of way, near the Iowa Lumber Company's lumber yard [northeast corner Sixth and Fir], and near the stock yards [northwest corner Fifth and Evergreen]. Permission had been secured from the Southern Pacific for this purpose, but manager Hafer, who is also a councilman, interposed objections, alleging that the dust from this crushed rock would injure his lumber, and the sparks from the engine pushing the cars up the incline to these bins would endanger his company's lumber and buildings. Some telegraph messages passed between Mr. Hafer and superintendent Fields in Portland--and it terminated in Mr. Fields' asking the councilmen to look elsewhere for their bin site--and then it is said there was an exchange of courtesies between Mr. Hafer and other members of the council which were more emphatic than complimentary, and the councilmen started out to find--another bin site--which they didn't find by a ding sight, or by any other site.
    They endeavored to figure out, with the assistance of engineer Osgood, whether or not these bins could be put in south of the Barnum depot
[northwest corner Sixth and Evergreen]. Here they encountered Mr. Osenbrugge's machinery shed [southeast corner Sixth and Fir], and it would be necessary to crop off about 30 feet of the west [?] end of this building, and this cropping process would set the taxpayers back $250 a crop--this The Morning Mail understands was the price paid on the damage to Mr. Osenbrugge by Mr. Hafer.
    Other persons farther down the line interposed objections to putting in the track and bins here because that they would narrow the street too much, which was already too narrow for use in their business. And that is where the matter of paving Seventh Street stood at 6 o'clock last night.
    The work on this street could begin within ten days from now, but it is right here blocked because that no site for the track and rock bins can be found. My, but we are having an awful time at our house--and the improvements go ahead with a velocity calculated to make one forget where he's at--or if he's anywhere.
    Dr. Ray has offered to sell a tract of land out west of the city for the use of this track and bins at $500 per acre, but it would be a big expense hauling the rock to town from this point.
Medford Mail, September 11, 1908, page 1



WORK NIGHT AND DAY.
Official of the Warren Bros. Paving Company in Medford Yesterday.
    W. B. Warren, the vice-president of the paving firm of Warren Bros. company, of Boston, was in Medford yesterday looking after matters in connection with the paving of Seventh and cross streets. The real work of putting in the paving is done by the Warren Construction Company, with headquarters in Portland, but the Warren Bros. supervise all the work and look after the financial part.
    In conversation with a Morning Mail reporter Mr. Warren stated that the plant was now on the way here from Vancouver, Wash., and that it would be here in about one week from now. In the meantime the other work will be rushed. Electric lights will be put in where the rock crushing work will be done, so that operations can go on at night as well as in the daytime.
Medford Mail, October 16, 1908, page 1


WILL START TODAY.
Rain or Shine, the Paving Work Will Start Today.
    Had there not more rain fallen Sunday night work on the street excavation, preparatory to putting down pavement, would have been commenced yesterday. However, the work, we understand, will commence this morning, rain or shine.
    The work will start at the west end of the proposed street improvements. The paving plant proper is not here yet, but the excavating will no longer be delayed.
Medford Mail, October 23, 1908, page 2

   

    Several more carloads of machinery for the street paving plant arrived yesterday. Several teams and 20 or more men are now at work excavating out near the west school building, and actual paving work will commence next week.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, October 29, 1908, page 2


READY TO COMMENCE.
The Paving Plant Is Now Ready To Begin Work.
    The street paving plant, or rather the plant for preparing the material for street paving, is now practically in readiness to commence operations, and by tomorrow the actual work is expected to commence. The rock bunkers are completed, the switch leading to them is in, and yesterday the first load of crushed rock was dumped into the bunkers.
    The work of excavating on the street is being pushed with all possible vigor. Great quantities of crushed rock is being hauled onto the excavated and rolled portion of the streets, and if this good weather continues it will not be many days until a portion, at least, of the pavement is down and in use.

Medford Mail, November 5, 1908, page 1


    Mr. Barnum has the connections made with his main line and was yesterday laying the iron on the spur track at the rock bunkers in West Medford.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, November 5, 1908, page 2


    Aside from the new water system the most important improvement going on in Medford at present is the bitulithic paving of the streets by the Warren Construction Company. On West Seventh Street, where the company have a large crew of men at work at present, it presents a busy scene, and is the chief attraction for the crowds daily passing to and fro along that popular thoroughfare. The company are doing excellent work and are putting in a good paving product that will undoubtedly give excellent satisfaction for years to come. Up to last night they had completed the first course of the block lying between I and J streets, and had the entire block laid over with crushed rock. It necessitates running day and night crews on the rock-crushing plant in order to keep up with the paving work, which will be continued today and every Sunday in order to push the work to as steady completion as possible.
"Medford the Beautiful," Medford Mail, November 13, 1908, page 2



    Street paving work took a rest yesterday, owing to the fact that the supply of fine rock for use in the top dressing was temporarily exhausted.
    The contractors have had all kinds of hard luck in getting out rock at the quarry. The opening of a new quarry is always a slow and tedious job, and not even at this time has the company gotten it in shape so that sufficient room is given for both crushers to work advantageously. Another cause of delay was the breaking of one of the crushers. This, however, is now at work, and with the two crushers working night and day it is expected there will be but little delay in the progress of the work--if the weather keeps good.
    Workmen are busy putting in the water connections on Central Avenue before the paving starts on that street.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, November 13, 1908, page 5


    Mr. Barnum is putting in a new sidetrack in the railroad yards here for use in handling rock cars.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, November 20, 1908, page 2


HIGH-CLASS PAVING.
Some of the Rock Used for Paving the Streets Contains Gold.
    Paving the streets with gold-bearing rock! Now, what do you know about that? But that is just what is being done in Medford right now.
    Of course it isn't $100 rock or anything like that, but there is gold in it, just the same.
    A few days ago some of the employees of the paving company "panned" some of the fine rock which is used for the pavement, and in every pan they found several colors--three or four to the pan.

Medford Mail,
November 27, 1908, page 3

Hillsboro, Oregon 1908
A street roller in Hillsboro, Oregon in 1908.

THE MACHINE WAS SOBER.
But the Engineer of the Street Roller Was Very Much Otherwise.
    People watching the work of the street paving yesterday afternoon were at a loss to understand the peculiar actions of the street roller. First it would head toward one side of the street and then make a dash in the opposite direction. Finally it failed to make the turn quick enough and ran into the curb.
    The manager of the work soon discovered that what was wrong was with the engineer of the machine, and assisted him out in quick shape before any more damage was done. A sober engineer was brought from the rock-crushing plant until another one could be got here from Portland.
Medford Mail, December 11, 1908, page 1


PROGRESS OF PAVING.
Work Completed Down Street to Railroad Tracks.
    Well, what do you think of this? Seventh Street is paved from the West Side School to the railroad track--and the weather continues good, and because of this fact the work will continue.
    Yesterday was a bumper day with the street paving gang. Every man on the job, from Mr. Chipman down to "Jimmie" with coal oil sack, buckled down to business, and a good-sized chunk of muddy street was transformed into a seemingly good, solid pavement. West Seventh Street was cement-tied to Barnum's railroad track, and that was what the company has been hoping to be able to do--and the weather has acted splendidly.
    This morning the gang will commence doing business on the east side of the track and will continue right on east to the Bear Creek bridge if the weather keeps good. Then if the weather continues good, the gang will back up and put in the pavement across the railroad track. There is a lot of puttering work around the four tracks, and the company did not want to consume all this fine weather on such slow work.
    There are some bad spots in the pavement put down during the last couple of days, caused by the earth underneath being soft, but these the company says will be taken out and replaced with a more substantial article.
Medford Mail, December 11, 1908, page 1


AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT.
    R. W. Jones was driving an automobile down 7th Street Sunday and when about opposite the Hotel Moore he attempted to make a short turn, but evidently he misjudged his speed, for instead of clearing the walk he struck the curb and a telephone pole at the same time, smashing a spring and lamp and otherwise breaking the front of his machine. He was able to get away after some slight repairs. He will probably learn not to travel so fast on paved streets.
Medford Mail, December 11, 1908, page 5


Paving Matters.
    The Warren Construction Company have a sufficient amount of crushed rock now on hand and in Medford to complete their present paving contract, which consists of about three blocks on Main Street and one block north and south from Main on Central Avenue.
    Paving is contemplated on a number of other streets, and if the people living on these streets expect to petition to have this work done next season they should prepare and circulate the petitions at once, so the city council can act upon them at an early meeting.
    There is talk of paving Oakdale Avenue and J Street, West Seventh Street and north and south on Central Avenue.
Medford Mail, January 29, 1909, page 2


CONNECT WITH MAINS
    I. L. Hamilton will have a force of men laying the cast-iron pipe to connect the reservoir of the new gravity water system with the city distributing system at Riverside Avenue in a week or ten days, and the work will be rushed to completion.
    It had been contemplated to have this work done later, when Bear Creek had receded. The reason that the work is undertaken now is the fact that the contractors wish to accommodate the residents of East Main Street, which is to be paved, and by doing this work early, it will give ample time for the ground to settle before the paving is put down.
Excerpt, Medford Mail, March 26, 1909, page 1


    The Medford Cement Company yesterday commenced the work of putting in cement curbing on South Central Avenue, between Main and Eighth streets. As soon as this curbing is in and set the Warren Construction Company expect to resume paving operations. The company have of their unfinished contract yet to do two blocks on Central Avenue, one and a half blocks on East Main Street and one block on West Main.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, March 26, 1909, page 2


PAVING RESUMED
Work on Main Street Has Again Been Put in Motion
    Street paving operations were resumed in this city Monday. Such work on Main Street and on Central Avenue as was delayed by stormy weather and other circumstances will be taken up with renewed vigor, and the Warren Construction Company, which has the work in charge, expects to finish the paving already contracted for as soon as conditions will permit. Only the lack of the necessary labor or an unexpected change in weather conditions will prevent the company from putting the streets in fine condition in record time.
Excerpt, Medford Mail, April 16, 1909, page 1


    Last week a goodly number of the citizens living in East Medford, becoming disgusted with the wretched condition of some of the streets on the north side of Main, hired, at their own expense, teams and men and set them to work smoothing up and grading so that now they have some of the best roads adjoining the city, for which said citizens deserve much credit.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, April 16, 1909, page 2


MANY MEN EMPLOYED
Public and Private Work Gives Work for a Little Army
    That Medford is an exceedingly busy town and growing, as becomes it as the metropolis of Rogue River Valley, is proven by the great extent of work, both public and individual, that is being done this spring.
    As one instance of the hustle of this busy little city is the fact that there were 78 men by actual count at work on Oakdale Avenue Friday, and 76 men yesterday. These men embraced crews that were employed in laying cement sidewalk, cement curbing, laying sewer connections, putting in water connections, the city engineer's force and the men stringing the new cable for the improvement to the telephone system of that part of the city. All this work is to prepare the street for bitulithic paving, which will be put down within the next two weeks.
    In several other parts of the city are crews of men engaged in putting down cement sidewalks and cement curbs, making water and sewer connections, extending water mains and sewers and in making other public improvements. And to add to this list of workers is the 50 men that the Warren Construction Company has in its street-paving crew.
    And Medford's growth is only begun, and it will continue, steady and permanent, until this city ranks in population and wealth with the best cities of the Pacific coast, for it has the backing of resources that will make of it a city in fact as well as in name.
Medford Mail, May 14, 1909, page 5


    The Warren Construction Company will commence spreading the top pavement dressing on Front Street North this morning. There is quite an amount of this work now ahead of the company, and the crew will undoubtedly be kept busy for a couple or three weeks without an intermission.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, May 28, 1909, page 2


    Six new dump wagons and a rock crusher for the Warren Construction Company were being unloaded from the cars in this city yesterday.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, June 18, 1909, page 2


    When the paving on Oakdale Avenue is completed the paving company expects to move its plant to Ashland, where there is a contract awaiting them for putting in 21,000 yards of paving. West Main Street in Medford is still waiting to be paved. It ought to have been included in the Oakdale Avenue contract--but was not, and now the chances are not very favorable for getting it paved this season. The Ashland contact will keep the company busy until early fall, after which the outfit will return to Medford and pave West Main Street--if the contract is awarded. Should this bring the paving work into the wet season, there will be a vigorous protest made. Wet weather paving is not good paving--and it is expensive, both to the company and the city; still something must be done to improve West Main Street before another winter.

Medford Mail, June 18, 1909, page 4


    B. C. Copeland, superintendent for the Warren Construction Company, is authority for the statement that the work of grading for paving work on West Main Street will commence next week, and that by September 1 paving work will commence and will be completed 12 days later.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, July 30, 1909, page 5


PAVING WORK DELAYED.
New Main Will Have To Be Put In Before West Main Street Is Paved.
    Work of grading West Main Street has been temporarily held up because of the fact that when the work was to have commenced yesterday it was discovered that the old water mains were laid too close to the surface to permit the necessary grading for the paving which is to be put in. A contract has already been let for a new main on this street, but it will probably be two weeks before the pipe for this will reach Medford.
Medford Mail, August 13, 1909, page 6


RESUME PAVING
Work Started Last Week on West End of Seventh Street

(From Friday's Daily.)

    It will no doubt be good news to the residents of West Main Street in particular and to the citizens of Medford in general to learn that work on the paving of that thoroughfare will commence this morning, and the company which has the contract for the work claims that it will be done as fast as it is possible to do so.
    The work to be started this morning will be the grading, and this will begin at the extreme west end of the street. The only thing which is likely to delay the work will be the laying of the water pipes along the whole length of the part of the street to be paved.
Delay the Work.
    Yesterday Walter Burgess Warren of Boston, Mass., the vice-president of the Warren Brothers Company, arrived in Medford to see how the work was progressing here in the paving line. To a representative of the Morning Mail he stated that as soon as the grading was finished on West Main Street that the paving plant would be here with the men to do the work, and that there would be no delay on the part of the paving company.
    Mr. Warren and B. C. Copeland, the superintendent of the Warren Construction Company for the work of paving in Ashland and Medford, went to Ashland yesterday afternoon to see how the work there was going on. Mr. Copeland before leaving stated that they would have all the teams and men necessary to do both the grading and the paving work.
Central Avenue Also.
    It is also understood that after the paving of West Main Street is completed that the work on East Main Street will begin. In the meantime everything on that part of the street will be gotten in readiness. In addition to that, a petition is being circulated among the people residing on North Central Avenue asking that the street be paved from the end of the present pavement at Sixth Street to the northerly city limits.
Medford Mail, August 20, 1909, page 2


WORK OF PAVING SEVENTH STREET TO START SOON
    As soon as all connections with the sewer on West Main Street are made the work of paving will begin. The Warren Construction Company are moving their machinery here, having completed the work at Ashland, and in a short time it will be up and ready for operation. The work of paving will begin at the east end of the part to be paved, and the work will be pushed with all possible dispatch, in order to get as much done as possible before the bad weather sets in. Mayor Canon went over the ground Friday in company with Engineer Foster.
Southern Oregonian, October 27, 1909, page 7


   
The work of paving Main Street west from the Washington School to the city limits will commence this week and will be pushed as rapidly thereafter as the weather will permit. This morning the machinery for the mixing plant was taken out to the operating grounds on the Rogue River Valley Railroad, and it will be in a position to commence work in a few days.
"Social and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, November 2, 1909, page 5


PAVING WORK TO START ON EAST SIDE NEXT WEEK
Clark-Henery Company Will Be Ready to Start Excavation Work Soon--
Council Soon to Sign Contract--Work on West Main.
    Next week the Clark-Henery Construction Company will probably start work on the paving of ten miles of the city's streets, as they expect their excavating machinery to arrive soon. The council within a day or two will sign the contract and then work will be under way in earnest.
    The first work to be done will be on East Main Street. Although the water has not dried far from the surface, it is thought that by the time the excavation is completed that it will be ready for the cement binder.
    The work of paving West Main is under way, but the contractors are having more or less trouble with soft spots. However, by May 1 this street should be completed.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 4, 1910, page 1


    The Warren Construction Company are operating their mixing plant on West Eighth Street preparing the material for the paving of Main Street, for which the company has the contract. Work commenced on the paving Monday, and the company will push it to a finish.
"Social and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, April 12, 1910, page 5


364 CARLOADS OF CEMENT FOR STREET PAVING
Big Pines Lumber Company Has Contracted with Clark-Henery Company
for Delivery of 40,000 Barrels of Cement for Street Paving.
PAVING COMPANY WILL FAVOR LOCAL FIRMS
Sixteen Thousand Additional Barrels Will Be Needed in Medford
for Other Work During the Year--Much Building in Sight.
    The Big Pines Lumber Company has contracted with the Clark-Henery company, paving contractors, for the delivery of 40,000 barrels of standard Portland cement for the use of the Clark-Henery people in the filling of their contract with the city.
    This order alone will fill approximately 364 cars.
    Contrary to the usual procedure of large contracting firms in cities of Medford's size, the Clark-Henery company are inclined to give the local dealers in supplies they may need the benefit of the trade. The cement, lumber, etc. needed in their work has been ordered through local dealers whenever possible.
    This one cement order, however, does not comprise all the cement which will be used this year. Orders now filed with and to come to the Big Pines Company will aggregate 16,000 barrels more within the next eight months.
    When one stops to figure the brick, lumber, hardware and labor necessary to use up this amount of cement, and the fact that these figures are from one firm only, it is a case of give up the job of computing the building in store for 1910.

Medford Mail Tribune,
April 17, 1910, page 1



Residence District Paved.
    MEDFORD, Or., May 11.--(Special.)--Grading and paving on East Main Street and Queen Anne Avenue are practically completed, and the people on these streets are using the dirt thrown out by the excavating to level up their property and will soon plant lawns. The work is under contract to the Clark-Henery Company.
Morning Oregonian,
Portland, May 12, 1910, page 3



MAY NOT PAVE EAST MAIN NOW
Water Pipe Proposition Is Worrying Council and City Engineer--
Cannot Lay Pavement Over Wooden Main Without Drain.
    The city council, the mayor and the city engineer spent this morning investigating the water pipe proposition on East Main Street. The question involved is whether it will be better to postpone the paving of the street until iron pipe would be laid, involving an additional expense of some $15,000, or by laying a tile beneath the leaking wood pipe, surrounded by rocks, to carry the leakage to the sewers at different street crossings, thus keeping the leakage from reaching the surface and weakening the foundation of the pavement after it had been laid above the pipe.
    The people of the east side are extremely anxious to have the street paved and are willing to do almost anything rather than wade through the mud as they have been doing.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 18, 1910, page 1


MEDFORD PAVES STREETS
Sixteen Miles of Hard Surfacing Ordered by Enterprising Town.
    MEDFORD, Or., July 15.--Work is being rushed on Medford's paving, of which more than 16 miles has been ordered and the contracts for which have been executed. Ten miles of this paving will be completed this year, while the remainder will be done next season.
    It is believed by the Medford officers that the city is getting its paving done more cheaply than any other town outside of Portland, the price paid here being $1.76 per yard.
    The paving company pays out $20,000 a month to its men. of whom it employs 320. It is estimated that 90 percent of that sum is spent in Medford. Two thousand tons of asphalt and 20,000 barrels of cement will be used in this year's operations.
    One mile of cement walks have been laid in Medford each month of the present year and that ratio will keep up for the remainder of the season. Six miles of water mains are being laid this year and four and a half miles of sewer.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 16, 1910, page 3



Handling a Million-Dollar Job
From a Layman's Point of View
    The handling of a million-dollar job is no sinecure. Few there are who realize the hard work, the worries and the troubles which beset "the boss" on every side, or the immense amount of vitality and driving power that is required to keep things moving. It is not job for a whiner, and appears to me as an incessant game of football; a straight dash to the goal would be a happy incident--touchdowns are seldom made in one sprint--it takes six feet of pluck as well as two feet of speed to hammer and batter through the opposition. And yet today in Medford there is a young man, barely past 30, who is successfully handling a million-dollar job. And he will win out, but there will be no hue and cry about it. He realizes that it would be fatal to cry for help, and he is too busy doing big things to pay any attention to the comments of the crowd.
    It was my good fortune to be allowed to spend a half day "on the job" with "the boss." Ordinarily he is too busy to be burdened with a sightseer, especially one who knows nothing but the asking of questions. Yet I found that he was never too busy to tell of the work, for he is mightily interested. I approached him on a friendship basis, and he did not know that I intended to tell the story of how he was handling a million-dollar job to the readers of the Mail Tribune. Indeed, I dared not ask him questions about himself, for I knew that friendship or no friendship, he would soon find some excuse for getting rid of me, for he is too busy to talk of himself. His job is another matter. Regarding it and all of its details, he is willing to talk--and he is enthusiastic over its possibilities.
    When the Clark & Henery Construction Company last winter secured a contract for paving in this city totaling $500,000 the men who direct the destinies of the firm, which has handled some of the largest construction jobs outside of railroad building on the coast, began to look around for a man they could put in Medford. They decided upon Arthur W. Clark, a young member of the firm, who had done a great deal of work and who had handled some fairly large-sized jobs in a satisfactory manner. The firm realized that the letting of a contract in Medford for $500,000 was but a starter--that a great many more streets would be added to the original contract. They knew that the contract would nearly double, and their faith will in all probability be justified, for already $200,000 worth of work additional has been ordered, and petitions are out for more streets.
    So Arthur W. Clark, a young man of barely 30 years, but old in responsibility, full of driving force and initiative, was sent to direct the work. Mr. Clark was given but one brief order: "You go to Medford, do a good job and come home." Mr. Clark came to Medford; he is doing a good job (I quote the city engineer); and he will probably go home in a year or two, only to be given a still larger job. For no man can stay on the job with him half a day and fail to see that he is making a success of his work.
    Few of Medford's residents realize the immensity of the work now going on in Medford. In order that they may grasp this in a concise manner, here are a few facts and figures:
    Two hundred and fifty men are employed, all, for the most part, being expert workmen.
    One hundred and eighty horses are owned by the company, and they are constantly trying to obtain more.
    Fourteen carloads of material arrives and is used each day on the streets.
    The largest size of any asphalt paving plant is in operation.
    A rock screen is in operation which loads 400 wagons daily, scooping the material from the creek bed.
    Three steam rollers are in constant operation.
    One large grader is in use, which plows up the streets and loads the dirt onto patent dump wagons.
    Eighty patent dump wagons are in use.
    Ten thousand sacks of cement are piled about on the streets of the city. Fifteen thousand sacks are held as a reserve force in the warehouse in case a freight tie-up should occur, so that the work need not be delayed.
    Three barges are stationed at Gold Ray and are used for pumping sand from the river bed onto cars.
    From $10,000 to $15,000 is paid monthly to the Southern Pacific company for freight charges.
    Fifteen thousand dollars is the average monthly payroll, or over $600 a day.
    A large concrete mixer and a second ordered.
    The company has already completed the paving of West Tenth Street, Genessee Street and East Main Street.
    By the first of August the company will have completed South Riverside, South Holly and South Central. On these three streets the concrete base is already laid and is ready for asphalt surface.
    The concrete base is now being laid on South Central.  
    Curbs and gutters have been placed on Laurel, Eighth and North Riverside and curb is now being laid on North Central.
    So great will be the amount of cement used in the city that Mr. Clark estimates that the sacks which he will return and on which he is allowed 10 cents each will amount to $20,000. In other words, 200,000 sacks of cement will be used on Medford's streets.
    These are the figures which will give you some idea of what it means to handle a million-dollar paving job. A second large concrete mixer has been ordered, for the pavers are crowding the cement gang too closely.
    Mr. Clark's office is in his automobile. From one part of the city to another he is constantly traveling, seeing that all parts of the work is progressing as it should. East side, west side, north and south I was hurled in his auto Friday afternoon, until I began to think that there was not a street in the city that had not some part of his crew upon it. So long has Mr. Clark been driving over torn-up streets that he thinks nothing of hurtling sewer trenches,  plowing through heaps of gravel and dodging heavy wagons and telegraph poles. It is an education for a man to ride with him, although it seems at times as if your education would be brought to an abrupt end. As he drives his auto he is driving a big job with all of the vim and vitality that six feet of brawn at 30 can master.
    First we shot down North Central to where the huge grader, operating like a huge harvester, was tearing up the roadbed and piling the dirt onto dump wagons. Fifty men are at work in this crew, and they are tearing up the streets in fast shape. After a word or two there with the foreman Mr. Clark hurried me down to North Riverside, where a large gang was engaged in putting in the concrete curb and gutter. This gang is spread out for some distance and comprises 120 men.
    Next we visited the concrete layers on South Central, and there we found 25 men employed. These men are all experts with the exception of a few muckers. A small rail track runs up an incline to the top of a huge mixer, run by a large gasoline engine. Up this track are hauled cars of material, which is dumped into the mixer. From the mixer it passes into large carts especially constructed and is hauled off to where it is being laid on the streets. Here is a crew of six men, who are experts at spreading the concrete so that a uniform grade is maintained. This is put down rapidly. Then in three or four days the crew handling the binder follows.
    From the concrete mixers we went to the south end of Central, where the large paving plant is in operation. Here is a plant that represents the latest ideas in the art of paving. Huge vats of boiling asphalt are seen as well as great ovens in which the material with which the asphalt is mixed is heated. There is a vast amount of noise and great clouds of dust. Men grimy with dirt peer at you from all parts of the huge plant, and it is with relief that one completes a tour of inspection and gets out into the sunlight again. Crude oil is burned and is kept in a huge concrete tank beneath the plant. There is nothing of a temporary or a makeshift order to be see here.
    The asphalt wearing surface is put down by a gang of 15 men, all of them burly negroes. This gang is one of the most expert in the employ of the company and has been with them for a number of years. They spread the material and do the finishing.
    One could write columns about the big job--of the stables, of the blacksmith shops, of the oil room, of buying axle grease by the barrel, of the fire department, of the thousand and one countless details which are included in this huge job. That Mr. Clark is prepared for an emergency of nearly every kind is shown by the fact that he has even erected a tank at the plant in which he keeps several thousand gallons of water for use in case the city supply should fail. It would be something entirely unexpected indeed that would catch him napping. So thorough is the system to which the work is reduced that if a foreman should stop a man for a half hour from hauling gravel in order that he might haul a bit of lumber the office force would know it that evening. System is the keynote of the whole affair. Every man is timed on his trips between the plant and the street, and every load of material is checked up. There are no leaks.
    It is a big job that Mr. Clark has on his hands--a job that many a man would fall down on. But he will drive it to the last ditch, for he is full of the optimism of youth and is not afraid of hard work.          HIX.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 24, 1910, page B1


    September first finds Medford with over ten miles of bitulithic and asphalt paved streets. New contracts totaling over 280,000 square yards of pavement, with curving and guttering, amounting to over a million dollars, the largest contract ever made on the coast, is but forty percent completed. When completed, Medford will be the best-paved city of its size anywhere.
"What September Finds in Medford,"
Medford Mail Tribune, September 1, 1910, page 4


Paved Street Is Mile Long.
    MEDFORD, Or., Sept. 29.--(Special.)--Medford now boasts of a single stretch of pavement one mile in length. Main Street, running through the business section across from one end of town to the other, has been laid with asphalt. No other in the state, besides Portland, has an equal or greater length of pavement.
Morning Oregonian, September 30, 1910, page 7



18 PERCENT OF MEDFORD STREETS ARE NOW PAVED
City Engineer Compiles Figures Giving Total Amount of Paving in the City--
Sidewalks and Total Length of Streets Also in Report.
    According to figures compiled by City Engineer Foster for his annual report to the city council, which is as yet incomplete, 18 percent of the streets of Medford, or nearly one-fifth, have been paved and the pavement accepted.
    According to the report, Medford streets total 45.43 miles. Of this distance, 8.42 are paved, or 18 percent. Another eight miles have been ordered paved.
    The city now has 20.30 miles of cement sidewalks and 8.46 miles of board walks. In the city 1075 houses have been numbered.
    According to the report, the city has 157.024 square yards of pavement, which cost $377.615.08.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 18, 1910, page 1


ANOTHER STREET IS AFTER IMPROVEMENTS
    The property holders on Geneva Avenue filed a petition with City Recorder Robert W. Telfer yesterday afternoon requesting that the city proceed to have that portion of their street running between Main Street and Sherman Avenue paved with asphalt at an early date.
    The street in question was only very recently opened up, but sewer and water mains have already been laid along it.
Medford Mail Tribune weekly, February 2, 1911, page 2


BRICKOLITHIC MAY GO ON GENEVA
RESIDENTS FEAR CLARK-HENERY CAN'T GET IT
Near Bottom of the List and May Be Left Out of the Regular Work
    Residents along Geneva Street are contemplating having the street paved with brickolithic paving. This same kind of material will be used on Reddy Avenue.
    A resident of Geneva Street yesterday said: "Our street was one of the last to be approved for paving, and consequently it will be left till the latter part of the year to be improved. It is quite possible that if things went wrong that we would not be paved at all this year. Therefore we thought that since the Clark-Henery Company had its hands full we would make sure to have our street paved this season.
    "The Company handling the brickolithic is a good one, and I have received favorable reports regarding their method of paving.
    "We feel that we should safeguard ourselves against mud of another winter, hence our decision to use brickolithic."
Medford Sun, February 25, 1911, page 1



HOW THE STREETS WERE DRAGGED
CITIZEN GROWS SARCASTIC OVER APOLOGIST'S SWELLUP
Says Same Amount of Good Is Done
As If Street Commissioner Had Been Used As Harrow
    A resident of the southern portion of the city yesterday called at the Sun office to make mention of a statement he had seen in the Evening Apologist [the Mail Tribune] during the past week, to the effect that all the unpaved streets of the city had been "dragged" by the Honorable W. P. Baker, street commissioner-in-chief of Medford, and were now in first-class condition.
    "My street was one of the ones dragged," said the Sun's patron, "and if it is not a fright I don't know what you would call it. About as much impression has been made on its surface by the 'dragging' as if instead of the drag the Honorable W. P. himself had been drawn over it.
    "Just come out in front and look at your own street, which must have been one of those dragged by the Honorable W. P. It is one of the unpaved ones, so the Apologist must have meant to include Grape Street in the number."
    "We have heard that Grape Street was dragged," said the Sun man. "In fact, we saw a cloud of dust there one morning and think we heard Mr. Baker's voice issuing from the center or sidelines of the cloud."
    "Well, that gives you an idea," said the caller, "But it is not half as bad as my street. If he is going to repair the streets, why doesn't he do so? Why doesn't he take a scraper instead of a drag, or a number of them and level down the hummocks and mounds and heaps of dirt in the middle and sides.
    "No, you can't see where any dragging has been done on your street, and if the Honorable W. P. had been dragged over it you would see the same amount of change in it as the way it has been done.
    "If that isn't a hot one of the Apologist to claim so much glory for the Honorable W. P., then I miss my guess. Did you ever hear or see anything like it? Did you ever hear of a thing calling itself a newspaper to swell itself and its city administration up over that equaled this for gall? It must take the people of Medford for damn fools--that's all I've got to say."
Medford Sun, March 12, 1911, page 1


THREE BLOCKS OF GENESSEE STREET
NOW PAVED WITH CONCRETE
    Three blocks on Genessee Street have now been finished with concrete pavement, and gives a surface as hard as iron, or harder, and is supposed to last as long as the Egyptian Pyramids, or longer.
    Such is the method of paving on this popular residence street, and it is one of a few in the country.
    Horses will have a sure footing on this pavement, as a result of crisscross lines, or checks. Vehicles will roll over it with ease, though it is not adapted to comfortable speeding, as a tremor will result to passengers in horse-drawn vehicles or autos.
    There are to be six or seven blocks finished with concrete.
    There is a move afoot to have Central Avenue paved from the present terminus to the Whitman addition.
Medford Sun, April 2, 1911, page 3

Paving Geneva Street, March 1911
Paving Geneva Street, March 1911

PAVING COMPLETE ON TWO STREETS
GENEVA AND REDDY COVERED WITH BRICKOLITHIC
Bise and Foss Started Only Last Monday--One Hundred Men Are Employed
    Two streets on the east side, Geneva and Reddy, have been paved this spring by Bise and Foss, the brickolithic paving contractors. Geneva will be finished by tonight and Reddy is already finished.
    The paving work on these streets started only Monday. The whole paving material is put down at one time, and when through with a section it is done. The grading started several weeks ago, but all has been done this spring.
    The distance paved on the two streets is 1400 feet or four blocks in length. The firm employ 100 men.
Medford Sun, April 4, 1911, page 1



PREPARING TO PAVE EAST MAIN
    Tearing up the planking on East Main Street beyond the end of the paving began yesterday. It is understood that the first work to be done afterward will be to replace the wooden water pipe with steel, after which the street will be paved.
Medford Sun, April 5, 1911, page 2


TWO HUNDRED THOUSAND YARD
PAVING CONTRACT IS AWARDED
Price Is One Dollar and Seventy-One Cents--All Asphalt Material--
May Change in Thirty Days
    A contract for approximately 200,000 yards of pavement was awarded yesterday afternoon at an executive session of the city council to the Clark and Henery Construction Company, at a contract price of $1.71 per square yard. The city reserves the right to select one of two different grades of paving, one being higher and the other lower in price, providing such change is made within thirty days.
    The kind of paving contracted for differs somewhat from that of last year and that which is at the present time under contract. It is an all-asphalt pavement. That is to say, the base is of asphalt and is put down hot and rolled instead of the former concrete base, upon which the asphalt is placed. Being put down hot, it is left to cool and to set, after which a second coat of asphalt, heated to somewhat over 200 degrees, is placed over this and again rolled. This causes the two to coalesce and form into a crust of all asphalt for the entire depth of the pavement.
    It has a thickness of about one and one-half inches less than that with the concrete base. The cost is five cents less, the [asphalt with a] concrete base being $1.75 per square yard.
    Before determining whether or not the all-asphalt at $1.71 shall be adopted or that with the concrete base at a higher price or another at a lower cost, the mayor and two or three representatives of the city will take a trip to Sacramento and inspect the three different kinds of pavement which have been put down by the Clark and Henery Company. The trip must be made before the thirty days are up, or the construction company will proceed to lay the all-asphalt pavement.
Excerpt, Medford Sun, April 20, 1911, page 1



BAKER'S DRAG AT WORK
    The famous drag of the Honorable W. P. Baker, the esteemed street commissioner of Medford, is again in action. It has revolutionized the earth in the Medford road districts just outside of the city limits on that particular part, parcel and piece of road that connects Roosevelt Avenue with the county thoroughfare. The old harrow has been doing great work over there and has caused the somewhat aesthetic owners of automobiles to remark that the road is not according to their ideas of high-class art. Be that as it may, the Honorable W. P. is busy with the harrow, and the people will be able to find out where the road is.
    The Honorable W. P. is also being mentioned casually in connection with the section of road which is in the Medford road district, lying between the pavement at the end of West Main and the Jacksonville macadamized road, which is something like fifty rods distant. The road was advertised last year as being macadamized by the city, and the Honorable W. P. had charge of the work. At that time there were great clouds of dust in that direction, and the people thought that the great feat was being performed, but since the dust has settled down proof is abundant that the sand, crushed rock and boulders were in readiness and are still in readiness but that there is no macadam there to hide them from the noonday sun. Cranky autoists are kicking about this as they generally do and state that they would like to have at least a narrow strip of macadam covering this missing link, although the width may not be so great as to be measured by metes and bounds.
Medford Sun, April 20, 1911, page 2


WATT BACK FROM INSPECTION TRIP
Other City Dads, However, Continue Their Journey Southwards
Inspecting Fire Apparatus and Pavements of Various Makes.
    Councilman J. E. Watt returned to Medford [omission] evening from Sacramento, where he, in company with Mayor W. H. Canon and Councilman V. J. Emerick and H. G. Wortman, went to investigate the paving in that city. A thorough investigation was conducted by this committee in Sacramento, San Mateo and Stockton, and the pavements there [were] found to be excellent and capable of supporting heavy traffic.
    The difference between the pavements previously laid in Medford and that proposed is as follows. The old style with the wearing surface by a 1½-inch binder, while the proposed pavement consists of a 5½-inch asphaltic base, upon which the wearing surface is poured and rolled without necessitating the binder. This makes the pavement thinner and therefore less costly.
    Several well-known engineers as well as property owners were consulted, and all spoke well of the Clark & Henery Construction Company and of the quality of their work.
    Mayor Canon and Messrs. Wortman and Emerick continued their journey to Los Angeles[and] Santa Barbara, where they will investigate the automobile fire apparatus used there. They are expected home the beginning of next week.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 30, 1911, page 8


MAKING MEDFORD THE BEST-PAVED CITY IN AMERICA
    The time is close at hand when Medford will be known as the best-paved city of its size in America. Three hundred men, modern machinery and nearly 150 head of horses are employed in transforming her streets, which heretofore in midwinter have been but streaks of mire, into boulevards open to traffic the year around. To date nearly 300,000 square yards of pavement has been laid while a contract for an additional 300,000 square yards has just been let. When completed Medford will have nearly 24 miles of paved streets, costing nearly $1,000,000, a tremendous amount considering the population, now estimated at 10,500.
    Three years ago there was not a single square yard of paving in the state south of Salem. Then it was that Medford, an ambitious little city of 5000 souls, started an agitation for better streets. Each winter found her thoroughfares impassable. The agitation grew, and a contract was let for 35,000 yards. This was laid on the principal street of the city, and so obvious were its benefits that the following season an additional contract was let. This season this has been supplemented by a contract as great as the first two together. Others towns in southern Oregon have profited by Medford's example and now are having their streets surfaced. The county court, recognizing the benefits to be derived from good roads, have also called for the laying of an asphalt macadam road between this city and Central Point. Medford pointed the way.
    The gigantic task of making Medford the best-paved city in America is in the hands of the Clark & Henery Construction Company of Sacramento and Stockton, Cal. That they are doing a good job and are laying a superior pavement is evidenced by the fact that they have just been awarded the second contract after laying six or seven miles of their asphalt pavement in the city. They now have more work than they can complete this season, which will extend until the rainy season sets in, but they are making great efforts to get as much of the work done as possible. They will complete their original contract late in July and then will start on the work of laying the additional 300,000 yards of pavement. It may be that a third contract will be given them next season, but even if this is not done Medford, for its size, will be the best-paved city in the United States.
    The Clark & Henery Construction Company is a California corporation, in which W. R. Clark and Samuel Henery are the principal and controlling stockholders. In charge of the work being done in this city is Arthur W. Clark, who is making a record for himself and the company by the manner in which he is handling the job. The company is one of the largest contracting firms on the Pacific coast and now has paving plants at Roseburg, Stockton, Sacramento, Ukiah, San Mateo, San Jose, Oakland and Burlingame. The fact that all of the cities in which they have worked speak highly of their pavement and the manner in which it is laid shows that the company can be depended upon to do a splendid job in Medford. Before letting the recent contract the members of the Medford city council visited several of these cities and gained information first hand in regard to the company and on their return immediately entered into the new contract.
    But let us take the field and see how this company goes about the handling of a large contract such as is under way in Medford. First a few figures regarding the immensity of the job and then we will go for a ride with Arthur W. Clark, "the boss."
    Few of Medford's residents realize the immensity of the work now going on in Medford. In order that they may grasp this in a concise manner here are a few facts and figures:
    Three hundred are employed, all, for the most part, being expert workmen.
    One hundred and fifty horses are owned by the company, and they are constantly trying to obtain more.
    Twenty carloads of material arrives and is used each day on the streets.
    The largest size of any asphalt paving plant is in operation.
    A rock screen is in operation which loads 400 wagons daily, scooping the material from the creek bed.
    Three steam rollers are in constant operation.
    One grader is in use, which plows up the streets and loads the dirt onto patent dump wagons.
    Eighty patent dump wagons are in use.
    Ten thousand sacks of cement are piled about on the streets of the city. Fifteen thousand sacks are held as a reserve force in the warehouse in case a freight tieup should occur so that the work need not be delayed.
    Two large concrete mixers, each capable of turning out 1800 square yards of concrete base a day, are in use.
    The monthly payroll exceeds $30,000.
    Twelve hundred barrels of crude oil are burned daily.
    Three hundred and fifty barrels of asphalt are used each day.
    One hundred and eighty cubic yards of sand and gravel passes through the plant daily.
    So great is the amount of cement used in the city that Mr. Clark estimates that the sacks, which he will return and on which he is allowed 10 cents each, will amount to $40,000. In other words, 400,000 sacks of cement will be used on Medford's streets.
    Twenty thousand dollars is paid monthly to the Southern Pacific for freight charges.
    Mr. Clark's office is in his automobile. From one part of the city to another he is constantly traveling, seeing that all parts of the work is progressing as it should. East side, west side, north and south, one is hurled in his auto until you begin to think that there is not a street in the city that has not some part of his crew upon it. So long has Mr. Clark been driving over torn-up streets that he thinks nothing of hurdling sewer trenches, plowing through heaps of gravel and dodging heavy wagons and telegraph poles. It is an education for a man to ride with him, although it seems at times as if your education would be brought to an abrupt end. As he drives his auto he is driving a big job.
    On the afternoon I was out with him, we went first to where the huge grader, operating like a harvester, was tearing up the roadbed and piling the dirt onto dump wagons. Fifty men are at work in this crew, and they are tearing up the streets in fast shape. After a word or two there with the foreman Mr. Clark hurried me down to where a large gang was engaged in putting in the concrete curb and gutter. This gang is spread out for some distance and contains over 100 men.
    Now we visited the concrete layers, where 25 men are employed. These men are all experts, with the exception of a few muckers. A small rail track runs up an incline to the top of a huge mixer, run by a large gasoline engine. Up this track are hauled cars of material, which is dumped into the mixer. From the mixer it passes into large carts especially constructed and is hauled off to where it is being laid on the streets. Here is a crew of six men who are experts at spreading the concrete so that a uniform grade is maintained. This is put down rapidly. Then in three or four days the crew handling the binder follows.
    From the concrete mixers we went to the south end of Central, where the large paving plant is in operation. Here is a plant that represents the latest ideas in the art of paving. Huge vats of boiling asphalt are seen as well as great ovens in which the material with which the asphalt is mixed is heated. There is a vast amount of noise and great clouds of dust. Men grimy with dirt peer at you from all parts of the huge plant, and it is with relief that one completes a tour of inspection and gets out into the sunlight again. Crude oil is burned and is kept in a huge concrete tank beneath the plant. There is nothing of a temporary or of a makeshift order to be seen here.
    The asphalt wearing surface is put down by a gang of 15 men, all of them burly Negroes. This gang of men is one of the most expert men in this line of work on the Pacific coast. They spread the material and do the finishing.
    One could write columns about the big job--of the stables, of the blacksmith shops, of the oil room, of buying axle grease by the barrel, of the fire department, of the thousand and one countless details which are included in this huge job. That Mr. Clark is prepared for an emergency of nearly every kind is shown by the fact that he has even erected a tank at the plant in which he keeps several thousand gallons of water for use in case the city supply should fail. It would be something entirely unexpected indeed that would catch him napping. So thorough is the system to which the work is reduced that if a foreman should stop a man for a half hour from hauling gravel in order that he might haul a bit of lumber the office force would know it that evening. System is the keynote of the whole affair. Every man is timed on his trips between the plant and the street, and every load of material is checked up. There are no leaks.
    It is a big job handled in a big way. Someday get out of your rut and go out and watch it. It is well worthwhile.
    The company lays an asphalt pavement which is shown to be very successful wherever it has been laid. First they lay a concrete base some five inches in thickness, then a binder course an inch thick and on top of this is laid the wearing surface two inches in thickness. The new contract call for the laying of an asphaltic concrete base, the pavement being lighter. It was adopted owing to the splendid showing it has made in California cities.
    Medford is well satisfied with the pavement being laid in the city, for she feels that she is getting a "square deal." And, after all, that is the one big essential.              H.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 18, 1911, page B1   A considerably condensed version of this text was printed in the Sunday Oregonian, June 25, 1911, page 58.


REPAIRING MAIN STREET PAVEMENT
Warren Construction Company Starts Work Under Maintenance Contract with City--
Much Repair Work Should Be Done.
    The Warren Construction Company has started work under their maintenance contract with the city to repair the bitulithic pavement laid by them three years ago on Main Street. All of those portions of the pavement which show wear or signs of giving way are to be replaced. The city has a maintenance contract with the company, the terms of which provide that the Warren company shall keep the pavement in repair for ten years for a yearly payment of 2½ cents a square yard per year.
    Under the terms of a similar contract between the company and Eugene the company was forced to lay an entire new wearing surface on a large amount of work in that city which did not stand up to the specifications. There has been considerable complaint regarding the pavement on Main Street and it may be that the company will be forced to resurface it. They notified the city recently that they were ready to repair the street as the contract provides, and work started Thursday morning.

Medford Mail Tribune, August 24, 1911, page 6


BEST-PAVED CITY OF ITS SIZE IN NORTHWEST
City Council Orders Hundred Thousand Square Yards
Of Additional Hard Surface Pavement at Its Regular Monthly Meeting Friday.
TOTAL PAVED STREETS TO EXCEED 24 MILES
    Million Dollars Is Approximate Cost of Paving Medford Streets--
Work Is Being Pushed.
    Nearly 100,000 square yards of asphalt paving was ordered by the city council Friday evening. Those streets which will be paved are North Grape from Sixth to Vermont; South Ivy from Eighth to Thirteenth; Rose Avenue from Seventh to Fourth; Beatty from C to Manzanita; Bennett Avenue from Howard to Roosevelt; Tenth Street west from Oakdale to Holly; Washington from Genessee to Roosevelt; Hamilton from Oakdale to Oleson; Oleson from Second to Fourth; Third from D'Anjou to Apple; Mistletoe from Main to Tenth; South Peach from Seventh to Tenth; Bartlett from Eighth to Ninth; Orange from Tenth to Eleventh; Minnesota Avenue from Geneva to Roosevelt; alley of block 2, Central Avenue, running north and south; alley through block 21 from East Seventh to Sixth, and alley from Eighth to point seventy-five feet from Seventh.
Best-Paved City.
    The time is close at hand when Medford will be known as the best-paved city of its size in America. Three hundred men, modern machinery and nearly 150 feet of horses are employed in transforming her streets, which heretofore in mid-winter have been but streaks of mire into boulevards open to traffic the year around. To date nearly 300,000 square yards of pavement has been laid while contracts for similar quantity has just been let. When completed Medford will have nearly twenty-four miles of paved streets, costing nearly $1,000,000, a tremendous amount considering the population now estimated at 10,500.
    Three years ago there was not a single square yard of paving in the state south of Eugene. Then it was that Medford, an ambitious little city of 5000 souls, started an agitation for better streets. Each winter found her thoroughfares impassable. The agitation grew, and a contract was let for 35,000 yards. This was laid on the principal street of the city, and so obvious were its benefits that the following season an additional contract was let. This season this has been supplemented by a contract as great as the first two together. Other towns in southern Oregon have profited by Medford's example and now are having their streets surfaced. The county court, recognizing the benefits to be derived from good roads, have also called for the laying of an asphalt macadam road between this city and Central Point. Medford pointed the way.
Who Is Doing It?
    The gigantic task of making Medford the best-paved city in America is in the hands of the Clark & Henery Construction Company of Sacramento and Stockton, Cal. That they are doing a good job and are laying a superior pavement is evidenced by the fact that they have just been awarded the second contract after laying six or seven miles of their asphalt pavement in the city. They now have more work than they can complete this season, which will extend until the rainy season sets in, but they are making great efforts to get as much of the work done as possible. They will complete their original contract late in July and then will start on the work of laying the additional 300,000 yards of pavement. It may be that a third contract will be given them next season, but even if this is not done Medford, for its size, will be the best-paved city in the United States.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 9, 1911, page B1



IMPROVING END OF EAST MAIN
Street Commissioner Baker Cutting Down Embankment Leading to Siskiyou Heights--
Improvement is Very Much Needed
    Street Commissioner Baker has a gang of men at work cutting down the approach to the East Main Street paving. The paved street grade leading up to this point is about five feet lower than the road from that point on east on Siskiyou Heights, and it is this approach which Mr. Baker is now working on. The earth to be excavated will be from 300 to 400 feet in length and will vary in depth from three to five feet. Some of the excavating can be done with plows and scrapers, but the deepest of it Mr. Baker will tunnel and blow out with dynamite.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 7, 1911, page 3

January 1, 1912 Medford Mail Tribune
January 1, 1912 Medford Mail Tribune

Clark & Henery Company stables.
Clark & Henery Company stables.

Asphalt plant at the south end of Central.
Asphalt plant at the south end of Central.

The concrete gang on an unidentified Medford street.
The concrete gang on an unidentified Medford street.

The binder gang on North Bartlett.
The binder gang on North Bartlett.

Loading at the concrete mixer on West Ninth.
Loading at the concrete mixer on West Ninth.

The surfacing gang.
The surfacing gang.

The gutter crew.
The gutter crew.
Curb and gutter crew, June 25, 1911 Sunday Oregonian.
A tighter cropping of the curb and gutter crew photo, from the June 25, 1911 Sunday Oregonian

SHIPPING PAVING PLANT TO EUGENE
    The paving plant of the Clark & Henery construction company which has stood for three years at the south end of Central Avenue has been wrecked and is being shipped to Eugene, where much work is being done.
    The company has a paving plant on wheels for use on small jobs, and this will be shipped to Medford to complete small jobs in this city and contracts now under way.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 23, 1912, page 6


MEDFORD BEST-PAVED CITY FOR SIZE IN NATION
    No city in the world excels Medford in the amount of paving for its population. The city boasts of 20 miles of hard surface pavement, all of which was laid in the past five years. The cost approximates $1,000,000, the bulk of the pavement in asphalt with concrete base.
    "Medford is the best-paved city in the world. Not only has it the most paved streets for its size, but the quality of the pavement is superior to that of any city south of it," said Sam Hill, president of the National Good Roads Association and foremost good roads advocate in the nation, while recently visiting in this city.
    "I have inspected all the new roads and paving construction under way in both Europe and America, so I feel that I know what I am talking about. Pavement and good hotels have transformed Medford into a most attractive city. Medford and Ashland are far ahead of any cities south to Sacramento."
    A city of 11,00 inhabitants, it has 389,707 square yards of pavement, or 20.03 lineal miles, or 35 square yards per capita. Medford has more paved streets today than Portland had at the time of the Lewis and Clark Fair in 1905, and Portland at that time was a city of 150,000 inhabitants.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 1, 1915, page 7


City Pavement
    Medford's excellent system of paved streets was increased in 1914 by additional improvements of 3062.80 square yards being laid at a cost of $5130.67, bringing the total surface pavement to 389,707.76 square yards, or over 20 miles of paved streets. The total cost of Medford's paved streets is $935,696.13.
Excerpt,
Medford Mail Tribune, January 1, 1915, page D8


    The paving at the intersection of Main Street and Central Avenue, under the warm sun, became as soft as mush, affording some discomfort to pedestrians. It is likely the city council will take some action toward having it improved.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, June 17, 1916, page 2


FINANCIAL PLAN ISSUE
MEDFORD ELECTORS TO VOTE ON CHARTER AMENDMENTS.
Campaign Waged on Medynski and Hanson Systems of Providing for Obligations of City.
    MEDFORD, Or., Jan. 4.--(Special.)--Interest in the city election January 9 centers largely in the Medynski plan of refinancing the city, which was defeated a year ago and has been presented again for acceptance or rejection. This year there is a competing measure known as the Hanson plan devised by Colonel Howard Hanson, former assistant corporation counsel of Seattle.
    The Medynski plan involves the rebonding of the entire pavement debt of approximately $1,000,000 and the refunding of $370,000 already paid into the city treasury by property owners. It provides also that the paving debt should be an obligation of the city instead of the abutting property.
    The Hanson plan is a complete reorganization of the city finances, including the pavement debt, water debt and general obligations of the city. The present method of collecting paving assessments is retained, relief, however, being given in extension of time during the next 13 years and the tax levy for the next 30 years outlined which would wipe out the city indebtedness without proving to be an excessive burden upon the people.
    There are two tickets in the field, one led by F. V. Medynski, originator of the plan, for mayor; the other by C. E. Gates, former president of the Commercial Club and a prominent business man, who as mayoralty candidate favors the opposing measure.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 5, 1917, page 19


WILL PAVE ROAD TO LOCAL LUMBER PLANT
    An announcement that is hailed with satisfaction by the Owen-Oregon Lumber Co. in particular and the public in general is that a decision has been reached to pave the road from the end of the pavement on North Central Avenue to the office and plant of the Owen-Oregon Co.
    The decision was reached this week at the session of the county [commissioners], and the expense will be shared by the county and city. The contract for the paving has been awarded to C. J. Semon.
Jackson County News, February 6, 1925, page 1



KING STREET BEING PAVED
    Distributing concrete at the rate of 1,500 yards daily, the Smith paver operating on King Street is fast surfacing that thoroughfare. The work was gotten under way Monday by the Medford Concrete Construction [Company,] which has the paving contract.
    Preparations for the paving work started last fall, but was halted on account of the mud caused by the wet weather. As soon as good weather permitted this spring the grading part of the paving operations was begun.
    With the paving machine fast work may be made of a surfacing job. It keeps eight trucks busy hauling sand for mixing with the cement.
    The trucks dump loads on a big spoon. This hoists up and allows the material to slide into a mixer. After mixing the mass of sand, water and cement for over a minute the combination is dumped into a big ladle and run out on a crane, and it may be swung about and dumped wherever needed.
Medford News, May 23, 1928, page 6


Medford street crew, probably on the 500 block of South Grape, circa 1925.

EAST SIDE CLUB TO RAISE FUNDS FOR OILING ROAD
    At the meeting of the East Side Improvement Club in the council council chamber last evening, the proposed project was discussed of having all of the road between the end of East Main Street and the Medford Golf Club grounds oil-macadamized, which plan a club committee, after an investigation, reported should be done. According to this report the cost would be about $1500, of which sum one-third has been promised by the county court and $300 by the city of Medford. It is the plan to assess the rest of the cost against the benefiting property at a cost of about 15 cents a foot front. Property owners are now being interviewed on the matter.
Excerpt, Medford Mail Tribune, May 24, 1928, page 5


RESUME PAVING CITY STREETS AFTER 17 YEARS
First Extensive Paving Since 1911 Done Past 12 Months--
Over Four Miles of Black Top and Concrete Laid--
City Growth Demanded Improvements
    New paving in the city of Medford in 1928 aggregated 4.38 miles, and grading and surfacing totaled approximately the same amount, according to statistics in the office of City Engineer Fred Scheffel.
    This construction marked the first resumption of paving on a large scale in this city since 1911. The coming year promises to equal the 1928 record, as many petitions for paving and grading are on file, subject to favorable action by the city council.
    The cost of the year's paving and grading will total slightly over $165,000.
    The first paving operations came in the spring of 1928, with the laying of 24 blocks of concrete paving, at a cost of $70,212,28, all in residential areas. The streets completed were South King, North Bartlett, North Ivy, North Court, North Oakdale and West Third. All were in thickly populated districts, and all were stretches left uncompleted in 1911.
    Asphalt was laid upon the following streets, at a cost of approximately $60,000: Arcadia and Spencer streets in the southeast portion of the city, Portland Avenue and Almond streets on the east side, and North Holly Street in the vicinity of the senior high school. The total distance asphalted was 18 blocks.
More Paving in 1929
    South Park Street is being paved, but will not be completed until next spring, and is the only street on the 1928 building program unfinished and not open for traffic at the end of the year.
    Forty blocks were graded and graveled, all of the work being in the mill district or on the outlying districts. They were graded to paving grade so if in the future the property owners should desire paving, it can be procured at a minimum of delay and cost. The grading and graveling entailed an expenditure of $25,000.
    The streets graded and graveled were:
    Edwards, Newtown, West Twelfth, Welch, Western Avenue, East Jackson, Lincoln, East Ninth, Haven and Clark.
4.5 Miles of New Sewers
    Additional sewers built or extended during the year totaled a distance of 4.5 miles, and cost $13,148.49. All were in new residential sections, facing a rapid growth. The improvements were made on the following streets: Boardman, Manzanita, Columbus Avenue, Chestnut, Clark, Bliss, Iowa, Narregan, Cedar, Haven, Hamilton, Hawthorne, West Holly, King, Lincoln, Newtown, Peach, Mary, Marie and May.
    Also during the year protective measures and work against Bear Creek floods were taken. This includes the widening, deepening and removal of brush from the banks of the stream, and the building of a dike representing an outlay of $8800. Besides reducing the flood damage peril, the flooding of the sewer system by backwater of the flood is eliminated.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 31, 1928, page C6



Last revised December 5, 2015