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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


White Slavery in Medford: The Viola Miller Affair

"Viola Miller" went by at least six other names: Fay Freeman, Laura White, Laura Stevenson, Lottie Miller, Laura Miller, Laura Bromley
 
A problem is that both Viola Miller and Laura Stevenson were real people. The 1910 Census finds a Viola Miller in a red-light district in Astoria, and the 1900 Census shows that Viola also was a real person.
 
But when "Viola" was interviewed in 1912 in Portland she reported she was the sister of Lena Maud Stevenson Wallaude--who did indeed have a sister Laura.
 
So who was Viola Miller? Was she Viola Miller--or Laura Stevenson--or someone else?

Unidentified West Coast opium den, circa 1890-1910.
Unidentified West Coast opium den, circa 1890-1910.

The Work of Roughs.
    An attempt was made to blow up Wing Lee's wash house and store at Grants Pass about 1:30 o'clock on the morning of the 17th. A bomb was thrown on the front porch, but was not of sufficient force to do the desired work. A hole was blown through the porch and a smaller one in the side of the wall. The windows and doors were shattered, but none of the Chinamen were injured. The damage is slight. A gang of roughs have been agitating the Chinese deportation question lately, and they evidently intended to make quick work of it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 20, 1893, page 3   It's unknown if Wing Lee is the same man as Wo Lee/Wah Lee/Wah Kee.


Census date: June 8, 1900
Name: George Miller, 35, general merchant, born Australia February 1865
Residence: Port Orchard precinct, Kitsap County, Washington
Household members:
Jennie L., 28, wife, born Nebraska October 1871
Eva J., 10, daughter, born Washington February 1890
Viola M., 9, daughter, born Washington June 1891
Leonard H., 4, son, born Washington July 1895
United States Census


Census date: June 9, 1900
Name: Charles Stevenson, 42, blacksmith, born Ohio
Residence: 12th Street, Portland, Oregon
Household members:
Mary, 40, wife, born Colorado
Lena, 19, daughter, waitress, born Colorado
Auther, 16, son, laborer, born Colorado
Milo, 15, son, born Colorado
Mabel, 13, daughter, born Colorado
Laura, 10, daughter, born Colorado
Gladdis, 6, daughter, born Colorado
United States Census         Laura Stevenson may have been the "real" Viola Miller/Laura White.


Census date: June 12, 1900
Name: Wo Kee, 49, laundryman, married 20 years, born in China
Residence: East Medford precinct, Medford, Oregon
Renter, can read and write, came to U.S. in 1890
United States Census


Leonard Miller died July 13, 1901, Sidney, Washington, spinal meningitis
Father: George E. Miller, born Glasgow, Scotland
Mother: Jennie Celene, born Nebraska
Washington State Death Records, ancestry.com



Serious Charge Against Youth.
    VANCOUVER, Wash., Feb. 13.--Milo Stevenson, a boy 15 years of age, pleaded guilty in Justice McMasters' court today to the charge of assault committed upon Mabel Oliver, aged 11 years, and was held in $500 bonds for his appearance in the Superior Court. Young Stevenson's arrest and conviction is the outgrowth of a case against Charles Baker, aged 55 years, brought by Superintendent Gardiner, of the Boys' and Girls' Aid Society, of Portland, in which young Stevenson was the complaining witness. During the trial the testimony of the little Oliver girl exonerated Baker, but incriminated Stevenson. Both young Stevenson and Mabel Oliver were former charges of the Boys' and Girls' Aid Society, and found a home at Baker's house, a few miles from here, at Baker's application, some two months ago. While the testimony exonerated Baker of the crime charged, there were circumstances indicating strongly that he had been guilty on more than one occasion of improper familiarity toward the child, and was consequently considered an improper person to be longer entrusted with her care, and she was taken back to the Home by Superintendent Gardiner. The Stevenson boy will doubtless be sent to the State Reform School.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 14, 1901, page 3


ONE BOY'S RECORD.
Case of Milo Stevenson, Arrested for Stealing Coal.
    PORTLAND, March 30.--(To the Editor.)--I observed in your issue of March 22 an item respecting the pardon of Milo Stevenson. It stated that this was his first offense. I do not wish to bring this matter again before the public, but in justice to Municipal Judge Hogue I feel it my duty to correct this statement, as The Oregonian has undoubtedly been misinformed.
    Milo Stevenson, 17 years old, has been under arrest and before the Municipal Court in this city three times--once for roaming the streets after hours and twice for larceny. He was also held to appear before the Superior Court in Vancouver in February 1901 for criminal assault on a little girl. Judge Miller, of that court, says that he has no doubt as to the boy's guilt, and would have committed him to the reform school, but on account of his youth and the promises made by his parents that they would care for him, he was allowed to go free. Thus it has been every time the boy got into trouble--his parents would succeed in begging him off. He has been three times committed to the Boys' and Girls' Aid Society, and while there behaved well, but on returning home would soon get into trouble. His school teachers will verify my statement.
    I wish to say that in all cases I have found Municipal Judge Hogue much against sending boys to jail or to a penal institution.
W. T. GARDNER,
Superintendent, Boys' and Girls' Aid Society of Oregon.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 2, 1903, page 10


Marriage Licenses.
Carl Wallauer, 23; Lena M. Stevenson, 22.
"Daily City Statistics," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, March 26, 1905, page 15     Lena (below) would have been "Viola Miller"'s sister--if "Viola" was actually Laura Stevenson.

April 2, 1905 Oregonian, page 30
Wallauer-Stevenson.
    A pretty home wedding took place last Sunday evening at the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. M. E. Stevenson, 176 Russell Street, when her eldest daughter, Miss Lena Maud Stevenson, was united in marriage to Carl Wallauer. The bride was becomingly attired in her traveling gown, and was attended by Miss Jewel Welch. The best man was Earl Fanning. Rev. Harry Pratt, of Forbes Presbyterian Church, performed the ceremony, using the ring service. Miss Louise Wallauer, sister of the groom, played the wedding march. The house was prettily decorated with greenery and roses. During the evening they were serenaded by the Foresters Band of 25 pieces. Mr. and Mrs. Wallauer left on a late train for a trip through British Columbia. Will be at home to friends after April 10. No cards.
"Society," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, April 2, 1905, page 30


CHINESE WEDS WHITE
AH YING AND MISS FAY FREEMAN
MARRY IN VANCOUVER.
Couple Seek Ceremony in California and Oregon,
But Fail in Their Search.
    VANCOUVER, Wash., June 23--(Special.)--Ah Ying, a Chinaman, and Miss Fay Freeman, an American girl, both of San Francisco, were married in this city this afternoon by Rev. B. F. Brooks, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
    They had tried to get married in both California and Oregon but found that the law in each state prohibited the Chinese from marrying Caucasians.
    Ah Ying is a restaurant keeper of San Francisco, aged 45 years. He has his queue cut short, and was dressed as an American. The bride, a milliner, 21 years of age, was good looking and well dressed. She was acting of her own free will, and told the minister that Ying was her choice. They came from the Bay City to Vancouver to be married and will visit the A.-Y.-P. Exposition on their honeymoon and then go back to San Francisco, where they will make their future home.
    When Ying appeared at the courthouse and asked for a marriage license, he produced a doctor's certificate, issued by Dr. E. Van Zandt, of this city, which testified that both he and his bride-to-be had met the requirements of the new marriage law. Chin Yam, a restaurant keeper in Vancouver, acted as witness and the marriage license was issued by Carl Zuarmnberg, Deputy County Auditor.
Oregonian, Portland, June 24, 1909, page 5


FAIR MILLINER MARRIES CHINESE
San Francisco Girl Goes to Vancouver to Wed Ah Ying
    VANCOUVER, Wash., June 24.--Ah Ying, a Chinese from San Francisco, and Fay Freeman, a pretty San Francisco milliner, after trying to get a license in both Oregon and California, were married here yesterday by the Rev. D. F. Brooks at the Methodist parsonage. The couple, who were jeered through Vancouver streets, announced they would spend the honeymoon at the Alaska-Pacific Exposition and would return from Seattle to San Francisco by boat in a few days.
Oakland Tribune, June 24, 1909, page 12


Local Girl Marries Chinese
    VANCOUVER, Wash., June 23.--A young woman who gave her name as Fay Freeman was married today to an Americanized Chinese named Ah Ying by Rev. B. F. Brock, a Methodist minister of this place.
    Both the man and the woman said they lived in San Francisco. Ah Ying's occupation is given as restaurant keeper, and the woman's as a milliner. They stated they had tried to get married both in California and Oregon but had been unable to.
    They left here for Seattle to visit the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific exposition, after which they stated they intend to return to San Francisco. The girl is 21 years old and the Chinese 45.
San Francisco Call, June 24, 1909, page 2


CHINAMAN WEDS WHITE WOMAN
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
    VANCOUVER, Wash., June 25.--Ah Ying, an Americanized Chinaman, and Miss Fay Freeman, white woman, were married here yesterday by Rev. B. F. Brook of the Methodist Church. Both man and wife claim to be from California, the Chinaman stating that he was a restaurant owner. They told Rev. Brook that they had traveled up the coast in order to get married, having been refused a license both in Oregon and California. They left for the A.-Y.-P. exposition last night.
The Tacoma Times, June 25, 1909, page 6


CHOW YOUNG'S CHINESE MEDICINES--Will cure rheumatism, asthma, paralysis, sores and private diseases. These remedies may be procured at the Sing Lee laundry, 123 S. Riverside Avenue, where they will be sold by the proprietor.
    Dr. Chow Young has treated several severe cases with his remedies since coming to Medford and has for reference some of the best-known and most intelligent citizens in Southern Oregon. Call on him.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 7, 1910, page 7  This ad ran through August 30, 1910.


Census date: April 15, 1910
Name: E. J. Bays, 24, glazier, born in Oregon
Mabel Bays, 21, wife, born in Colorado
Mary E. Stevenson, 47, mother-in-law, born in Colorado
Gladys Stevenson, 16, sister-in-law, born in Washington
Residence: 708½ Union Avenue North, Portland, Oregon
United States Census     Mary was the mother of Lena and Laura Stevenson.


Census date: April 16, 1910
Name: Geo. E. Miller, 46, bank manager, born Scotland
Residence: Port Orchard precinct, Kitsap County, Washington
Household members:
Jennie L., 38, wife, born Illinois, married 21 years, five children, three living
George Jr., 5, son, born Washington
United States Census


Census date: April 16, 1910
Name: Viola Miller, 18, dress maker
Residence: 70 Sixth Street, Astoria, Clatsop County, Oregon
Married one year, living alone, no children
United States Census   Sixth Street was an acknowledged red light district of Astoria. Viola was one of eleven young women surveyed sequentially by the census taker, all living alone, all reporting their occupation as "dress maker."



Medford Mail Tribune, May 15, 1910

Medical.
CHOW YOUNG'S CHINESE MEDICINES--Will cure rheumatism, asthma, paralysis, sores and private diseases. These remedies may be purchased at the Sing Lee Laundry, 123 South Riverside Ave., where they will be sold by the proprietor, CHOW YOUNG.
    Dr. Chow Young has treated several severe cases with his remedies since coming to Medford and has for references some of the best-known and most intelligent citizens in Southern Oregon. Call on him..

Classified ad, Medford Mail Tribune, May 11, 1910, page 7

Royal Cafe ad, 1910-5-19MMT
Medford Mail Tribune, May 19, 1910

LAUNDRIES.
WO LEE CO.--Laundry, at 123 Brookside St. [i.e., Riverside], Medford, Or.
Classified ad, Medford Mail Tribune, September 6-8, 1910, page 7


LAUNDRIES.
SING LEE has sold his laundry to Wah Lee Co., and hereafter it will be conducted by Wah Lee. He is an experienced man in the business.
Classified ad, Medford Mail Tribune, September 7-October 19, 1910, page 7


MANAGEMENT OF ROYAL CAFE CHANGES

Experienced Owners Will Thoroughly Overhaul Upstairs and Down--
New Help Engaged Throughout.
    The Royal Cafe and Rooming House has changed hands, with Mrs. L. A. Hanscom as proprietress and E. J. Rhoades manager. The whole house has been given a thorough renovating, there is an entire change of employees, and the rooms will be closed for several days that they may be remodeled and refurnished, but the cafe will not close. It runs day and night and in addition to serving regular meals will serve lunches, short orders, chili and oysters.
    Mrs. Hanscom is well known here and Mr. Rhoades is experienced in his line and they will conduct a clean, first-class place.
Medford Sun, November 30, 1910, page 2


Medford Sun, January 13, 1911

SHORT CHANGE ARTIST JAILED
Man Who took $10 from Grants Pass Boys at Royal Rooming House
Is Caught and Is Fined $25 by Justice Taylor.
    G. W. Williams, the young man who relieved W. C. Curtis and A. Greenman of Grants Pass of $10 at the Royal Rooming House a few nights ago, was tried before Justice Taylor Friday morning and received a fine of $25 and costs or 16 days in the county jail. He was unable to raise the money but was given a few hours to do so.
    After attending the circus Tuesday evening the two men, who are from Grants Pass, went to the rooming house and gave Williams, whom they supposed to be the landlord, $10 to pay for their rooms. Williams went out for change and did not return. Mrs. L. A. Hanscom, the landlady, was notified and returned the money, stating in court this morning that Williams was not in her employ, but she did not wish the house to get a bad name.
    When questioned by prosecuting attorney Mulkey, Williams claimed he was drunk and did not know what he was doing. He went to Central Point and continued his spree and returned to Medford only to be apprehended and brought into court. He admitted taking the money but pleaded drunkenness and was given the minimum fine by Justice Taylor.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 5, 1911, page 2


FATHER GETS HIS CHILDREN BACK
    Judge Calkins in the circuit court Thursday afternoon entered an additional decree in the divorce case of Hanscome vs. Hanscome, which awards the custody of the children to the father. The action was based upon the allegations of the father, which were sustained, that the mother was allowing the children to go astray.
    Three children figure in the case, Myrtle, Rose and Leon. The mother recently married again, this time a Greek named Spanos, who is a son of the Greek who was recently murdered. Hanscome claims that the mother who runs the Royal Rooming House and Restaurant was allowing the older girls to run with a number of Greeks.
    By the terms of the order Mrs. Spanos is allowed to visit the children for one hour each week at a convenient time and place.
Medford Mail Tribune weekly, September 7, 1911, page 7


Royal The, Mrs Julia Levenberry propr, furn rms 320 E Main
Polk's Jackson County Directory 1912, page 122


Wo Lee, laundry 123 S Riverside av
Polk's Jackson County Directory 1912, page 144


THREE ASHLAND BOYS ARRESTED FOR GAMBLING
    Percy Hale, Frank Casey and George Brennan of Ashland were arrested at the Royal lodging house Sunday evening for gambling. The arrests were made by policemen Hellans and Crawford after they had watched the game. The men were well supplied with whiskey and were rather noisy. The officers found $3.15 on the table when the men were picked up.
    Hale is the 19-year-old boy of Ashland who recently came to Medford with the Ashland chief of police and bought whiskey in three saloons, causing the indictments of three bartenders.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 6, 1912, page 1



LOCAL CHINAMAN ROBBED OF $800 BY COUNTRYMAN
Wo Lee, Who Conducts Laundry on South Riverside,
Is Attacked and Forced to Give Up Key to Treasure Chest
Only Gave Up Key after He Had Been Stabbed over Heart--May Be Jim Ling of Ashland
    Wo Lee, a Chinaman who operates a laundry on South Riverside Avenue, was robbed at an early hour today of $800 in gold by an unknown Chinaman. In a struggle with the robber Wo Lee suffered a severe cut over the heart and severe bruises about his body. Probably the only thing which saved his life was the fact that he surrendered the key to the chest in which the gold was placed and allowed the robber to depart.
    Wo was asleep in his room in the rear of the laundry when the robber entered and awakened him. In English and later in Chinese he demanded the key to a large chest in the room in which the robber evidently knew that Wo kept his money. Wo at first refused, whereupon the robber drew a knife from beneath his blouse and attacked him. He cut Wo over the heart, inflicting a deep flesh wound, the course of the knife being stopped by one of Wo's ribs. He made a second attempt to stab him, driving the knife through the bedding. He then seized Wo by the throat and again demanded the key to the chest. This time Wo, to save his life, acquiesced and gave up the key.
    The robber then opened the chest and took from it a sack containing $800 in 5's, 10's and 20's gold pieces and made his escape through an open window. He overlooked another sack in which about $100 in silver was placed and refused to touch about $400 worth of jewelry.
    As the robber escaped through a window Wo sprang from his bed and jerked open a door. The rays from a hall light fell across one side of the robber's face and Wo swears that he will know the man if he sees him again.
    Wo then notified the police and summoned Dr. Shearer, who dressed the wounds.
    Suspicion points somewhat to a Chinaman named Jim Ling of Ashland who was in this city Sunday evening. Ling and Wo had had trouble previously. Wo refuses to accuse him, but admits that the Chinaman he saw going through the window might have been Ling. The police are working on the case.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 13, 1912, page 1


ORIENTALS INVOLVED IN ROBBERY
MEDFORD CHINAMAN CHOKED, STABBED AND ROBBED OF NEARLY
$1,000--SUSPICION RESTS UPON ASHLAND CELESTIALS
    A tragedy was averted in Medford last night by the mere fact of a rib stopping the course of a knife thrust, when a Chinaman attempted to murder a brother Oriental in his bunk. The affair occurred about midnight, and the story was told by the victim who so narrowly escaped death. According to report, the injured Chinaman, whose name is given as Wah, was asleep in his bunk at the rear of his laundry when he was suddenly awakened by the sensation of choking. He put up a struggle but was unable to extricate himself from the grasp of his assailants, who choked and stabbed him into submission. One thrust was aimed at his heart and failed to reach its mark only because of an intervening rib. The assailants then seized Wah's keys and opened a wooden chest in the room and helped themselves to between $800 and $900 in gold, which represented the savings of the victim, in $5, $10 and $20 denominations. A considerable amount of jewelry in the chest was not molested, the robbers evidently fearing detection from these articles.
    Suspicion rests upon two members of the Ashland Chinese colony, although the names are not given. They have not at this hour been apprehended, however, and the suspicion may not be well founded. The injured Chinaman says he would be able to recognize his assailants if brought before him, and action along this line is expected soon.

Ashland Tidings, May 13, 1912, page 1


'WHITE SLAVE' THROWS LIGHT ON 'ROBBERY'
Laura White, Who Declares She Was Held in Slavery by Chinese,
Tells of Stabbing Affray Morning
Is Confined in County Jail Pending Full Investigation of the Affair by Authorities.
    When Wo Lee appeared on the streets at an early hour Sunday morning and appealed to the police to assist him in finding the doctor he turned the searchlight of investigation upon what promises to be the most sordid den of iniquity which has ever flourished in Southern Oregon and began the unearthing of crimes which in number rival those of the Chinatown of San Francisco. Wholesale violation of the law is shown, if the stories be true, in which white slavery, gambling, stabbing affrays, and attempted murders figure. The extent of the crimes will probably never be known but already enough has come to light to lead the authorities to probe the matter to the greatest depths possible.
    In the county jail today there is a white woman who for two months has been at the mercy of the local Chinese colony, a slave to opium, and what is worse, to a Chinaman, who is said to have purchased her in San Francisco for the purpose of living off her earnings here. She declares that the fight Sunday morning in which Wo Lee was stabbed was the result of a fight over a division of her illicit gains.
    This woman is known as Laura White. Since she was 15 years old, according to the story she told the authorities, she has been a slave to opium and has had a Chinese master. Two months ago she was sold for $200 by a Chinaman who posed as her husband in San Francisco to Jim Ling, who brought her to Ashland and Medford. She has been rooming at the Royal lodging house for some weeks.
    According to her story she saw Jim Ling plunge his knife into Wo Lee's breast. She declares that the stabbing affray followed a quarrel over her, Ling believing that she was telling Wo Lee of his plans to rob him, while in reality she was only begging for opium. Ling declared that he would kill both of them, she says, whereupon she made her escape after seeing Ling plunge a knife into Wo Lee's breast. The robbery then followed, she says, if it really occurred: No trace of the $800 was found.
    Ling was arrested Monday evening but has so far refused to make any statement. Wo Lee remains silent. District Attorney Mulkey is keeping them separated pending a full investigation of the affair.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 14, 1912, page 1


WHITE SLAVE CASE TOLD IN CHINESE ROBBERY
LAURA WHITE TELLS POLICE SHE WAS CHATTEL AMONG CHINAMEN
Confession Asserts She Saw Ling Stab Wo Lee in Jealous Rage--
Married Chinaman When Fifteen Years Old
    Developments Monday in the purported robbery of Wo Lee, a local Chinaman, Sunday night of $500 brought to light a sordid story of white slavery, in which an American woman, age 22 years, had been sold and bartered among Chinamen. The stabbing of Wo Lee, according to a confession she made to the police last night, was the closing of a quarrel over who should possess the wages of her shame.
    Her name is Laura White, a roomer at the Royal lodging house. She says she saw Jim Ling plunge a small dagger into Wo Lee's side--and then she ran. Both are held in the city jail, the woman as a witness and Jim Ling on a charge to be filed by prosecuting attorney Mulkey. The robbery, Laura White asserts, was an afterthought to the real motive.
    Jim Ling was arrested by officer Hellams Monday night and the woman at 10 o'clock, on the statement of Wo Lee, that she was calling upon him when Ling came into the laundry. The Chinese were her source of supply for opium, and yesterday they refused her more without money, of which she had none. She told the police her story, and upon instruction from Dr. R. W. Stearns she was given opiates.
    She says that Ling came [to] Medford for the purpose of robbing Wo Lee, but that when he saw her in his company he became insanely jealous and tried to kill her, afterwards attacking Wo Lee with the knife. She implicates two other Chinamen, who lost their nerve in a card game. Wo Lee belongs to a different tong than the rest of the Chinamen in the Rogue River Valley.
    According to the story of the White woman, she was married when she was 15 years old to a Chinaman in San Francisco, and that she was a slave girl in the Bay City. Ling, she says, bought her from her husband for $200 and brought her to Ashland and Medford, forcing her into a sinful life. She came to Medford two months ago. A week ago she says Ling hit her over the head with an opium pipe, because he suspected that she was not turning over all her earnings.
    The story of Wo Lee's and the White woman do not vary, except that the stabbed Mongolia denies that his place was a supply station for opium. The woman says that she went to Lee's laundry to smoke opium and that while chatting with him Ling entered and threatened to kill both. When Ling came from Ashland Sunday morning she says he told her that he intended to rob Wo and that he suspected she was telling him of his plans during the visit. About a month ago Ling went to the Royal rooming house and threatened to kill the landlady because of a refusal of the White woman to talk to him.
    Things, she declared, have not been running smoothly between Ling and his purchased white wife for some time, and jealousy sprang up between Wo Lee and Jim Ling. When she was sick she alleges Ling drove her into the street and barred her even from the meager comfort of the Chinese. Other Chinamen belonging to a different tong than Jim Ling took pity and opened their doors to her.
    In her cell in the city jail the woman was hysterical and denounced Jim Ling, standing in an adjoining cell, in no uncertain terms. She branded him as a highbinder and a "hatchet man" employed by tongs during the recent trouble in California.
    A warrant will be issued today by the prosecuting attorney against Ling, charging either assault with attempt to commit murder or white slavery. No trace of the $800 supposed to have been stolen has been found, and the police are inclined to believe this is a tale to hide the real story.
Medford Sun, May 14, 1912, page 1


VILE DEN FOUND WHEN OFFICERS LOOK FOR OPIUM
Place Viola Miller Called Home in Rear of Chinese Laundry
Vies in Horror with Dens in San Francisco's Chinatown.
Jim Ling Is Bound Over to Grand Jury for Assault on Wo Lee--
White Slave Probe May Follow.
    Down in the rear of a Chinese laundry on Riverside Avenue so low that the waters of Bear Creek almost lap along its sides, filthy in the extreme, and so unsanitary as to make one shudder, is a "white slave" den which parallels the worst offered in San Francisco's far-famed Chinatown, with the single exception that its walls are of wood while in San Francisco they are often hewed from the earth itself. Dark and filthy, this small chamber, about 10 feet square, gives evidence of such unspeakable horrors as to make men wonder how such things can be. And it took an attempted murder following a quarrel over the earnings of the poor unfortunate who called this place her home to bring knowledge of its existence to the outside world. Yet for many months, perhaps years, this den of iniquity has been in existence. It escaped attention because no white man had ever entered it until yesterday.
Viola Miller's Home.
    For the past two months it has been the home of Viola Miller, who also lays claim to the name of Laura White. There she has been the slave of 20 or 25 Chinamen who make their headquarters at the laundry. How many poor unfortunates previously called the place home is not known and never can be known, but the den gives evidence of having been occupied for a long time past.
    Viola Miller was not confined to the room by the antiquated method of bars and locks. The Chinese have a more cruel and effective method of keeping their slaves within their power. They taught her the opium habit. Well they knew that she would return when she went forth to other places about the city. Well they knew that she would not seek the protection of her white countrymen. What of it if she did--would they not kick this poor unfortunate on down the path she was following, and if they did not, would not the craving for opium make any offer of help futile? There was little use of locks and bars.
Ensnared Early in Life.
    According to her story Viola Miller was forced to go to work at an early age to help support her mother and sister in San Francisco. She wandered into Chinatown one day when she was 15 years old and disappeared. Long afterward she located her mother and sister at Los Angeles, that they never knew of her fate. She told them that she had been married.
    This statement was true--but she did not tell them that it was to a Chinaman who kept her locked in a room in Chinatown until she had become a slave of the drug. Then he sold her--to a Chinaman at Portland. She was taken to various cities in the Northwest, and recently she ran away. She came to Ashland in search of work and there she met Jim Ling, the Chinaman accused of stabbing Wo Lee in this city at the laundry late Sunday morning.
    The craving for the drug was on Viola Miller, and she easily fell into Jim Ling's power. He brought her to Medford and to the den on the banks of Bear Creek. She spent a portion of her time at the Royal lodging house. But every so often the craving for the drug led her back to the den.
Tells of the Assault.
    On last Sunday night she left the Royal lodging house at about 1 o'clock and went to the laundry. Her master, Jim Ling, appeared on the scene and demanded money of her. She declared that she had but $2 and that she was sick and needed it. He then drew a knife on her, according to her story, and threatened to kill her. She fled and sought refuge with Wo Lee. Then she declared Jim Ling entered Wo Lee's room and drew a knife. As she fled she declares she saw Jim Ling plunge the knife at Wo Lee.
    Wo Lee's story as told on the witness stand Tuesday afternoon in the justice's court did not correspond with that of the woman. He says they were alone in the room when Jim Ling entered and demanded money. As the complaint filed against Jim Ling only specified assault with attempt to kill, the matter of a subsequent robbery was not gone into. It is a consensus of opinion that the two men quarreled over the earnings of the woman.
Woman Unnerved.
    The fact that the woman was badly unnerved by being kept away from the influences of the drug and the fact that Wo Lee does not understand English very well may account in some degree for the differences in their stories. Jim Ling was bound over to the grand jury by Justice of the Peace Taylor and bond set at $500. The woman was also held. It may be that confinement in the county jail for the next three months may tend toward breaking her of the drug habit and place her in such a physical condition that she will have an opportunity to start her life anew.
    It was during a search for opium at the laundry Tuesday afternoon that the den was found. About it were scattered several pieces of woman's clothing. On a shelf was found a small quantity of opium and a large number of letters addressed to Viola Miller which corroborate her story regarding her mother in Los Angeles. She has evidently been in the habit of sending money home, for in several of the letters this is mentioned. Her mother urges her to "be a good girl." By a peculiar circumstance there was found in the room a copy of Leslie's Weekly in which Kaufman recounts the experiences of a white slave in the dens of San Francisco's Chinatown.
Little Opium Found.
    The only opium found at the laundry was the small quantity in this room. But it is evident that an organized business of getting it to Chinamen and others is carried on and it is believed by the authorities that the laundry is headquarters for it. Viola Miller declares that both Wo Lee and Jim Ling sell it.
    District Attorney Mulkey declares that he will continue to probe the case and will have it brought to the attention of the federal officers, who will probably probe the opium selling and white slave aspects.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 15, 1912, page 1


HOLD JIM LING FOR ATTACK ON WO LEE
ATTORNEYS AND OFFICIALS WRANGLE IN CHINESE STABBING CASE
Police Investigation Uncovers Vile Conditions--
Laura White's Letters to Sisters Tell of the Opium Habit
    Jim Ling, the Chinaman accused of stabbing Wo Lee during a quarrel in the latter's place early Monday morning, was bound over to the next grand jury term by Justice of the Peace Glenn O. Taylor Tuesday afternoon, with bonds fixed at $500. The evidence was full of sordid details, and considerable acrimony developed between prosecuting attorney Mulkey, attorney E. E. Kelly for the defense, and constable Singler, who took the fingerprints of the defendant.
    "How comes it," asked attorney Kelly of constable Singler, "that you are taking fingerprints of this man?" Constable Singler explained that it was a proper procedure. An argument followed, which was closed by attorney Kelly announcing that "no stiff like you can rub a razoo on me." Justice Taylor warned both that they would be fined for contempt if they did not keep still. Before this exchange [attorney] Kelly declared that the evidence against Ling would not "convict a yellow dog."
    Before the trial the police made an investigation of the laundry where the stabbing occurred. They found that there was no doubt about the occupants breaking the health laws. Opium was found, and between twenty-five and thirty Chinamen occupying rooms on the second floor. The police did not know there were that many Chinamen in Medford. Complete opium smoking outfits were found.
    In a room in the basement was found wearing apparel of a woman, which Laura White admitted belonged to her. Letters written to her sister in Los Angeles were also discovered. In one of them she warns her relative against the use of opium; that she cannot be cured of the habit, though she had spent her earnings to do so, and that Medford and Ashland are two places in Oregon where the drug is easily obtainable. The police believe that the Chinese relied upon the woman's addiction to opium to keep her in bondage, knowing that she would return to them when the craving became strong.
    Wo Lee, the stabbed Chinese, and Laura White told conflicting stories, the woman admitting that she was smoking opium with him at the time and Wo Lee failing to state that she was in the room. Wo testified that Ling pressed a pistol against his cheek and asked if he knew what it was. The woman testified that she did not see the pistol. Both agreed, however, on the manner in which the stabbing had been done.
    Legal procedure allows only the introduction of evidence having a direct bearing on the case, so the depravity uncovered in the arrest was not introduced as evidence. In her recital to prosecuting attorney Mulkey, Laura White told of an alleged attempt of Jim Ling to ensnare a girl known as "Nellie," and that she had given "Nellie" all the money she possessed. This, she said angered Ling, who threatened to kill her and "play in her blood."
    According to the White woman's story, she was married to Harry Lee, a Chinaman, in Vancouver, Wash., in June, 1911, and that last winter he was deported to China for failure to have the proper legal papers. She says that since then she has been a toy in the hands of Chinese because of her desire for opium. Her marriage to Harry Lee created quite a scandal at the time and received due mention in the papers of the Northwest.
    Wo Lee, who was stabbed, is one of the oldest Chinamen in southern Oregon. He helped build the Southern Pacific railway, and afterwards mined in Jacksonville. He exhibited the wound in his breast to prove that he was stabbed.
    The affair has excited the Chinese, countrymen coming from as far south as Yreka, Cal., to hear the case and give financial assistance.
Medford Sun, May 15, 1912, page 1


GIRL, 16 YEARS OF AGE, FIGURES IN CHINESE CASE
If Story Told by Viola Miller to the Authorities Is Correct,
Young Girl Has Been Saved from Similar Fate at Hands of Chinese.
Girl Is Said to Be at Ashland and Authorities Will Endeavor
to Induce Her to Tell Her Story.
    If the story told the authorities by Viola Miller, otherwise known as Laura White, who figured as a slave to the local Chinese colony during the investigation which followed the stabbing of Wo Lee Sunday morning by Jim Ling of Ashland, is correct, a young girl, known as "Nellie" and who is said to be but 16 years of age, has been saved from a fate as dark as that of Viola Miller. It is claimed that Jim Ling was endeavoring to teach this young girl the opium habit that she might in reality become his slave.
    This matter is to be probed to the bottom by the authorities. Constable Singler will go to Ashland and endeavor to locate the girl who disappeared the same night that Viola Miller was arrested. If she can be found and her story tallies with that told by Viola Miller it is believed that Jim Ling and one or two of his accomplices can be sent to the penitentiary for a number of years. The United States government may take a hand if the matter develops.
    According to Viola Miller Jim Ling met "Nellie" some weeks ago at Ashland and has already induced her to smoke opium several times. She is also said to have visited the Chinese laundry on Riverside Avenue in this city on one or two occasions but made her headquarters at the Royal rooming house. How far the Chinese had succeeded in getting her into their power is not known.
    The opium-selling features of the case are not to be allowed to drop. The authorities have several clues which lead them to suspect the source from which it is received by the Chinamen and are now engaged in following these up. The assistance of the government will probably be invoked. Several sensations are promised in the case.
    In the meantime the city will proceed to enforce the health laws at the laundry, forcing the premises to be cleaned up. They will also keep a watch on the den found in the rear of the laundry and see that it continues no longer as a den of iniquity.
    Viola Miller is confined in the county jail. It is believed that two or three months spent there will be to her advantage if she is sincere in her protests that she wishes to break away from the opium habit.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 16, 1912, page 1


    There is no reason why clean-up activities should not include such joints as Wo Lee's.
A Chinese Tale.
O gee,
Wo Lee,
Lose cash,
Get gash.
Jim Ling,
Sure thing,
Him wail
In jail.
"Jolts and Jingles by Ad. Brown," Medford Mail Tribune, May 16, 1912, page 4


TO FORCE WO LEE TO CLEAN UP
CITY TO ENFORCE HEALTH ORDINANCE ON CHINESE
Jim Ling Waits in County Jail for Bail Money--
Expect Confinement to Cure Laura White
    As a result of the arrest and binding over of Jim Ling on a charge of assault of a deadly weapon, the city may order Wo Lee, the stabbed Chinaman, to clean up his premises in accordance with the city health ordinance. Investigation Tuesday showed the laundry to be highly unsanitary, with sewer connections that would be a disgrace in his native land in the time of the immortal Confucius. It is in the so-called basement that the real unhealthful condition exist, the upper floor being as clean-appearing as any Mongolian resort.
    Jim Ling still rests in the county jail. In a separate cell rests Laura White, and it is expected that jail confinement will cure her of the opium habit. Ling has sent to San Francisco for money to secure his freedom. He will be liberated upon its receipt, but the woman in the case will have to wait until the first of September to testify against him. Ling is a Chinese Mason, and this order is planning to come to his rescue. Ling seems to be in disrepute among the local Mongolians.
    Prosecuting attorney Mulkey has also advised the federal authorities at Portland of the white slave and opium selling conditions existing in connection with the case, and it is expected that they will order an investigation.
Medford Sun, May 16, 1912, page 1; Ashland Tidings, May 16, 1912, page 1


JIM LING IS BOUND OVER
ASHLAND CHINAMAN HELD FOR ASSAULT ON WO LEE.
WHITE SLAVE FIGURES IN CASE.
Sordid Details of Opium Den Come Out in Hearing--
Ashland Medford Given As Good Towns to Secure Opium In.
    Jim Ling, the Chinaman accused of stabbing Wo Lee during a quarrel in the latter's place early Monday morning, was bound over to the next grand jury term by Justice of the Peace Glenn O. Taylor Tuesday afternoon, with bonds fixed at $500. The evidence was full of sordid details, and considerable acrimony developed between prosecuting attorney Mulkey, attorney E. E. Kelly for the defense, and constable Singler, who took the fingerprints of the defendant.
    Before the trial the police made an investigation of the laundry where the stabbing occurred. They found that there was no doubt about the occupants breaking the health laws. Opium was found, and between 35 and 30 Chinamen occupying rooms on the second floor. The police did not know there were this many Chinamen in Medford. Complete opium smoking outfits were found.
    In a room in the basement was found wearing apparel of a woman, which Laura White admitted belonged to her. Letters written to her sister in Los Angeles were also discovered. In one of them she warns her relative against the use of opium; that she cannot be cured of the habit, though she had spent her earnings to do so, and that Medford and Ashland are two places in Oregon where the drug is easily obtainable. The police believe that the Chinese relied upon the woman's addiction to opium to keep her in bondage, knowing that she would return to them when the craving became strong.
    Wo Lee, the stabbed Chinese, and Laura White told conflicting stories, the woman admitting that she was smoking opium with him at the time and Wo Lee failing to state that she was in the room. Wo testified that Ling pressed a pistol against his cheek and asked if he knew what it was. The woman testified that she did not see the pistol. Both agreed, however, on the manner in which the stabbing had been done.
    Legal procedure allows only the introduction of evidence having a direct bearing on the case, so the depravity uncovered in the arrest was not introduced as evidence. In her recital to prosecuting attorney Mulkey, Laura White told of an alleged attempt of Jim Ling to ensnare a girl known as "Nellie," and that she had given "Nellie" all the money she possessed so she could go to Portland. This, she said, angered Ling, who threatened to kill her and "play in her blood."
    According to the White woman's story, she was married to Harry Lee, a Chinaman, in Vancouver, Wash. in June 1911, and that last winter he was deported to China for failure to have the proper legal papers. She says that since then she has been a toy in the hands of Chinese because of her desire for opium. Her marriage to Harry Lee created quite a scandal at the time and received due mention in the papers of the Northwest.
    Wo Lee, who was stabbed, is one of the oldest Chinamen in southern Oregon. He helped build the Southern Pacific railway, and afterwards mined near Jacksonville. He exhibited the wound in his breast to prove that he was stabbed.
    The affair has excited the Chinese countrymen coming from as far south as Yreka, Cal. to hear the case and give financial assistance.
Ashland Tidings, May 16, 1912, page 1


LADIES TO HELP VIOLA MILLER
    The W.C.T.U. locals of Jackson County are to interest themselves in the future of Viola Miller, otherwise known as Laura White, who was rescued from a white slave den maintained by Chinese in the rear of the Chinese laundry on Riverside Avenue. The ladies will attempt to make it easy for the woman to start and follow a new life. Every aid will be extended to her in her fight to free herself from the opium habit.
    The most pitiable stories told by Viola Miller are those relating to her efforts to free herself of the habit. She is sincere in her desire to quit it once and for all and it is believed that with a helping hand extended by the W.C.T.U. her reformation can be worked.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 17, 1912, page 4



W.C.T.U. TO AID SLAVE GIRL OF CHINESE
CASE OF LAURA WHITE INTERESTS LOCAL WHITE RIBBON AIDES
Organization Will Pay Expenses of Unfortunate in Effort to Cure Drug Habit--
To Investigate Further
    Laura White, identified with the Jim Ling-Wo Lee stabbing affray, whose true name is supposed to be Viola Miller of Vancouver, Wash., Thursday came under the notice of the Medford W.C.T.U. The organization will make an effort to secure the consent of the county authorities to remove the woman to the Sacred Heart Hospital to undergo treatment for the cure of the opium habit, to which she is a self-confessed slave. Mrs. Jackson Silbaugh, an organizer for the W.C.T.U., visited the woman in the county jail. The W.C.T.U. will pay the expenses of the hospital care and guarantee her appearance as a witness at the trial of Jim Ling.
    The W.C.T.U. are also interested in the case of "Nellie," mentioned by the White woman in her confession, as an intended victim of Jim Ling, through making her a slave to the opium habit. The police do not seem to have much knowledge of "Nellie," referred to by Laura White as 16 years old, and a "family girl." The "Nellie" they have in mind is twice sixteen years and disappeared, the police say, about the time of the stabbing Sunday night. Thursday she is said to have returned to Medford.
    The story as told by Laura White and first published in The Sun came as a shock to the churches and organizations, and it is probable that further action will be taken and the matter discussed from the pulpits Sunday. Laura White told her detailed story to a delegation of W.C.T.U. members Thursday.
    Steps are under way toward securing a federal probe of the opium traffic in southern Oregon, and the white slave conditions alleged by Laura White against Jim Ling. Prosecuting attorney Mulkey is also expected to act in conjunction with the government authorities. Some startling evidence is likely to be brought to light.
    In the visit to the laundry of Wo Lee, a packet of letters written by Laura White to her mother and sister were found. They were never sent. These are now in the possession of the prosecuting attorney's office and will play an important part in the future developments of the case. The letters that were never sent tell the story.
    Those that were penned to the sister in Los Angeles were evidently the thoughts uppermost in the hours of remorse, when the opium was absent. They tell of the struggle to overcome the chains of the Oriental drug, its terrors and the inability to conquer. To her sister, the unfortunate woman bared the secrets of her soul, and all through the pathetic epistles are warnings never to become a slave to the charms of the poppy.
    The letters to the mother are as if they were written by another hand. There is no mention of the sin in the life of the daughter, no word of a drug eating out the heart and soul. All is peace and contentment and happily mated life. The end of each letter contains the promise to send money home to aid in the family support. But a letter to the sister says that she can send no money home, for it took all she earns to satisfy the cravings for opium.
Medford Sun, May 17, 1912, page 1


'NELLIE' FAILS TO SUBSTANTIATE TALE OF SLAVERY
    Following an examination of the young woman known as "Nellie," who Viola Miller, otherwise known as Laura White, said the Chinese were endeavoring to bring into their power as they had her, by District Attorney Mulkey, the authorities are fearing a collapse of a white slave charge against Jim Ling or Wo Lee. "Nellie" has absolutely denied the story as told by Viola Miller. She declares that she never was in the Chinese laundry on Riverside Avenue and that she knows [not] Jim Ling, other than by reputation. She also declares that she has never used opium in any form.
    It is reported that a number of persons have seen her entering the Chinese laundry on Riverside Avenue. If this can be proven it will be known that she was untruthful when questioned by the district attorney. Her story is at absolute variance with the one told by Viola Miller.
    "Nellie" came to Medford on orders of the authorities Thursday evening and returned to Ashland Friday following her examination by District Attorney Mulkey. She has removed her effects from the Royal rooming house.
    The authorities are inclined to believe that representatives of the Chinese saw her at Ashland and forced her to tell the story she told the authorities. They had 48 hours in which to make their arrangements.
    In a further search for opium District Attorney Mulkey, Sheriff Jones and Chief of Police Hittson went to the Chinese laundry on Riverside again Friday. They failed to find any more of the drug.
    In the meantime the Chinese cleaned up the den in the basement. All of the dirty clothing, papers and other litter in the room found on the first visit had been removed, and the room straightened generally.
    Viola Miller is to be removed from the county jail to the Sacred Heart Hospital, where she will be treated for the opium habit. The county W.C.T.U. will bear one-half the expense of keeping her at the hospital and the county the other. It is figured that this course will not cost the county any more than keeping the woman in jail.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 18, 1912, page 1



CHINAMAN ROBBED
At Medford of Hard-Earned Laundry Money. $800 Taken
    Wo Lee, a Chinese laundryman of Medford, was robbed of $800 in gold at an early hour Monday morning. Wo was asleep in a room at the rear of the laundry when the robber entered and awakened him demanding the key to a chest in the room.
    In a struggle for the key the robber inflicted a severe cut upon Wo over the heart and several bruises about the body. The only thing which saved Wo's life was his surrendering the key to the chest in which the gold was kept.
    The money was in $5's, $10's and $20's and contained in a sack which the thief carried off. He overlooked another sack containing about $100 in silver.
Jacksonville Post, May 18, 1912, page 1


SEND GIRL SLAVE OF OPIUM TO HOSPITAL
COUNTY AND W.C.T.U. WILL PAY EXPENSES OF CURE OF LAURA WHITE
Friends of Unfortunate Believe That Weeks of Clean Living
and Medicine Will Redeem Woman from Toils
    Arrangements were completed Friday whereby Viola Miller, alias Laura White, the Chinese white slave girl, was transferred to the Sacred Heart Hospital from the county jail at Jacksonville for treatment for the cure of the opium habit. The county will pay half and the W.C.T.U. the remainder of the expenses incident to the medical treatment. Bonds were fixed to guarantee her appearance as a witness next September against Jim Ling, her Oriental master.
    Members of the W.C.T.U., who have taken an interest in the unfortunate woman, believed that a cure will be effected in her case, and that the clean life and right living of the hospital, aided by skilled medical attention, will redeem her to the ranks. The woman herself is anxious to be cured and has made several starts on her own account, but due to the machinations of the Chinese and her companions, has always failed.
    In agreeing to pay one-half the expenses, the county court figured its share of the hospital fees would be less than the cost of keeping the woman in the county jail all summer, and besides be doing the humane thing in aiding in her reformation and redemption.
    Jim Ling, the Chinaman in the case, Friday received $500 bail money from friends in San Francisco and is at liberty.
Medford Sun, May 18, 1912, page 1; Ashland
Tidings, May 20, 1912, page 1


PROBE OF OPIUM TRAFFIC FEDERAL PLAN
AUTHORITIES INVESTIGATE THE SALE OF DRUG AMONG CHINESE OF OREGON
Letters of Laura White to Sister in California Form Clue--
Mongolians Come from South
    Sweeping investigation of the sale of opium in Medford and Ashland as uncovered by the evidence brought out in the Wo Lee-Jim Ling stabbing will be made by the federal authorities, according to information given out Monday, it being stated that a customs inspector spent Friday, Saturday and Sunday in this city and Ashland making a quiet investigation, to return later. The letters written by Laura White, the slave girl, form an important link in the chain of evidence.
    In one of these letters to her sister in Los Angeles Laura wrote, "Medford and Ashland are two easy places to get opium. In Portland you cannot buy a spoonful, even for ten dollars." The authorities would like to determine how the opium was brought here and by whom, the price for which it was sold, and from where. It is unlawful to import opium into the united States, and the local authorities say the "dream stuff" in the hands of the local Chinese was part of a consignment smuggled into San Francisco from Mexico last winter.
    In an investigation of the laundry of Wo Lee and the room of Laura it was shown that the drug was fairly plentiful. The police found a substantial lot in the hand satchel of Laura White, and plenty of cans lying around the laundry. Before the officers could make a thorough search, however, the Mongolians living there managed to secrete all damaging evidence.
    The arrest and binding over of Jim Ling has caused considerable of a stir among the Chinese. Sunday there were twenty-five new Chinamen in town, all of them coming from California points. Jim Ling is a Chinese Mason, and it is supposed his brethren are coming to his support. Wo Lee does not even belong to a tong.
Medford Sun, May 21, 1912, page 1; Ashland
Tidings, May 23, 1912, page 8


SAYS POLICE ABLE TO STOP SOCIAL EVIL

J. C. WESTERNBERG OF SAN FRANCISCO MISSION
SAYS AUTHORITIES DERELICT
Lecturer Names Two Places of Disrepute--
Declares Police Can Close Them Anytime They Choose on Evidence
    Declaring the local authorities are responsible for the social evil in Medford and that they may precede any action they may take by informing the guilty parties of it, J. C. Westernberg, superintendent of the "Whosoeverwill" Rescue Mission of San Francisco, closed a series of talks at the Baptist Church Monday night on white slavery.
    The speaker named the Royal Rooming House and The Oaks on Front Street as transgressors and declared that the city authorities could close them at any time they cared to.
    Yesterday Police Chief Hittson called Rev. A. A. Holmes and asked that Mr. Westernberg issue a warrant against the places if he had any evidence regarding them.
    "You need no evidence," declared the San Francisco reformer. "According to the Oregon law all the evidence needed is the common repute of the place. I have been in Medford long enough to know the common repute of the places in question. Ask any merchant in Medford. It is the duty of the police to shut up these places."
    The talks were illustrated by lantern slides showing the methods by which young girls are taken advantage of, with special reference to cafes, street flirtations, dance halls and joyrides.
    Both Mr. Westernberg and Rev. Holmes investigated the recent Chinese stabbing case and interviewed Laura White, the alleged slave girl. In their opinion both Jim Ling and Wo Lee are implicated in the white slave traffic, although both factions accuse the other of guilt, and try to maintain their own innocence.
Medford Sun, May 22, 1912, page 1


SLAVE GIRL SENT AWAY TO EFFECT CURE
LAURA WHITE, VICTIM OF OPIUM AND CHINESE, FURTHER AIDED BY WOMEN
Fear Influence of Mongolians Will Be Used to Induce White Girl to Curb Testimony
    Laura White, held by the authorities as a witness in the recent Jim Ling-Wo Lee stabbing affray, and taken charge [of] by the W.C.T.U. and other ladies of the city to help her break the chains of the opium habit, has been sent to an institution in Seattle for treatment. She will be held and will return to Medford at the fall term of the circuit court to give testimony. It was found after two weeks that a more rigid cure than could be obtained in Medford was needed, so a fund was secured to send the unfortunate girl away.
    Owing to the peculiar nature of the Chinese, care will be exercised by her benefactors to see that no friends of Jim Ling in Seattle succeed in influencing her. When she boarded the train a Chinaman was on the depot platform watching developments. The woman is making an honest effort to redeem herself and is more than anxious to repay the interest shown in her by local people. Since the [arrest] the Chinese have been making an effort to reach their former captive that she be induced not to testify against Jim Ling.
Medford Sun, May 29, 1912, page 1


    June 4th--Mrs. Cotterill called to report that she had located Viola Miller in the Bon Ton Restaurant, Vancouver, Wash. This girl is a dope fiend, who was brought here by Mrs. Cotterill, special officer, from Medford. She is also known as Laura Stevenson, alias Lottie or Laura Miller, alias Laura Bromley, alias Laura White. Was in a jail at Jacksonville on account of two Chinamen. With her was Vivian Larue, aged 16. Dist. Attorney B. F. Mulkey knows about the case. Mrs. Carl Walauer is Laura's sister. The Chinaman with whom Laura is intimate is Jim Wo Lee [sic]. Claim they were married in Vancouver. Chinaman arrested on white slave charges, is to be deported. When Laura first arrived here she was taken to the Louise Home, but was so disorderly they could not keep her. Later--Mrs. Cotterill found the girl, took her to Multnomah Hospital, signed a state charge of vagrancy against her, at Mrs. B's advice.
Day Book 1912, Detective Lola G. Baldwin, Portland Police Museum


LAURA WHITE IS UNABLE TO DEFY OPIUM CRAVING
    The opium habit which has fastened its grip on Laura White, who was rescued some time ago in this city from a den beneath the Chinese laundry on Riverside Avenue, has again asserted its complete mastery over the girl, who, in spite of watching and aid of friends, disappeared last week at Portland, where she was taken for treatment, and was found only after a close search and then in one of the dens of Portland's Chinatown. She is now in the custody of the Multnomah County authorities and will probably be committed to a sanitarium for treatment. The craving for opium led her to escape from her friends and go back to the Chinese of Portland--because they could give her opium.
    Laura White was taken to Portland some time ago by Mrs. Frank Cotterill, in whose custody she was placed for treatment. Mrs. Cotterill was informed by an institution at Portland that they would be glad to care for the girl, but after arriving at Portland, they declined to take her owing to some misunderstanding. Mrs. Cotterill had arranged treatment for her when she slipped away.
    Mrs. Cotterill at once appealed to the police of Portland. A number of detectives were detailed to find her but they did not succeed. Finally Chief Slover issued "go-gettem" orders, as they are known to the police, and the entire department turned out, raiding every suspicious house in the city. Laura White was found in one of the hidden dens of Chinatown with Ah Yee, her husband. This is the man who married her at San Francisco and took her to Portland before she came to Medford. Jim Ling is said to have purchased her from Ah Yee.
     Thirty-nine arrests were made by the Portland police in the case. Ah Yee admitted that he was in this country illegally and was turned over to the federal officers for deportation.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 14, 1912, page 3



LITTLE OPIUM FOUND IN RAID OF CHINESE DEN
    Under the personal direction of Sheriff Jones a raid on each and every Chinese establishment in the city was made Sunday night. Simultaneously raids were conducted by deputy sheriffs at Central Point, Gold Hill and Ashland. A considerable amount of opium was found, but none in bulk. The opium found was confiscated by the officers. No arrests were made.
    The authorities have been planning the raid for some time, in fact, since Laura White was rescued from a Chinese den in this city. She told the officers details of an organized opium trade, and the authorities hoped to secure incriminating evidence by raiding the establishments. However, the Chinese in Jackson County have evidently not yet recovered from the effects of the scare they got following the Laura White case and had the opium beyond reach.
    The sheriff also took pains to look for evidence of gambling, but while cards and buttons were found no evidence was goatherd which would stand in court.
     It is believed by the authorities that the Chinese have taken great care in handling opium since Laura White was arrested and told her story. It was to allow their fears to be dispelled that the officers delayed the raid until this time, but the Chinamen evidently outguessed them.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 17, 1912, page 2


OPIUM RECLAIMS GIRL.
Laura White Returns to Chinese for Drug.
    The opium habit which has fastened its grip on Laura White, who was rescued some time ago in Medford from a den beneath the Chinese laundry on Riverside Avenue, has again asserted its complete mastery over the girl, who, in spite of watching and aid of friends, disappeared last week at Portland, where she was taken for treatment, and was found only after a close search and then in one of the dens of Portland's Chinatown. She is now in the custody of the Multnomah County authorities and will probably be committed to a sanitarium for treatment. The craving for opium led her to escape from her friends and go back to the Chinese of Portland--because they could give her opium.
Ashland Tidings, June 17, 1912, page 8



UNDESIRABLES ARE TOLD TO GET OUT
    For the first time in many months Medford is today practically free of all undesirable women. This condition follows the issuance of orders Friday by Mayor Canon to the police that all women of ill repute must leave the city. Friday afternoon the exodus began, and by noon Saturday the women had scattered to the four winds. Their recent haunts in this city are today closed and silent.
    The police descended first upon the Royal Rooming House, which has housed a number of women during the past year, and from there the police covered the rooming houses in the city, some known to be of a more or less disorderly character, and some which were under suspicion only.
    For some time the women have not been disturbed as a class, and only those who were too prominent on the streets were forced to leave town. This crusade was general, however, and all were told to move out.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 24, 1912, page 4


    A number of other cases, including the one against Jim Ling, a Chinaman, are now being considered by the grand jury. The jury, which was chosen for the March term and which will be succeeded by a new one next week when the September term of court opens, consists of Ira Shoudy, foreman; G. B. Ross, Elmo Neil, R. H. Toft, T. J. O'Hara, J. C. Brown and F. W. Sifers.
"Eight Indictments by Grand Jury," Medford Mail Tribune, August 28, 1912, page 2


RECENT INMATES OF ROYAL ARRESTED
    PORTLAND, Ore., Aug. 28.--While investigating white slave cases Tuesday, Detectives Long and Martin found Charlotte and Kate Diamond in a room with a 15-year-old girl, Irene Lamar, whom they state they were taking from Medford to Grays Harbor, but as the room was littered with empty beer bottles and cigarette stubs, the women were held for contributing to the delinquency of a minor and were bound over to the grand jury this morning. Eva Goldstone, who was found in the hotel, was arrested on a vagrancy charge and she, with the others, will be given a hearing Friday.

Circus 1912May29-June2--Arnolds Consolidated Show
Irene Lamar's "street carnival," Arnold's Consolidated Shows, pictured above just north of the railroad
 depot, played Medford May 29 through June 2, 1912.
    The three women mentioned in the above dispatch were inmates of the Royal Rooming House in this city, which was closed last Friday by the police. The Lamar girl is said to have come to Medford with a street carnival three months ago and since that time has been an inmate of the Royal. No investigation as to her age was made by the authorities while she was here.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 28, 1912, page 3


BENCH WARRANT OUT FOR WITNESS IN JIM LING CASE
    A bench warrant was issued by Judge Calkins of the circuit court Tuesday afternoon for the apprehension of Laura White, otherwise known as Viola Miller, who figured in the Wo Lee-Jim Ling stabbing affray at a local Chinese laundry in this city some time ago. The woman is a material witness in the case. She is said to be at Portland at present, and an effort will be made to apprehend her and return her to Jacksonville to testify in the case of the state vs. Jim Ling for an assault with a deadly weapon.
    If Jim Ling is not convicted it will not be the fault of the local colony of Chinese, who are said to be lined up solidly against him and who have spent time and money in an endeavor to show the authorities his past record. Local Chinese say that he is a white slaver, a joint keeper and an altogether undesirable citizen. Some time ago they started an investigation to incriminate him and are said to have been partially successful.
    Jim Ling is the Chinaman who is accused of having stabbed and robbed Wo Lee in a local laundry some time ago. In the developments which followed a discovery was made of a white slave den in the basement of the laundry and a white girl taken from there. An effort was made to reform the girl which apparently failed. She is now said to be living in a Chinese den at Portland, being a confirmed opium slave.
    The Jim Ling case will probably come to trial next week.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 28, 1912, page 4


    Eight indictments were returned by the grand jury Tuesday. According to report, the probe of the inquisitorial body will be deeper than expected and that several new channels of investigation will be opened. . . . One of the informations to be heard is the one against Jim Lee, a Chinaman charged with keeping a white woman in bondage in a laundry on Riverside Avenue.
"Eight True Bills,"
Ashland Tidings, August 29, 1912, page 1


JIM LING CASE IS AGAIN POSTPONED
    The case of the state vs. Jim Ling, charged with an assault with a deadly weapon on the person of Wo Lee, a local laundryman, has gone over to the next grand jury owing to the absence of Laura Miller, an important witness. The case will be taken up next week if the woman is located. A bench warrant for her was issued Tuesday, but so far she has not been located. She is believed to be in a den at Portland.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 30, 1912, page 6


BENCH WARRANT ISSUED
Laura White Wanted As Witness in Jim Ling Case.
    Circuit judge F. M. Calkins issued a bench warrant Tuesday afternoon for the apprehension of Laura White, also known as Viola Miller, who was a prominent figure in the Wo Lee-Jim Ling stabbing affray at a Medford Chinese laundry some time ago. The woman, who is said to be at Portland, is wanted as a witness in the case of the state vs. Jim Ling for an assault with a deadly weapon, and an effort will be made to apprehend her and return to Jacksonville.
    Jim Ling is the Chinaman who is accused of having stabbed and robbed Wo Lee in a local laundry some time ago. In the developments which followed a discovery was made of a white slave den in the basement of the laundry and a white girl, Laura White, taken from there. An effort was made to reform the girl, which apparently failed. She is now said to be living in a Chinese den at Portland, being a confirmed opium slave.
    Medford Chinese are said to be lined up solidly against Jim Ling, and have spent time and money in an effort to show the authorities his past record. They claim that he is a white slaver, a joint keeper and an altogether undesirable citizen. His case will probably come to trial next week.
Jacksonville Post, August 31, 1912, page 1


WILL TRY JIM LING.
Case of Local Chinaman Likely to Come Up This Week.
    A bench warrant was issued by Judge Calkins of the circuit court Tuesday afternoon for the apprehension of Laura White, otherwise known as Viola Miller, who figured in the Wo Lee-Jim Ling stabbing affray at a Medford Chinese laundry some time ago. The woman is a material witness in the case. She is said to be at Portland at present, and an effort will be made to apprehend her and return her to Jacksonville to testify in the case of the state vs. Jim Ling for an assault with a deadly weapon.
    If Jim Ling is not convicted it will not be the fault of the Medford colony of Chinese, who are said to be lined up solidly against him and who have spent time and money in an endeavor to show the authorities his past record. They say that he is a white slaver, a joint keeper and an altogether undesirable citizen. Some time ago they started an investigation to incriminate him and are said to have been partially successful.
    Jim Ling is the Chinaman who is accused of having stabbed and robbed Wo Lee in a Medford laundry some time ago. In the developments which followed a discovery was made of a white slave den in the basement of the laundry and a white girl taken from there. An effort was made to reform the girl, which apparently failed. She is now said to be living in a Chinese den at Portland, being a confirmed opium slave.
    The Jim Ling case will probably come to trial this week.

Ashland Tidings, September 2, 1912, page 8


    Chief of Police Slover at Portland has advised District Attorney Mulkey that he has Viola Miller in custody. She will be returned to Medford as a witness in the Jim Ling case.
"Local and General," Medford Mail Tribune, September 3, 1912, page 2


JIM LING HELD BY GRAND JURY
    Jim Ling was indicted by the grand jury Tuesday afternoon following the arrival of Laura Miller, white slave, from Portland. The trial will follow later during this term of court.
    The Chinese tong in which Wo Lee, who was assaulted by Jim Ling, holds membership, is said to be active in backing the prosecution of Ling.
    Jim Ling was first arrested in this city several months ago for assaulting Wo Lee, a laundryman. Later investigation shows that Laura Miller, a white girl, had been held as a white slave in the basement of the laundry.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 4, 1912, page 3


BRING SLAVE GIRL WITNESS BACK
TESTIFIES BEFORE GRAND JURY--INDICT JIM LING
Wah Lee's Tong Take Interest in Case--Hire Special Attorney--
Portland Man on Ground
    Laura White, the missing Chinese slave woman, wanted as a witness in the Wah Lee-Jim Ling stabbing affray, was brought to Medford Tuesday by attorney B. S. Pague, representative of a tong opposed to Jim Ling. She appeared before the grand jury Tuesday afternoon, and reiterated the main points of the story she told in the justice court last spring. After hearing her testimony the grand jury returned an indictment against Jim Ling.
    Friends of Wah Lee have hired attorney DeArmond to assist prosecuting attorney Mulkey in the case, and a conference was held between the opposing forces. Jim Ling is a tongless Chinaman, therefore he has nothing but his friends to rely upon. Jim is one of the oldest Mongolians in southern Oregon, and when a young man worked for one of the pioneer families at Ashland. Wah Lee's faction is reported to be hot after the man alleged to have stabbed him, and the trial which will come at the close of the present term is exciting considerable interest.
Medford Sun, September 4, 1912, page 1


LING CASE ON IN CIRCUIT COURT
    The case of the state vs. Jim Ling for assault with a deadly weapon upon the person of Wo Lee, a local laundryman, was called Friday morning in the circuit court with B. F. Mulkey for the state and E. E. Kelley for the defense.
    The preliminary work of choosing a jury proved a more formidable task than was expected. A new panel was drawn during the morning, the box being filled shortly before noon. The jury consists of J. Cameron, J. I. Pelton, W. Kahler, J. M. Williams, John T. Donegan, H. S. Lynch, George McClain, N. Mitchell, W. von der Hellen, Carl von der Hellen, Ed Dutton and G. H. Wamsley.
    The case promises to be one of the hardest fought in many months in the circuit court. A score of Chinamen were on hand to watch proceedings. A large number of witnesses were summoned by each side.
    It is not expected that the case will go to the jury before Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 13, 1912, page 6; Ashland
Tidings, September 16, 1912, page 1


CHINESE SCANDAL TRIAL TODAY
JIM LING TO FACE JURY FOR STABBING WAH LEE
Case Concerns White Woman, Opium, Sordid Immorality, and Powerful Tong
    Jim Ling, servant member of one of the pioneer families of Ashland, indicted on a charge of stabbing Wah Lee, a Medford Mongolian, during the progress of a quarrel last spring, will face a jury in the circuit court, and Chinese from San Diego to Victoria, B.C. are coming to town to see that the machinery of the law works. Jim Ling is a member of the Hop See Tong, powerful factor in Chinese life, and Wah Lee is a lone wolf of his kind with no tong, few friends, but plenty of money earned by washing shirts for fifteen years. The trial will demonstrate whether a Chinaman with a tong can win out over a tongless one.
    Both Jim Ling and Wah Lee have told four or five different tales of the stabbing, and are expected to tell an entirely different one when they next get a chance. During the last week friends of both sides have held conferences, in which they said little, and stood about and smoked cigarettes. The Wah Lee faction are so anxious to enforce the power of the law upon Jim Ling that they have hired attorney Harvey DeArmond to assist prosecutor Mulkey int he case. Attorney B. S. Pague, representative of Ling's tong, will also be on the ground.
    Interwoven in the case is a white woman--Laura White, by name--a slave to opium, who was brought from Portland as a witness in the case. In the preliminary trial she told a sordid story of her alleged slavery, with Jim Ling as her master, in which accusations of white slavery, opium selling and immorality were filed. Powerful influences have been put upon the girl by the Chinese. When the local police made an investigation of the white girl's story, they found neither the sanitation nor the moral anything to be proud of.
    Wah Lee was stabbed while he slept, and at the time it was supposed that robbery was the motive, as Wah's money was hidden in the folds of his shirt. Later it developed from the evidence that the love of the white woman was the real motive, and that a midnight call upon Wah Lee for opium had roused the jealousy of the Ashland Celestial. With this as a basis, testimony of a thrilling nature can be expected.
    Among the local people who have been subpoenaed are members of the police force. Dr. J. E. Shearer of Glendale, who dressed Wah's wounds, Chief of Police Hittson and Harry Hicks, a newspaper reporter., who delved as deep as anybody into the facts of the scandal.
Medford Sun, September 13, 1912, page 1


JIM LING'S FATE IN HANDS OF JURY
    At a late hour this afternoon, the jury in the case of the state vs. Jim Ling for assault with a deadly weapon  on the person of Wo Lee, a local Chinaman, had not returned a verdict although they went out a ten o'clock Saturday morning.
    A mass of contradictory statements characterized the Ling case throughout. Wo Lee, the complaining witness, not only told a different story from the ones he told when the case was first probed by the police, but contradicted himself while on the stand at Jacksonville. On the other hand, Jim Ling, the defendant, with a better command of English, kept his story straight. It was, however, a simple one, to the effect that while he was at the laundry he was asleep in the upstairs room throughout, and that he knew nothing of the cutting affray until the next day.
    Laura Miller, the white slave, who occupied a room at the laundry, stated that she saw the assault occur.
    Witnesses for the defense testified that Wo Lee for two days following the assault denied that Jim Ling was the man who had assaulted him.
    The case was completed as far as the taking of evidence was concerned Friday afternoon. After a short argument Saturday morning the case went to the jury at 10 o'clock.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 14, 1912, page 2



SOMEBODY LIED IN JIM LING'S TRIAL
STABBING AFFRAY BRINGS OUT DIFFERENT TALE FROM EVERY MOUTH
Wah Lee Classifies Debonair Scribe as "Hobo" When Queried
About Story He Told--to Jury Today
    Apparently there is nothing in the Book of Confucius about bearing false witness. The trial of Jim Ling now going on in the circuit court at Jacksonville is a Chinese puzzle of perjury.
    Celestial witnesses not only contradict each other but contradict themselves about every five minutes, and at the close of the session yesterday so many lies had been told that Judge Calkins had to walk up and down the courtroom and stand on his head before he could get his balance and proceed to the virtuous shades of Ashland.
    Wah Lee, the plaintiff, gave his story, and Jim Ling, the defendant, gave his. Laura Miller, the white slave victim, a witness of the alleged stabbing affray, gave her version, and Officer Cady, Dr. Shearer and Harry Hicks gave theirs. After piecing them all together it was doubtful as to whether the said Jim Ling flew in the window or walked through the door, whether there was a light in the room, an opium lamp or nothing at all, whether $600 or $48 was stolen, whether Jim Ling and Wo Lee were restaurant partners or old-time enemies with no business connections whatever, whether Jim Ling slept peacefully through the fracas at the Chinese laundry last spring, as he related, or whether he slipped through the door with a knife in his belt and proceeded to cut his victim and filch the strongbox.
    A number of Chinese friends of Wah Lee testified, and one Hong King, who slept next to Wah Lee's room, had to have an interpreter. Hong talked like a turkey gobbler with the croup and substantiated no one's testimony but his own.
    Laura Miller, the girl in the case, did her best for Wah Lee, and incidentally admitted to Lawyer Kelly for the defense that she had been addicted to the hop pipe but recently had taken to eating rather than smoking the drug. Her excuse for being in Wah's room at the time was that she had been sent there by Jim Ling to borrow some money. She looked very pale and worn and seemed to be relieved when her part in the program was over.
    Harry Hicks testified that Wah Lee had told him that Jim Ling did not commit the assault and then later declared he did not know how did it. Called on the stand in rebuttal Wah was asked by prosecuting attorney Mulkey to explain why he had not told the newspaper scribe the truth.
    "Me no tell hobo, me no tell hobo," was Wah's reply.
    "Do you mean to call Mr. Hicks a hobo?" queried attorney Kelly indignantly.
    "Me not know. So many of 'em," was the reply.
    Mr. H. Hicks was attired with all the studied negligence of a Jack London and declared it was the first time he had ever been mistaken for a hobo.
    The deposition of Police Chief Hittson will be read this morning and the summing up will follow. A verdict is expected before noon. Attorney E. E. Kelly was willing to waive the deposition and summing up, but the prosecuting attorney thought the case demanded more consideration.
Medford Sun, September 14, 1912, page 1



JIM LING JURY IS DISCHARGED
TOO MUCH LYING FOR TWELVE MEN TO REACH VERDICT
Divided Half for Guilt, Half for Acquittal--Second Trial is Probable.
    Apparently the Celestial lying at the Jim Ling trial was too much for the jury. After deliberating from 10 o'clock in the morning until nearly 6 in the evening the jury finally told Judge Calkins they could not agree and were discharged. Jim Ling, the defendant, will probably be held over to the December term of court, unless there is some understanding in the meantime.
    The closing argument was opened yesterday morning for the state by attorney DeArmond, but as E. E. Kelly, for the defendant, waived the right to close, prosecuting attorney Mulkey's speech was not delivered. This was a great disappointment to Wah Lee and his friends, who believed that the lawyer for the state would send Jim Ling to the pen.
    According to current comment, the jury was divided half for acquittal and half for guilt. Several times they filed in the courtroom and declared their inability to reach a verdict. The evidence was read, also with no avail.
Medford Sun, September 15, 1912, page 1


JIM LING JURY FAILED TO AGREE
    Apparently the Celestial lying at the Jim Ling trial was too much for the jury. After deliberating from 10 o'clock in the morning until nearly 6 in the evening the jury finally told Judge Calkins they could not agree and were discharged. Jim Ling, the defendant, was allowed to go on his own recognizance until the December term of court.
    The closing argument was opened Saturday morning for the state by Attorney DeArmond, but as E. E. Kelly, for the defendant, waived the right to close, Prosecuting Attorney Mulkey's speech was not delivered. This was a great disappointment to Wah Lee and his friends, who believed that the lawyer for the state would send Jim Ling to the pen.
    According to current comment, the jury was divided half for acquittal and half for guilt. Several times they filed in the courtroom and declared their inability to reach a verdict. The evidence was read, also with no avail.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 16, 1912, page 3


    The criminal docket of the present term of the circuit court closed Monday with the sentencing of six convicted prisoners to terms in the county jail and state prison. Sixteen indictments were returned by the grand jury. In twelve of these verdicts of guilty were returned, one was acquitted and a hung jury resulted in the other, because of the complexity of the testimony of Chinese.

"Criminal Docket Cleaned," Ashland
Tidings, September 19, 1912, page 1


Run Along, Ling.
    Jim Ling, the Medford Chinaman who was charged with stabbing Wah Lee of Ashland [sic], has been given his liberty on his own recognizance by the court, to appear at the December term of court. The jury in his trial last week disagreed because of the wide range of testimony offered by the Mongolian witnesses. Laura White, the "slave girl" in the same case, will likely be allowed to return to Portland, where she has a position as a waitress.
Ashland Tidings, September 23, 1912, page 1
 

JIM LING IS TO BE TRIED AGAIN
   The case of the state against Jim Ling, charged with assault with a deadly weapon upon the person of Wo Lee, is to be aired again in the circuit court. The first trial resulted in a disagreement following which Ling was freed on his own recognizance and the case continued until the December term of the court.
    The case was brought up Monday in the circuit court and set down for trial following the other criminal cases on the docket.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 10, 1912, page 6


    The case of Jim Ling, the Ashland Chinaman, accused of an assault upon Wo Lee, a Medford Mongolian, in which Laura White, an alleged white slave girl, was involved, was dismissed upon notice of District Attorney Mulkey. A jury of a previous term had disagreed on the case.
"Lift White Slave Charge Against Cummings," Medford Sun, January 3, 1913, page 1;
Ashland Tidings, January 6, 1913, page 1


LID IS CLAMPED ON TIGHT BY OFFICIALS
    The lid, as far as the underworld is concerned in Medford, has been clamped on tight by Mayor Eifert and Chief of Police Hittson. One or two questionable rooming houses in the city have been rid of undesirables, notice being given to get out of town.
    Chief Hittson, City Attorney Boggs and Mayor Eifert visited the questionable places Wednesday and issued the orders. Today the town is cleaned up, to remain clean, state the officials.
Medford Mail Tribune weekly edition, March 20, 1913, page 6



REMOVE THE ROYAL
    There is no excuse for the further existence of the Royal Rooming House. It has been given marching orders frequently enough, but this time it should be taken by the scruff of the neck and dropped into some convenient septic tank. It has become a public nuisance, and the present administration should see that it is removed.
    The Royal represents an evil as old as civilization and involves a problem which has never been solved to the satisfaction of right-minded people. It begins to look as though the twentieth century might hit upon a solution which would at least remove some of the most flagrant evils of the traffic.
    The following editorial from the "Awful" number of Life [magazine, the issue of March 27, 1913] treats the problem in a rational and interesting manner:
    Something suitable for this number might perhaps be said about Prostitution as a Parlor Topic. We never knew it to be anything like so much discussed in domestic circles. It has been discussed in the newspapers before now, though seldom so profusely as at present, but never so much at home, in general company, at breakfast and after dinner. First-hand information on this topic is not very freely offered, and it is not a subject which ladies may conveniently go out and investigate for themselves, so we are not surprised to be told that the second-hand information that is current does not accurately disclose the underlying causes and conditions of the topic. That may make some good people feel a little worse about it than they might if they were more accurately informed, but that is no great matter. The institution has no friends that deserve respect, no reputation, no deserts except for ill, nothing to rely on but a deep-down hold on human nature and an immemorial antiquity.
    Why is there such a stir about it now? Is it because its conditions are getting worse than usual, or because society is getting better?
    Our own sentiment is that what everybody feels is intolerable is the current commercialization of it. There are far, far, too many men concerned in this industry; too much graft; too much organization. One thinks with a kind of indulgence about Rahab the harlot who lodged the spies in Jericho, but with undiluted abhorrence of all male white slavers and of all trappers of girls for any kind of profit, and with unrelenting contempt on grafters high or low, immediate or remote, who tax or share gains made at so bitter a price.
    It is not a pretty parlor topic. Indeed, it is pretty awful. But this is the age of candor, and in a democracy the most effective remedy for all public evils is publicity. Let us see, then, what publicity can do for prostitution. If the usual exaggerations transpire, no matter. If there is about it all some air of weeping over Adam's grave, no matter. It takes a tremendous force of public sentiment to mitigate a deep-rooted evil, and public sentiment is private sentiment spread out. Whitman is accomplishing something in New York; there seems to be a good deal doing in Chicago. It may not all end in talk.
Medford Sun, March 28, 1913, page 4



Medford Mail Tribune, March 29, 1913, page 1


BOGGS EXPLAINS LETTER TO RESORT LANDLADY
NEW ANGLE GIVEN TO CONTROVERSY IN CITY POLITICS
BY PUBLICATION OF LETTER
City Attorney Will Enforce Laws Against Royal--
Promises Full Statement on Millar Hearing
    A new angle was given the political controversy raging in city affairs Saturday by the publication of a letter written by City Attorney O. C. Boggs to Mrs. Julia Jackson or Levenberry, landlady of the notorious Royal Rooming House. Opponents of Mayor Eifert and City Attorney Boggs were quick to make capital out of this epistle, declaring that it showed that the administration was offering "protection" to the resort, but failing to state just how the letter came into the possession of others than those directly concerned.
    The letter was written, according to friends of City Attorney Boggs, to forestall any possible attempt to induce Mrs. Jackson or Levenberry to change her testimony before the Millar investigating hearing, and to assure her that she would not be unjustly bothered. Action against the resort has been contemplated for some time.
    Following the publication of the letter, City Attorney Boggs issued this statement:
To the Citizens of Medford:
    I have heretofore made no statement in the newspapers regarding my position as city attorney, although I have been repeatedly misrepresented in the Medford Mail Tribune.
   
I now make the following statements:
    With reference to the letter published in the Medford Mail Tribune Saturday, March 28th, I have to say that any lawyer or any layman who will give the matter a moment's consideration knows that there is a difference between promising immunity to a witness and promising protection. I did not promise immunity to the proprietress of the Royal Rooming House and do not propose to do so, but I do intend to enforce the laws against this house as quickly as possible.
    With reference to the letter published in the Medford Mail Tribune Saturday, March 28th, I have to say that any lawyer or any layman who will give the matter a moment's consideration knows that there is a difference between promising immunity to a witness and promising protection. I did not promise immunity to the proprietress of the Royal Rooming House and do not propose to do so, but I do intend to enforce the laws against this house as quickly as possible.
    With reference to the many allegations in the Medford Mail Tribune that the suit of the City of Medford vs. George H. Millar, as now pending, is unjustified and brought by me for the purpose of persecuting the defendant, I promise the people a statement of the undisputed facts with reference to this case, as soon as the trial is concluded, which will justify its having been prosecuted in the most vigorous manner.
O. C. BOGGS,
City Attorney
Medford Sun, March 30, 1913, page 1


COUNCIL ASKS MAYOR TO CLEAN OUT THE ROYAL
    Members of the city council today requested Mayor Eifert to have the police force clean out the Royal Rooming House and any other place of questionable repute in the city. If this is not done in the near future the councilmen state that they will so instruct the police.
    The suggestion that the council take steps in this matter was made by Councilmen Mitchell, Summerville and Campbell today. In all probability the places will be cleaned out at once.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 2, 1913, page 3


PROPRIETRESS OF ROYAL THREATENS GENERAL EXPOSE
    Declaring that she has "more letters" to show and threatening a general expose if the city authorities attempted to bother her in any way, Mrs. Julia Jackson, proprietress of the Royal Rooming House, which has been more or less in the limelight during the past two weeks, served notice on the police force this morning that she intended to "be left strictly alone or know the reason why." Mrs. Jackson is much wrought up over the action of the city council Wednesday in demanding that the Royal be cleaned out.
    Mrs. Jackson was up early today issuing her defi to the public at an early hours. She declares that she can "fix a lot of these fellows so they can't look anybody in the face."
    In spite of Mrs. Jackson's indignation the Royal as well as all rooming houses of the city with questionable reputations are to be cleaned out.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 3, 1913, page 2


RAID ON CHINESE ROOMING HOUSE NETS 30 TINS OF OPIUM
    A raid by officers headed by Sheriff August D. Singler on all of the Chinese rooming houses in the county Sunday night netted thirty tins of opium and a considerable quantity of milder preparations of dope. Jim Ling and one or two other Chinamen were caught in the raid.
    All of the opium found by the officers was at Ashland. The raid at Medford did not net any of the drug, but as the rooming houses at Ashland were first raided, it is believed that local Chinamen were warned by telephone and had time to hide any of the drug they might have had on hand.
    Jim Ling, who was caught in the net at Ashland, figured in a stabbing affray in this city some months ago. At that time the laundry and rooming house conducted by Wo Lee on Riverside was raided, but no opium was found. Since then one or two raids were made but nothing found.
    It has been reported frequently that Ashland was a distributing center for this section for the opium trade among the Chinese. This led to the raiding of the rooming houses there first.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 21, 1913, page 6


LOCAL JOY RIDERS CAUGHT IN RAID ON ROOMING HOUSE
    Six joy riders from Medford were arrested at Ashland Sunday night during the raids by the police in search of opium and carried to the police court, where they put up a bond of $50 for the appearance. They were Al Hermiston, Merrill Kellogg, E. L. Roth, Walter Brown, Hazel Williamson and Hazel McCoy. The last two names are said to be fictitious, Hazel McCoy being Mrs. Julia Levenbury, proprietress of the Royal Rooming House, according to the officers, and Hazel Williamson an inmate of the place whose real name is said to be unknown.
    The party is said to have been making the night hideous at the Imperial Rooming House at Ashland. The officers when they raided the place put A. H. Woodburn, proprietor of the place, under arrest, as they found two complete opium outfits in the place. The joy riders were only held for disturbing the peace.
    Following the raid Jim Ling's place was raided, four more opium outfits being found. Ling and another Chinaman were arrested, but only Ling was held. Ling and Woodburn will probably be given their preliminary hearing soon before Justice Hurd of Ashland. Some effort was made to transfer the case to Ashland [sic], but this has as not yet been done.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 22, 1913, page 6


   
The problem presented by Mrs. Julia Levenbury is not solved by putting her out of one house and allowing her to conduct her business in another. The problem can not be solved permanently by pestering the surface indications of a disease which strikes to the depths of society. In the first place the outer manifestations must be vigorously opposed, checked, removed, if possible, but before essential betterment can be attained the young people must be educated to understand this problem and be aware of the suffering and misery which it entails. Extensive investigations carried on by the Bureau of Social Hygiene promise to hit upon a solution. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., is using his money to splendid purpose in financing this work.
Editorial, Medford Sun, April 23, 1913, page 4


WERE TRIED HERE.
Victims of Opium Raid Not Taken to Medford.
    There was a change made in the program of the trial of Jim Ling and A. F. Woodburn, charged with having opium illegally.
    Their attorneys demanded Monday afternoon that they be brought before the nearest justice and they were arraigned before C. H. Gillette. The trial of Jim Ling was held Tuesday afternoon, and he was found guilty and was fined $50 and costs.

Ashland Tidings,
April 24, 1913, page 8



JIM LING FINED $50 BY GILLETTE
    Jim Ling, a Chinaman well known to the police of Medford, was fined $50 and costs by Recorder Gillette of Ashland for having opium in his possession. A. H. Woodburn, proprietor of the Imperial lodging house in Ashland, arrested at the same time for a like offense, got a similar punishment.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 26, 1913, page 5



MUST BE CLEANUP IN MEDFORD
SO SAYS ATTORNEY MEARS AT SUNDAY MEETING
Laws Not Enforced by Public Officers Pledged to Enforce Them
    "Realizing the difficulties confronting every public officer," said attorney F. W. Mears at the First Baptist Church Sunday, "I am the last to criticize when there is evidence of conscientious endeavor, but I wish to remind the members of the present administration that they have gone on record for law enforcement, and that unless the laws in this city are enforced there will be a reckoning at the next election."
    "Notorious houses are running on the principal streets of the city and have been for weeks, and if the members of the city council don't know it they don't know what every citizen knows.
    "Unless there is marked improvement in local conditions the issue will be clearly drawn between those who believe in law enforcement and those who don't, between those who wink at houses of prostitution and corruption of the young and those who believe that the city of Medford should do everything to improve the moral conditions of the city and raise the standards which go to form our environment.
    "There are state laws that will aid self-respecting people in Medford and elsewhere to secure those surroundings which they desire for their families and children. One is the law giving women the vote, the other is the law making it impossible for anyone to register on election day.
    "If Medford is not cleaned up, by that I mean if the laws in this city are not enforced, those responsible will have to answer at the next election."
Medford Sun, July 15, 1913, page 1


COUNCIL TO CALL F. W. MEARS TO THE MAT
AROUSED BY LAWYER'S CRITICISM, SPECIAL MEETING IS ARRANGED
Mr. Mears Declares Statements Can Be Verified by Common Reputation of Places
    Believing that Fred W. Mears' statements as to the immoral condition of parts of the city are based on hearsay alone, the city council last night invited him to tell all he knows at a special meeting tonight at the city hall at 7:30.
    The council members say that if he is acting in good faith, he will not hesitate to tell the council what he knows and if he fails to appear at the meeting called for the purpose they will be convinced that he was merely "four-flushing."
    Councilman John Summerville made the motion to extend Mr. Mears the invitation and said that many Medford people would believe from his statements that immoral conditions exist here. He said that in order to substantiate such rumors Mr. Mears should testify as to his actual knowledge of affairs and the council could act to remedy the wrong. Councilman Millar seconded the motion and said that he thought Mr. Mears had a "political bee in his bonnet."
    Mayor Eifert advised against the measure before it was seconded on the grounds that his talk was merely hearsay and should be treated as such, but the councilmen claimed that Mr. Mears seemed so certain in his statement that the city should be given the benefit of his knowledge.
    When informed of the council's action last night Mr. Mears said:
    "If the members of the city council will call witnesses I think they can be enlightened regarding conditions in this city. I am simply interested in bettering the conditions and if the councilmen will meet me in that spirit I think some good can be accomplished through a meeting. As far as that is concerned common reputations of certain places is enough to condemn them."
Medford Sun, July 16, 1913, page 1


CITIZENS PROTEST AGAINST VICE CONDITIONS IN MEDFORD; COUNCIL DECLARES IT IS POWERLESS TO ACT
F. W. MEARS ACCEPTS CHALLENGE OF COUNCILMEN TO TESTIFY
MINISTERS OF MEDFORD BACK UP LAWYER IN CRUSADE
H. C. Garnett Testifies Regarding Vice Conditions, Queries Summerville--
Meeting Adjourns When City Atty. Pleads Inability
    "Now we must go home and tell our families and our children we are helpless against vice and immorality and our boys and girls must grow up surrounded by these conditions," said Rev. D. D. Boyle at the special meeting of the city council last night, after City Attorney McCabe had said that the city government and officials were absolutely helpless to suppress prostitution, that the council had no authority to order the police to close notorious resorts, and that the new law that permits the closing of disreputable houses because of common "fame" is unconstitutional. With this all but one or two of the fifty men present walked out of the hall.
    His speech was made at the close of one of the most exciting meetings ever held in Medford. Attorney Fred W. Mears had been invited by the council to tell all he knew of immoral conditions in Medford and he accepted with interest. Mayor Eifert immediately asked him to give his testimony. Mears contended that by the last act of the legislature common fame was enough to close rooming houses and any city official that permitted such houses to exist was doing a criminal act. He read his evidence and remarks which was as follows:
    1. Read 1913 session laws at page 519-520.
    2. Read advertisements.
    3. Question: If there is a single councilman who does not believe that there are in this city houses of assignation based on the "common fame" of these places, I wish they would say so right now.
4. Common Fame
    (a) Mr. E. E. Kelly, the prosecuting attorney, told the W.C.T.U. a short time ago that he was gathering evidence to go after these immoral places. If there are no such immoral places in this town what is Mr. Kelly gathering evidence for, and why did he tell these women he was gathering such evidence unless there are such immoral places?
    (b) A leading citizen of this town told me not long ago that his business was such that he did not naturally come in contact with the people who would be liable to know about such immoral places, yet that he had heard on the street that these places existed in the town and that he was satisfied from what he heard, and based on "common fame," that such immoral places existed here at the present time. I asked this man the direct question if he thought the council had done anything the last few months to remedy the conditions and he said, and I quote his exact words, "Not that anyone knows of."
    (c) Councilman Millar testified on the witness stand here that the Royal Rooming House was a sporting house. I ask the question now, "Has the Royal Rooming House been closed up?" Is is running now? The committee accepted a $5 contribution from the notorious Royal Rooming House for our Fourth of July celebration.
    (d) A man who is connected with a saloon in this town told me recently that he knew that what was known as the "Moore Annex" was an immoral place. He asked me not to use his name, but if I were allowed to give the name you would know that this man knew what he was talking about.
    (e) Mr. T. B. Ellison, a Civil War veteran and one who is downtown on the streets a good deal, told me that it was common knowledge on the streets that these immoral places existed here at the present time, and that he was willing for me to quote him as saying this.
    (f) Another leading citizen of this town, and one whose probity is unquestioned, told me a short time ago, and he verified the statement this morning, that he went to one of the councilmen of this city to get a scythe sharpened and in the conversation told this councilman that the scythe made no more impression on the grass than the reporting of these places of immorality to the council made upon the councilmen. And that is all the good it did to talk to this councilman. This same gentleman went to another one of these councilmen, the gentleman who so kindly introduced the motion last night asking me to appear before you, and he told him this same story that he told the other councilman, and in addition told him that it was commonly reported that there was an immoral house near one of the councilmen's homes, and the only reply he got was a smile. I can get a statement from this gentleman verifying it if it is necessary. And yet, gentlemen, this was the councilman who told me this morning that he objected to my making a public statement last Sunday night, but it would be all right to bring it before the council. I like to know what use it is to present these matters to the councilmen in a private manner, only to receive a smile. I tell you, gentlemen, this matter has been presented to some of you individually and you have been asked to do something. You have been asked to keep your public promise which you made a few months ago that you would clean those places up, and what have you done? The same business man whom you all know and who stated to me that although his business was such that he did not come into contact with these things, yet knew from general fame and talk that such things now existed in our town, and when asked the direct question by me if he thought the council had done anything the last few months to remedy the conditions, said, and I quote his exact words: "Not that anyone knows of."
    It is a well-known fact that in all cities of any size in the United States the police know where these places are. And I am right here to say that the police in this city know where these places are. Did not the police about the time of the [Viola] Miller trial of a short time before run the inmates out of town? Now, if they could do that they certainly must know where these places are. The mayor of this city told one of our citizens who went to him asking him to do something to bring about some of these prosecutions against the owners of these places, the mayor told him that he could not get any help from the police and that the council would do nothing. Now, it is a well-known fact in this town that whereas the mayor has the theoretical right and power to handle this question, yet as a matter of fact since the election on the amendment a short time ago the real power is in this council.
5. Statements of Leading Witnesses
    (a) A leading physician of this city told me yesterday in one of the leading business houses in town and in the presence of the proprietor himself, that he had just treated professionally a woman whom he knew to be a prostitute, and that she told him that she had a room in one of these places on Main Street, and the physician gave the name of the place. The physician further said that whereas he had never been to that place himself in a professional capacity, he was satisfied in his own mind that the place was an immoral place. I could give you the name of this physician, but I will not do so without first getting his permission.
    (b) Mr. H. A. Canaday said that I might use his name and quote him. Mr. Canaday has his office and living room in the Fruitgrowers' Bank building. He told me that within the last thirty days he was returning home from the 11:30 train; that after he had got something to eat in one of the restaurants here he walked along toward his office at about 12:30 a.m., and he saw a number of young men and boys going up and down a certain stairway leading to certain rooms. He passed along a little further and saw a number of young men and boys going up and also going down a certain stairway, leading to some other rooms on Main Street. This was the same place mentioned by the physician as being an immoral place.
    (c) I can bring evidence to show that some of these places have both a front and a back entrance; that on a certain day not long since some reputable citizens saw a large box over half full of beer bottles, that men have been seen going up the back way during the week-day. And yet this place is not a mercantile place. And so I might come on and give you more facts if I desired.
Conclusion
    You have called me before you to give you information as to these immoral places existing in our midst, presumably not knowing anything about any of these immoral places and presumably on the theory that you have no common fame as to these places.
    I have given you some of this information, sufficient for you to proceed.
    Mr. Mears then quoted the following laws passed at the last session of the legislature:
    Section 1. Whosoever shall erect, establish, continue, maintain, use, own or lease any building, erection or place used for the purpose of lewdness, assignation or prostitution or any other immoral act is guilty of maintaining a nuisance and the building, erection or place or the ground itself in or upon which or in any part of which such lewdness, assignation or prostitution is conducted, permitted or carried on, continued or exists, and the furniture, fixtures, musical instruments and contents are also declared a nuisance and shall be enjoined and abated as hereinafter provided.
    Section 2. Whenever a nuisance is kept any taxpayer of the county may maintain a suit in equity to perpetually enjoin such nuisance.
    Section 3. The suit when brought under the provisions of this act shall be promptly tried and in such suit common fame shall be competent evidence in support of the complaint.
Promised to Enforce Law
    You promised the people of Medford a few months ago that you would clean up the city, an admission by you that these immoral places did exist. Advertisements have appeared in both of our newspapers, the Mail Tribune and the Sun, as I read to you tonight, calling upon you to close up these immoral places. No attention has been paid to this public notification.
    You have been seen individually by leading citizens of this community and told recently of these places and your only reply has been a smile. Leading citizens have gone to some of you personally and offered to furnish evidence if you would prosecute the owners of these houses. Your only reply has been one of evasion. You have been told that if you would honestly ask your own police to furnish you evidence that the police could do so. Didn't the police send some of these people out of town? Do you or any honest man for one moment imagine that these places could run if they were not permitted to run? Would not an order to our police or to the police of any city in this country to close these places up result in their being closed up?
    You ask for evidence as to these things. I have given you sufficient evidence with which to proceed. This is not the place to give complete evidence.
    This council is not a judicial body to use said evidence.
Asks for Roll Call
    In fact it looks to the citizens of Medford that this council does not approve of the doing away of these places. That no less a one than the former city attorney, Mr. Boggs, and the one whose duty it was not only as a public official but a good citizen as well, presented before the court evidence of these things and prosecuted a case to its finish; and for so doing this council absolutely threw him out of office. And now knowing what the council did in that matter with their own public official it would be utter folly for me or any other private citizen to furnish further evidence.
    As you have asked me to appear before you and answer questions I now ask the privilege of asking the council a question. With the permission of this council I would like to ask the recorder to call the roll and let each councilman answer whether or not he is in favor of closing up these places.
    H. D. Penfield then made a speech in which he asked why the city authorities had not long since closed up the Royal and said that punishment should be dealt to the owners of the building rather than the inmates.
    He told how Governor West had sent the promise of aid to other cities where immoral conditions existed. All the members of the council said that they were in favor of cleaning up the city but lacked the knowledge of the various places. Penfield responded to this by saying that if the city authorities could drive out the inmates of the houses at one time they could again and said that it was absurd that the police did not know where the infamous places were.
    Rev. Eldridge of the Methodist Church said that unless the city authorities took steps to clean up the city of immoral women the citizens would. This caused much applause. When Mr. Mitchell said that he did not believe the council would be able to do this, Rev. Eldridge said that if the present city government found that they were powerless more efficient officials should be chosen. Rev. Boyle then said if past laws did not give the city officials jurisdiction over immoral houses, the new law did.
    H. C. Garnett rose to say that he had heard many times that the rooming house directly above the mayor's place of business was a house of prostitution, and that Mrs. Larsen, one of the inmates, was a lewd woman. He also said he has heard many things about a rooming house near councilman Summerville's residence. Summerville replied that the place was "all right." Shorty Garnett asked him then if he allowed his family to communicate with women living in the house and he said [as] he had never learned anything against her, he had never instructed his family as to the matter.
    Rev. Eldridge spoke again and said that he knew a Medford merchant who on July 4th saw a woman in a nearly nude condition stand for nearly an hour in the window above Mayor Eifert's business house, and that if he was ever brought up as a witness he could mention the man's name.
    Councilman Campbell responded to this by saying if the merchant had been a good citizen he would have reported the matter to the police. Rev. Eldridge suggested that a number of detectives be appointed to watch the suspected houses and gather evidence for a trial. It was suggested that Governor West's assistance be asked, but the plan was rejected because it would give the city such a bad reputation. Mr. Fouts, Dr. Lockwood, Mr. Stine and others made speeches.
    Attorney McCabe rejected nearly every plan proposed to rid Medford of the unwelcome element and said that the only way out of the difficulty would be to secure someone willing to turn state's evidence against the women, which would of course be nearly impossible to bring about. He said that the new law as to "common fame" would not hold up in court and the city would have no authority to subpoena anyone seen going out of the suspected places because no evidence other than "common fame" could be secured against them. The council all expressed their heartfelt cooperation with the movement for a cleaner Medford and different members said if immoral conditions do exist, it is because the wrong-doers could not be located and no evidence could be secured to drive them out. McCabe seemed to think that the council did not even have authority to instruct the police to raid or inspect the suspected places.
    Councilman Mitchell was in favor of swearing out a complaint this morning against the inmates of the house above Mayor Eifert's and issuing subpoenas for all those giving evidence at the meeting. Mr. McCabe thought the case would be lost because of lack of testimony and only three of those present held up their hands in favor of the move.
Medford Sun, July 17, 1913, page 1


MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL RAID ROOMING HOUSES
AND REPORT CONDITIONS MORAL AND IMMACULATE
NOT A SIGN OF GAY LIFE
MEN AND BEER BOTTLES ONLY DAMAGING EVIDENCE
Notorious Royal As Quiet As the Grave--Not a Landlady in Sight
    After the adjournment of the council meeting last night we, the mayor, members of the city council, chief of police, H. S. Stine and a reporter for the Sun, visited practically all the rooming houses in the city and failed to find anything of a suggestive or incriminating nature.
(Signed)       W. W. Eifert, Mayor
J. F. Hittson, Chief of Police
W. M. Campbell
J. W. Mitchell
Geo. W. Porter
J. T. Summerville
J. E. Stewart
G. H. Millar
H. S. Stine
    Finding nothing of a suggestive or an incriminating nature is right. In fact the rooming houses visited were nearly as empty as the proverbial "shark's egg," and even the Royal den o' sin had only two lonely men sleeping in it.
    The council, the mayor, the police and Mr. Stine began first with the Oaks Rooming house on Front Street, which contained about twenty beds that had not been slept in for the past six weeks, and a few more which were occupied by men. Then the famous place above Mayor Eifert's was investigated with like results. Then the small army of officials strode on to the other rooming house--the Royal (now known as the Opera), the Palm, the Seattle, and many more. At the Seattle were three men, one of whom claimed to be a member of the Ashland police, one the man who had a small prize fight with Shorty Miles some time ago, and another youth. A number of empty beer bottles were the nearest thing to incriminating evidence here.
    Then with the resolve to rid Medford "immoral influences" the chief, Mr. Stine, the mayor, Mr. Porter and Mr. Mitchell got into the chief's and Porter's automobiles and hied themselves to the house near Johnny Summerville's residence. This was found correspondingly empty, with the landlady downstairs and one boarder upstairs.
    Then the party visited the Oregon Rooms and made a minute examination. The landlord was inclined to be huffy and said that the would permit the search this time but his slim bunch of boarders were not to be disturbed again without a search warrant.
    "A few more of these Hoosiers around here," he said, "and grass will be growin' in the middle of the pavements." This made Mr. Stine rather hot under the collar, as he was the only Hoosier in the party. Then the six men joined the rest of the council and the police at the Manhattan, where they all had coffee and pie.
Medford Sun, July 17, 1913, page 1


THE SUN'S LETTER BOX
HOW DO LANDLADIES LIVE?
A. J. Oke Comments Upon Strange Raid of City Council
    To the editor: Was not that raid on the rooming houses by our city officials great; but did they not overdo it just a little? Should they not have left enough roomers in the houses to have paid for the wear and tear on the carpets, if they have any; or do these houses do all their business in the daytime; one of the keepers is said to have stated that she did not rent her rooms by the week, but rented them three or four times a day.
    And were they not sharp in taking brother Stine along and pulling the wool over his eyes, giving him such a royal lunch at the Manhattan--coffee and pie and then securing his signature to their findings?
    Can't you get one of your penny-a-liners to write it up and have it played as a comedy at the Page?
A. J. OKE                  
Medford Sun, July 19, 1913, page 4


SAM WING CO.--Has purchased the Woo Lee laundry situated at 123 S. Riverside and will conduct the business hereafter. Washings called for and delivered. Prices reasonable.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 22, 1913, page 5


    Eleven Chinamen from Siskiyou mountain town came to Medford this morning to visit Wo Lee, the well-known laundryman.
"Local and General," Medford Mail Tribune, November 22, 1913, page 2


WO KEE, Laundry ss California nr 4th [Jacksonville]

Polk's Jackson County Directory 1914, page 295


Chinese Laundry
On June first, I will open a first-class laundry. A trial will convince you of our ability to please. All hand work. Hi Shing, 123 South Riverside. Phone 189.

Medford Mail Tribune, June 9, 1914, page 6


    A squad of Yreka, Cal. Chinamen arrived Tuesday afternoon to make their regular monthly visit with the inmates of the Wah Lee Laundry.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, July 8, 1914, page 2


RAID ON CHINESE CONNECTS PORTERS WITH OPIUM RING
    The colored porters on the Southern Pacific trains are the links that connect the opium ring recently unearthed at Vancouver with Medford is the belief of S. B. Sandefer of the state board of pharmacy. He says that the opium is smuggled in from the Orient at Vancouver, passed to the porters, who deposit it with Chinamen in the towns that they pass through. That a large amount of opium has been left in Medford in the past few years is shown by the quantity found in the possession of the Chinamen in the raid made last night by the city police on the Chinese laundry and restaurant on South Riverside.
    Six of the Chinamen were tried before Judge Gay this morning and pled guilty. They were fined $25 each. Two others of the thirteen arrested were released on $25 bonds on the same charge. Five of them will be heard this afternoon on the more serious charge of having opium in their possession. Three of them will also be tried for gambling. The minimum fine for having opium is $100. This case does not come under city jurisdiction, but is a state case.
    The raid was made at midnight last night by the city police, assisted by Messrs. Sailing and Sandefer of the state board of pharmacy. Thirteen Chinamen were found in the laundry and the restaurant. Eleven of them were deep in games of fan tan, and something over $700 was the stakes. The policemen entered, covered the men with guns and confiscated the opium, the money and the fan tan outfits. What was left of the money was returned to the Chinamen after their fines were paid. A Chinese woman who apparently does not speak the English language was among those caught.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 24, 1914, page 3



MIDNIGHT RAID DISCLOSES DEN
CHINESE LAUNDRY PROVES GAMBLING AND OPIUM DEN
Police Find $1,000 and Considerable Opium--Woman Among Gamblers
    In a raid last night at midnight of the Chinese laundry on Riverside Avenue, conducted by S. B. Sailing of the state board of pharmacy, W. K. Jeffries, Chief of Police Hittson and Sergeant Pat Mego, eleven Chinamen were found smoking opium and gambling. They were immediately marched up to the city hall, where they were searched. They made a big effort to hide their money, some putting it in their shoes and socks. Something over $1000 was taken from them.
    Among the victims was one woman who, apparently a winner in the night's game, had a surplus amount of small change. Considerable opium was found.
    Authorities have been watching the place for a number of months, but not until last night did they gather sufficient evidence to arrest the Chinamen. A state charge will be filed.
Medford Sun,
July 24, 1914, page 1    
In its reprint of this article, the Jacksonville Post of July 25, 1914 added Sheriff Singler to the list of officers conducting the raid.


Robbery Epidemic at Medford
    Medford is suffering from an epidemic of petty robberies. The police are making an effort to clean the city of all undesirables and Friday night raided a Chinese laundry. Thirteen Chinamen were found in the laundry and the restaurant. Eleven were deep in games of fan tan and something over $700 was the stake. The policemen entered, covered the men with guns, and confiscated the opium, the money and the fan tan outfit. What was left of the money was returned to the Chinamen after their fines were paid. A Chinese woman who apparently does not speak the English language was among those caught.
    The colored porters on the Southern Pacific trains are the links that connect the opium ring recently unearthed at Vancouver with Medford, is the belief of S. B. Sandefer of the state board of pharmacy. He says the opium is smuggled in from the Orient at Vancouver, passed to the porters, who deposit it with Chinamen in the towns that they pass through. That a large amount of opium has been left in Medford in the past few years is shown by the quantity found in the possession of the Chinamen in the raid made by the police on the Chinese laundry and restaurant on South Riverside.
Ashland Tidings, July 27, 1914, page 1



NOTICE.
    Public notice is hereby given that Woo Lee and Hai Sing have sold their laundry and equipment thereto, on South Riverside Avenue, Medford, Oregon, to the undersigned, who will conduct the business at the same place under the name of Sing Dock Hong. The money for this business is to be paid and the transfer is to be made on August 8th, 1914. All creditors will hereby take notice of this transfer and sale, and all customers and the public generally are hereby cordially invited to continue their patronage.
FONG TONG.               
Medford Mail Tribune, August 5, 1914, page 5


    Some few days ago the Chinamen on South Riverside Avenue proposed a plan to placer several groups of claims in the Applegate country. They are now preparing to depart for the gold country.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, August 8, 1914, page 2


    Since the recent raid on the Chinese laundry on Riverside Avenue, the denizens thereof have been extremely wary of the police, investigation showing that they have Chinamen lookouts in the front and back yards, and on both sides. The raid also put a damper on the visits of Ashland and Yreka Chinese to this city.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, August 13, 1914, page 2


JULIA JACKSON HELD FOR FRAUD IN RE PENSION
    Julia Jackson, alias Julia Levenberry, former landlady of the notorious Royal rooming house, was bound over to the next term of the federal grand jury by Justice of the Peace Taylor this morning upon the charge of falsifying affidavits for the pension department in an effort to secure bounty from the government for the military service rendered by her husband in the Indian wars of the Southwest. Her bonds were fixed at $2000. The complaint was filed by District Attorney Clarence Reames.
    It is charged in the complaint that on February 1, 1913, Julia Jackson made an application for a widow's pension, claiming to be entitled to such pension as the widow of Isaac Jackson. She swore in her affidavit that the soldier, Isaac Jackson had died and that she had never intermarried with any person since the death of said soldier. Under the law, if she had intermarried after the death of her first husband she would not be entitled to a pension.
    It is claimed by the government that the defendant subsequent to the death of her first husband, did intermarry with John Lockett in Tucson, Arizona, on August 22, 1903, and that the statement in the affidavit that she had not married was false and untrue.
    After the declaration or application for a pension had been filed with the commissioner of pensions, the defendant was called upon to furnish further proof of her right to the pension and she made a similar affidavit before H. L. DeArmond and swore before him that she had never married since the death of her first husband.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 14, 1914, page 4


WEDDING SLIPS MIND
Woman Forgets She Married After Becoming Widow.
PENSION PROVES UNDOING
Government Shows Mrs. Julia Jackson Certificate,
Which Recalls to Her Ceremony with Lockett, Who, She Says, Was Black.
    A husband more or less is such a small matter to Mrs. Julia Jackson, of Medford, held as a federal prisoner in Portland on a charge of perjury that, according to her own statement, made in her preliminary hearing, she is likely to forget all about it.
    Mrs. Jackson's case presents such a startling instance of complete loss of memory that it is proving a puzzle to United States District Attorney Reames and other federal officials.
    Mrs. Jackson, 45, is proprietor of the Seattle rooming house at Medford. She made application February 1, 1913, for a pension as a soldier's widow, her husband, Isaac Jackson, who died in New Mexico, October 25, 1902, having served against the Indians in Arizona.
Woman Admits No Divorce.
    In the application Mrs. Jackson made a sworn statement that she had never been divorced from Jackson, and that she had married no other person since his death.
    But the cautious pension bureau at Washington wanted more proof, so September 29, 1913, at Medford, Mrs. Jackson made another affidavit in which she reaffirmed the statements made in the application.
    The pension bureau in the meantime had evidence that the woman had been married three times, and once since Jackson's death. This was to John Lockett, at Tucson, Ariz., August 22, 1903.
    It was this marriage that Mrs. Jackson completely forgot until shown the marriage certificate at her preliminary hearing at Medford Monday, following her arrest by Deputy United States Marshal William MacSwain.
Certificate Recalls Marriage.
    Questioned by Special Examiner O. L. Sues, of the pension bureau, she at first said that Jackson had been her last husband. Then she was shown the certificate and asked if she remembered the marriage to John Lockett.
    "Now that you have shown me the marriage certificate," she said, "I do remember that marriage. I was legally married to Lockett so far as I know. He was from Panama and I don't know what became of him. I was never divorced from him.
    "Yes, I am that Julia Jackson," she continued, having said that she realized that anything she might say might be used against her, "but my mind has been so bad and my memory so poor that I forgot about that entirely. I really am not well yet. It was on account of my entire loss of memory that I forgot all about the Lockett marriage until you called my attention to it just now."
Loss Affects Mind.
    "Do you mean to say that you have had trouble with your mind?" asked Examiner Sues, as shown by the record of the hearing now in the hands of District Attorney Reames.
    "Yes, ever since I lost Mr. Jackson," was the reply. "I would get nervous and flighty and forget all about happenings. My mother before me was just the same way, and Mr. Jackson often told me that I was not right mentally. I thought I was going to go crazy.
    "I used to go for weeks without eating or drinking," she continued, "and I do that yet."
    Then Mrs. Jackson volubly recalled how a Mrs. Zeigler in Phoenix had called a doctor, who told her that if she did not get better he would have to send her to an insane asylum.
Last Husband Was Black.
    "It all comes to me now," she said, "but I had clean forgotten it. Lockett was a black man, but claimed not to be a negro, but from some other country, I don't know where. I was persuaded by Mrs. Zeigler to marry Lockett, as she thought it might help my mind, but it did not, and we just drifted apart, and I don't know what happened to him."
    She said she didn't know how long she lived with Lockett, and that she didn't know when they separated. She reiterated that her treacherous memory was the only explanation she could offer, and said that she did not know what in marrying Lockett she had forfeited all right to a pension as Jackson's widow. She also asserted that there had been a doctor at the Medford Hotel who used to treat her for headaches, but that he was gone and that she didn't remember his name.
    Mrs. Jackson is being held in default of $2000 bonds to await action by the October United States grand jury.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, September 16, 1914, page 13



    The Hi Shing laundry on South Riverside was a volcano of noise Thursday night, a big and loud argument being in progress between the Chinese inmates. The racket kept citizens of that section awake who complained to the police who in turn silenced the orators. The discussion was over a gambling game.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, November 6, 1914, page 2


    The case of Julia Jackson, a former landlady of this city, accused of forgery in connection with pension papers, will be called before the federal grand jury at Portland next month.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, November 20, 1914, page 2



    The department of justice has taken no action to date upon the petition of Mrs. Julia Jackson or Levenberry, former landlady of local rooming houses, for falsification of pension papers, for which she is now under sentence. Her petition has been signed by a number and affidavits filed setting forth that she is in ill health, and that the ends of justice will best be served by official mercy being granted. Mrs. Jackson's term is about half over, and will likely be all over, before any official cognizance is taken of her plea.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, January 14, 1915, page 2


    The department of justice to date has taken no action regarding the petition for a pardon to Mrs. Julia Levenberry or Jackson of this city accused of falsifying pension papers, and under sentence of six months. It is not likely that any action will be forthcoming..

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, January 23, 1915, page 2


"The Inside of the White Slave Traffic," May 10, 1915 Medford Mail Tribune
May 10, 1915 Medford Mail Tribune

    . . . George Miller, of the Port Orchard Club, extended greetings.
"Navy Yard Cities Honor Officer," Seattle Daily Times, August 18, 1915, page 14


    Wo Kee, the laundryman, has returned from a short trip to San Francisco.

"Local News," Jacksonville Post, October 2, 1915, page 3


    Thirty-two of the poor were present to enjoy a free dinner given Thanksgiving Day at the Seattle rooming house by Mrs. Julia Jackson the landlady.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, November 26, 1915, page 2


    Mrs. W. H. Wiscomb and Mrs. George Miller, of Port Orchard, are at The Arlington.
"Hotel News," Seattle Daily Times, March 1, 1916, page 28

Wo Lee ad, May 3 through May 28, 1917 Ashland Tidings
Wo Lee ad, May 3 through May 28, 1917 Ashland Tidings

CHINESE IS BOOTLEGGER
Laundry Bundle Found to Contain Dozen Quarts of Whisky.
    MEDFORD, Or., April 7.--(Special.)--Lou Jew, a local Chinese laundryman, was fined $200 and given a 30-day jail sentence today by Justice Taylor for having enough liquor in his laundry bundle to stock a California roadhouse.
    For several weeks Lou had been observed making regular weekly visits to Ashland by the local police and always carrying a large laundry bundle. Charles Adams, night policeman, decided to investigate Saturday night, and when Lou boarded an Ashland jitney ordered a deputy to follow him. In Ashland the old Chinaman with many protests was forced to open his bundle and reveal a dozen quarts of whisky, which he said was being taken to a fellow oriental in the Granite City for "washee."
    The court decided Lou was not ignorant of the contents of the package or the kind of "washee" intended, so his conviction was speedily brought about.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 8, 1919, page 2

OFFICER LOSES POSITION
Medford Man Declared to Have Used Liquor Evidence.
    MEDFORD, Or., April 8.--(Special.)--Because he was discovered drinking some of the evidence in the Lu Jew bootlegging case, Night Officer William Garrett was discharged from the police force today by Mayor C. E. Gates.
    Special Officer W. E. McFurson, who arrested Lu Jew Sunday, returned to the police station last night and declared he found Garrett filling a pint bottle from one of the Chinaman's demijohns, from which he  subsequently drank. Garrett is a man over 60 years of age, has always had a good reputation, and because of this it was decided to allow him to resign.
    But the Lu Jew juice apparently was so potent that it stimulated the officer's fighting instincts, and when charged with the indiscretion he became abusive. Mayor Gates, therefore, lost his patience, paid the night officer's salary from his own pocket and sent him on his way.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 9, 1919, page 9


    Mr. Zook has been busily engaged the past week in removing one of the old Ryan buildings on California street, formerly occupied by the Wo Kee Laundry. Wo Kee, the Chinese laundryman who formerly occupied the building, is now located in Medford.

"Property Changes Hands," Jacksonville Post, July 26, 1919, page 3


Chink Is Fined $100 for Selling 3 Pints Booze.
    As the result of a raid made last night on Fong Chong's Chinese laundry on South Riverside by night policeman Chas. Adams and Deputy Sheriff J. Wimer, the proprietor and two other Chinamen were arrested. Fong Chong had been suspected of bootlegging for some time, and last night he was caught in the language of the police with the "goods on him." On Wong Han, one of the men arrested, and who was a hanger-on about the laundry, a couple of opium pills and a small quantity of liquid opium were found. The third Chinaman was let go this morning as there was no evidence against him.
    In Judge Taylor's court this noon, Fong Chong pleaded guilty to the charge of selling a pint of intoxicating liquor to a Medford man Sunday for $8. He admitted that he brought three pints of booze back from Yreka last week, which he sold. He was fined $100 and sentenced to 15 days in jail.
    Wong Han pleaded not guilty to having opium in his possession, and his trial was set for this afternoon. Both he and the Medford Chinaman who acted as interpreter claimed that the opium was nothing but an eye wash which he bought at Ashland and which is for sale in any Chinese drug store in this country. Two Medford druggists who analyzed the pills and liquid declared that the concoctions had opium in them.--Tribune.
Jacksonville Post,
December 13, 1919, page 1


Census date: January 3, 1920
Name: Cal Wallauer, 37, oil company manager, born in Oregon
Lena M. Wallauer, 36, wife, born in Colorado
Evelyn J. Bays, 6, niece, born in California
Residence: Silveyville, Solano County, California
United States Census


Census date: January 2, 1920
Name: George E. Miller, 55, banker in Bremerton, born Scotland
Residence: Port Orchard precinct, Kitsap County, Washington
Household members:
Jennie L., 46, wife, born Illinois
George E. Jr., son, born Washington
United States Census


    The vice squad raiders under Patrolman McCormick arrested Bobbie Reed at the Oakland Rooms, 269½ First Street, and booked her on a morals charge.
    On a similar accusation . . . Madge Lane and Viola Miller were arrested by the squad at the Mecca Hotel, 271½ Third Street, and booked in the jail.
"Police Net Makes Haul of Suspects," Oregonian, Portland, December 3, 1929, page 24


Census date: April 10, 1930
Name: George E. Miller, 65, banker, born Australia
Residence: Port Orchard precinct, Kitsap County, Washington
Household members:
Jennie L., 56, wife, born Nebraska
United States Census


Census date: April 11, 1930
Name: Viola Miller, 37
Residence: First Street, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon
Occupation: Servant, Private Residence
Birth location: Washington (father Pennsylvania, mother Pennsylvania)
Age at first marriage: 16, widowed
United States Census    This may be the wrong Viola. Though data as recorded by census takers are notoriously inaccurate, Viola's age should have been reported as 39, she was around 18 when she married, and her parents' birth places were Australia and Nebraska in the 1900 census.


    Hughes-Miller--Alfred H. Hughes, 40, Carrolls, Wash., and Viola M. Miller, 36, same address.
"Vancouver Marriage Licenses," Oregonian, Portland, May 12, 1939  Correct initial, correct area--was Viola lying about her age?


George E. Miller, Sr. (February 8, 1865-January 18, 1934), son of P. B. M. Miller
Jennie Lillian Celene Miller (October 29, 1872-October 12, 1949), daughter of
    Charles and Elizabeth Celene
Married June 12, 1888 in Seattle
Children: George E. Miller (August 21, 1904-October 17, 1971)
Buried Lake View Cemetery, Seattle
findagrave.com


Viola Miller, born June 19, 1891, died May 1972
Last known residence: Columbus, Muscogee County, Georgia
Social Security Death Index   This is the wrong Viola Miller, though she was born in the same year. This is Viola Katherine Miller, daughter of Thomas Z. and Elizabeth L. Miller; she died May 1, 1972 in Columbus Medical Center.



Last revised October 28, 2014