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Medford Saloons

News about Medford saloons.


    The money that is invested in property and business in this town [Jacksonville] will remain where it is, and will continue to improve and increase under the influence of the new encouragement afforded by the railroad. Imaginative corner lots on the direct line of the road will continue to be cultivated in corn and wheat, and the ideal town [i.e., Medford] will evaporate entirely, or sink into the insignificance of a second-class saloon and a railroad lunch house.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 19, 1883, page 3


    Some are waiting to see what the central depot [at Medford] will amount to. Dr. Crook is already making arrangements to build a saloon and lunch house there.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 16, 1883, page 3


    Medford has one saloon, and a multitude of others are expected soon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 21, 1883, page 3


    Betterton & Work have a building already in use as a saloon, and T. E. Stanley intends to build for the same business.
Ashland Tidings, December 21, 1883, page 3


    Betterton & Co. have opened a saloon at Medford and keep excellent liquors. T. E. Stanley and some others propose engaging in the same business there soon.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 28, 1883, page 3


    Mr. Byers has begun laying brick for the second brick building of Byers & Jacobs at Medford. It will be two stories high. The walls of the smaller building are up ready for the joist.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1884, page 3


    Betterton & Work have retired from the saloon business at Medford. The former has gone to other scenes and the latter is now in the employ of T. E. Stanley.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1884, page 3


    The new brick buildings at Medford, owned by Byers and Jacobs, are fine structures and will make beautiful stores. Baruch Fisher has rented the one on the side street [Main] and will open a general merchandise store there. The others are being negotiated for by outside parties, and as they are connected the owners are making an effort to rent them to one party as one large store.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 17, 1884, page 3


    Baruch Fisher will open a store in one of Byers & Jacobs' brick buildings at Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 23, 1884, page 3


    Baruch Fisher has got his store at Medford opened out in one of Byar's new bricks and is now ready for business. He keeps nearly everything but will make a specialty of goods required by the fair sex.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 24, 1884, page 3


    W. G. Kenney and H. H. Wolters have rented the corner room of Byers & Co.'s brick building in Medford and will open a saloon in about two weeks.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1884, page 3


    H. H. Wolters and Wm. Kenney will open a saloon in Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 6, 1884, page 3


    Frank Kasshafer is tending bar at Noland & Ulrich's saloon at Medford while the junior member of the firm is getting settled down to married life.
    The corner room in Byers & Jacobs' new brick at Medford has been rented by W. G. Kenney and H. H. Wolters, who will open a saloon at that place. They propose fitting it up in fine style, will keep none but the best of liquors and cigars and will be ready for business in a couple of weeks.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 7, 1884, page 3


    W. G. Kenney has returned from Portland, where he has been laying in a stock of goods for the new saloon at Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1884, page 3


    W. G. Kenney returned from Portland this week where he purchased a stock of liquors and cigars for the saloon of Kenney & Wolters at Medford.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 14, 1884, page 3


    W. G. Kenney and H. H. Wolters, who are getting the corner room of Byers & Co.'s brick building at Medford in readiness for a saloon, expect to have it in running order in a few days. It will be one of the finest business places of the kind in southern Oregon.
"Random Jottings," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1884, page 1


    Wolters & Kenney opened their fine saloon at Medford this week.
    Ed. Work of Medford was in town Wednesday. He did not come alone.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1884, page 3


W. G. KENNEY                               H. H. WOLTERS
THE GEM SALOON
--AT--
MEDFORD, OREGON,
Kenney & Wolters.
----
    Having opened our saloon in the new brick building of Byers & Co. at Medford we are now prepared to furnish any kind of a drink that can be called for, made with liquors that are acknowledged to be the best in the market.
A Fine Billiard Table
will also be found at this house and on the tables you can find the leading pictorial and sporting papers of the day. Give us a trial.
KENNEY & WOLTERS
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 21, 1884 et seq., page 2


    The Gem Saloon at Medford, Kenney & Wolters proprietors, has opened out for business and is one of the neatest places in this end of the State. One of the latest style billiard tables can also be found there and all the fixtures and liquids are in keeping with the age of progress. Give Bill and Ham a call and we will guarantee that you are treated well.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 21, 1884, page 3


   Wolters & Kenney of Medford were this week granted license to retail liquor at that place.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1884, page 3


    A neat and novel sign, the work of a local artist, now ornaments the Gem Saloon at Medford, owned by Kenney & Wolters. A fine new billiard table can also be found there as well as at the Railroad Saloon of Noland & Ulrich.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 26, 1884, page 3


    Kenney & Wolters, of the Gem Saloon at Medford, have just put up a nobby sign.

    The Gem and Railroad saloons at Medford each keep one of Brunswick, Balke & Co.'s celebrated billiard tables.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1884, page 3


    The handsome sign which ornaments the Gem Saloon at Medford was painted by H. Kinney of that place, who is an excellent artist.
    John Simmons, who went to Klamath County recently to look after his land interests, has returned. He has closed his saloon at Medford and will soon move back to his ranch.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1884, page 3


    John Simmons has closed his saloon at Medford and will go to farming.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 2, 1884, page 3


    W. G. Kenney of Medford is lying sick at the residence of his mother in this place. Frank Kasshafer will assist H. H. Wolters at the Gem Saloon during K.'s illness.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1884, page 3


    Frank Kasshafer officiates at the Gem Saloon at Medford during the illness of W. G. Kenney.
    W. G. Kenney was brought from Medford this week suffering with a severe attack of bilious or intermittent fever and is now at his mother's home in town. His condition was much improved at last accounts.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 16, 1884, page 3


    W. G. Kenney, having recovered from his recent sickness, is on duty again at the Gem Saloon in Medford. Frank Kasshafer has returned home.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1884, page 3


    C. S. Ferguson of Grants Pass, Noland & Ulrich of Medford and M. L. Stanley of Woodville were granted license to sell liquor.

"Commissioner's Court," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 13, 1884, page 3


    Geo. Love had a mishap at Medford Tuesday evening. He was turning his team in the vicinity of Kenney & Wolters' saloon, when the vehicle struck a stump hid by the darkness and threw George violently to the ground, bruising him somewhat. He held to the lines, however, and succeeded in stopping the horses before much harm resulted. The tongue was broken from the wagon, but no other damage was done.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1884, page 3


    A. G. Epps has rented Byers & Co.'s hall at Medford, and will turn it into a hotel.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1884, page 3


    Wm. Churchman has purchased Thos. E. Stanley's building at Medford and will conduct a first-class saloon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1884, page 3


    The Gem Saloon at Medford, Kenney & Wolters proprietors, is the boss place. A club room, fine billiard table and all the late papers of the day can be found at this place.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 22, 1884, page 3


    Only the best brands of wines, liquors and cigars are kept at the Gem Saloon, Medford.
    One of Brunswick, Balke & Co.'s celebrated billiard tables is kept at the Gem Saloon at Medford.
    When you are at Medford give Kenney & Wolters a call. Their saloon is one of the neatest and best in the State.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1884, page 3


    Everybody calls on Kenney & Wolters when at Medford.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 29, 1884, page 3


    W. G. Kenney has leased a residence at Medford. Who's who, Bill?
    Don't fail to give Kenney & Wolters a call when you visit Medford. The boys will treat you well.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 6, 1884, page 3


    Mrs. E. Kenny has removed to Medford.
    The Gem Saloon at Medford is second to none.
    The finest brands of wines, liquors and cigars always kept on hand at the Gem Saloon at Medford. One of the best billiard tables may also be found there. K. & W. will always give you a hearty welcome.
    Everybody gives Kenney & Wolters a call when in Medford, for they keep one of the neatest places in the State.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1884, page 3


    Mrs. Elizabeth Kenny is now a resident of Medford.
    The Gem Saloon at Medford, Kenney & Wolters proprietors, is the boss place. A club room, fine billiard table and all the late papers of the day can be found at this place.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 13, 1884, page 3


    The Gem at Medford has no superior among the saloons of southern Oregon. Only the best wines, liquors and cigars kept there.
    Why is the Gem Saloon the most popular place in Medford? Because everybody who visits that place calls there when in quest of liquid refreshments.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1884, page 3


    Kenney & Wolters are going to give a fine lunch at their saloon in Medford Christmas eve. Don't be afraid to call because there will be enough for all.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 20, 1884, page 3


    We learn that Wm. G. Kenney of Medford was married to Miss Mollie Snider of Roseburg this week. We congratulate them and wish them a long and prosperous life.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1884, page 3


    Mrs. E. Kenny has removed from Jacksonville to Medford.
    Wm. Kinney, of Medford, was married at Roseburg last Tuesday to Miss Mollie Ryder, of that place. They came south to Medford on the train the same day.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 26, 1884, page 3


     HYMENEAL.--W. G. Kenney of Medford and Miss Mollie Snider of Roseburg were married at the bride's residence at the last mentioned place on Tuesday of this week. They are now at Medford where Mr. Kenney is engaged in business where they will make their permanent home. We wish them good luck and happiness.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 27, 1884, page 3


    Drinks are free at the Gem Saloon at Medford. Congratulate Kenney and he don't care for expenses.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 27, 1884, page 3


    The finest brands of wines, liquors and cigars always kept on hand at the Gem Saloon at Medford. One of the best billiard tables may also be found there. K. & W. will always give you a hearty welcome.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 3, 1885, page 3


    The county commissioners' court this week granted liquor licenses to Kenney & Wolters of Medford and M. Hershberger of Central Point.    
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1885, page 3


No Shooting Done.
    Last Friday night there was a free fight at Medford, which resulted in several of the combatants being knocked out. A carpenter named Walker was the victor, until he undertook to demolish one of the proprietors of the Gem Saloon, who was acting in the role of peacemaker. He received an ugly wound in the head at the hands of W. G. [Kenney], who struck him with a self-cocking pistol that went off at the same time. Wm. Heffron of Roseburg, one of the combatants, had the index finger of his right hand so badly bitten by Walker that Dr. Geary was compelled to amputate it, and his cheek also suffered the loss of a piece of flesh. At last accounts Walker was at work at his trade, but little the worse for his exploits.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1885, page 3


    A MISTAKE.--The report that W. G. Kenney had shot a man at Medford last week was all a mistake. A general row had taken place between several parties that evening when Kenney was called from his bed to quell the disturbance and with the force required he put the disturbing party out of the house. Wm. Heffron had to have a portion of a finger amputated--the result of a fight a short time before with the same party--but is now doing well. The whole trouble was caused by "too much benzine."
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 17, 1885, page 3


    Wm. Egan and Mr. Skeel have rented Thos. McAndrews' building in Medford and will open a saloon there soon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1885, page 3


    Wm. Egan and C. W. Skeel will open another saloon at Medford in a few days.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 14, 1885, page 3


    Wm. Egan and C. W. Skeel have purchased Wm. Churchman's stock of liquors etc. at Medford and placed them in McAndrews' new building.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1885, page 3


    Egan & Skeel opened their new saloon at Medford this week.
    The Medford lodge of A.O.U.W. did not come up last night as expected--bad roads being the cause.
    A son of N. K. Lytle of this place had an arm broken at Medford the other day by falling from a fence.
    The different charter bills for Jacksonville, Ashland and Medford have all passed the two houses of the legislature and after the signature of the Governor will become law.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 21, 1885, page 3


    A. W. Carey, having purchased Wm. Egan's interest in the saloon business at Medford, will remove there with his family in a short time.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1885, page 3


    Ed. Caton and Al Carey negotiated for the purchase of certain saloon property at Medford this week but have since changed their minds and will remain here.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 14, 1885, page 3


    A CHANGE.--J. B. Riddle has leased Byers and Jacobs' brick hotel at Medford and will have it ready for the public three weeks hence. W. G. Kenney has sold his interest in the saloon to his partner, H. H. Wolters, and bought Mr. Lynch's interest in the livery stable there.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 3, 1886, page 3


    When at Medford give Wm. Egan at the Union saloon a call. He will treat you well and is always prepared to furnish something nice.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 9, 1885, page 3


    Wm. Egan, formerly saloon keeper at Medford, has gone to Lakeview to locate. He thinks of going into the stock business again.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 30, 1885, page 3


    Medford will soon have another saloon, with W H. McAdams and W. Heeley as proprietors. They propose opening July 1st and will run a first-class saloon.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 20, 1885, page 3


    Kenney & Wolters' saloon at Medford has been repainted and renovated in good style.
    There is some conflict between the authorities of Medford and parties holding liquor licenses from the county court; and the matter will be tested soon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 10, 1885, page 3


    The Gem Saloon at Medford has been renovated in fine style.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1885, page 3


    The Brewery Saloon at Medford has a new billiard table.
    The fixtures and stock in Wm. Egan's saloon at Medford were sold by the sheriff yesterday. The proprietor is said to have skipped to other scenes.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1885, page 3


    In another column will be found a notice in which the firm of Kenney & Wolters, of Medford, call on all those indebted to them either by note or book account to settle the same by September 1st. They mean just what they say and expect a prompt response as they must have money.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1885, page 3


Case to be Reviewed.
    Noland & Ulrich of Medford, being fined $50 for selling liquor without town license, intend having the action of the Recorder's court reviewed by the circuit court. They claim that they have a license from the county court [the county commissioners], and are therefore privileged to sell under it until it expires.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1885, page 3


    The firm of Noland & Ulrich at Medford were fined $30 and costs in Recorder Lawton's court at that place for selling liquor without a town license. They hold a county license and now propose testing the matter in the Circuit Court.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 22, 1885, page 3


    Medford will soon have a new brick hotel. A second story is being built on Byers' brick and the building will also be considerably enlarged. Kenney and Wolters' saloon will be moved to the room adjoining where they now are and their old stand on the corner changed to an office for the hotel. From the plans shown us we think it ought to make a commodious and well-arranged building for the purposes for which it is destined.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 26, 1885, page 3


    McAdams & Heeley now occupy their new saloon building at Medford.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 31, 1885, page 3


    McAdams & Healy's opening in their new building at Medford was well patronized and a success.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885, page 3


    W. H. McAdams is now sole proprietor of the Brewery Saloon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 4, 1885, page 3


    Kenney & Wolters have renovated the Gem Saloon in fine style.
    There will be a grand turkey raffle at the Brewery Saloon on Christmas eve; also, a shooting match next day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 11, 1885, page 3


    Prohibition clubs have been organized at Phoenix and Medford.
    The Prohibition county convention will be held at Medford next Thursday, to nominate a full county ticket.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 19, 1886, page 3


    THE MEANEST MAN IN OREGON.--The meanest man in Oregon lives within three miles of Medford. Not long ago one of his neighbors sent by him to get some brandy for his sick wife. He (the mean man) went into a saloon (a place he never patronized) and represented that there was a poor, sick woman in his neighborhood that needed some brandy, and had no money to pay for it. The saloon keeper, after consulting his partner, concluded to send the woman a bottle of their fine peach brandy. But instead of giving the brandy donated by the saloon keeper he gave the sick woman some water with a little brandy in it from a beer bottle.
    Talk about the man that stole acorns from a blind pig. This barany [?--sic] man takes the "cake" when we consider that he and his wife own a half-section of land with good improvements on it, and his name is not Grindstone either.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 20, 1886, page 3


    The Jacksonville and Medford papers have had considerable to say lately about the fellow they call the meanest man in Oregon, whose name is a half-brother to Grindstone, and who with his wife owns a half section of the best of land near Medford. They say he was sent by a sick neighbor to get some brandy for medicinal purposes and went into a saloon and represented that there was a poor sick woman in his neighborhood who wanted some brandy and had no money to pay for it. The saloonkeeper, after consulting his partner, concluded to send the woman a bottle of their fine peach brandy. But instead of giving the brandy donated by the saloonkeeper, he gave the sick woman some water with a little brandy in it from a beer bottle.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 26, 1886, page 3


    W. G. Kenney has sold his interest in the saloon to his partner, H. H. Wolters, and bought Mr. Lynch's interest in the livery stable there.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 3, 1886, page 3


    J. B. Riddle will take possession of the large hotel at Medford as soon as it can be finished. H. H. Wolters will run the saloon or barroom, having bought out Kenney's interest last week.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 9, 1886, page 3


    PRIZE FIGHT.--At Ashland on Sunday last a prize fight for $50 a side was fought between George Edwards of Yreka and Oscar Lewis of Medford. The whole affair was kept very quiet and only the favored ones of Medford and Ashland were let into the secret. The result of the fight was that in three rounds Edwards knocked Lewis out of time, blackening the latter's eyes and somewhat damaging his nose. Several hundred dollars are said to have changed hands on the result.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 24, 1886, page 3


    McAdams, a Medford saloon man, has been arrested as one of the persons concerned in the prize fight, but is out on bail now.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 30, 1886, page 3


    Ham Wolters' Gem Saloon at Medford has been moved to the adjoining room where he shows up as smiling as usual. D. W. Crosby is his right-hand bower.
    W. H. McAdams, a saloon keeper of Medford, was arrested this week for aiding and abetting a prize fight between Edwards and Lewis at Ashland and Justice Foudray held him under $1000 bonds, which he furnished. Edwards, Lewis and Stover are still in jail and all will be called on to attend the regular session of the grand jury next week.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 1, 1886, page 3


    It is reported that McAdams, the Medford saloon man who figured prominently in the prize fight, has "skipped" from Medford. He probably feared a drubbing at the hands of Edwards.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 14, 1886, page 3


    SOLE PROPRIETOR.--The partnership existing between John Noland and Wm. Ulrich, proprietors of the Railroad Exchange, was dissolved June 30. Mr. Noland has filed his bonds according to law and taken out license for six months. Mr. Noland is a genial, whole-souled gentleman, always has a good word for everybody. He is straightforward in all his dealings, and his guests and patrons can rely on fair and honest treatment in every particular.--Monitor.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 10, 1886, page 3


    "Ham" Wolters of Medford called yesterday. He said he wasn't courting.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 16, 1886, page 3


"Victims of the Bottle."
    The drama presented at Myer's hall last Saturday evening by the Medford amateurs was witnessed by a full house, and gave full satisfaction to the audience. The cast of the piece included in the characters several young people who did admirably, and the whole play was considered excellent for an amateur performance. Among the leading players well known here were C. W. Wolters and J. E. Niles, who each took their share of the applause. The characters of Miss Nettleby and Rob Brittle, by Mrs. West and Mr. Hamilton carried the humor of the play, and their appearance was always greeted with smiles. The other ladies in the play did the pathetic and tragic scenes smoothly and easily, and the "heavy villain," Hollis, looked and acted wickedly enough, but couldn't quite prevent the audience from considering him a pretty good sort of man outside of the play. Profs. Williams and Woolf furnished the orchestra music. Come again.
Ashland Tidings, December 10, 1886, page 3


    The Railroad Saloon has been renovated, besides receiving a new side, which greatly improves its looks.
    A. H. Carlson of the Brewery Saloon has invested in a lot of fine turkeys, which will be raffled off on Christmas.
    Some liquors, etc., belonging to McAdams & Heeley were sold by Sheriff Dean last Saturday, but did not bring a fancy figure. Thos. Riley of the Farmer's Exchange at Jacksonville purchased the refrigerator.
    The Riddle House and Gem Saloon are two of the leading business places in Medford, each doing a good business. The best of meals and lodgings are furnished at the former, while superior liquid refreshments can be obtained at the latter. Whenever you are in this place give Bous and Ham a call, for they will treat you well.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886, page 3


THE RIDDLE HOUSE!
Medford, Oregon,
J. B. RIDDLE, Prop'r.
----
THIS HOUSE HAS BEEN THOROUGHLY fitted up with new and elegant furniture and is second to none south of Portland.
    Special pains taken in making commercial travelers feel at home.
    The tables are supplied with the best of everything the market affords.
----
FAMOUS GEM SALOON!
J. B. RIDDLE                     H. H. WOLTERS
RIDDLE & WOLTERS, Proprietors,
MEDFORD, OR.
----
ONLY THE FINEST WINES, LIQUORS AND Cigars kept on hand, and a first-class billiard table is connected with the saloon. The leading papers of the day can also be found on the reading tables.
    The proprietors are also sole agents of Medford for the Celebrated Rogue River Whiskeys.
    The saloon will always be found open at the arrival of all trains.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886 et seq., page 3


    ROGUE RIVER DISTILLERY.--We are informed that the Rogue River Distillery has had a thorough overhauling from top to bottom. All the machinery has been repaired and put in order. They will commence operations on the first of the year.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 25, 1886, page 3


    H. H. Wolters has sold his interest in the Gem Saloon to his partner, J. B. Riddle, who will hereafter conduct the business. What Ham proposes engaging in is not known.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 31, 1886, page 3


    Frank Lynch is assisting A. H. Carlson in the management of the Brewery Saloon.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887, page 2


FAMOUS GEM SALOON!
J. B. RIDDLE PROPRIETOR.
----
ONLY THE FINEST WINES, LIQUORS and Cigars are kept on hand and a first-class billiard table is connected with the saloon. The leading papers of the day can also be found on the reading tables.
    The proprietor is also sole agent of Medford for the Celebrated Rogue River Whiskeys.
    The saloon will always be found open at the arrival of all trains.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887 et seq., page 3


    The Brewery Saloon, under the management of Gus. Carlson, is a popular resort, where the best of wines, liquors and cigars are dispensed. A fine billiard table may also be found there. Read his advertisement elsewhere.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 28, 1887, page 3


BREWERY SALOON
AUGUST CARLSON, Prop.
COR. A & 7th STREETS, MEDFORD, OR
----
THIS MOST FAVORITE RESORT has been thoroughly refitted and furnished in the most modern style, including a fine billiard table. The bar is always supplied with the choicest brands of
        WINES, LIQUORS,
BEER AND CIGARS,          
and the leading papers can always be found on the tables.
    Special pains taken to accommodate patrons and visitors. Call and see me.
                                                                                           A. H. CARLSON.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 4, 1887 et seq., page 3


    J. S. Howard of Medford was in town yesterday engaged in surveying about the Rogue River Distillery.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1887, page 3


    Prof. Rork of Michigan spoke on the prohibition question at Walton's hall last Wednesday evening. He had a large audience and left a favorable impression.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 2


    No clue as yet has been found to the fellow who recently broke into A. H. Carlson's saloon in Medford and stole $50. Gus had the money hidden in an obscure place, but the thief was probably looking into the window at the time he was counting it, and saw where he hid it. Entrance as effected through a small window in the side of the building.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1887, page 2


    Angus Carlson of the Brewery Saloon inaugurated a turkey shooting match near his place of business, which proved quite interesting. A large number of fat turkeys were slaughtered and some good marksmanship was shown on Christmas.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1887, page 3


    The Brewery Saloon, conducted by August Carlson, has been closed, through the financial embarrassment of its proprietor.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1888, page 2


    A. H. Carlson of the Brewery Saloon, now closed, gave a bill of sale of his fixtures, stock, etc., to a whisky drummer named Lewis, with the express understanding that he would divide the proceeds, pro rata, among the creditors. The fellow, after securing the papers, proceeded to sell everything at a great sacrifice, without regard to his promise and to the great disadvantage of Carlson and those he owed, being careful to get what was due the house he represented, however. His conduct is generally condemned, and was no fault of Mr. G. that his creditors were thus defrauded.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3


    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has reopened the saloon formerly kept by A. H. Carlson, thoroughly refitting it and making many improvements. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 4, 1888, page 3


Prohibition Party Wanting Here.
    The prohibition vote has almost entirely disappeared in this county, most of it having been consolidated with the Republicans. This will account, in a considerable measure, for the reduction of the Democratic majority in southern Oregon, and is more evidence that the Prohibitionists are mainly original Republicans.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1888, page 3


    Wm. Ulrich has sold his interest in the saloon building opposite the depot to John Noland for $1,000.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 29, 1888, page 2


    Frank Kasshafer of Jacksonville is assisting H. H. Wolters at the Monarch Saloon in Medford.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1888, page 3


    John Noland is now the sole proprietor of the Railroad Saloon building, having purchased Wm. Ulrich's interest several days ago for $1000.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1888, page 3


    A branch of the W.C.T.U. will soon be organized in this place.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 9, 1888, page 3


Notice.
    TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Whereas I made a statement privately that others made public, that I saw Geo. L. Webb playing cards in a saloon on a certain occasion, but, after learning more, I admit that I was mistaken in the person.
J. W. MILLER.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 1, 1888, page 3


    The town council has passed an ordinance licensing the different business houses, and there is some lively kicking. Saloons are required to pay $300 a year.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 27, 1888, page 2


    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.

    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has reopened the saloon formerly kept by A. H. Carlson, thoroughly refitting it and making many improvements. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890, page 3


    Mr. O'Donnell has purchased a half interest in the Railroad Saloon of Chas. Brous. Give the new firm a call, as they keep the best of everything in their line.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1890, page 3


    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has removed his saloon to the building next door to C. W. Palm's barber shop, on Front Street. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1890, page 3


    Shorty Hamilton has resigned his position as manager for Ed. Worman, and now operates, with Tom Harris, the Grand Central saloon, says the Mail.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1890, page 2


    An overturned lamp in Ham Wolters' saloon caused an alarm of fire one day last week. The damage was slight, the flames being smothered with the billiard table cover.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1890, page 3


    Walks across Seventh Street, from the Grand Central to Brous' saloon, and from Goldsmith's store to the bank, were built last week.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1891, page 2


    Wm. Clark, the Tammany brave, who was in business so long at Medford, has taken charge of the bar in the Merchants' Hotel at Portland, and is doing well. His many friends wish him success.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 2, 1891, page 3


    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has removed his saloon to the building next door to C. W. Palm's barber shop, on Front Street. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 1, 1892, page 2

Roxy Saloon ad, January 14, 1892 Medford Mail
January 14, 1892 Medford Mail

    Tom Morine last week resigned his position as night watch, and has bought an interest in the Roxy Ann Saloon. The best of wines, liquors and cigars are always kept there.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1892, page 2


    John F. Johnson, formerly of Grants Pass, is now officiating as chief mixologist at Hanley's.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1892, page 2


    T. M. Howard and W. H. Hosler have bought Tom Morine's saloon business and will conduct a first-class place.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1892, page 2


    Nearly the whole week has been consumed at Medford in attempting to convict the saloon keepers of violating the Sunday law, but so far without success. The prosecution has been balked every time by legal impediments, and no case had gone to the jury up to the time the Times went to press.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1892, page 3


In Status Quo.
    There has been a cessation of hostilities between the saloon-keepers of Medford and those who inaugurated the Sunday-closing crusade. Owing to the faulty condition of the complaints gotten up by the prosecution not a single case ever reached a jury, although several attempts were made to do so. The defendants sued out a writ of prohibition last Friday, to prevent the complainants from molesting them further, which will come up before Judge Hanna at the regular September term of court. Prosecuting Attorney Benson appears for the state, while the defense is represented by Wm. M. Colvig, Willard Crawford and Francis Fitch.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


    The matter of the dismissal of the writ of prohibition sued out of the circuit court in order to enable the district attorney to let go of the Medford prosecutions in the Sunday closing cases led the papers to state that the justice court had no jurisdiction in the matter, which was erroneous and properly accounted for by the Mail last week.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1892, page 3


    D. I. Waldroop of Ashland is now compounding at the Hanley saloon.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 19, 1893, page 3


    J. M. Howard, recently from the East, succeeds to the business of W. H. Hosler in this place.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1893, page 2


    The bar fixtures in James Coeti's saloon are exciting much admiration, and, as they are from the factory of Weeks Bros. of this place and Phoenix, due credit should be given one of our most promising local manufacturers.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1893, page 3


    A. Fetsch has purchased the saloon formerly conducted by Howard Bros. and will keep the best of wines, liquors and cigars. Mr. Lutkemeier is officiating as chief mixologist.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 29, 1893, page 2


RAILROAD EXCHANGE
M. H. HANLEY, PROP'R.
    A neat resort where all the best of imported and domestic wines, liquors and cigars are displayed by polite and attentive bartenders, is the Exchange Saloon as conducted by M. H. Hanley. He handles none but the very best of wines, liquors and cigars procurable, and anyone patronizing this establishment will find him a courteous, obliging gentleman who conducts his business on a basis of strict integrity, never taking advantage of anyone in regards to prices. All mail orders receive the promptest attention. Mr. Hanley has been identified with the business interests of Medford for several years.
Medford Mail, December 1, 1893, page 1


    A burglar effected an entrance to John Hanley's saloon one day last week by cutting a hole through the rear door and removing the bolt. He got four or five dollars in change from the till for hs trouble.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 15, 1893, page 2


    S. A. D. Higgins will open a saloon at his place of business on Front Street, having disposed of his stock of candies, etc. He will keep the best of liquors, wines and cigars.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 8, 1894, page 3


    Marshal Dyer will not be a candidate for reelection. He will remove to Medford and assist S. A. D. Higgins in dispensing liquid refreshments at his new saloon.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 25, 1894, page 3


    F. Lutkemeier has moved his family into the second story of the Lyon building on Front Street, and will occupy the lower floor as a saloon.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 22, 1894, page 3


    Fred Lutkemeier has opened a saloon in the Lyon building on Front Street, next door to the place which was burned. He will keep a fine line of wines, liquors and cigars.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 2, 1894, page 2


    At the city council meeting, Tuesday evening . . . the liquor license of F. Lutkemeier was, by request, transferred to M. H. Hanley.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, July 6, 1894, page 3


   
Hotel Medford bar windows have been decorated in most artistic designs by A. L. Chapman, a recently arrived sign painter and all-round artisan.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, October 19, 1894, page 3


    There has been a new shift made in the ownership of the Turf Exchange Saloon this week. S. F. Morine has sold his interest therein to J. C. Hall (called Court for short) of Central Point, and the firm is now Legate & Hall. Mr. Hall has decided to retire from his business at Central Point and will soon be a permanent resident of this city. H. H. Wolters will be retained as mixerologist until matters are gotten squarely in good running shape--perhaps he will be a permanent fixture. The new firm expect to add some considerable new furniture to the place. Mr. Morine will probably devote his entire attention to his quite extensive interests in the Applegate district.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, January 31, 1896, page 5


August 7, 1896 Medford Mail
August 7, 1896 Medford Mail\

    As will be seen by his ad in another column Jas. Coeti has opened up a saloon in the old building formerly occupied by him. Mr. Coeti informs us that the place will be kept strictly up to the best standard of excellency that can possibly be secured--and that it will be free from all the influences that have formerly made the saloon business in Medford one of such indecent character. Nothing but the best of wines and liquors will be kept on hand--and the business will be conducted on thorough business principles.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, July 17, 1896, page 7


JOHN SCHNEIDER.
RED FRONT BEER HALL.
    Among the many resorts of this city there is none that is better known than that owned by Mr. John Schneider. The main saloon is a large spacious room with modern fixtures, and in the rear is arranged private and club rooms. He handles exclusively famous Medford beer and soft drinks. He also serves lunches of all kinds. His place is orderly and well conducted and is enjoying a large patronage.
TURF EXCHANGE SALOON.
COURT HALL, PROPRIETOR.
    "Here's to the things of friendship, may they never rust" is a toast that is truly noble. Such is the motto of the "Turf Exchange," a well and favorably known resort opposite the Hotel Nash. Mr. Hall handles nothing but the best foreign and domestic wines, liquors and cigars. He makes a specialty of the very best of brandies and Cyrus Noble whiskey. One wishing to while away an hour will meet with courteous treatment at this popular resort.
Medford Mail, May 28, 1897, page 3


     John Schneider of the Red Front Saloon has made an assignment for the benefit of his creditors. Z. Maxcy has been named as assignee.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 28, 1898, page 3

1898 Nash Hotel advertising card
Turf Exchange Saloon advertising on an 1898 Hutchison & Lumsden advertising card, SOHS M44C1

    Ream R. Findley claims that he was pushed off a train going at full speed in Union County a short time since and considerably injured. He says that Jas. Coeti, who left Medford for Colorado, and with whom he was traveling, was guilty of the act. it was the greatest wonder that he was not killed. Findley also charges Coeti with rifling his valise, after having borrowed $20 from him.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1898, page 3


    John Schneider has reopened the Red Front Saloon, and is selling the best of beer for 5 cents a glass. He will also furnish the best of sandwiches to order. Give him a call when you are hungry or thirsty, as he will treat you well.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 28, 1898, page 3


    R. Derr and wife, late of Ashland, have become residents of Medford. Bob is Court Hall's chief mixologist now.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 5, 1898, page 3



    G. T. Hershberger is chief dispenser for the M. D.
& R. Co.'s retail department since J. J. Brophy left for his homestead in Lost Creek precinct. He fills the place acceptably.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 12, 1898, page 3


    John Schneider has been quite ill but is on deck at the Red Front again.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1898, page 2


    J. C. Hall has had the Turf Exchange Saloon renovated in fine style, and it has no superior in southern Oregon.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1898, page 3


   
J. J. Brophy has removed to his homestead claim in Lost Creek precinct and W. I. Taggart has succeeded him as dispenser of liquid refreshments at the retail establishment of M. D. & R. Co.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1898, page 3


    The Medford brewery is doing an immense business these times. Since the warm weather came on the demand for both ice and beer has made it necessary to put on a night crew, and now the machinery in the building is kept running continually. Mr. Merz is a thorough hustler for business, and he is fast getting a sure foothold in Southern Oregon that will soon put entirely in the shade all possibility of any importation of the goods in which he deals.
"City Happenings,"
Medford Mail, July 22, 1898, page 3


    At the Red Front Exchange in Medford can be obtained ice-cold beer, and choice wines and liquors by the gallon, to say nothing of the toothsome sandwiches which are made to order. John Schneider, who is in charge of that resort, will spare no pains to please you when you call.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1898, page 3


     C. B. Rostel has purchased the bar fixtures formerly used by S. P. Jones at Jacksonville, and will open a beer saloon in his building on Front Street.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1898, page 3


    John Schneider of Medford, proprietor of the Red Front, has commenced an action in the circuit [court] against Thos. Collins of Klamath County for damages, alleging that he libeled him.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1898, page 3


    W. A. Owen of Central Point is at the Turf Exchange during fair week.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 29, 1898, page 3



    One day last week Marshal Johnson filed a complaint against John Schneider, the vendor of wet groceries, in Recorder Lawton's court on a charge of selling liquor to minors. The hearing of the case was postponed until Monday of the week, but before the trial of the case came on, the marshal withdrew the complaint on account of the town ordinance being defective. The case will probably come up in Justice Stewart's court.
    In this city, Sept. 22, 1898, there was quite a little wedding solemnized by Rev. F. Sack, in which C. B. Rostel and Mrs. Emeline R. Town were the contracting parties. Mr. Rostel has lately opened out a beer saloon on Front Street and is now a permanent fixture in our town.
    J. H. Bellinger is dispensing moist goods at Shorty's Hotel Nash thirst parlors this week--and he does it with an aptness that is a credit to the profession.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 30, 1898, page 7


    The Red Front Saloon, two doors west of Hotel Nash, will soon be reopened.
    John Schneider, who has been conducting the Red Front for some time past, has removed to Sisson, Calif., where he will again engage in the saloon business.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 27, 1898, page 2


    The Red Front Saloon will be reopened shortly by W. F. Taggart, the expert mixologist. He will soon make it a popular resort.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1898, page 3



    The Red Front has been thoroughly renovated and fitted up with handsome bar fixtures, etc. W. F. Taggart, a popular mixologist, is in charge and building up a good business.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 24, 1898, page 3


    J. C. Hall has sold his saloon business to W. T. Nelson, who arrived from Klamath County a short time since. Court has not yet decided what he will engage in.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1898, page 3


    Wiley B. Allen's sample rooms are being visited by many every day. Mr. Allen spares no pains to please all who call, and is doing a good business.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 8, 1898, page 3



    R. N. Warnock has fitted up his building on Front Street in fine style and will soon open a saloon there, which will be stocked with the best in the market.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 22, 1898, page 2


    Al Helms has recently purchased the Mint Saloon at Medford.

"Oregon News Notes," Daily Capital Journal, Salem, March 20, 1899, page 3



    L. Lytle has purchased an interest in W. F. Taggart's saloon at Medford and will dispense liquid refreshments there in the clever fashion which has made him popular.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1899, page 3


    Geo. E. Neuber and T. J. Kenney have purchased of Chas. F. Wall of Honolulu the property in Medford on the corner of Seventh and Front streets, occupied by Nelson's saloon, Macaulay's tamale stand and Butler's watchmaker's shop. The consideration was $4200. A handsome brick building will be built on it in the course of time.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1899, page 3


    For a long time--ever since Medford shed her baby dresses--the frame building standing on the corner of Seventh and D streets, and known as the Turf Exchange Saloon, has, because of its prominent position in the town been a structure which no citizen has pointed to with any very great degree of pride--but things are not now what they were and if we guess aright it will not be many months ere a two-story brick building, of modern architecture, will loom up from that corner. Mr. T. J. Kenney, of Jacksonville, this week purchased the property from C. F. Wall, paying therefor $4250. The purchase embraces a piece of land 50x100 feet in size, and the buildings thereon. That Mr. Kenney made this purchase with the intent of leaving it as it now is, is not probable. While it is not general street gossip yet it is whispered around that Geo. E. Neuber, of Jacksonville, is mixed up in the deal and that he will build a two-story brick building on the lot and will occupy the same with the "finest saloon south of Portland." However, we feel safe in predicting that the old buildings will be removed and a new one take their place. This deal was made through the York & Wortman real estate agency.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 28, 1899, page 7


   
Thos. Collins has succeeded W. T. Nelson in the proprietorship of the Turf Exchange, and has inaugurated a number of improvements. He keeps some of the best liquors and will take pains to please his customers. Give Tom a call when you are in Medford.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1899, page 3


    All bar-rooms located at S.P. stations on the property of the company have been ordered closed on June 1st.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 11, 1899, page 3


    Thos. Collins has purchased the Turf Exchange Saloon from W. T. Nelson. Mr. Collins is now in charge with John Hanley as able aid and all-'round expert dispenser of moist goods. We understand it is not the intention of Mr. Kenney, who recently purchased this building, to erect a new building this season.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 12, 1899, page 7



    The Medford Distilling & Refining Company has closed its saloon, the one formerly conducted by W. F. Taggart, and the company is now fitting up the building preparatory to moving the distillery office and saloon thereto. Mr. Taggart has moved to the Sutton farm, near Phoenix, where he will reside in the future.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 19, 1899, page 7



    The Turf Exchange Saloon, Thos. Collins, proprietor, is unquestionably the most popular resort in Medford. Here all kinds of drinks are served--plain and fancy. Medford Brewing Company's beer at five cents per glass.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 15, 1899, page 7


    A. D. Helms will this week let the contract for building a 25x60-foot brick saloon building on his lot, south of Hotel Nash. The building will be one story high and will probably be built by G. W. Priddy. Now if B. P. Theiss will get in and put up a brick on his lot and Capt. Nash builds his new hotel annex, South D Street will have nearly a block of solid brick buildings.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, March 2, 1900, page 7


Medford Saloon Burglarized.
    MEDFORD, Or., May. 1.--A. M. Helm's saloon was entered by burglars last night and money and stock amounting to about $50 taken. The burglar, supposedly a tramp, forced his way in by a rear window late in the night, after the night watchman went off duty.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, May 2, 1900, page 4


A Warning to Saloon Men.
    To Whom It May Concern:--Saloon keepers and others are warned and entreated to not sell or furnish intoxicating liquors of any kind to my husband, Dr. L. Wiggin. If they do, they will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. To anyone giving evidence leading to the arrest and conviction of any person or persons so selling or furnishing to L. Wiggin any intoxicating liquors, a reward of $25 will be paid.
MRS. L. WIGGIN.               
Medford Mail, May 4, 1900, page 2


    Last Monday night, shortly after midnight, the saloon of A. M. Helms [on] South D Street was broken into, and a quantity of bottled goods taken. The cash register was also rifled, but fortunately it contained but a few dollars, mostly in small change. The robber, who is thought to have been a hobo, forced an entrance through a rear window and proceeded to acquire the necessary elements for several future jags without being disturbed, then made his escape without leaving a trace of his identity. Mr. Helms states that his loss in money and goods will amount to about $40.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 4, 1900, page 7


    A young man by the name of Kinney "got gay" Tuesday and undertook to dictate the management of one of the saloons in this city. A blow from a beer keg mallet on his left temple sufficed to convince him that he wasn't the "whole show," his own opinion to the contrary notwithstanding. The sum total of the result of his undue presumption was quite an ugly gash on the temple which required the aid of a surgeon to properly dress.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, March 1, 1901, page 7


    Petition of C. B. Rostel for a license to sell malt liquors in the city of Medford for a term of six months, accompanied by a bond with B. P. Theiss, John Arnold and himself as sureties, was granted.
    Petition of B. P. Theiss for a license to sell spirituous, malt and vinous liquors for a period of one year, in the city of Medford, accompanied by a bond with W. H. Simmons and J. B. Ehwegen as sureties, was granted.
"City Council Proceedings," Medford Mail, March 8, 1901, page 2


    W. E. Macauley has discontinued the tamale business owing to his inability to secure a stand suitable for the purpose. It was his intention to move his stand from alongside of the Postal Telegraph office to the vacant lot adjoining W. J. King's saloon, on North D Street, but the city council enjoined him from so doing.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 12, 1901, page 7


    The latest in the line of secret societies is an order known as the "Buffaloes." From all accounts it is not of a particularly serious nature--in fact it is decidedly otherwise. Good fellowship and eleven cents are the qualifications of membership. The fundamental rules of the new order are as follows: "Members must always carry a one-cent piece; handshaking must be done by the left, the right being reserved for punching; all drinks must be piloted to the lips with the left hand; sign of the order, the left hand over the left ear; absolute sobriety and silence must be observed by the initiated of a week's standing; initiation fee, the coin in the possession of the candidate nearest to eleven cents. These are the cardinal rules. Any breach of them by a 'Buffalo,' if called, means the purchase of something drinkable for the crowd."

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 19, 1901, page 7


    When you have drunk bad water, or if you have eaten something that is heavy, or if you cannot eat, get one gallon of the real old grain distilled whiskey for your home use, at $2.25 per gallon and up--at the distillery office--opposite new depot.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 26, 1901, page 7


    Otto Young, who has been in the employ of B. P. Theiss for a number of years, left this week for Seattle, Wash., whither he went in quest of employment or to engage in business. Bert Hooker has taken the position vacated by Otto as dispenser of liquid refreshments.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, May 10, 1901, page 6


    Rance Rouse has purchased the saloon business of A. M. Helms on D Street and is now in charge. Rance is a jolly good fellow and will keep a popular resort.
Medford Enquirer, May 11, 1901, page 5



    Jas. Eaton has resigned his position as wine clerk at the Nash Hotel bar and has been succeeded by Chas. Gay, an experienced mixologist, until recently engaged in a similar capacity for a Portland home club. Mr. Eaton expects to leave Medford soon, and will probably go to Mankato, Minnesota.

"Additional Local," Medford Mail, June 14, 1901, page 6


    A. M. Helms was granted a liquor license , and his bond, with I. L. Hamilton and A. Slover as sureties, was approved.
    I. L. Hamilton was granted a liquor license, and his bond, with C. W. Palm and E. Worman as sureties, was approved.
"Meeting of City Council,"
Medford Mail, July 5, 1901, page 2


    "B. I. Stoner, of Medford, a mixologist of much experience, is now employed by Hall & Young, of this city."--Gold Hill News.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, July 5, 1901, page 7


    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 2



    W. J. King, proprietor of the Turf Exchange saloon, has received, direct from the distillery in North Carolina, a good supply of pure white corn whiskey. Samplers of this beverage pronounced it superior to any other whiskey on the coast market. It is especially desired in preference to other brands for medical purposes.

    A crowd of Ashland boys, the oldest said to be not over seventeen, was in Medford Monday evening and upon leaving town at a late hour all were beastly intoxicated. Where they secured their drink has not yet been learned, but Chief of Police Johnson is camping on a couple of trails, and if he secures positive evidence arrests will follow. It is known that some of our saloon men refused to sell them drinks--but there is evidence conclusive that they secured liquor someplace in the city. Medford is just as keen for Ashland money as from any other place, but the majority of our townspeople don't want to take it from boys in payment for whiskey. Saloon men, as a rule, make complaint that they are not permitted to pursue the even tenor of their way undisturbed--which may be true to a certain extent, but it is such open and flagrant violations of law and common decency which keeps up the trouble for them.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 30, 1901, page 7


    E. W. Carver has taken a position as wine clerk at the Hotel Nash bar. W. F. Taggart has taken a similar position with the Medford Distilling and Refining Company, and Chas. Hay is performing like duties in W. J. King's Turf Exchange.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, October 25, 1901, page 6


    Ashland had a city election on Tuesday, the issue being the same as it was last year, to wit: Whether saloons should or should not be licensed. The litigation resulting from the success last year of the anti-saloon party and the consequent refusal of the city council to grant license to saloons was finally disposed of a few weeks ago by the decision of the supreme court, upholding the action of the lower courts in finding for the city in the contention. Tuesday's election resulted in electing two prohibition and two license councilmen, together with a license mayor. The two councilmen which hold over are prohibitionists--hence the town will be "dry" for another year.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, December 20, 1901, page 7


    W. J. King, proprietor of the Turf Exchange Saloon, left Thursday night for Portland.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, February 28, 1902, page 6


    H. B. Myers, the jeweler, indulged too freely in the use of stimulants--the kind that makes hilarious--on Wednesday afternoon of this week and became decidedly reckless with firearms. He was arrested by Deputy Chief of Police Fredenburg and placed in the city bastille, where he remained until the following morning when he was brought before Recorder York, where he pled guilty and was fined $10 upon a charge of disorderly conduct and $15 for carrying concealed weapons, and to this was added $1.50 costs, amounting in all to $26.50. The shooting took place in the rear room of Helms' saloon. Several shots were fired, aimed apparently at no particular object, but as two of the bullets passed through a window, thence through a toilet room at the rear and into the alley, there might have serious injury resulted had there happened to have been anyone within range.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, March 7, 1902, page 6


Reckless Shooting.
    Wednesday afternoon, H. B. Myers, the jeweler, while under the influence of liquor, went to the hardware store of Beek & Son and secured a .38 caliber Colts revolver and some cartridges, telling the salesman, John Norris, he would try the weapon and if found as represented he would purchase it. Mr. Norris at the time had no idea he was under the influence of liquor and of course readily complied. It seems he went directly from there to the saloon of A. H. Helms on [South] Front Street, where he had a drink with some of the hangers on, of course standing treat. Among those in the place at the time were several "tinhorns" who soon proposed a game and got him into the back room for that purpose. The bartender would not let them have cards or chips to play, and Myers, it is said, gave a boy $2.00 to go out and get a deck of cards. While the boy was out after the cards Myers pulled out the gun, calling the attention of those present to its qualities and by way of emphasizing them started into shooting through the back door. Four shots were fired, two of them through the frame of the door and two through the glass. Two shots passed entirely through the water closet and crossed the alley in the rear of the saloon, leaving their imprint on the woodshed back of the book store.
    As soon as the shots were heard, Mr. Helms hurried to the saloon and rushed to the back room where he found them putting up a target on the wall to shoot at, which piece of business he immediately put a stop to. Soon after Myers left the saloon and repaired to the Turf Exchange, where he again created a disturbance and flourished his gun. Here, or in the immediate vicinity, he remained until supper time, although during that time he was disarmed by Chief of Police Amann. During the chief of police's absence at supper J. W. Fredenburg, his deputy, was left to watch for his appearance on the street and just before he returned from his supper Myers came out of the saloon and was immediately arrested by policeman Fredenburg and taken to the city jail, Chief of Police Amann arriving in time to assist in locking him up. Here he remained until 9 o'clock Thursday morning, when he was taken before Recorder York and given the nominal fine of $26.50, which he paid, and was discharged. As this is the second time in the past year he has been up before the city recorder for being drunk, disorderly and making a spectacular gun play, the recorder is open to just censure for not giving him the full fine the offense justifies, as well as in not making him give bonds to keep the peace.
    If the lives of the citizens of the community are to be put in jeopardy by every drunken man for the paltry sum of $26.50, we will no doubt have a veritable reign of terror in Medford, for it is well known the town is overrun with a worthless lot of "tinhorn" gamblers and depraved wretches, who live off the earnings of fallen women. And in speaking of this class, let us say they should be run out of town. There is no use for them in a decent community. They are an eyesore and a blot upon the city's fair name as well as tending to deprave many promising young men. It is said Myers was not alone in the shooting, that another did part of it, while it was also intimated he was "doped." But be that as it may it is a shame and a disgrace that it is possible for these things to occur.
    We are sorry to be compelled to speak so plainly of these matters. But when we see innocent boys and girls thrown into companionship daily with this "sporting fraternity" we think it is high time the community was aroused to the danger.
    Before long we shall prepare a list for publication of the sporting fraternity of Medford who are recognized in this county as "tinhorns," so the ignorant and innocent may profit thereby.
Medford Enquirer, March 8, 1902, page 4


Jeweler with a Gun.
    H. B. Meyers, a jeweler of Medford, became hilarious in Helms' saloon in that city Wednesday afternoon and began shooting at random with a revolver. Several shots were fired before he was suppressed by the police. He pled guilty in the city court and paid fines to the amount of $26.50.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, March 13, 1902, page 3


    J. M. Kiernan has engaged his services to W. J. King, proprietor of the Turf Exchange saloon. Mr. Kiernan has had considerably experience in the hotel and bar business, and being a very clever gentleman he will doubtless prove himself efficient in the capacity of wine clerk.

"Additional Local," Medford Mail, May 2, 1902, page 6


    J. M. Kiernan officiates at the Turf Exchange, vice Chas. Hale, who will soon go into business on his own account.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1902, page 7


    C. V. Hale opened his saloon in the Rostel building on Tuesday of this week. The interior of the building has been repapered and painted--the work of Geo. Anderson--and the place as a whole presents a very pretty appearance. New bar fixtures have been put up and the whole interior practically made over. Mr. Hale is a very clever gentleman, and his friends are predicting that he will get his full share of the business in that line. Orin Murphy is his wine clerk.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, May 16, 1902, page 6


    Wm. Ennis, of Siskiyou County, Cal., who was engaged in the saloon business in Medford, passed through the valley a few days ago, en route to Portland, to enter a hospital. He had his hand crippled a short time since.
"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1902, page 5


    W. J. King was granted a liquor license, and his bonds, with C. W. Palm and I. L. Hamilton as sureties, were approved.

"Meeting of City Council," Medford Mail, June 13, 1902, page 2


    I. L. Hamilton was granted a saloon license. His sureties are C. W. Palm and A. M. Helms.
    A. M. Helms was granted a saloon license. His sureties are I. L. Hamilton and W. J. King.
"Meeting of City Council," Medford Mail, July 4, 1902, page 3


    J. Court Hall, of Gold Hill, has rented the saloon room which is to be put up on the corner of Seventh and D streets by Palm & Bodge. Mr. Hall aims to have the best-appointed saloon in Oregon south of Portland.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, July 4, 1902, page 6


A SERIOUS AFFRAY
Almost Occurred in Medford Monday Evening.
    A young man who has been doing business in Medford for some time, and is peaceable enough when sober, while under the influence of liquor assaulted the proprietor of one of the saloons of this city with a piece of iron and a knife. The latter took the rod from him, however, and used it with effect upon his assailant's head. As it happened, neither party was hurt very much, but both had a narrow escape from serious injury.
    It was intended at first to hush the matter, but later a warrant for the arrest of the aggressor was sworn out and placed in the hands of Constable Johnson. He had departed for other scenes, however, and is still at large.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville,
July 10, 1902, page 4


    Palm & Bodge will commence the construction of their proposed brick block during the present month. We are informed that Court Hall has rented the lower corner room and will fit [it] up handsomely for a saloon.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 10, 1902, page 5


    Harry Meyers, the jeweler, got himself mixed up with more trouble on Monday of this week. He imbibed too freely of the liquids which intoxicate, and after he had reached a hilarious condition he became quarrelsome and made his way to A. M. Helms' saloon, where he soon engaged himself in a quarrel with the proprietor. The story as told a Mail representative is that after this little skirmish Meyers went to his jewelry store and procured two ring anvils, tapering pieces of iron about fourteen inches long and weighing about two and one-half pounds each. With these in his pocket he returned to the Helms saloon where he approached Mr. Helms from behind and dealt him a blow on the head with one of the irons. Helms then struck Meyers and took the iron from him and with it struck him (Meyers) on the head, which stunned him and the row was off for a brief period, but Meyers rallied again and made an assault with the other iron. Later Meyers drew a jackknife and with it cut Helms' left hand and also cut several slits in his clothing. The bystanders here interfered, and the trouble was ended. A police call was sounded, but no policemen were within hailing distance. Meyers was taken away by his friends and has not been seen since. The next forenoon a warrant was sworn out before Justice Purdin and placed in the hands of Constable Johnson, but was yet it has not been served because of the fact that Meyers has not been located.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, July 11, 1902, page 7


    J. Court Hall and C. F. Young, of Gold Hill, have leased the corner room of the first floor of the Palm-Bodge Block, now being built, and will open up in it one of the finest saloons in Southern Oregon. Messrs. Hall & Young were in Medford Tuesday taking measurements from the plans of their room so as to order their fixtures of the right length, and that evening they left for San Francisco to make their purchases.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, July 25, 1902, page 7


    The extremely warm weather and the non-arrival of a carload of malt beverage almost caused a beer famine in Medford one day this week. Col. Ehwegen was equal to the emergency, however, and the suffering public was relieved before any dire results.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1902, page 7


    The old Turf Exchange Saloon has been razed to the ground and hauled away in sections. Contractor Schermerhorn bought the building, paying $35 for it, and has taken it down with such care as to save nearly all the lumber. The structure was one of the very first buildings erected in Medford, and has always been used for the purpose for which it was put up--that of a saloon. This old landmark has been an eyesore to Medford people for years because of its dilapidated condition and general unsightliness, but not until Messrs. Palm & Bodge secured possession of the lot was there a ghost of a show for any new building.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 8, 1902, page 7


    Wm. F. Taggart and his wife left Tuesday for an outing on upper Rogue River. Bert Hooker is filling his place at the Distillery Saloon.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1902, page 1


    The bar fixtures and partitions for the saloon which J. Court Hall will conduct in the corner room of the Palm-Bodge building arrived this week. They are of polished walnut and up-to-date in style and finish.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 19, 1902, page 7


    B. I. Stoner came in from Pendleton last week. He has been engaged in dispensing malt and spirituous beverages in that place for several months past, and comes to Medford to accept a like position with J. Court Hall, when that gentleman shall have fitted up his place of business in the Palm-Bodge new brick.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 10, 1902, page 6


    J. C. Hall and his family are again residents of Medford. He is making preparations for the opening of a handsome saloon in Palm & Bodge's brick block.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1902, page 2


    Bond of M.D.&R. Co., for selling liquors, approved and license ordered issued.
"City Council Proceedings," Medford Mail, October 17, 1902, page 6


Notice of Request for Liquor License.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will make application to the city council, at its next regular meeting, November 4, 1902, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in the city of Medford. Place of business will be on the corner of Seventh and North D streets, Medford, Jackson County, Oregon.
YOUNG & HALL.       
Medford Mail, October 17, 1902, page 2


Notice of Request for Liquor License.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will make application to the city council, at its next regular meeting, November 4, 1902, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in the city of Medford. Place of business will be the Rostel building on South D Street, Medford, Jackson County, Oregon.
CHAS. HALE.       
Medford Mail, October 17, 1902, page 2


    R. Rouse left for San Francisco Thursday night, on a visit. In the meantime his place at Helms' saloon is being filled by Thos. M. Reed.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1902, page 3


    Ordinance was passed compelling saloons to close between the hours of 1 and 5 a.m.

"City Council Proceedings," Medford Mail, November 7, 1902, page 2


    Medford's council has passed an ordinance requiring saloons to close between the hours of 1 and 5 o'clock a.m.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 12, 1902, page 2


    Palm & Bodge's big and handsome brick block is nearing completion. Young & Hall, who have leased the corner rooms, will open their saloon inside of two weeks. It will be called The Medford, and will be second to no resort of the kind in the state.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 19, 1902, page 1


    Mayor Grant, of Ashland, has appointed A. L. Kitchen, president of the Ashland Anti-Saloon League, a special officer to enforce the city ordinances against the selling of liquor, and gambling. It is a notorious fact that the granite city's prohibition laws do not prohibit, and strong effort will now be made to enforce them.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, November 21, 1902, page 7


    About Christmas time will see the completion of the finest brick block in Medford, and one which would be a credit to many towns of larger size. Everybody, of course, knows that the Palm-Bodge building is meant. After many vexatious delays the finishing touches are now being put on. The rooms of the lower floor are all plastered and the glass fronts and doors are being put in. Upstairs some plastering remains to be done yet, but that part of the work will soon be finished. Seventh and D Street corner, to be occupied by Young & Hall, is done and J. Court is now busily engaged in getting his bar fixtures, etc., in shape for the opening, which will occur in a few days. When finished it will be one of the handsomest saloons in the state outside of the large cities.
    Seventh and D Street corner, to be occupied by Young & Hall, is done and J. Court is now busily engaged in getting his bar fixtures, etc., in shape for the opening, which will occur in a few days. When finished it will be one of the handsomest saloons in the state outside of the large cities.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, November 28, 1902, page 7


    Young & Hall's new saloon, "The Medford," in the Palm-Bodge building, will be opened to the public on Saturday, December 6th. This is one of the finest saloons in the state and is worthy of inspection.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, December 5, 1902, page 7


   
Chas. F.  Young of Gold Hill, who is interested in The Medford with J. C. Hall, has been in town recently.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 10, 1902, page 4


"The Medford" Opening.
    The first business place to open its doors to the public in the new Palm-Bodge block was "The Medford," Young & Hall, proprietors. This saloon is undoubtedly one of the finest fitted up of any business place of the kind in the state south of Portland, and there are few in that city which excel it. The bar is of solid mahogany, eighteen feet long, and the back bar contains three large plate glass mirrors, the center one being 8½x5 feet and the two end ones 3x4 feet in size. The partition between the barroom and the cardroom in the rear is also of mahogany and strictly up-to-date in style and finish. The walls are papered with heavy paper of artistic design and color, and several handsome pictures help out the general effect. The rooms are lighted with electricity throughout. In the center back bar is a handsome chandelier and a corresponding one in the center of the room. At each end of the back bar are frosted globes, giving a soft, mellow light, and other lights placed at convenient intervals. The windows are screened with heavy portieres of a rich style. The floor of the barroom is of tile, inlaid in a handsome pattern, while the cardroom floor is covered with linoleum.
    On Saturday the house was thrown open for business, and, during the day and night, an appetizing luncheon was served the many patrons who came in to assist Young & Hall in their housewarming.
    Young & Hall have been at great expense to fit up this place to make it second to none between Portland and San Francisco, and to give Medford a first-class saloon in every sense of the word.
    They will handle nothing but staple goods and have taken great pains in selecting, so as to have nothing but the very best to serve their patrons. Their stock of glassware is the handsomest and most up-to-date selection in Southern Oregon, and all the latest devices for serving liquors are at hand. Their beer is kept in a cellar built especially for that purpose, and the newest things in drawing and keeping it are employed.
    The attendants will be in keeping with the place; none but the very best men in the business will be employed. B. I. Stoner will officiate as chief day mixologist, and J. Court Hall will attend to the night shift. Mr. Hall will look after the Medford business, while his partner takes care of the Gold Hill end of the line.
Medford Mail, December 12, 1902, page 2


Hall & Young's Opening.
    Saturday last Hall & Young opened to the public their elegant new resort, "The Medford," in the Palm-Bodge block. A view of the interior proves it to be one of the finest places of its kind this side of Portland, or anywhere else outside the large cities. The bar and wood fixtures are of the finest mahogany, and the bar is made with three fine plate glass mirrors. The partitions between the bar proper and the card room is also of Spanish cedar and mahogany. The floor is laid with colored tiles, while the walls and ceiling are papered in an artistic manner lending color and brilliancy which blends in a harmonious manner with the rest of the furnishings of the place. Messrs. Hall & Young have been at an expense of some $3000 in fitting up this room and intend to give Medford a first-class saloon. They will handle nothing but sample goods and will do their very best to serve their patrons with the best goods to be had in the market. One of the finest things they have in view is their elegant display of cut glass which is beautifully displayed upon their bar. They also have a fine cellar where they store their beer and other liquors and keep it at an even temperature and away from the light, insuring its quality at all times. B. I. Stoner, who is well known to everybody, is the mixologist who will dispense liquid refreshments during the day time, while Mr. Hall will look after the night shift. Mr. Young will continue to reside at Gold Hill and look after their business at that place.
Medford Enquirer, December 13, 1902, page 5


    Charles V. Hale, who resided with his family in East Medford, died last Thursday, and was buried Saturday. Mr. Hale was a native of Greene County, Tenn., and was 43 years of age. He left a widow and two children to miss a husband's tender care and a father's pleasant company. The immediate cause of death was appendicitis. Last fall Mr. Hale engaged in the saloon business for himself on D Street, and had made many friends.

    B. P. Theiss and J. Court Hall have been appointed appraisers of the property of the late Chas. V. Hale, who operated a saloon on D Street. James Mays, a half brother of Mr. Hale, has been appointed administrator and has charge of the property pending the report of the appraisers. Colvig & Cannon are the attorneys for the estate.

"Additional Local," Medford Mail, December 19, 1902, page 6


Notice of Request for Liquor License.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will make application to the city council, at its next regular meeting, January 6, 1903, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in the city of Medford. Place of business will be in Nash Hotel, corner of Seventh and South D streets, Medford, Jackson County, Oregon.
C. C. RAGSDALE.       
Medford Mail, December 26, 1902, page 2


SHOOTING AT MEDFORD
Saloon Row at Medford Sunday Night.
    There was a shooting scrape in the bar room of the Hotel Nash, at Medford, Sunday the principals being Walter Wyland, a young man with a recent rather unsavory record, who was intoxicated and defiant, and Chas. Gay, the barkeeper. Four shots were fired by Wyland but all missed their mark, two of them lodging in a door casing and another crashing through the mirror behind the bar. Wyland immediately disappeared and it is claimed by some that he was wounded by a bullet from the barkeeper's pistol, but nothing definite has been learned of the truth of this report. There have as yet been no arrests made.--Tidings.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, October 15, 1903, page 1


Sheriff Hits Five Times.
    Medford, Or., Oct. 15.--Word was received by telephone late Wednesday evening that Walter Wyland was shot five times by Sheriff Rader and E. E. Carver, while resisting arrest at Wyland's uncle's ranch, situated on Antelope Creek, 15 miles east of Medford. None of the wounds are thought to be serious.
    Wyland, while under the influence of liquor, last Sunday evening, drew his pistol on a son of Justice of the Peace Purdin for some fancied grievance, and finally brought up at the Hotel Nash bar with the intention of doing [harm to] Charles Gay, the night barkeeper. They exchanged a few words, and both drew pistols and began shooting. Gay fired but one shot, which took effect near the thigh, making a slight flesh wound, while Wyland fired five shots, none taking effect.
    Wyland then left town, a warrant was sworn out for his arrest, and Sheriff Rader has been on the lookout for him. He was taken to Jacksonville tonight, and will be brought here for preliminary examination tomorrow. Wyland generally is considered a desperate character.
The Daily Journal, Salem, October 15, 1903, page 5



    The city election was held today, and the outcome was a decided victory for the Citizens' ticket. . . . The Citizens' ticket was for an open town, and the People's ticket was to close the saloons on Sunday. . . . The majority for the Citizens' ticket was about 75. A large amount of work was done on both sides, circulars were freely distributed and more or less excitement was manifested during the day.
"Medford Is an Open Town," Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 13, 1904, page 6


    A. M. Helms has sold his saloon business in Medford to D. T. Irwin, late of Ashland, who has had considerable experience in that line. Al. will engage in stock raising and farming.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1904, page 1


Medford Saloon Robbed.
    MEDFORD, Or., June 24.--(Special.)--Chief of Police Angle, at 1 o'clock this morning, arrested Jesse Madison and George Erwin, emerging from the saloon of Selsby & Co. The burglars had effected an entrance through a window in the back of the saloon and pried off the backs of two slot machines, taking about $50. When they discovered they were detected they threw the money under the sidewalk and attempted to escape by climbing over the building. The officer covered them with guns and compelled them to come back.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, June 24, 1904, page 14


    Friday evening the usually quiet town of Jacksonville was in an uproar, caused by the escape of four of the six prisoners confined in the county jail. Three of those who attempted to escape were the fellows who made so much trouble for the officers when they were arrested near Ashland, in June last. The other was Madison, who was awaiting trial for robbing Selsby & Magill's saloon in Medford.
"Jail Break at Jacksonville," Medford Mail, August 19, 1904, page 1



Medford Is Half and Half.
    MEDFORD, Or., Dec. 2.--J. C. Hall, a saloon man of this city, whose place of business is in the "wet" precinct, is applying for license to sell liquor for one year, and the Prohibitionists are working with a remonstrance trying to prohibit his obtaining it. When the Prohibitionists, who lost out in North Medford, and the saloon men, who lost out in South Medford, both went before County Judge Dunn, trying to have the recent election contested, the Judge decided that according to the statutes of Oregon he could make no decision, therefore would take no action. The election thus stands as the returns show, leaving one-half of the city "wet" and the other half "dry."
Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 3, 1904, page 4



Medford Saloon Men Win.
    MEDFORD, Or., Dec. 7.--(Special.)--At the Medford City Council meeting last night Young & Hall, proprietors of the Medford saloon, won a decisive victory over the prohibition forces of this district, the occasion being a hearing on their application for a renewal of their license. It was a significant fact that their petition contained 327 names as against 134 names on the remonstrance, the majority of the business men and larger property owners of the community appearing on the petition for the license.
    Although the prohibitionist leaders attended and addressed the meeting, the sentiment of the Council was clearly in favor of granting the license, and this was done by unanimous vote.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 8, 1904, page 6


Licenses in "Dry" Medford District.
    MEDFORD, Or., Jan. 4.--(Special.)--The city council last night granted license to sell liquor for six months to Selby & Magill and the Nash Hotel Company. Both these saloons are located in the precinct that went "dry" last election, and the licenses were granted under a tacit agreement that the city would not be liable for damages in case the licenses were revoked under the local option law and that the petitioners would accept city warrants at par if their money must be refunded.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 5, 1905, page 5

MEDFORD SALOONS TEST LAW.
Four Liquor Sellers in Dry District Demand Jury Trial.
    MEDFORD, Or., Jan. 23.--(Special.)--The proprietors of the four saloons in South Medford precinct, which went "dry" in November, were arraigned before Justice Stewart today, charged with illegally selling liquor under the local option law. A jury trial was demanded, and the panel having been exhausted after four jurors had been secured, the case was postponed until tomorrow at 9 o'clock.
    The defense will be made upon the illegality of the election and law points as regarding the right of incorporated cities to control matters within their own limits. Two of the defendants, Silsby & Magill and the Nash Hotel, were granted licenses at the last meeting of the City Council, after having assured the board that no action for damages would be instituted in case the license should be revoked under the state law.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 24, 1905, page 7


Medford Bartender Is Acquitted.
    MEDFORD, Or., Jan. 24.--(Special.)--In the Justice Court of Medford, E. B. Carver was tried today and found not guilty for selling liquor illegally. This was the first case coming up on account of the arrests made Saturday. Trial by jury was had. In connection with this case there are three others.
    At the November election one precinct in Medford went "dry," the other showed a "wet" majority. Four saloons were located in the dry precinct. Saturday complaints were filed against these places, and Monday the cases were brought before Justice Stewart. It was not until today at noon that a jury was secured, and it was 4 o clock before the case was submitted to the jury. The jury, after being out two hours, found the defendant not guilty.
    The defendant in this case is the bartender at the Hotel Nash bar. Others arrested at the same time were Silsby & Magill, Medford Distilling & Refining Company and Capnick & Kennedy.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 25, 1905, page 6



    The amended charter of Medford will become a law in ninety days, due to the fact that the governor has filed it with the secretary of state without his approval.
    The provisions of the amended charter which were most objected to were those which gave the council exclusive authority in the matter of licensing saloons and permitted the city council to allow saloons to keep open on Sunday--a provision directly contrary to the state law. This latter provision will be eliminated by the further amendment introduced by Senator Carter taking away this authority from the council thus leaving the matter of Sunday closing under the operation of the state law.
    The amendment provides, however, that the city shall have full control over the liquor traffic within its corporation lines.

"Medford Charter a Law," Medford Mail, February 10, 1905, page 1


    The petition and bond of Hutton & Co., for license to sell liquor in less quantities than one gallon for the period of one year, was accepted and license ordered to be issued.
    The petition and bond of Kapnick & Kennedy for license to sell liquor for six months was accepted and license ordered issued, subject to the same conditions as those imposed upon saloons in South Medford to which license had heretofore been granted.
"City Council Proceedings," 
Medford Mail, February 10, 1905, page 4


    The Iowa Lumber and Box Company is erecting a 16x18-foot ice house, near the Presbyterian Church, upon land owned by C. W. Palm. The ice house will be used to store ice for the Neuber & Hutton saloon, which expects to soon be opened, on North D Street.

"City Happenings," 
Medford Mail, February 10, 1905, page 5


    Shearer & Kerr, the interior decorators, have been doing some fine work on the W. A. Hutton & Co. saloon building on D Street. Although somewhat handicapped by bad walls and ceilings, they have succeeded in creating an artistic and cheerful effect. The walls and callings are paneled with artistically contrasted colors, harmonizing with the furniture and fixtures, the whole making a pleasing ensemble.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, February 17, 1905, page 5


SLOT MACHINE FORBIDDEN
Medford Council Gives Order at Request of W.C.T.U.
    MEDFORD, Or., March 12.--(Special.)--At the last session of the city council that body was petitioned by the Ministerial Association and the W.C.T.U. to close saloons Sundays and stop the operation of the slot machines, and the petition was granted. The order has not yet been put into effect, and there is much speculation in the matter.
    Every saloon and cigar store has one or more slot machines, and the city has been receiving from each nickel machine $2.50 and each quarter machine $5 per month revenue.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 13, 1906, page 6



    Messrs. M. J. and V. J. Emerick . . . own the Ivy Leaf Saloon property on South D Street, and upon the ground where now stands an old wooden building they will erect in the spring a two-story brick.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, December 21, 1906, page 5


    H. O. Wilkinson of Roseburg will open a saloon in Medford, on what is popularly known as whisky row, in July. It will be a handsome one.
"Local Briefs," Southern Oregonian, Medford, May 18, 1907, page 5


CLOSE SALOONS ON SUNDAY
MORAL WAVE SWEEPS OVER JACKSON COUNTY.
Sheriff's Order Also Puts Slot Machines Out of Sight Medford Doesn't Like It.
    ASHLAND, Or., Sept. 16.--(Special.)--Sheriff D. H. Jackson today put down the "lid" tight on gambling in Jackson County. He issued orders for all nickel-in-the-slot machines, which have been allowed in some parts of the county for years, contrary to law, to cease operations. Several months ago he shut down on gambling and games of chance, which ran openly in some places, but the latest order is more sweeping, and also includes strict compliance with the state Sunday closing law for saloons in every part of Jackson County. This is something that has never been known in the history of this county.
    The city authorities of Medford, it is reported, are inclined to try conclusions with the authority of the county officials in the matter, but the latter mean business, and it is believed they will decide to accept the inevitable.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, September 17, 1907, page 10


TO CORNER SALES
W. L. Vaughn Asks for Exclusive Franchise at Medford.
    MEDFORD, Or., Oct. 15.--(Special.)--At a meeting of the city council this afternoon an ordinance was introduced at the request of W. L. Vaughn, of Portland, for the sale to the Medford Gothenberg Association of the exclusive right to sell liquor within the corporate limits of Medford for a period of ten years, beginning on October 1, 1909, for $55,000, to be paid at the rate of $5000 for the first five years and $6000 for the second five.
    At the present time there are nine saloons here, but under the rules of the association there will be but six, and the rules of the association provide for strict regulations.
    Mr. Vaughn states that the plan as provided by the Gothenberg Association has worked admirably wherever tried.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, October 16, 1908, page 1


    [J. S. Howard's Pioneer Store] still stands in the original location, which is just south of the Nash Hotel on Front Street, and is now occupied by the Distillery saloon.
Rogue River Fruit Grower, January 1909


NOTICE
is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, on December 7, 1909, for license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors in less quantities than one gallon, at lots 14, 15 and 16, block 21 in Medford, Oregon, for a period of six months.
YOUNG & HALL.               
    Dated November 21st.               
Medford Mail Tribune, November 21, 1909, page 13


NOTICE
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the next regular meeting of the city council of Medford, Oregon, to be held on December 7, 1909, for a license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors in less quantities than one gallon, on lots 9 and 10, block 45, of the town (now city) of Medford, in Jackson County, for a period of six months.
W. F. RAU.               
    Dated November 18, 1909.               
Medford Mail Tribune, November 21, 1909, page 13


NOTICE
Is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, on December 7, 1909, for license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors in less quantities than one gallon, at lot 17, block 20, in Medford, Oregon, for a period of six months.
O. M. SELSBY.               
    Dated November 24.               
Medford Mail Tribune, November 28, 1909, page 18


NOTICE
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of Medford, Oregon, at its next meeting, for a license to sell spiritous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon, at its place of business at lots 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, in block 20, of the city of Medford, Oregon.
HOTEL NASH COMPANY.               
    Dated December 8, 1909.               
Medford Mail Tribune, December 21, 1909, page 4


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at the meeting thereof on March 2, 1910, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon, for the period of six months, at his place of business at No. 31 Front Street South in said city.
B. S. RADCLIFF & CO.               
    Dated February 17, 1910.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 27, 1910, page 14


Grand Opening.
To Whom It May Concern:
    The former famous chef at the Nash Grill, Mr. Sam Lock, will open a first-class restaurant next Thursday morning, above Kennedy's saloon, No. 33 South Front Street. Entrance at both sides. Only first-class meals will be served, and just the name of the proprietor is the best guarantee. This is the only place where will be served chop suey and China noodles next month. Come and see me and I and you are both sure you will come back. Remember, I am willing and I preach what I promise. Yours truly,
SAM LOCK.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 20, 1910, page 10


$1000 LICENSE IS TO BE ASKED OF SALOON MEN
Currently Reported That at Next Meeting of City Council
License Committee Will Submit New Ordinance Raising License $200 Year in the City.
    It is currently reported that at the next meeting of the city council the license committee will submit an ordinance fixing the yearly license to sell malt and vinous liquors at $1000 per annum. The present license is $800 a year.
    The license committee refuses to discuss any of the phases of the matter, while the mayor refuses to make a statement.
    Late last evening a local business man who is closely in touch with the administration stated that such an ordinance would be introduced at the next regular meeting.
    The reason for raising the license at this time is in order to give the city better police protection by the addition of new men. The additional revenue to the city will be in the neighborhood of $2000 a year.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 27, 1910, page 1



NOTICE
Is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the next meeting of the city council of Medford, Oregon, for license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors in less quantities than one gallon, for six months, at lot 10, block 20, in Medford, Oregon, for a period of six months.
BASS & HALE.               
    Dated March 22, 1910.          
Medford Mail Tribune, April 1, 1910, page 3


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the next regular meeting of the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at his place of business at No. 22 Front Street, North, in said city, for a period of six months.
JOHN HARRINGTON.               
    April 8, 1910.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 18, 1910, page 7


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the next regular meeting of the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at No. 16 South Fir Street, in said city, for a period of six months.
O. M. MURPHY.               
    Dated April 21, 1910.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 24, 1910, page 11


NO MORE SALOONS WANTED.
    Application has been made for another saloon on the West Side.
    There is but one bar now west of the tracks, and that is in connection with a hotel.
    A majority of the people of that section do not want another saloon located west of the tracks.
    A majority of the people of Medford do not want the number of saloons increased on either side.
    While Medford's saloons are well regulated and comparatively orderly, there are too many of them for the population. The fewer saloons, the higher the class, the more orderly, and the easier to maintain order.
    Saloon licenses should be increased to $1000 a year and the number not increased except for hotels of 50 rooms and over.
    A bar is an essential to a first-class hotel. There will be no objection to such institutions securing licenses. There will, however, be a decided objection to increasing the number of saloons.

Medford Mail Tribune, April 28, 1910, page 4



MAYOR'S VOTE TURNS DOWN NEW SALOON
ON THE WEST SIDE
Petition of O. M. Murphy Rejected
After Councilmen Divided on Question by Mayor Voting No
    O. M. Murphy's application for a license to sell liquor on the West Side, near the present location of the Hotel Moore bar, was rejected by the city council Tuesday evening, when Mayor Canon voted no. The councilmen split on the question, Eifert, Demmer and Emerick voting yes; Welsh, Merrick and Wortman voting no
    The councilmen state that Mr. Murphy's personality did not enter into the matter, as they each have a high regard for his standing, but that they believe the sentiment of the citizens of Medford is against the opening of additional saloons, especially on the West Side away from saloon row.

Medford Mail Tribune, May 4, 1910, page 1



    The council did well to refuse to increase the number of saloons in Medford. Now let them raise the license to $1000.
----
    If saloon men had ordinary business acumen they would insist on $1000 license, if for no other reason [than] to keep out competition.
Editorial notes, Medford Mail Tribune, May 4, 1910, page 4


MEDFORD LICENSE HIGHER
City Aims to Exclude Undesirable Class of Saloons.
    MEDFORD, Or., May 18.--(Special.)--The city council at its meeting Tuesday night raised the saloon license for Medford from $800 to $1000 a year.
    This action came in pursuance of the city's avowed intention of keeping out the more undesirable class of saloons and providing an increased revenue for policing the town.

Morning Oregonian,
Portland, May 19, 1910, page 9



COLD GREY DAWN FINDS DOOR OPEN AND CASH GONE
(EMILY F. JANNEY.)
    John Harrington was much perturbed Saturday morning to find the back door of his saloon on Front Street wide open to the cold, gray dawn and $50, the receipts of Friday's business, gone.
    Some time after 1 o'clock Saturday morning a hole was bored in the back door, the bar inside lifted, and the lock sprung. The miscreants entered, disturbing nothing, restrained themselves from tempting rows of cigars and free drinks, and satisfied themselves with lifting a modest pile of $50 from an unlocked locker, before making their getaway. It is supposed that they derived their knowledge of the whereabouts of Harrington's coin by peering in the windows at the time he cached it under some aprons in a locker.
    There is at present no clue as to the identity of the bold, bad men, who today are living in opulence on John's hard-earned lucre.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 15, 1910, page 1


EMERICK EXPLAINS HOTEL MOORE BAR OPPOSITION
    Opposition to the Hotel Moore [liquor] license, states Councilman Emerick, is based upon the fact that the bar is not operated in connection with the hotel, but separately, in another building, and that there is but a far-fetched connection between the two.
    "If the bar was in the same building and run as an orderly high-class hotel bar, there would be no opposition," states Mr. Emerick. "Nor would there be opposition if the bar got rid of the disorderly element that frequents it and annoys the neighborhood. This city cannot afford to police this place alone, and if ten cents was the minimum price of drinks there it would probably bar this hobo element. I voted for another saloon alongside because the additional license would provide funds for policing the west side."
Medford Mail Tribune, May 17, 1910, page 8



NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at his place of business on lot 17, block 20, in said city, for a period of six months.
O. M. SELSBY.               
    Dated May 25, 1910.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 29, 1910, page 10


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at their place of business on lots 15 and 16 in block 21 in said city, for a period of six months.
RYAN & BROWN.               
Medford Mail Tribune, May 30, 1910, page 6


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on June 21, 1910, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lots 5, 6, 7, 8, block 20, in said city, for a period of six months.
HOTEL NASH CO.               
    June 10, 1910.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 12, 1910, page 2



NOTICE
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the next regular meeting of the city council, to be held August 2, 1910, for a license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors in quantities less than one gallon at his place of business in lot 20, block 11, in the city of Medford.
W. M. KENNEDY.               
    Dated July 20, 1910.          
Medford Mail Tribune, July 24, 1910, page 13


Notice.
    Notice is hereby given that we will apply to the city council for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in less than gallon lots at our place of business, 31 South Front Street, in the city of Medford in Jackson County, for a period of six months from date of issuance.
RADCLIFFE & CO.               
Medford Mail Tribune, September 10, 1910, page 2


BARTENDER UNDER ARREST
Chehalis Woman Alleges Husband Got Away with $2100.
    MEDFORD, Or., Sept. 12.--(Special.)--Charles Daley, alias Harry O'Neil, who has been tending bar in the Oaks Saloon here for the past two weeks, was arrested today by Chief of Police Shearer, on receipt of a communication from the sheriff of Chehalis County, Washington.
    Daley is wanted at Montesano on a charge of grand larceny. His wife accuses him of stealing $2100. Chief Shearer has placed the accused man in the county jail at Jacksonville, waiting for directions from the sheriff of Chehalis County.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, September 13, 1910, page 6



NOTICE
Is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council of Medford, Oregon, for license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors in less quantities than one gallon, for six months, at lot 10, block 20, in Medford, Oregon, for a period of six months.
BASS & HALE.               
    Dated September 22, 1910.          
Medford Mail Tribune, September 25, 1910, page 15


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting thereof, to be held on October 18, 1910, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors for a period of six months at his place of business, at No. 22 Front Street, North, in said city.
JOHN HARRINGTON.               
    Dated October 7, 1910.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 10, 1910, page 2


NOTICE
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the next regular meeting of the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon for a license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors in less quantities than a gallon, at their place of business located at lots 9 and 10, block 21, original townsite in said city for a period of six months.
M. AND E. J. ADAMS.               
    Dated at Medford, Oregon, October 20th, 1910.          
Medford Mail Tribune, October 20, 1910, page 8


REGULATING THE SALOON.
    Circuit courts [in Pennsylvania], instead of city councils, control the saloon, issue the licenses, hear complaints and impose penalties, and there is no recourse.
    As a result of the Pennsylvania plan, the saloon has been removed from politics. A liquor dealer must be a man of good character or he cannot secure the license. He is compelled to defend himself in court against any complaint. If he does not scrupulously obey the regulations, he loses his license. Hence the unruly element is eliminated, and prohibition agitation, which is primarily produced by the conduct of saloonkeepers themselves, unknown.
    While present laws probably will not permit the court to regulate the liquor traffic here, they can be made to, and this should be an end to be worked for. Take the saloon out of politics, both for the benefit of the public and for the welfare of the saloon.
    Medford has ten saloons, including two hotel bars, one less than it had three years ago. It has a $1000-a-year license fee. This is a sufficient number of saloons for double or triple the population. There should be no more licenses granted, except for first-class hotel bars, until the city has a population of 20,000 or over. One saloon for every 2500 inhabitants is sufficient, but to cancel any present license without cause would be unfair. The license fee can be increased as population increases.
    More stringent rules ought to be embodied in the saloon ordinance, and a third offense for violating restrictions punished by forfeiture of license. In this manner the unruly saloonkeeper would be eliminated, and the law-abiding dealer as well as the public protected.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 29, 1910, page 4


DOC RYAN MEETS WITH A PAINFUL ACCIDENT
    A painful accident occurred to Doc Ryan of Ryan & Brown, at 10 o'clock Wednesday at the Medford [Saloon]. Mr. Ryan had a call to the telephone and in arising to obey the call he in some manner swung the heavy safe door, which caught the middle finger of his right hand, badly smashing the member. While it is believed that amputation will not be necessary, the accident caused Mr. Ryan extreme pain and will put him out of commission for some weeks.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 30, 1910, page 1



RYAN & BROWN ARE IMPROVING PROPERTY
    Ryan & Brown are making several changes in their place of business. The partitions are being removed and set back, the bar extended to a length of 25 feet, and all chairs removed from the place.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 30, 1910, page 6



NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at his place of business on lot 17, block 20, in said city, for a period of six months.
O. M. SELSBY.               
    Dated November 25, 1910.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon for a period of six months, at their place of business at No. 2 Front Street, North, in said city.
RYAN & BROWN.               
----
NOTICE.
    Please take notice that on Tuesday evening, December 6, 1910, the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than one gallon for a period of one year on and after December 3, 1910, at its place of business, located on lots 10, 11 and 12, of block 45, of the town of Medford.
RAU-MOHR COMPANY.               
Medford Mail Tribune, December 4, 1910, page B2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Or., at its regular meeting on January 3, 1911, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business in the Hotel Nash building, at southeast corner [Front] and Main streets, in said city, for a period of six months.
HOTEL NASH CO.               
Medford Mail Tribune, December 23, 1910, page 6


REGULATION OF SALOONS PLAN OF CITY DADS
Model License Law Is Being Drafted
Which Will Put Local Booze Vendors Under Much Stricter Supervision.
ALL SCREENS AND CARD TABLES PROBABLY GO
New Ordinance Will Probably Be Introduced at Next Session
Of Council--Early Closing.
    The mayor and members of the city council are working upon a model license law, which is being designed for the purpose of more strictly regulating Medford saloons. The members of the council are consulting with various business and professional men in the city and giving the matter a great deal of thought. In all probability the new ordinance will be presented at the next session of the city council.
    Three points in particular are being given much consideration. One is for an earlier closing hour, one does away with card rooms and tables, and one provides that all screens shall be removed.
    In the opinion of many who have given the matter thought, it will be a decided change for the better if the barrooms of the city close at an earlier hour than at present. In all probability the saloons will be forced to close either at 10 or 11 o'clock in the evening, whereas they close at 1 o'clock now and at 12 on Saturday nights.
    Card rooms, chairs and card playing will probably be eliminated, as these are said to [contribute] considerably to drunkenness and loafing in saloons.
    All screens are to be removed with the exception of those five feet in height, which will prevent children looking in to barrooms. But above five feet in height the view must be unobstructed.
    The details of the law have not as yet been fully agreed upon, but the councilmen feel that the saloons should be more rigidly regulated and are working toward that end.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 20, 1911, page 1


WIDOW WRECKS SALOON
WOMAN LEADS CARPENTERS IN SEIZING FIXTURES.
Mrs. Frances Snyder, Obtaining Judgment Against Bar, Strips Place of All its Finery.
    MEDFORD, Or., Feb. 1.--(Special.)--Armed with a judgment in her favor signed by Justice McBride. of the Supreme Court of Oregon, and reinforced by her attorney, W. E. Phipps, Deputy Sheriff Robert Dow and a small army of carpenters, Mrs. Frances Snyder, the widow of the late Victor K. Snyder, swooped down upon the Office Bar shortly after 1 o'clock this afternoon and started to dismantle it.
    Everything from the linoleum to the fixtures hanging from the ceiling is claimed by Mrs. Snyder. Under the ruling of the court and on the strength of the judgment, John Harrington, occupant of the saloon, will be left this evening with nothing but a saloon license and four bare walls. Mrs. Snyder, after taking possession of the saloon today, superintended its wrecking personally.
    The case first attracted attention when, shortly after the death of Mr. Snyder in 1907, his widow endeavored to obtain from Harrington her share of the value of the saloon. Harrington contended that Snyder's interest was nil and the legal battle started. It has waged through every court in the state since June 1907, and ended two weeks ago when Justice McBride handed down the decision which  prompted Mrs. Snyder's action today.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 2, 1911, page 3



ORR IS DROPPED FROM CITY POLICE
Mayor Canon Revokes Special Officer's Appointment of Officer Frank Orr
Following Allegations of Insobriety--Relieved of "Tools"
    Mayor W. H. Canon Friday relieved Frank Orr, a special officer holding a temporary appointment on the local police force, of his star and "tools." The dismissal was made as the result of allegations to the effect that Orr had been found asleep in an intoxicated condition in the rear room of the Bass and Hale saloon on South Front Street at a late hour Thursday night.
    He was discovered by Officer Harry Snider who, failing in an attempt to wake him up, relieved him of his gun and star. Snider deposited the gun with the night clerk of the Nash Hotel and, taking the star to Mayor Canon's home, turned it over to him.
    Orr was called before the Mayor this morning and dismissed from the force.
    While he had never been given an appointment to the regular police force, Orr had under a special appointment been assigned to duty with members of the regular forces and was working the night patrol in company with Officer Snider when he met his Waterloo.
    Officer Snider last night called Officer Harry Cingcade, one of the day force, to finish our Orr's tour of duty and this morning Snider remained on duty with Day Officer W. B. Hall until relieved again by Cingcade.
    No appointment has been made in Orr's place but Officers Snider, Cingcade and Hall will divide the patrols until a fourth man is appointed.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 3, 1911, page 5


RIGID SALOON LAW ASKED
Medford License Committee Submits Strict Proposed Ordinance.
    MEDFORD, Or., March 8.--(Special.)--The license committee this afternoon introduced a proposed model liquor license ordinance for the approval of the City Council at a special meeting of that body.
    According to the provisions of the new law it will, if enacted, cause all local saloons to be closed dally at midnight and .to remain closed until 5 o'clock in the morning. The present closing hour is 1 a.m. It will prohibit opening saloons as at present between midnight Sunday and 1 o'clock Monday morning.
    Card tables, back rooms and dice shaking are placed under the ban, and the number of licenses will be restricted to one for every 1000 of population. Questionable resorts may not receive licenses, and no woman may enter a place where liquor is sold.
    Under the proposed law the license is fixed at $1000 a year for saloons and $400 for clubs, drug stores and wholesale houses dealing  direct with the consumer.
    Decision on the ordinance was postponed until the next regular meeting.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 9, 1911, page 6


MEDFORD SALOONS CURBED
City Adopts Rigid Law, Cards, Dice, Tables, Chairs Barred.
    MEDFORD, Or., March 21.--(Special.)--The city council tonight adopted a model liquor ordinance which goes into immediate effect and issued instructions to the chief of police to see that it was enforced.
    The ordinance provides for the strictest regulation of saloons yet provided in Medford. All screens must be removed about five feet from the sidewalk, cards and dice are barred, as are tables and chairs, and the closing hour is fixed at 11 o'clock instead of 1 o'clock. The ordinance also provides a license for clubs of $400 a year, which may result in the closing of the University Club.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 22, 1911, page 6


NEW SALOON LAW GOES INTO EFFECT NEXT MONDAY
Then All the Saloons Must Have a Cleaning Up Day--New Regulations to Be Enforced.
    The new license ordinance [Ordinance No. 475] recently passed by the city council strictly regulating Medford saloons will be put in effect Monday, according to an announcement by Mayor W. H. Canon this morning. Then the saloons must observe the new closing hours and other provisions.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 31, 1911, page 1



NOTICE
    Notice is hereby given that the Rogue River Valley University Club will make application to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon at its regular meeting on April 18th, 1911 for a license to sell spirituous liquors, and malt liquors, in quantities less than a gallon, at its club room in the Mail Tribune building on Fir Street, for a period of six months.
Rogue River Valley University Club,               
By W. C. ANDERSON,               
Secretary.               
----
NOTICE
    Is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the meeting of the city council of the city of Medford to be held on April 18th, 1911, at 7:30 p.m. for a retail liquor license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors at retail  for six months at the store room on the ground floor No. 21 South D'Anjou Street, Medford, Oregon. Dated March 29th, 1911.
WM. GILL,               
JOHN S. GILL,               
JAMES VOGELI.               

Medford Mail Tribune, April 2, 1911, page B3


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the next regular meeting of the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, on April 18, 1911, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon for a period of six months, at his place of business at No. 22 North Front Street, in said city.
JOHN HARRINGTON.               
    Dated April 7, 1911.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 11, 1911, page 4


Notice.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the next regular meeting of the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, on May 2, 1911, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon, at their place of business at 32 Front St., in said city, for a period of six months.
M. & E. J. ADAMS.               
    Dated April 21, 1911.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 30, 1911, page B8


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on June 6, 1911, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon, at his place of business at No. 2 Front Street, in said city, for a period of six months.
E. G. BROWN.               
    Date of first publication May 26, 1911.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 28, 1911, page 10


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on June 20, 1911, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lots 5, 6, 7, 8, block 20, in said city, for a period of six months.
HOTEL NASH CO.               
    Dated June 8, 1911.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its regular meeting on June 20, 1911, for a license to sell spirituous liquors and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon, at his place of business at No. 17 South Front Street, for a period of six months.
O. M. SELSBY.               
    Date of first publication, June 8, 1911.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 19, 1911, page 4


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on August 1st, 1911, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon, at his place of business at No. 25 South Front Street, in said city, for a period of six months.
CARNS BROS.               
    Date of first publication July 20, 1911.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 21, 1911, page 6


    Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Barkdull and Mr. and Mrs. Ed Brown returned Friday evening from a trip to Crescent City.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, August 19, 1911, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon at its next regular meeting on September 5, 1911 for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors, in quantities less than a gallon, at their place of business at Hotel Medford, located on northwest corner Main and Ivy, lots 16, 17 and 18, in said city, for a period of six months.
RAU-MOHR CO.               
    Date of first publication August 17, 1911.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 31, 1911, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the next meeting of the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon to be held October 24th, 1911 for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors, in quantities less than a gallon, for a period of six months, at his place of business at No. 22 North Front Street, in said city.
J. R. RYAN.               
    Dated October 10th, 1911.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 11, 1911, page 8


Notice.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held November 7, 1911 at 7:30 p.m., for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lot 10, block 44, of the town (now city) of Medford, for a period of six months.
HOLLAND HOTEL COMPANY.               
    Dated October 27, 1911.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 27, 1911, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the Rogue River Valley University Club will make application to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon at its regular meeting on November 21, 1911 for a license to sell spirituous liquors, and malt liquors, in quantities less than a gallon, at its club room in the Mail Tribune building on Fir Street, for a period of six months.
Rogue River Valley University Club,               
By Stanton Griffis, Secretary.               
----
Notice.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held November 21, 1911 at 7:30 p.m., for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at wholesale in quantities to consumers direct at its place of business, No. 10 North Front Street, Medford, Oregon, for a period of six months.
YOUNG & HALL.               
    Nov. 9, 1911.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon at its next regular meeting on Nov. 21st, 1911 for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors, in quantities less than a gallon, at their place of business on South Fir Street, located at lots 10, 11 and 12, block 45, of the original townsite, in said city, for a period of six months.
RAU-MOHR CO.               
    Date of first publication November 8, 1911.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 13, 1911, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on January 2, 1912, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lots 5, 6, 7, 8, block 20, in said city, for a period of six months.
HOTEL NASH CO.               
    Dated Dec. 14, 1911.
----
Notice.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will make application to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its regular meeting on December 19th, 1911, for a license to sell spirituous liquors and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at No. 17 So. Front St., for a period of six months.
O. M. SELSBY.               
    Dated Dec. 8th, 1911.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 16, 1911, page 8


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will make application to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on February 6th, 1912, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at his place of business on lot 10, block 20, in said city, for a period of six months.
WILL KARNES.               
    Dated Jan. 19, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune,
January 19, 1912, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council March 19, 1912, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at the Hotel Medford, lots 16, 17, 18, block 78, for a period of six months.
RAU-MOHR COMPANY.               
    Dated Feb. 23, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 2, 1912, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council March 19, 1912, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at lot 8, block 20, No. 13 [omission] in original town of Medford, for a period of six months.
SHAW & REED.               
    Dated March 6, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 7, 1912, page 6


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on May 7, 1912, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors at wholesale and retail, or for a license to sell the same in quantities more than one gallon, and for a license to sell the same at retail, or in quantities less than one gallon, at No. 16 North Front Street, in said city, for a period of one year.
ANGELES WINE CO.,               
Per A. S. Ash.               
    April 25, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 27, 1912, page 6


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on May 21, 1912, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon, at No. 32 North Front Street, in said city, for a period of six months.
M. & E. J. ADAMS.               
Medford Mail Tribune, May 9, 1912, page 6


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on July 2, 1912, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lots 5, 6, 7, 8, block 20, in said city, for a period of six months.
HOTEL NASH CO.               
    Dated June 18, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 26, 1912, page 6


Notice.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held July 16, 1912, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lot 10, block 44, city of Medford, for a period of six months.
HOLLAND HOTEL COMPANY.               
    Dated July 5, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 12, 1912, page 6


    Murphy & Co. will move the Snug Bar from its present location on South Front Street to the new location adjoining The Quiz Saturday. The new bar will be known as The Stag and has been handsomely fitted up.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, August 2, 1912, page 2



    Had the designs of Bert Harmon and Frank Burgess not miscarried, Ed Brown would have had nothing but water to drink on his way to Pendleton to attend the roundup. They substituted water, but Brown's suspicions were aroused and he beat them to it. The ensuing scramble at the Southern Pacific depot attracted the attention of a large crowd.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, September 25, 1912, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council October 15, 1912, for a license to sell beer and malt products only in quantities of not less than twelve common quart beer bottles or its equivalent to the consumer from our place of business at No. 201 South Riverside Avenue for a period of six months.
GEO. MAPLE,               
WALTER E. HARDY.               
    Dated Oct. 2, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 5, 1912, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the special meeting of the city council October 21, 1912, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at 22 North Front Street, for a period of six months.
SELSBY & KENNEDY.               
    Dated October 9, 1912.
----
NOTICE.
    Public notice is hereby given that the undersigned will, at the regular meeting of the city council of Medford, Oregon, on October 15th, 1912, apply to said city council for a wholesale liquor license to transact the business of a wholesale liquor dealer at its place of business, No. 301 North Fir Street, in the city of Medford, Oregon, for a period of six months from the date of said license, in accordance with the provisions of Ordinance No. 705 of the said city of Medford, adopted by the said city council on October 1st, 1912.
H. WEINHARD BEER & ICE DEPOT.               
    Dated at Medford, Oregon, this 7th day of October, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 12, 1912, page 7


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council October 15, 1912, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at 16 North Front Street, for a period of six months.
MURPHY & CO.               
    Dated October 4, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 14, 1912, page 3


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council November 5, 1912, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at 32 North Front Street, for a period of six months.
M. & E. J. ADAMS.               
    Dated October 22, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 25, 1912, page 6


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council November 19, 1912, for a license to sell beer and malt products only in quantities of not less than twelve common quart beer bottles or its equivalent to the consumer from 109 E. 8th Street for a period of six months.           
PURITY BOTTLING & SUPPLY CO.               
    Dated Nov. 8th, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 12, 1912, page 5



NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on December 3rd, 1912, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon, at their place of business on South Fir Street, located at lots 10, 11 and 12, block 45, of the original townsite, in said city, for a period of six months.
RAU-MOHR CO.               
Medford Mail Tribune, November 23, 1912, page 4


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on January 7, 1913, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lots 5, 6, 7, 8, block 20, in said city, for a period of six months.
HOTEL NASH CO.               
    Dated December 17, 1912.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held on Jan. 2, 1913, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lot 10, block 44, city of Medford, for a period of six months.
  HOLLAND HOTEL CO.               
    Dated Dec. 14, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 19, 1912, page 4


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council March 4, 1913, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at 31 South Front Street, for a period of six months.
B. S. RADCLIFF.               
    Dated Feb. 18, 1913.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held March 4th, 1913, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lot 11, block 20, city of Medford, for a period of six months.
  W. M. KENNEDY.               
    Dated February 14, 1913.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1913, page 6


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council March 18, 1913, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at the Hotel Medford, lots 16, 17, 18, block 78, for a period of six months.
HOTEL MEDFORD.               
    Dated March 7, 1913.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford at its next regular meeting on March 18, 1913, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at his place of business at No. 13 South Front Street, in said city, for a period of six months.
  C. L. REED.               
    Dated March 5, 1913.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 14, 1913, page 7


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council May 6, 1913, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at 32 North Front Street, for a period of six months.
M. AND E. J. ADAMS.               
    Dated April 23, 1913.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council May 6, 1913, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at 22 North Front Street, for a period of six months.
SELSBY & KENNEDY.               
    Dated April 11, 1913.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council May 6, 1913, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at their quarters over 27 N. Fir St., for a period of six months.
ROGUE RIVER VALLEY UNIVERSITY CLUB.               
Medford Mail Tribune, April 28, 1913, page 5


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its regular meeting on June 3, 1913, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at his place of business at No. 2 N. Front St., in said city, for a period of six months.
    E. G. BROWN.               
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on June 3d, 1913, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at their place of business on South Fir Street, located at lots 10, 11 and 12, block 45, of the original townsite, in said city, for a period of six months.
  RAU-MOHR CO.                
    Date of first publication May 22, 1913.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 28, 1913, page 5


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting, October 21st, 1913, for a license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors at his place of business, No. 22, North Front Street, Medford, Oregon, for a period of six months.
SELSBY & KENNEDY.               
    Dated Oct. 10th, 1913.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting, October 21st, 1913, for a license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors at their place of business, on North Fir Street, Medford, Oregon, for a period of six months.
ROGUE RIVER VALLEY UNIVERSITY CLUB.               
    Dated Oct. 11th, 1913.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting, October 21st, 1913, for a license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors at his place of business, No. 16, North Front Street, Medford, Oregon, for a period of six months.
MURPHY & CO.               
    Dated Oct. 6th, 1913.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 11, 1913, page 4
Brown's Saloon July 4, 1911 Medford Sun
Brown's logo, July 4, 1911 Medford Sun

    In accordance with an annual custom, E. G. Brown invites all children of the city twelve years of age or under to be his guests at the Isis Theater on Thanksgiving Day, when a special bill has been prepared for their entertainment.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, November 25, 1913, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting December 2nd, 1913, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at their place of business on South Fir Street, located at lots 10, 11 and 12, block 45, of the original townsite, in said city, for a period of six months.
    HOTEL MOORE.               
    Date of first publication November 20th, 1913.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on Dec. 2, 1913, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors at retail in quantities less than a gallon at his place of business at No. 2 N. Front Street, in said city, for a period of six months.
    E. G. BROWN.               
    Dated November 20, 1913.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 28, 1913, page 5


   
Ed Wilkinson is overhauling the lower story of one of his buildings on Front Street, which will be occupied by Hale & Lyons, when the improvements are completed.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, December 3, 1913, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on Dec. 16, 1913, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors at retail in quantities less than a gallon at his place of business at No. 17, South Front Street, in said city, for a period of six months.
  O. M. SELSBY.                
    Dated Dec. 4th, 1913.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 15, 1913, page 5


    The only flurry of the [city council] session came when Councilman Sargent of the second ward announced that if the Holland Hotel was not running at the end of six months he would vote to deny a liquor license, in accordance with the unwritten law that no saloons be allowed off Front Street, except in hotels. Councilman Emerick said he thought it would be running as such long before that time.
"Emerick Elected President of New City Council," Medford Mail Tribune, January 21, 1914, page 3


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held March 3rd, 1914, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business, No. 36, North Front Street, city of Medford, for a period of six months.
    B. S. RADCLIFFE.               
Dated February 16, 1914.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held March 3rd, 1914, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lot 11, block 20, city of Medford, for a period of six months.
  W. M. KENNEDY.               
Dated February 14, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 21, 1914, page 8


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held March 17th, 1914, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business, 13 S. Front Street, city of Medford, for a period of six months.
    C. L. REED.               
Dated March 4, 1914.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held March 17th, 1914, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on West Main Street, city of Medford, for a period of six months.
    HOTEL MEDFORD.               
Dated March 2nd, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 11, 1914, page 6


INHERITANCE WINS BRIDE
Former Portland Man Gets $7777.77 and Rushes East to Sweetheart.
    MEDFORD, Or., March 30.--(Special.)--A. K. Welsh, formerly a member of the Portland fire department, and who was up to a few days ago an employee of the Oaks Billiard Hall, has received $7777.77 as the share of the estate of his uncle, H. M. Kitchen, who died in Los Angeles recently.
    With the money in his pocket Mr. Welsh left today for Grand Rapids, Mich., where he will marry Miss Katherine Garber, of that city, to whom he has been engaged for many years. Heretofore slender finances made marriage impossible.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 31, 1914, page 1



NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held April 21st, 1914, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business, 16 N. Front Street, city of Medford, for a period of six months.
    MURPHY & CO.               
    Dated April 10th, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 18, 1914, page 8


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply at the regular meeting of the city council May 5, 1914, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors at 32 North Front Street, for a period of six months.
M. AND E. J. ADAMS.               
    Dated April 17th, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 20, 1914, page 3


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held April 21st, 1914, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business, 22 N. Front Street, city of Medford for a period of six months..
            SELSBY & KENNEDY.               
    Dated April 11th, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 20, 1914, page 4


    A gentleman who said he had stomach trouble was sharpening knives in front of the Quiz Thursday afternoon, when Officer Crawford mobilized, and delivered an ukase to the effect that such was lacerating the peace and dignity of the community, to be healed at the rate of $50 a quarter for a license. The gentleman said it would take the rest of his life at a nickel a blade to pay that amount, and took his grindstone and red wagon and went down the street.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, July 31, 1914, page 2



    Ed Brown and wife, Mrs. Maude Miller and Court Hall will leave in the morning for Fish Lake, where Mr. Brown will build a lodge.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, August 3, 1914, page 4



NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting, September 1st, 1914, for a license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors at his place of business, No. 36, N. Front Street, Medford, Oregon, for a period of six months.
    B. S. RADCLIFF.               
    Dated Aug. 18, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 18, 1914, page 5


    The White Front Saloon was granted an extension of 19 days in its license last night by the city council. The place recently went into bankruptcy, and the extension was granted to allow an adjustment of the business with the creditors.
    [A Mr. Downs, accused] of picking the pockets of R. Ryan in a Front Street resort, was ordered out of town this morning by Police Judge Gay, upon the grounds that he was a barnacle on economy. To convict Downs would take in the neighborhood of $150, with his board and the holding of two witnesses, and the court figured his absence was worth more than this presence in the county jail. Downs claimed it was his first offense. All the parties involved in the deal were more or less under the influence of firewater.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, September 16, 1914, page 2


    Difficulty is being experienced by the police in keeping Indians out of the saloons, despite a diligent effort on the part of the proprietors of bars to prevent. They enter the places on any kind of a pretext, and then refuse to leave. They are as keen after whiskey as a wasp after fish.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, October 10, 1914, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held October 20, 1914, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lot 11, block 20, city of Medford for a period of six months..
            SELSBY & KENNEDY.              
                                                                                                22 North Front St.
    Dated October 10th, 1914.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 10, 1914, page 2


    Murphy and Company, Selsby and Kennedy and the University Club were granted liquor licenses for a period of six months by the council council last night. All three are renewals.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, October 21, 1914, page 2


NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE.
    In the district court of the United States for the district of Oregon.
    In the matter of C. L. Reed, bankrupt.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will sell to the highest responsible bidder for cash all of the property formerly belonging to the above-named bankrupt, C. L. Reed, and located at 13 S. Front Street in the city of Medford, Jackson County, Oregon, and known as the White Front Saloon, said property consisting of wines, liquors, bar fixtures and other paraphernalia used in and about said place of business in conducting said saloon, said bar fixtures will be sold subject to the prior claim of Weinhard Brewery in the sum of $275.00. Said property can be seen and examined by application to the undersigned trustee.
    Also Medford city license for conducting a saloon at said place, said license expiring on the 4th day of April, 1914, subject, however, to the approval of the council of said city of Medford.
    Bids must be sealed and filed with the undersigned trustee in Medford, Oregon, or with F. J. Newman, referee in bankruptcy, Medford, Oregon, and will be opened in the office of said referee November 11, 1914, at the hour of 10 a.m.
                O. M. SELSBY,
                        Trustee.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 30, 1914, page 7


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held November 3rd, 1914, for a license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business, at 32 North Front Street, in the city of Medford, for a period of six months.
    M. & E. J. ADAMS.               
    Dated October 22nd, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 30, 1914, page 7



    The city council at its meeting Tuesday night authorized the transfer of the White Front Saloon license. The saloon was recently declared insolvent.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 3, 1915, page 2



NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on January 5, 1915, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon, at his place of business, 17 South Front Street, in said city, for a period of six months.
    O. M. SELSBY.               
    Date of first publication December 10, 1914.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on January 5th, 1915, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors at retail in quantities less than a gallon, at its place of business on South Front Street, in said city, for a period of six months.
HOTEL NASH.               
    Dated December 19th, 1914.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on January 5, 1915, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon, at its place of business on lot 10, block 44, city of Medford, for a period of six months.
HOLLAND HOTEL CO.               
    Dated December 11, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 21, 1914, page 5


MEDFORD LIQUOR CASES ON TRIAL
    The first of the Medford liquor cases, hanging fire in the courts for two years, will be called in the circuit court this afternoon. The defendants are J. H. Bell and Jack Sheridan of the Nash Hotel Company, charged with selling liquor to minors. Similar charges are filed against nine other Medford saloon owners.
    The action was first brought two years ago when an Ashland youth under age, but representing himself as above 21 years, purchased liquor at nine Medford bars. Afterward indictments were returned.
    Ed G. Brown of this city was first put on trial, and through his attorney raised the issue that an employer was not responsible for the act of his employee, and that any violation of the law was made without his sanction. The case was appealed to the supreme court, that body recently holding that a saloonkeeper was responsible for the acts of his agent.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1915, page 2



NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held April 20, 1915, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lot 11, block 20, city of Medford for a period of six months..
    Dated April 10, 1915.

            SELSBY & KENNEDY.               
                    22 North Front St.               
Medford Mail Tribune, April 10, 1915, page 6


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at their next regular meeting on June 1st, 1915, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors in quantities less than a gallon at their place of business on South Fir Street, located on lots 10, 11 and 12, block 45 of the original townsite, in said city, for a period of six months.
    HOTEL MOORE.               
    Date of first publication May 18, 1915.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at their next regular meeting on June 1, 1915, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors at retail at his place of business at No. 2 North Front Street, in said city, until Dec. 31, 1915.
    E. G. BROWN.               
    Dated May 15th, 1915.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 19, 1915, page 6


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held June 15, 1915, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lot 10, block 44, city of Medford until January 1, 1916.
    HOLLAND HOTEL CO.               
    Dated June 4th, 1915.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at their next regular meeting on June 15th, 1915, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors at retail at his place of business at No. 17 South Front Street, in said city, until January 1st, 1916.
    O. M. SELSBY.               
    Dated June 3, 1915.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 5, 1915, page 7


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting on July 6th, 1915, for a license to sell spirituous, vinous and malt liquors at retail in quantities less than a gallon, at its place of business on South Front Street, in said city, January 1st, 1916.
HOTEL NASH.               
    Dated June 19, 1915.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 22, 1915, page 2


GUN EXPLODES IN ED BROWN'S HAND
    By the explosion of the barrel of a Remington rifle he was testing, Ed G. Brown this morning suffered laceration of his left hand that may bring amputation of the forefinger. The accident occurred at the target grounds near the fair grounds. Brown and R. L. Ewing went to the grounds with the gun, which Brown contemplated buying for his wife. Ewing discharged the weapon three times. Brown then placed the rifle to his shoulder for a trial shot, and the barrel split where the hand gripped with the pulling of the trigger. The gun was of high power and the latest make.
    The injured man was rushed to the Sacred Heart Hospital and medical assistance given. The gun will be sent back to the factory for examination.

Medford Mail Tribune, September 3, 1915, page 2


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting, September 7th, 1915, for a license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors at his place of business, No. 63, N. Front Street, Medford, Oregon, to December 31st, 1915.
    B. S. RADCLIFF.               
    Dated Aug. 23rd, 1915.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 3, 1915, page 5


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council of the city of Medford, Oregon, at its next regular meeting, October 5th, 1915, for a license to sell malt, vinous and spirituous liquors at their place of business, on North Fir Street, Medford, Oregon, until January 1, 1916.
ROGUE RIVER VALLEY UNIVERSITY CLUB.               
    Dated Sept. 23, 1915.
----
NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held October 5th, 1915, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon on its place of business at 13 South Front Street, city of Medford, until January 1, 1916.
C. J. CARSTENS.               
    Dated September 20, 1915.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 23, 1915, page 5


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held November 2, 1915, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business at 32 North Front Street, city of Medford, until January 1, 1916.
            M. & E. J. ADAMS.               
    Dated Oct. 18, 1915.              
Medford Mail Tribune, October 25, 1915, page 5


NOTICE.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will apply to the city council at its meeting to be held November 2, 1915, for a license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors in quantities less than a gallon at its place of business on lot 11, block 20, city of Medford until January 1, 1916.
    Dated October 9, 1915.

            SELSBY & KENNEDY.               
                    22 North Front St.               
Medford Mail Tribune, October 26, 1915, page 4


    One Medford saloon man who, with all the others, is retiring from that business in this state, said yesterday, "I'm mighty glad it's at an end. There is not a redeeming feature to the business. As long as there's competition in the matter of making fools and paupers of men and women who have the liquor disease, those in it made the business appear as attractive as possible. The little children who have suffered on account of having dissipated parents in this generation ought to set this prohibition palace on a foundation as solid as that of Gibraltar."
    Ed. Brown, who beat the New Year to it by a day or so when he closed his saloon permanently on Wednesday evening, is now at work in the reconstruction of the interior of the building, on the corner of Main and Front streets, for the proposed cigar and confectionery business and soft drink parlor.

"Local and Personal,"
Medford Mail Tribune, December 31, 1915, page 2


BROWN'S SODA FOUNTAIN TO BE OPENED TODAY
    "Brown's," one of the most up-to-date and sanitary soda fountain establishments in the state, with Mr. and Mrs. Ed G. Brown as proprietors, was opened this morning to the public at 8 o'clock. All dishes, delicacies and confections found in any high-class catering emporium will be served, with a cigar store adjunct.
    The equipment of the place is modern in every respect, with especial attention paid to sanitation. The public serving fountain is of mahogany and Italian marble. The indirect system of lighting is used.
    The tea room, with accommodations for ladies, is finished in old ivory and the booths filled with India reed seats. The chairs and table in this department are the same. A beautifully appointed telephone booth is also provided in this department. There are large booths for tea parties and other social functions. The secondary decorative colors are brown throughout. In outfitting the place the artistic has been kept in mind.
    Cut glass and Rogers Bros. silver is used in the service. Attention will be paid to the convenience of lady patrons.
    The mixing and preparation work will be in charge of Otto Jeldness, who is experienced in this line, and will be prepared to serve all new seasonal dishes as given to the public by the United Confection and Caterer's Association.
    "Brown's," the latest business addition to Medford, represents an investment of $5000.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 22, 1916, page 3


BROWN'S
    Then it was known as Brown's. And it was a good sort of place, at that. There was rich mahogany and plate glass mirrors and a shaded air of intimate exclusiveness, but no one thereabouts seemed particularly joyous or happy or proud of themselves. An opaque screen shut out the sunlight, and now and then some over-indulgent customer had to be carried out or taken to the hospital or the jail just around the corner.
    And now it is known as Brown's. The opaque screen has been removed, the mahogany bar has been replaced by white enamel and wicker, birds are singing in the flood of sunshine, and everyone seems happy and joyous and contented.
    The prohibition law has done considerable for Brown's.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 12, 1916, page 4


    As a result of a serious automobile accident Saturday night at the foot of the Blackwell Hill on the Pacific Highway between Gold Hill and Central Point, six well-known Medford people were injured, the most seriously being Edward G. Brown, part owner of Browns' tobacco store and pool and billiard hall, who suffered a fractured skull.
"Ed G. Brown Is Badly Hurt in Auto Smash-Up," Medford Mail Tribune, May 10, 1920, page 6


BROWN AND BROWN TO OPEN UP THEIR NEW HALL SAT.
    Brown and Brown will open their enlarged billiard and pocket billiard parlors to the public Saturday, Sept. 18, and Medford now boasts one of the most complete and commodious establishments of its kind on the Pacific coast. The improvement and equipment represents an investment of about $5000. The lower floor will be devoted exclusively to billiards, with five tables, and the upper floor will be equipped with ten pocket billiard tables. A feature of the enlarged business will be a reading and writing room for men, a new idea, adopted recently by similar businesses throughout the land. The floors are laid with linoleum throughout, and the present quarters at Main and Front Street will be enlarged to accommodate the growing business. A line of articles for men, complete in every detail, will be carried, and special effort made to maintain a clean and "clubby" atmosphere. It is announced by the proprietors that no minor will be allowed, without the written consent of both parents, and that the ancient alibi of customers called by telephone that "I'm not here" is null and void. [The] Browns state that the called will either answer, or the callee advised that he is on the way to the street.
    It is the intention of the Browns to conduct their new place along the lines of healthy amusement, and believe that their investment is justified by the new conditions. Three telephones will be installed to dispense information of any nature to the public.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 17, 1920, page 5


    Ed. Brown is another of the local business men who are evincing great faith in the future growth of Medford and this district. He has rented the room recently vacated by Lyons & Hale on North Front Street, and will extend his present cigar store and resort to include that space, making it by far the largest establishment of its kind in southern Oregon. Other improvements recently completed by Mr. Brown include extensive remodeling on the second floor, where he has made comfortable apartments for himself and Mrs. Brown and a number of up-to-date suites for bachelors.
Jackson County News, September 17, 1926, page 12


Brown's
    Brown's opened for business in 1909 with three employees. They also have grown with the city until now they have 14 employees and have added new departments as the business has grown.
    Under the management of Ed Brown, this establishment has become one of southern Oregon's most popular recreation places, where billiards and pool may be enjoyed in an atmosphere of clean respectability. Every possible step has been taken by Mr. Brown to provide a strictly high-class recreation hall for those who enjoy "the gentleman's game."
    Brown's coffee shop has won a wide patronage because of tasty foods and excellent service. In the same establishment is a soda fountain, department for the smoker, a barber shop and a shoe shining parlor, as well as a room for those who wish a friendly game of cards.
    Billiard tournaments are frequently staged at Brown's, and many nationally known cue artists have appeared in exhibition matches there.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 29, 1930, page 8

January 5, 1934 Medford News
January 5, 1934 Medford News


BEER SIGNS TO CONTAIN ONLY VAGUE MENTION
    SALEM, Ore., Sept. 12.--(AP)--The only manner in which beer retailers may make known the sale of such beverage through the medium of signs in front of their establishments, in the future, will be by displaying one sign bearing the words "Licensed Dispenser," the Oregon State Liquor Commission decided at its meeting here.
    The sign will be furnished by the commission and may be displayed on the door or window of the establishment conducted by the licensee. Any other signs indicating the sale of liquor will not be tolerated.
    This step was taken by the commission to put a stop to anti-beer sign regulation by the display of such phrases as "We sell it but can't spell it," "Suds for the thirsty" and other such signs.
    The commission further ruled that no advertisement for the sale of alcoholic liquors over 14 percent alcohol by volume, by the medium of newspapers, periodicals or other publication, should give the location of or mention any Oregon liquor control store or agency.
    George Neuner, attorney for the commission, declared that the next legislature should enact a law forbidding women under 21 years of age to work in a beer-dispensing establishment.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 12, 1934, page 2


SCHUSS VINTAGE ADDS SERVICES
    Opening Wednesday at the corner of Front and Main in the Nash Hotel bldg. is the Schuss Vintage company, expanded to include a coffee shop and bar, where breakfasts, steak dinners, sandwiches and drinks will be served, according to Victor Marshall, manager.
    The Schuss Vintage will feature fine steak dinners, with particular attention given to selection of best quality steaks. The meals will be served in the booths at the back of the new shop.
    The same fine line of domestic and imported champagnes and wines will be carried that have made the Schuss Vintage company outstanding, Marshall said. The Bisceglias Bros. wines are featured.
    A new mahogany bar has been installed, and Blitz' famous Milwaukee beer will be served. The Schuss Vintage has installed a silver-lined liquid Zahm system of dispensing tap beer, where the beer does not go through coils but is dispensed from silver-lined kegs, insuring the finest in uniformity and cleanliness. The Zahm system was demonstrated at the Chicago Worlds' Fair and received wide acclaim.
    "The Schuss Vintage with its new services will be first class and up to date," Marshall said, "as the wine store has been in the past. We have booths where the ladies can drop in during an afternoon's shopping for refreshments and where they will feel at home at all times."
    Marshall, as manager, will be assisted by Joe Harrell, assistant manager.
    The Nash Hotel building has been extensively remodeled during the past few months, and the Schuss Vintage, in taking over the corner location, has completed the remodeling.
    There are new fixtures throughout the new shop, making the shop one of the most modern in the city.
    Since opening in Medford the Schuss Vintage store has enjoyed a continually increasing patronage, due to the fine quality of wines sold and the courteous service. Among the services given is helping customers to select the correct wines for their dinners and parties.
    Wines sold at the Schuss Vintage are guaranteed as to quality and age, and the addition of the coffee shop and bar will make the Schuss Vintage one of the most popular spots in the city.

Medford News, May 7, 1937, page 3

May 7, 1937 Medford News
May 7, 1937 Medford News

BOHEMIAN CLUB BEER MADE OF BEST PRODUCT
    The excellence of Bohemian Club beer, its uniform taste and its high quality, are directly due to a combination of good materials and experienced brewing, according to Elmer Hayes, of the Medford Bohemian Club, where Bohemian Club is the only beer sold.
    Bohemian Club beer was selected because Mr. Hayes believes it is the best beer, both from a health and taste standpoint, that is available on the market. Bohemian Club light export is brewed entirely from malted barley which gives it the best possible taste. The malting or sprouting of any grain modifies the starches which are completely fermented in finished beer, making it more easily digested and more healthful.
    If beer is drunk as a beverage, or with meals, as it should be, it is very healthful and naturally one wants the highest quality available.
    Tables and booths have been prepared for those who wish to sit and sip their glass, and the Bohemian Club is conducted with the utmost propriety at all times.
    Patrons of the Bohemian Club are assured of courteous service at all times, and everyone is welcome.
Medford News, May 7, 1937, page 6


CARE OF BEER IMPORTANT TO GOOD QUALITY
    The best beer in the world can be rendered tasteless and flat unless properly served, but when a dealer has a high quality [beer] and aerates it properly, it is an excellent beverage, according to E. F. Hayes of the Bohemian Club.
    The Bohemian Club has a cooling unit that holds 75 half-barrels and 100 cases. In this cooler, beer that comes from the brewery is cooled to the proper temperature before the keg is tapped.
    The beer is dispensed through specially built coils immersed in ice water, thus the beer enters the glass cooled to the taste. Each glass is sterilized after using.
    Besides the cooling system, perfect cleanliness is necessary in all the dispensing system, because beer deteriorates faster even than milk if it comes in contact in any way with filth.
    Even the air that goes into the keg as the beer is used out is filtered to insure perfect cleanliness. All dispensing equipment in the Medford Bohemian Club is sterilized daily.
    Mr. Hayes has had a lifetime of experience in handling beer and personally supervises the care of all beer and equipment used in the Bohemian Club.
    The volume of beer served at the Bohemian Club helps to maintain an even quality of beer because it has no time to go "flat" between the time the keg is tapped and it is empty. The Bohemian Club has a capacity of dispensing 25 barrels a day, which insures fresh kegs of beer at all times.
    The Medford Bohemian Club was established in November 1933 by Mr. Hayes and is owned and operated by him and his son, D. E. Hayes. In 1934 the bar was enlarged, due to the continually increasing patronage, and in 1936 the Bohemian Club took over the entire corner of the building, the space formerly occupied by Lawrence's Jewelry store, and added a complete stock of domestic and imported wines, lunch goods and cocktail supplies.
    Besides the choice domestic and imported wines, which includes the rare champagnes, the Bohemian Club features its own brand of wine, Bohemian Club brand, bottled especially for the Bohemian Club by the Eagle Vineyards of California under regulations of the California pure foods law. All the wines are guaranteed as to quality, age, purity and percent[age], and are sold exclusively in Medford by the Bohemian Club.
Medford News, May 7, 1937, page 5


BROWN'S CAFE TO BE MODERNIZED AT $10,000 COST
Brown's Cafe matchbook    Improvements costing $10,000 will convert Brown's Cafe at 101 East Main Street into a modern, streamlined restaurant, bar and recreation center of attractive furnishings and appealing atmosphere.
    The remodeled establishment, now closed for alterations, will be reopened to the public in the near future. The place was purchased a few months ago by the Roxy Ann Investment Company. Al C. Leighton, vice-president of the company, is manager of the establishment.
    The exterior is being completely changed, a tile facing being used to attractive advantage with additional trim in mahogany.
    The interior is being practically rebuilt, with a new floor in a rear section being laid, partitions installed and new service rooms added. In addition the whole spacious interior is being redecorated.
    A new Brunswick-Balke bar is being installed to provide the latest improvement in serving beer. While continuous for a length of 50 feet, the bar will have two complete dispensing units so that two bartenders may work without crossing each other's path. There will be two direct-draw beer cabinets designed to be the last word in sanitation as they permit the beer to be drawn directly from the kegs instead of through coils, Mr. Leighton explained. The two dry-cold cabinets, each with a capacity of 40 cases of beer, will maintain the beer at any desired temperature. The back bar and arrangements under the dispensing bar will also be the most modern in design.
    The newest type lunch counter with 23 stools will be installed, with accessory cabinets, ice cream unit and soda fountain arranged for convenience and efficient service.
    All new kitchen equipment is being installed, and new silver and enamel ware has been purchased.
    The bar and lunch counter will be at the front, one opposite the other, the card room will be to the back and side, somewhat detached, and the pool and billiard room will continue in its present location at the extreme rear.
    Complete restaurant service will be available when the place is reopened. A club breakfast will be featured in the morning, a business man's lunch at noon. A la carte service and a special dinner will be available in the evening.
    The exterior will be bordered in neon light, with a large electric sign setting off the place.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 14, 1941, page 16


NO BEER PARLORS ALLOWED
    Major Bean announced recently that no beer parlors would be allowed within eight miles of the [Camp White] cantonment except in incorporated cities. A couple of applications for licenses at Four Corners were refused on this account.
Central Point American, February 12, 1942, page 1


    The city fire department was called out on a general alarm at 3 a.m. today to extinguish a fire in a beer parlor in the Merrick building [the Natatorium] on North Riverside Avenue, owned by Jack Moad. The fire was caused by an electric wire from the volume control in a juke box.
    The fire, confined to one room, caused considerable damage, burning out all of the inside of the parlor. No one was in the building at the time.
"Early Morning Fire Destroys Business Room," Medford Mail Tribune, September 25, 1947, page 1


The Spot matchbook11 Clubs, Taverns All Ready for Liquor-by-the-Glass Monday
    Eleven Jackson County taverns and clubs will be legally licensed to start serving drinks by the glass when the new liquor law becomes effective Monday, according to the State Liquor Control Commission.
    Others which have applied for licenses have been approved, but issuance of licenses are awaiting bonds.
    The establishments are:
    For Medford, Jackson Hotel, Medford Hotel, Fraternal Order of Eagles, Elks Club, Rogue Valley Country Club, and Veterans Club.
    In Ashland, Elks Club.
    For Central Point, Mon Desir Dining Inn.
    For Talent, The Tally-Ho.
    For Gold Hill, O.K. Pastime and The Dardanelles.
    The commission cautioned applicants that drinks may not be sold until authority to do so has been received direct from the commission.
    Sale of liquor by the drink does not change Oregon's status as a liquor monopoly control state, the commission said, and dispenser licensees may purchase bar stock only from the commission. The state tomorrow becomes the 17th monopoly control state to permit sale of liquor by the drink.
    At least 265 establishments throughout the state have so far been granted licenses, with 195 of them going to establishments serving the general public, and 70 to private clubs serving only members and guests.
    The law limits hours of sale to the period from 7 a.m. and 2:30 a.m.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 10, 1953, page 1


Liquor on Sale Over Oregon Bars; No Big Rush Told
By UNITED PRESS

    Liquor went on sale over the bar in Oregon today for the first time since saloon days.
    The State Liquor Control Commission, acting on the mandate of the voters last November and of the 1953 Legislature, had licensed about 200 bars and cocktail lounges to sell liquor by the drink on opening day. Officials said the approved outlets were well spread throughout the state to give nearly every area a chance at the new service.
Licenses To Total 760
   
The new law would permit a total of 760 liquor-by-the-drink licenses in the state, but the commission has managed to act on only a portion of the applications so far and some outlets said they would have to operate on letters of authorization for a few days until their actual licenses were issued.
    Although the sale of hard liquor directly to the customers by private business became legal at midnight last night, few outlets took advantage of the privilege until the opening of business today.
No Big Business Rush
    Those who did sell drinks for an hour or so before closing time last night reported no big business rush. They expected that would come later.
    The new law has resulted in a rash of remodeling and redecoration in Oregon bars where customers previously had to bring their own liquor and pay for the mixing, storing and serving. Oregon will remain a "monopoly state," and dispensers will have to bring their stocks from state stores--at regular retail prices.
------
    Early indications today in Medford were that liquor by the glass sales would be higher than under the old system--at least until the newness wore off.
    The Jackson Hotel lounge reported that it had had about 50 customers before noon, which is about one-third more than usual for a Monday morning. The Medford Hotel lounge, which opened for business at 12 noon, reported a "rush" of about 25 persons, but everybody had cleared out not quite an hour later.
    Two more Jackson County establishments reported this morning that they had been approved and would operate under the new law. They were Tabu Dinner House, according to manager Alice Crowe, and the American Legion Club. The Legion Club will begin service Tuesday evening, and will be open thereafter from 10 a.m. to 2 a.m. each day, according to officials.

Medford Mail Tribune, May 11, 1953, page 1


Confused Bartenders Lag Behind Orders on 1st Day
By UNITED PRESS
    Confused bartenders and a confusion of prices for liquor-by-the-drink were in evidence today following the first day of Oregon's new era of liquor over the bar.
    But there was nothing hazy about most customers' attitudes.
Bars Crowded
    They flocked to the bars, and bartenders reported that during "cocktail hour" Monday--from 5 to 7 p.m.--most of the bars had standing room only. Daytime drinkers, however, appeared to be few.
    Bar operators generally considered the rush of business due to the novelty of being able to buy a drink directly from a bottle and the fact that only about half the state's expected 760 licenses were operating.
    Befuddled bartenders, many mixing their first drinks on a commercial basis, were at times far behind on customers' orders.
    Prices of bar whisky showed wide variations.
Prices Vary
    In Portland, the low starting price for a bourbon and water was generally 35 cents. But the price for the seven-eighths of an ounce of liquor ranged from that low up to as high as 75 cents.
    But the confusion of the bartenders and prices and the novelty of a drink across the bar was expected soon to settle down after the more than 37 years that Oregon had been a dry state.

Medford Mail Tribune, May 12, 1953, page 1


    The Oregon Liquor Control Commission Friday ordered seven-day license suspensions for 21 licensees operating liquor outlets in Jackson County.
    The order followed a review of hearings held in Medford Jan. 22 and 23 in which the licensees were charged with making contributions to a candidate for political office or a political party in violation of Oregon liquor statutes.
    Forced to close their establishments for seven days will be Christian Schempp, operator of the Union Club; Harlan Syler, Sy's Place; Don Callahan, Siskiyou Lodge; Max A. Kulbe, Owl Cafe and Reliable Grocery; John DeMamy, Otto's Tavern; Harold Sutherland, Veterans Club; Dorence E. Hayes, Hayes Distributing Company; Leslie A. Wilson, Wilson Distributing Company; Merrill Osterhaudt, Highway Tavern; John Paul Hartsook, Barkley's Tavern; Thomas A. Dwyer Sr., Bohemian Club; Harold Straus, Tally Ho; Ed Colpitts, Pioneer Tavern; Ernest G. Childreth, Cook's Reception; Mrs. Myrtle Wilkinson, Mom's Hideaway; Bill Barnes, 90 and 9 Tavern; Kenneth G. Hamner, Holland Hotel; Alvin C. Leighton, Brown's Cafe; and Hugh Lappin, manager of Colony Restaurants Inc., doing business as the Tabu Dinner House.
"Licenses Suspended for Seven Days for Tavern Operators," Medford Mail Tribune, March 3, 1957, page 1


    A Friday night raid by Medford police officers and sheriff's deputies resulted in confiscation of three pinball machines and arrest of two bartenders and two tavern operators.
    Arrests were made after officers, dressed in plain clothes, played the pinball machines and collected cash over the counter for games they had won.
    Establishments involved in the raid were the Medford Hotel lounge, 406 West Main St., Medford; The Tavern, 43 South Front St., Medford; and the Talent Club, Talent.
    Arrested were Joseph Edward Stratman, Redding, Calif., bartender at the Medford Hotel lounge, who was charged with operating a game of chance; Lloyd Keller, 624 Valley View Drive, Medford, operator of The Tavern, charged with possessing and operating a game of chance; Sam Prough, owner of the Talent Club, charged with possessing, owning, operating and displaying a game of chance, and Charles Will Gleim, Talent, bartender at the Talent Club, charged with operating a game of chance.
"Pinball Machines Confiscated; Four Arrested in Raids," Medford Mail Tribune, March 17, 1957, page 1


Riot Involves 100 Persons Near Club in Medford Sunday
    Medford's police department, the sheriff's office and fire department joined forces Sunday morning to quell a riot involving more than 100 persons at the 21 Club, 1909 North Riverside Ave.
    Several police officers were roughed up during the melee, which started when two officers tried to break up a fight. There were no reported injuries.
    One man, Carl Gilbert Dusenbury, 22, of 1906 Hazel St., was arrested at the scene of the riot, and more arrests may be forthcoming, according to Police Chief Charles P. Champlin.
    The riot was of short duration, from 2:18 to 2:40 a.m.
Explosive Situation
    Chief Champlin said it was a "real explosive situation" and "could have been much worse." He attributed the riot to "mob psychology" and "excessive drinking" on the part of much of the crowd, most of them early Sunday morning patrons of the tavern.
    The riot started when officers Richard Hamilton and S. R. Reese attempted to break up a fight at the club.
    Officer Reese said a large crowd was gathered around two men who were fighting. He was able to get one of the men to the police car without incident, but the second man refused to come.
    The man backed off with a belt wrapped around his hand, Reese said, and Reese tackled him, forcing him up against the side of a parked car.
    Several persons then grabbed him, Reese said, and the fight was on.
    Reinforcement were requested, and several sheriff's deputies, eight police officers and two pumpers from the fire department responded.
    Several police officers were roughed up and had their shirts nearly torn off. Officer Richard Hurner was hit in the face by one of the rioters, and his glasses were broken.
    Officer Dennis Perkins, who was in plain clothes, but had a badge on his shirt, said he saw Dusenbury draw back his fist during the melee to start to strike one of the officers, and he (Perkins) grabbed him by the neck and threw him to the ground. Perkins said he did it in a manner "not to hurt him, but to restrain him."
    Dusenbury is believed to have been one of the instigators of the riot, and, according to one officer, he was "cursing at the police and yelling for the crowd to get us."
Rioters Handcuffed
    Police at first had four of the rioters handcuffed and in patrol cars, but someone gave an order to release them. Chief Champlin said today he is still trying to find out where the order came from.
    Champlin emphasized, however, that the "main thing is to break up" the riot and "not wanting to arrest a lot of people."
    The chief said he talked to Dusenbury this morning, and he was "very definitely" sorry about the incident and blamed the whole thing on "too much drinking."
    The two pumpers from the fire department were not used at the riot, because, according to officers, when the crowd saw them it quickly dispersed.
    Dusenbury was sentenced 30 days in jail each on charges of disorderly conduct and interfering with duties of a police officer. He appeared in municipal court this morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 22, 1960, page 1


Transfer of License for Tavern Voted by Medford Council
    Removal of one of the last of the Front St. taverns was assured by action of the Medford city council last night.
    The group, despite the protests of a "stirred-up" downtown businessman, approved the transfer of the liquor license for Otto's Tavern from 39 South Front St. to a new location at 2940 North Pacific Highway.
    Charles Burton Broomfield, proprietor of the tavern, was represented last night by Medford lawyer Joel B. Reeder, who said his client's lease at the Front St. location will expire Nov. 1, and that its operation would close Oct. 15.
    But George Lewis, owner of Rogue Travel Service, 111 East Eighth St., urged the council the "eliminate" the tavern rather than transfer its location.
Should Be Eliminated
    "Front Street has been a pig sty for years," Lewis charged, "and you shouldn't sweep it under the rug. You should eliminate it entirely."
    Lewis, whose business is located about a half-block away from Otto's Tavern, claimed the proprietors "haven't done a decent job." He said he has had to call the police at least once a week about things "these dregs of humanity have done."
    He said he was at complete variance with the city police report, which had found no reason to recommend against the transfer. "The proprietors will run a poor establishment," he predicted. "Their patrons have ruined my business for five years."
    Reeder replied that the new North Pacific Highway location would "not be objectionable," He pointed out that there will be "no close grouping of taverns," and that the closest similar operation would be about one-quarter mile away.
    "As long as there is a demand for this kind of operation, and as long as it is approved by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, it should be continued," he stated.
    Police Capt. Clyde C. Fichtner, in answer to councilmen's questions, said that taverns were more of a problem when they were "concentrated" in one area, such as Front St.
    Mayor James Dunlevy agreed that "decentralization will help minimize the problem." The vote to permit the transfer of the license was unanimous.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 20, 1963, page 1



Last revised April 6, 2017