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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised



Notes on Dr. Roland Pryce

Roland Pryce, 1848-1894, was an early Medford physician, locating here in 1885. His 1861 English indenture to a four-year pharmacist's apprenticeship is filed at the Southern Oregon Historical Society, MS828 box 3, folder 99.



    Frank Towne of Phoenix, who was in town Wednesday, informs us that considerable improvement is still going on in that place. Dr. R. Pryce is building himself a neat office there.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 14, 1883, page 3


    Dr. F. S. Stirling has located at Phoenix, instead of going to Roseburg, as was reported. He has taken the office formerly occupied by Dr. R. Pryce.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 3, 1884, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce has located at Medford and for the present may be found at Cunningham's hotel. The doctor formerly practiced with much success at Phoenix, and since then has been attending leading medical institutes in the East. We take pleasure in recommending him to the public.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1885, page 3


    We were yesterday pleased to meet our old friend, Dr. R. Pryce, formerly of Phoenix, and who has been spending several months past in Minnesota. He says that he had been enjoying himself since his departure, but that he prefers southern Oregon to any other section, after all.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1885, page 3


DR. R. PRYCE
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Medford, Oregon.

Calls promptly attended to, day or night. Can be found at Cunningham's hotel for the present.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1885 et seq., page 3


    Dr. Pryce informs us there are a few cases of diphtheria at Phoenix.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Pryce, after a trip to the Eastern States, has located at Medford for the practice of his profession and asks a share of public patronage when in need of medical skill. Read his card.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 23, 1885, page 3


R. PRYCE, M.D.,
Physician And Surgeon,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Office next door to Byar's block, residence, Cunningham's hotel.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 23, 1885 et seq., page 3


Bills Presented & Referred
Bill of Dr. Pryce for Service $8--
Medford City Council Minutes, July 6, 1885


Bills allowed & warrants ordered
Dr. R. Pryce--  8.00

Medford City Council Minutes, August 4, 1885


Accidents.
    Hon. S. Furry informs us that as John Van Dyke of Eden precinct was skinning a sheep he had just killed, the animal made its final struggle and knocked the sharp knife he was using against his leg with considerable force, cutting a deep gash and severing one of the principal arteries. It was with great difficulty that the flow of blood was stopped. Mr. V. is still quite weak, though slowly recovering. Dr. Pryce is in attendance.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Pryce of Medford was in town this week, and from him we learned that the condition of John G. Van Dyke of Eden precinct, who cut himself so severely last week, was somewhat improved, although, from the serious nature of his wound, he is not entirely out of danger.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Pryce of Medford was here this week as a witness in the Maxon case. His office is now in A. L. Johnson's building at that place.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 31, 1885, page 3


    Doctors Pryce and Geary of Medford, two of southern Oregon's best and most prominent physicians, have formed a co-partnership for the practice of medicine and surgery. Attention is called to their notice published in another column.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885, page 3


Notice of Co-Partnership.
WE THE UNDERSIGNED, DEEMING IT for our own convenience and for the best interests of the community, have decided to form a co-partnership in the practice of Medicine and Surgery in Medford and, in order to make the proper arrangements for such co-partnership, those indebted to either of us will confer a favor by settling their accounts at their earliest convenience.
    Our offices will be as heretofore until the rooms which we have engaged in Williams' brick building are completed.
                                                                        R. PRYCE, M.D.
                                                                        E. P. GEARY, M.D.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885 et seq., page 3


    Drs. R. Pryce and E. P. Geary of Medford have formed a partnership for the practice of medicine. They will make a strong team, as both are acknowledged as fine physicians and surgeons.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 14, 1885, page 3

 
Accidents.
    Ed. Saltmarsh, son of Jos. Saltmarsh, of Sterlingville, who is living with Claus Kleinhammer of Medford precinct, cut his foot quite badly one day last week, while cutting wood. Dr. Pryce was summoned who informs us that it will be some time before he wound is thoroughly healed, as it is a severe one.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 20, 1885, page 3


    Doctors E. P. Geary and R. Pryce, of Medford, have formed a copartnership.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 20, 1885, page 3


    Thos. Chavner of Gold Hill is lying seriously ill at his home of bronchitis. Dr. Pryce of Medford is the attending physician.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 21, 1885, page 3


   Attention is called to the business card of Doctors Pryce and Geary of Medford, who recently formed a copartnership for the practice of their profession. Both are excellent physicians and clever gentlemen.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 27, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Pryce of Medford called yesterday and reports health too good for his business in that locality.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 20, 1886, page 3


      Dr. Pryce has been in Jacksonville at different times during the week. He is kept busy.
“Medford Squibs,” Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 26, 1886, page 2



Monday 3rd
    Morning work, am a little better. Read in Lange's Commentary on Genesis. Drs. Geary and Pryce came to see Mrs. Taylor's eyes and decided to try and get her system in better condition before operating on her eyes. Evening work, read papers.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, January 3, 1887


Friday 7th
    After breakfast and family worship we returned home and found Drs. Geary and Pryce here getting ready to perform an operation on old Mrs. Taylor's eyes. Clark Taylor and his son were here waiting also to see it done. Well, Dr. Geary removed a cataract from her eye, and so far it is a grand success. Lord bless it for Jesus' sake.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, January 7, 1887


    Doctors Pryce and Geary have handsome offices in Hamlin's block and are kept busy responding to calls.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 28, 1887, page 3


Sabbath 30th
    Morning work. Rode down to Medford and received the following members to our church: Dr. R. Pryce, Mrs. Rose Robinson, Mrs. L. J. Foster, Martha Howard, Helen Haskins, George H. Haskins, J. R. West, Susie West; and baptized Helen Haskins, G. H. Haskins, Mrs. L. J. Foster, Martha Howard. Returned home. After dinner Mr. Charles Hoxie came with his wagon and took old Mrs. Taylor and Myra Wheeler down to Medford to go home tonight in the [railroad] cars to Grants Pass. Evening work.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, January 30, 1887


    Considerable sickness is reported in this vicinity by Doctors Geary and Pryce, who are kept busy attending to calls.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1887, page 2


    Mr. Baker, Dr. Pryce, J. C. Cowles and others are busy setting out shade trees in front of their property on C Street.
"Medford Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 19, 1887, page 3


Thursday 28th
    Morning work, Greek Testament, studied sermon much of the day. Mrs. Pigney of Grants Pass came about 8 A.M. to make us a visit. In the evening Dr. Pryce brought Miss Emma Coleman to make us a visit. Will Jacks came and worked today in the orchard. Evening work.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, April 28, 1887


    Doctors Pryce and Geary have lately invested in a handsome new buggy, and now drive as fine a turnout as there is in the county.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1887, page 3


Accidents.
    A son of Squire Barkdull of Medford had one of his legs broken in two places on Wednesday evening, by falling from a pile of lumber on which he was playing. He is doing well under the treatment of Doctors Pryce & Geary.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1887, page 2


    Doctors Pryce & Geary, our progressive physicians, have introduced the new treatment for consumption, and is it working wonders in some instances. They are always up to the times and are constantly adding to the enviable reputation they already enjoy.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1887, page 2


Deaths on the Siskiyou.
    Two deaths occurred at the railroad front last week and Dr. Pryce, county coroner, was summoned to hold inquests. One of the parties, named Farley, was crushed to death in the tunnel; and the other, one Stewart, was found dead in a car. The coroner did not deem it necessary to hold an inquest in Farley's case, but in the other empaneled a jury to ascertain the facts. It was adduced that Stewart was addicted to drink and had been on a protracted spree. A verdict of death from natural causes was subsequently returned.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1887, page 3


Saturday 30th
    Morning work. Went to Medford with Mrs. Williams and attended church. By a previous appointment, election was held for Elders and Trustees, with the following result: For Elders, Dr. E. P. Geary, for 3 years
                                Dr. R. Pryce, for 2 years
                                G. H. Haskins, for 1 year
For Trustees, Dr. R. Pryce, for 3 years
                        J. S. Howard, for 2 years
                        G. H. Haskins, for 1 year
All the Elders-elect have signified their willingness to serve, except Mr. Haskins, who holds the matter under advisement until tomorrow. Guide him, O Lord, in this decision by Thy holy spirit. Returned home with Mrs. Williams. Appointed the Ordination of the Elders for tomorrow morning, before Communion.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, July 30, 1887


Sabbath 31st
    Morning work. Went with Mrs. Williams to Medford and attended Sabbath School. Afterwards, before Communion services began, I ordained the two Elders-elect, who accepted the office, Dr. E. P. Geary and Dr. R. Pryce, the former for 3 years, the latter for 2 years. Then followed the Communion services. Returned home by 2 P.M. Took collection for Board of Home Missions, $10.75.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, July 31, 1887


    Dr. R. Pryce of Medford has gone to Yaquina Bay for a few days' recreation.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1887, page 3


Tuesday 16th
    Morning work. Mrs. Williams and I went to Medford first, then on to Jacksonville and attended to business. Returned towards home by Mr. Stewart's and called there quite a while. They gave us watermelons, tomatoes and sweet potatoes. Returned home before dark. Consulted with Drs. Geary and Pryce, who advised me to go to the mountains and quit work. They also gave me some medicine.
[Rev. Williams had been feeling poorly for quite some time. Many Rogue Valley residents spent part of summer months "rusticating" in the mountains to unwind, pick berries and avoid the heat.]
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, August 16, 1887


    Dr. R. Pryce of Medford has returned from his trip to Yaquina Bay.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1887, page 3


    Dr. Pryce has returned from his trip to Strawberry Valley, Cal. The demand for his services made his stay necessarily very short.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 2


Sabbath 16th
    Took Mr. Plymale's coach for Mr. Hanley's. Met Mr. Pape on the way, coming for me. So I exchanged the coach for his buggy and arrived about 9 A.M., got some breakfast. Then got some facts about Mrs. Hanley, and went a long train to Jacksonville, and preached the sermon in the Presbyterian Church to a full house. Brother Ennis took part. Went to the Cemetery and a great crowd gathered. Talked at the grave, and Brother Ennis also. Returned nearly home with Dr. Pryce, when a Mr. Stewart overtook us, and wanted the Dr. to come and set a broken leg. Mr. Stewart brought me to my gate, when I walked. Glad to meet Mrs. Williams and to get home.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, October 16, 1887
 

Saturday 5th
    Morning work, Greek Testament, studied sermon, read papers. Dr. Pryce of Medford came to see me about his recent fall [into temptation], and spree ["spree" is underlined]. God seems to have brought him to deep repentance.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, November 5, 1887
 

Sabbath 6th
    Morning work. Went to Medford with Mrs. Williams and sat in the Bible Class, preached at 11 A.M. Lord my God, bless Thy truth. Before I began my sermon, Dr. Pryce began and confessed his intoxication before all the people, and requested them to remember him in their prayers.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, November 6, 1887


Tuesday 6th
    Sick. Drs. Geary and Pryce visited me.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, December 6, 1887


Wednesday 7th and Thursday 8th
    Sick, but better somewhat. Thursday Dr. Pryce visited me today, and thought I was better. Brother Ennis came to visit me and spent the day. Gathered some apples in the orchard for his family, and has stopped with us all night.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, December 7-8, 1887


    We are glad to announce that our citizens appreciate the value of vaccination, and Doctors Pryce and Geary have been kept busy distributing bovine virus.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3


    The firm of Pryce & Geary of Medford, the well-known physicians and surgeons, will soon be dissolved. Elsewhere will be found their notice calling upon those indebted to call and settle at once.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1888, page 3


SETTLE-UP NOTICE.
ALL THOSE KNOWING THEMSELVES indebted to the undersigned, either by note or book account, are hereby earnestly requested to call and settle at their earliest convenience. Our business must be closed.
PRYCE & GEARY.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1888, page 3


    Drs. Pryce & Geary, of Medford, call upon all who are indebted to them to make settlement, either by cash or note, as soon as possible. Dr. Geary has sold out in Medford, and is preparing to move to Seattle as soon as he can settle his business affairs.
    Dr. E. P. Geary has sold his house and lots in Medford to his partner, Dr. R. Pryce, and will move to Seattle as soon as he can settle his business affairs in this county. Dr. Geary has gained a high reputation and a large practice in this valley, and many people will regret to see him leave.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 18, 1888, page 3


    Dr. Pryce of Medford is one of the best and most popular physicians in southern Oregon, and has filled the office of coroner very efficiently and acceptably for one term. The size of his majority is hard to estimate now, as it will be very large.
"Our Ticket," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1888, page 2


    Dr. Pryce is kept very busy and his practice extends the length and breadth of Rogue River Valley. He was a few days since called to Ashland, in consultation with Doctors Parson and Beebe, in the cases of Mesdames Wilson and Dollarhide, who have been dangerously ill.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1888, page 3


    Dr. Pryce's team took fright in Heber Grove a few days since and demolished the buggy to which they were attached.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1888, page 3


    We regret very much to hear of the serious illness of George Nichols of Chimney Rock precinct. Dr. Pryce is attending him and will doubtless bring him around all right.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 8, 1888, page 3


    Dr. Pryce is kept quite busy attending to his extensive practice.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1888, page 3


    Frank Galloway's little son is suffering with diphtheria, and has been in a critical condition. Doctors Pryce and Geary were obliged to practice tracheotomy upon him, and this very difficult operation so far gives evidence of success.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 20, 1888, page 2


    Dr. Pryce has gone to Portland for treatment in St. Vincent's Hospital. We hope to hear of his early recovery.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 27, 1888, page 2


    We are very much pleased to see Dr. Pryce, the skilled physician and surgeon, on our streets once more. He has returned from Portland much improved in health.
    Dr. Geary, assisted by several of our physicians, performed an operation upon the six-year-old son of Frank Galloway, who has been suffering with membranous croup. It is not often that tracheotomy is performed so successfully.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Pryce of Medford was in town Monday, and is in the best of health, we are glad to say.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Pryce was at Grants Pass during the week.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Pryce was at the county seat Tuesday. He is kept busy with professional calls.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1889, page 3


    The Catholic congregation of Medford are under obligations to Dr. R. Pryce for his donation of the fence posts in their new church enclosure.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1889, page 3


    Will. Farra, who was stricken with spinal meningitis, is recovering steadily. Dr. Pryce is in attendance.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 3


    Wm. Jones, living near Medford, has been prostrated for some time with typho-malarial fever. Dr. Pryce of Medford is attending him, and the worst stage of the disease is past.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Pryce returned last week from his mountain trip to the Dead Indian country, much improved in health.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Pryce has attractive office apartments on the second floor of Mrs. Stanley's new building.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Pryce is getting about again from a severe attack of typhoid fever.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 3


    Mrs. Samuel Potter of Eagle Point has been in Medford undergoing treatment at the hands of Dr. Pryce during the past week. She has been in poor health for a long time.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1889, page 3


    Miss Ollie Freeland of Albany has been in Medford during the week, undergoing medical treatment at the hands of Dr. Pryce. Her residence while here has been at Frank Galloway's.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Pryce returned home from Colestin last week, much the better for his trip.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890, page 3


    Mrs. H. G. Shock, Miss Amy Safford and Miss Sophie Simon of Little Butte precinct are all on the highway to health after attacks of typhoid fever. Dr. Pryce was the attending physician in each case.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 3


    The local medical examining board of the pension department, consisting of Doctors Pryce, Geary and Wait, has examined a large number of applicants during the past two weeks--some fifteen or twenty in all.
Ashland Tidings, June 5, 1891, page 2


    Dr. Pryce has returned from his trip to Cinnabar, much improved in health. He was gone several weeks.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1891, page 2


    Dr. R. Pryce is called upon to exercise his skill from Yreka to Grants Pass, and is steadily extending his practice.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1891, page 2


    Dr. Pryce is recovering from a severe attack of malarial fever.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 11, 1891, page 2


    Dr. Pryce, of Medford, met with a bad accident on Monday of last week. After a wasting spell of sickness he rose in a feverish delirium and stepped or fell out of a second-story window to the ground below, breaking several ribs and injuring himself severely, so that he was for a time in a critical condition. He was improving at last report.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 18, 1891, page 3


    Dr. Pryce, who fell out of his window during the temporary absence of his nurse, while delirious from fever, one night last week, and sustained two broken ribs in consequence of his fall, is in a fair way to recover again; but was badly shaken up.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 25, 1891, page 3


    The canard about Dr. Pryce having had several ribs broken was circulated over the county before he became well enough to deny it. He was much amused when he first heard of it. He is rapidly improving in health.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 1, 1892, page 2


    Henry Smith died Sunday evening at Grants Pass after an illness of only a few days. Kidney trouble was the cause. Mr. Smith was extensively known throughout Jackson County and Southern Oregon as a man of sterling business qualities. His investments covered a large territory and are reported all in a flourishing condition. Among other things he had a large sawmill and a general store at Wolf Creek and was interested largely in timber land, also a large store in Grants Pass and our immense general store in this city of which F. L. Cranfill is the manager. Mr. Cranfill and Dr. Pryce left on Sunday evening for the bedside of the patient but arrived only in time to take part in the last sad rites. The funeral took place Tuesday at Wolf Creek and many sorrowing friends attended the burial.
"Local News," Medford Mail, January 21, 1892, page 3


    Dr. Pryce is on his way to Portland to recuperate.

"Local News," Medford Mail, January 21, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce is back from the Willamette much improved in health.

"Local News," Medford Mail, February 11, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce will leave the valley soon in search of health and rest.

"Local News," Medford Mail, March 3, 1892, page 3


Notice.
    Dr. R. Pryce will leave Medford for a time because of ill health, and all those knowing themselves to be indebted to him are requested to call and settle with him within a short time or pay the amount to the Jackson County Bank.
Medford, March 3, 1892.           
Medford Mail, March 3-24, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce will leave Medford for a short time in the hope of benefiting his health. We hope that he will return soon, as he is a first-class surgeon and physician.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1892, page 2

 
    Dr. Pryce was called to Halsey Sunday to attend the bedside of the daughter of a prominent citizen of that place.
"Local News," Medford Mail, March 10, 1892, page 3



    Dr. Pryce went to Halsey, Linn County, to hold a consultation in a critical case. His services are in demand everywhere.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1892, page 2


    Dr. R. Pryce will depart for Klamath land, Friday, in search of much-needed rest and recreation.

"Local News," Medford Mail, April 7, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce has gone to Linkville to spend a few months in that high altitude for the benefit of his health. He is one of the best physicians in the state, and we hope that he will return to our midst in the near future, fully restored.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 8, 1892, page 3


    Dr. Pryce, of Medford, has arrived. The Doctor is a patient suffering from lung disease and has chosen the climate of Klamath in preference to that of Colorado. He is staying at the Hotel Linkville, where the fare is first class, the attendance courteous and tireless, and the rest and refreshment delightful. Dr. Pryce made a good choice.--Klamath Star.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, April 22, 1892, page 3

 
    Dr. Pryce, of Medford, has gone to Bly to obtain a "higher altitude," as he expresses it. When he reaches that elevated region he will be a high Pryce, though he will not, we hope, be unpopular on that account. High prices are in order to the north and east of Klamath Falls, anyhow.--Klamath Star.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, May 6, 1892, page 3


    Dr. Pryce is now at Bonanza, having returned from Bly to that lively town for a few days' visit.
"Klamath News," Southern Oregon Mail, May 13, 1892, page 2

 

    Dr. Pryce, of Medford, was in town from the Bonanza country Tuesday, en route to Medford. "Doc" Leavitt took him down to Ager.--Klamath Star.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, May 20, 1892, page 3

 

    Dr. R. Pryce is at Keno, Klamath County.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, June 24, 1892, page 3

 

    Dr. Pryce, after an absence of several months recuperating in the Klamath country and at the springs, returned to Medford last week much improved in health. He left for Cinnabar this week for another rest.
    While on the way to Cinnabar this week Dr. Pryce fell from a buggy and sustained severe injuries, not the least among which is a broken arm. He is under medical attendance in this vicinity.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, July 22, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce, while on his way to Cinnabar last Wednesday morning, fell to the ground from the wagon on which he was riding with such force as to break an arm. Dr. DeBar was summoned and set the broken limb, bringing his patient back with him.
"Accidents," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3


    Dr. Pryce, who has been in Klamath County for some time, returned last week. His health was not improved much while there, as the weather was cold most of the time.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3

 

    Dr. R. Pryce is back and his arm is doing well.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, September 2, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce, our skilled physician, has returned and is wearing his arm in a sling.
"Medford Items," Valley Record, Ashland, September 8, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce is gradually recovering the use of his broken arm. He has returned to Medford.
    Dr. Pryce was called to Ashland during the week, to attend the wife of W. L. Townsend of this place, who is quite sick at the residence of her father, Dan Chapman.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1892, page 2

 

    Dr. R. Pryce and W. H. Parker registered at the Gilman in Portland a few days ago.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, September 23, 1892, page 3


    Dr. Pryce, the well-known physician, has gone to Forest Grove to receive treatment at the Keeley Institute at that place. We hope that he will return completely cured.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 3

 

    Dr. R. Pryce is at Forest Grove, receiving treatment at the Keeley Institute.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, September 30, 1892, page 3


    E. W. Starr, who is working on the Chavner residence at Gold Hill, will soon be through that job, the contract being about completed.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, October 7, 1892, page 3

 

    Dr. R. Pryce, who has been at Forest Grove taking the Keeley cure, has been discharged and pronounced cured of the whisky habit. He is at present in Portland at St. Mary's hospital, resting up.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, October 28, 1892, page 3

 

    Dr. R. Pryce is back from the Willamette.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, November 4, 1892, page 3


    Dr. Pryce, who has been undergoing the Keeley cure at Forest Grove, has been pronounced cured, much to the delight of his many friends. He was still at Portland at last account.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville,
November 4, 1892, page 3


    Dr. Pryce, of Medford, who has taken the Keeley treatment at Forest Grove, is recuperating at one of the hospitals in Portland and will soon start out in the practice of his profession again free from the liquor habit.

"Personal,"
Ashland Tidings, November 11, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce is in San Jose, Cal., to spend a portion of the winter.

"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, November 17, 1892, page 1


    Dr. R. Pryce has gone to California for the benefit of his health.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1892, page 3


    In speaking of the Keeley Institute of Forest Grove, Dr. R. Pryce in a private letter to the Times office says: "I am so glad I took the treatment at Forest Grove. I am an entirely different man. My system does not demand liquor any more.  You cannot imagine what a relief it is to be free from the continual and incessant struggling of my former condition." The doctor is conceded to be one of the finest physicians ever located in southern Oregon, and his words ought to have much weight with those afflicted with the drink habit.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1893, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce is now at Phoenix, A.T., in the hope of getting relief from throat and lung troubles, from which he has been suffering for some time past. He will probably not return home before spring.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1893, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce last week returned home from his trip to Arizona, much improved in general health.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1893, page 3


 

    Dr. R. Pryce returned to Medford last week from Phoenix, Arizona, whither he went some time ago in hopes of improving his health by change of climate. The change while not detrimental was not particularly beneficial, hence his return, and it is possible the change back to his home again may be of benefit. We will all hope for his improved health.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, March 10, 1893, page 3


    Dr. Pryce made the Times office a call during the week. We are sorry to learn that he is suffering with lung disease.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 17, 1893, page 3

 

    Since Dr. Pryce's return to our city his health has improved somewhat, and while the good doctor is hardly rugged enough to do service as a harvest hand he is quite equal to the occasion of writing prescriptions, and he desires us to say to the people hereabouts that he will prescribe for all who will call at his C Street residence.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, March 24, 1893, page 3


    We are sorry to learn that Dr. Pryce, who went to Arizona for the benefit of his health, is not improved by his trip.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 24, 1893, page 3


    Dr. Pryce is again able to take partial charge of his medical practice, and will write prescriptions for all who call at his C Street residence. He is gradually recovering his health, it is hoped.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 31, 1893, page 3


    We are pleased to note the fact that Dr. R. Pryce is rapidly recovering his health and is again able to resume the active practice of his profession.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 14, 1893, page 3

 

    Dr. Pryce was called to Ashland Wednesday morning by a telegram, to attend professionally at the bedside of banker Adkinson, who, since his arrival from Oakland, has been quite ill and is now lying in a critical condition.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, April 21, 1893, page 3

 

    Dr. Pryce left for Portland Sunday evening to remain a few days.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, May 19, 1893, page 3


    C. W. Stuart will soon finish the fence that encloses the Chavner house. This residence is one of the finest homes in Southern Oregon, and is situated in a grove of oaks and laurels.
"Gold Hill Nuggets," Medford Mail, May 19, 1893, page 4


    A residence is being completed at the Chavner farm near Gold Hill, which is one of the handsomest, most commodious and convenient in southern Oregon.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 26, 1893, page 3


    Mrs. Col. Stone of Yreka, Cal. is in Medford under Dr. Pryce's treatment for asthma, and is somewhat improved.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1893, page 2


    Last Saturday Dr. Geary performed the surgical operation of amputating a leg for Joseph Robison, of Talent. Mr. Robison has been a sufferer from this diseased member for many years and has spent a great amount of money in doctoring, but to no avail. The bone had become badly diseased and in fact was dead at the time of amputation. The limb was taken off between the knee and hip--at a point known to surgeons as the upper third. Dr. Geary was assisted in the operation by Drs. Pryce, Wait and Pickel. At last accounts the patient was doing nicely.
Medford Mail, June 23, 1893, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce of Medford called on us yesterday. We are pleased to learn that his health is improving.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1893, page 3



      Married.--At the bride's residence in Willow Springs precinct, on Sunday, September 10, 1893, Dr. R. Pryce, of Medford, and Miss Mary A. Chavner, daughter of the late Thomas Chavner, of Willow Springs, Judge H. K. Hanna, officiating. Dr. Pryce is one of Medford's most eminent physicians, and has many warm friends who will be glad of this occasion to congratulate him. The bride is a highly cultured and refined young lady and has a host of friends in the locality where she resides. As to where these happy people will reside is not definitely known, but it is quite probable their home will be in the Willow Springs precinct, where the bride owns a large new farm dwelling house. The young lady is quite wealthy, being one of three children who inherit their father's property, valued at $100,000.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, September 15, 1893, page 3


    Last Monday night the good people of Gold Hill concluded to serenade Dr. and Mrs. Pryce on the event of their wedding. Accordingly, the band boys, headed by I. Deboy, leader; assisted by T. E. Hammersley, alto; Orris Crawford, baritone; Geo. Bryant, snare drum; Walter Bryant, first cornet; F. Blevins, second cornet; Bert Thomas, cornet; R. Fitzgerald, 2d tenor; Alec Carter, bass; Frank Parker, first alto; Henry Ray, bass drum; Geo. Carter, tenor, headed the procession. After the band came Mr. Ray, wife and daughter Lora, Mr. A. J. Barlow, wife and daughter Nellie, Mrs. Crawford, the Misses Katie Parker, Inez Fitzgerald, Maggie Hammersley and Ollie Marksberry, Messrs. Bart, Signorotti, H. Mansfield and last, but not least, W. P. Jacoby, who acted as master of ceremonies. On arriving at the premises the band struck up the wedding march and discoursed some excellent music. In fact, it may be said the boys fairly outstepped themselves. The doors were opened, and all invited into the spacious parlors. The doctor and his amiable wife were taken completely by surprise. The doctor, whose powers as a physician are acknowledged, was not a success as a parlor orator. He undertook to make a speech, but frankly confessed that he was not a speech maker. Mrs. Pryce, however, went to his rescue and said some very pleasant things. Mrs. Pryce was born and raised near Gold Hill, and on account of her womanly ways and genuine, true goodness has endeared herself to all who know her. The doctor presented the band boys with ten dollars for refreshment expenses, and after hearty congratulations and a pleasant good night, the crowd wended their way to their respective homes.
"Gold Hill Items," Ashland Tidings, September 15, 1893, page 2


    Dr. R. Pryce, who is now located at The Dardanelles, is improving in health, we are pleased to learn. He is one of the most learned and skillful physicians in the Northwest and has a host of friends, who hope to hear of his complete recovery.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 22, 1893, page 3

 

    Dr. Pryce was about the city yesterday doing the "handsome" to his many friends by setting up elegant Havanas--no five-for-ten but a good article of the smoker's delight, and this is in honor of his recent marriage.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, September 29, 1893, page 3


MR. JOHN M. HANLEY
    resides just north of Rev. Craven's place. There are about three lots in this plat, and the same is quite nicely laid out and a quite cozy residence is located upon it. Mr. Hanley has lived in Jackson County for a number of years and is at present one of Medford's businessmen. The residence property occupied by Mr. H. belongs to Dr. Pryce.
Medford Mail, October 13, 1893, page 1


 
    Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Pryce, of Gold Hill, were visiting Medford friends a few days last week.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 20, 1893, page 3


    We are sorry to learn that Dr. R. Pryce, the well-known physician, is lying quite ill at his residence in Gold Hill precinct.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 18, 1894, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce of Gold Hill is said to be dangerously ill with consumption.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 2, 1894, page 3


    Our Gold Hill correspondent reports Dr. Pryce improving in health. The doctor has many friends hereabouts to whom this will be glad news.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, May 18, 1894, page 3


    Dr. Pryce is improving slowly.

"Gold Hill Nuggets," Medford Mail, May 18, 1894, page 4


    We are sorry to state that our friend Dr. Pryce is very low at this writing.

"Gold Hill Nuggets," Medford Mail, June 15, 1894, page 4


    We are sorry to say that Dr. Pryce, of the Dardanelles, is no better.

"Kanes Creek Items," Medford Mail, June 15, 1894, page 4



    The report of the death at gold Hill of Dr. R. Pryce, the well-known physician, is unfounded.
"The City and Vicinity," Roseburg Plaindealer, June 21, 1894, page 3


    Dr. Pryce was reported yesterday to be resting very easy--in fact better than he has been for a number of days.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, June 22, 1894, page 3


Sabbath 19th
    Morning work, Greek Testament, Haldane, etc. This evening a messenger came, a Mr. Lawton, to request me to preach the funeral service of Dr. Pryce on next Tuesday at 1:30 P.M. in the Presbyterian Church, Medford.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, August 19, 1894


Monday 20th
    Morning work, Greek Testament. Studied funeral sermon for tomorrow. Rode down to Dr. Geary's and got a little history of Dr. Pryce for the funeral.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, August 20, 1894


Tuesday 21st
    Morning work, Greek Testament. Went down to Medford and preached the funeral sermon of Dr. Roland Pryce. Then went to Jacksonville in the cars, and had some talk at the grave. Returned to Medford by the cars, and from there Dr. Geary brought me home. Bless all, O Lord.
Diary of Rev. Moses Allen Williams, August 21, 1894


    Dr. R. Pryce died at Gold Hill early Monday morning, after several months suffering from consumption.
"Central Point Items," Ashland Tidings, August 23, 1894, page 2


    Dr. R. Pryce died at his home near Gold Hill Wednesday of consumption, after an illness of over a year. The doctor was one of the first settlers of Medford, having located in southern Oregon about 12 years ago, when the town of Medford was started.

"The City and Vicinity," Roseburg Plaindealer, August 23, 1894, page 3


    The funeral of Dr. Roland Pryce took place Tuesday. Services were held at the Presbyterian Church in Medford, and the interment was in Jacksonville Cemetery. A large concourse of friends followed the remains to that last resting place.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, August 23, 1894, page 2


    Dr. R. Pryce, who was a practicing physician at Medford for a number of years, but became a victim of consumption in consequence of an attack of pneumonia caused by reckless exposure of his health some three years ago, died at the Chavner home near Gold Hill last Sunday morning. After a stay in Arizona Dr. Pryce returned to this valley about a year ago, and was married last fall to a daughter of the late Thos. Chavner. He was a native of Ireland [sic] and received a good education, graduating at a college in Dublin. Dr. Pryce was a successful practitioner, and but for a fateful weakness which led him to periodical excess in liquors and finally undermined his health, he would have taken a high rank anywhere in the profession.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 23, 1894, page 3


Death of Dr. Pryce.
    Dr. Roland Pryce, formerly practicing physician in this city, died at his farm residence near Gold Hill, last Sunday morning of consumption. The doctor had been in poor health for a couple or three years and for the past eight or ten months had been confined to his bed. He was one of the leading physicians of the valley and had a very large practice. He leaves a wife and many warm friends who sorely grieve his demise. He was forty-six years of age and had lived in Medford about twelve years. Funeral services were held in the Presbyterian Church Tuesday, Rev. Williams conducting the services. Interment was made in the Jacksonville Cemetery.
Medford Mail, August 24, 1894, page 3


In Memory of Dr. Roland Pryce.
    Roland Pryce, M.D., C.M., was born near Machynlleth, Wales, March 31, 1848, and died at his country home near Gold Hill, August 19, 1894, aged 46 years, 4 months and 19 days. In his early youth his parents removed to Liverpool, England, where he received his rudimentary education. His father was a lumber dealer and shipping merchant, and carried on an extensive business. His parents were both church members, his father belonging to the Church of England and his mother to the Presbyterian Church, and he was raised under strict religious influences. He inherited from his father his wonderful executive ability, and from his mother, who was a woman of great piety and force of character, his fine mental temperament and exalted spirituality, blending in him a personality gifted with the most delicate sensitiveness and extraordinary skill, and an idealized conception of spiritual things, which exalted and refined his entire nature. He was sent to Trinity College, Dublin, where he completed his education. Choosing the medical profession for his life work, he entered Ledwick Medical College, Dublin, where he completed the prescribed course of study with high honors, carrying off the highest prize in the anatomical contest in a class of three hundred, for which his native town presented him with a handsomely engraved gold watch which he carried until his death. Returning to Liverpool, he followed one of those sudden impulses that so often changed the current of his eventful life and married a Miss Williams, and embarked at once for America, without receiving his degrees from the Royal College of Surgeons, to which he was entitled by the successful and honorable completion of his studies. Arriving in America he first located in Newark, Ohio, where he was appointed surgeon to a large coal company. Here his only child, William Roland Pryce, was born. Soon afterward he removed with his family to Hillsboro, Oregon, when, his marriage proving a most unhappy one, a separation ensued. He came south about twelve years ago and located in Phoenix, in this county, and after a few years' practice went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, to attend a course of lectures, where he received his degrees. On his return he located at Medford, where he practiced medicine with great success until his health failed completely. Six years since he met Miss Mary A. Chavner, the lady who afterwards became his wife. In her he found the embodiment of all his finer conceptions of womanhood. All through life his mother had been the guardian angel whose benign presence had shed a ray serene upon his pathway. But a new chord had been touched in his heart; a new hope like a white-winged angel spread its pinions o'er him, and henceforth twin stars came out upon his horizon and ruled his destiny. He loved the gentle maiden with all the ardor of his intense nature, and in full measure she gave back to him her unchanging devotion. His health, which had become impaired by his devotion to his professional duties, gave no promise of improvement, and he visited Arizona, hoping to be benefited by the change of climate. After several months' sojourn there he returned to his home in Southern Oregon nothing better but rather worse. He found his affianced wife true to her plighted troth, and they were married September 10, 1893, by Judge H. K. Hanna. For three months, blessed with the companionship of his devoted wife and surrounded by all the loving endearments of home, his health seemed to improve, and he basked in the sunshine of an earthly Eden. In January, 1894, pulmonary disease fastened itself upon him and for seven months he bravely battled with the fell destroyer, while he whispered words of love and consolation to his sorrowing wife, whose hopes and prayers were so soon to be crushed by the relentless hand of certainty. He had been for many years a communicant of the Presbyterian Church, and as the summer months waxed and waned, his physical strength grew weaker while his spiritual nature expanded in the fading sunset of earthly dissolution. On Sunday morning, August 19th, 1894, while the church bells all over the land were sending heavenward their joyous chimes, the pale watcher in the sickroom noticed a sudden change, and before a full sense of the awful reality dawned upon her, with a weary sigh the husband fell back in the arms of his faithful wife, dead, while the freed and happy spirit returned to the God that gave it. In that hallowed room, where a few months before had been consummated the marriage rites, a lonely and heartbroken wife now knelt beside the bier which held the mortal remains of her departed husband. "God's full orbed peace was shining on head and hand, on lip and eye, on folded arms, on pale unmoving breast." When death comes thus how sad it seems; the same hands that turned the bridal wreath now shape the funeral flowers, and hopes that shed their benison on a bright young life are now blotted out forever. But Dr. Roland Pryce still lives in blessed memory enshrined in the heart of a devoted wife, cherished by the son who bears his name, honored and beloved by his associates in his professional life, and held in everlasting gratitude by the many patients his wonderful skill relieved. This is not death; the good in every man lives on, fortified by the sorrows of earthly separation. Beyond the cares of earth, life basking in the sunlight of God's eternal love and goodness, he bides the time when waiting angels shall "open wide the mystic gates" and give back to him the wife and friends who now so sadly mourn him. The funeral took place at his former home in Medford. The Presbyterian Church was decorated with flowers, and many beautiful floral offerings mutely testified to the high esteem in which he was held. The interment was in the Jacksonville Cemetery, and many sorrowing friends followed the remains to their last resting place. Requiescat in pace.
Medford Mail, September 21, 1894, page 2


    Mrs. M. A. Pryce, of Gold Hill, is attending the Chautauqua at Ashland.
"Personal,"
The Monitor-Miner, Medford, July 16, 1896, page 3


    F. M. Wilson, the baker, has rented the Pryce residence, on South C Street, and will move his family thereto next week.

Medford Mail, March 16, 1900, page 6


    Surveyor Garl T. Jones was at Gold Hill Monday surveying out some town property for Mrs. Pryce.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, December 27, 1901, page 4


    L. L. Jacobs, the genial bookkeeper of the Jackson County Bank, has purchased the Pryce residence, situated on C Street [approximately 127 South Central--lot 10, block 15], paying $700 therefor. He will have it improved at once. W. B. Roberts bought the south half of the lots on which the dwelling stands.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1902, page 5


    ROLAND PRYCE was born in North Wales in 1848, growing to manhood in his native land, where he received a fine education. He attended Dublin Medical College, after which he came to the United States, settling first in the state of Vermont. From a residence in Vermont he removed to Ohio, and later came to Hillsboro, Ore., where he lived for a few years, after which he located in Medford. He practiced his profession of physician and surgeon after coming to the United States and met with entire success in his work. September 10, 1893, he was united in marriage with Mary A. Chavner, who was born in Jackson County, and in 1893 they removed to the ranch which had been the property of Mrs. Pryce's father, where they lived at the time of Dr. Pryce's death in 1894. He was then a prominent and influential physician of the community with a large and lucrative practice, to the attention of which he gave the effort and energy of a practical knowledge. He was also largely interested in the political affairs of the community, serving as county coroner for several terms in the interests of the Democratic Party, of whose principles he was a staunch adherent. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 202



Last revised August 8, 2016